Accent on Learning

Citation
Accent on Learning

Material Information

Title:
Accent on Learning
Added title page title:
USF undergraduate catalog
Added title page title:
Undergraduate catalog
Abbreviated Title:
University of South Florida catalog
General catalog
Creator:
University of South Florida
Place of Publication:
Tampa, FL
Publisher:
University of South Florida
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 online resources ( 335 pages)

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
University and colleges -- Curricula -- Catalogs ( lcsh )

Notes

General Note:
None published in 1960. Volume for 1975-76 issued in 2 parts: part 1. General information -- part 2. Curricula and courses. Supplement for 1961 entitled: Summer sessions, 1961. Continued in part by University of South Florida. Graduate School programs, [1985/86]- Continued by the CD-ROM publication: USF academic information.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of South Florida
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
024905859 ( ALEPH )
29205298 ( OCLC )
A52-00021 ( USF DOI )
a52.21 ( USFLDC Handle )

USFLDC Membership

Aggregations:
Added automatically
USF Catalogs (Accent on Learning)

Postcard Information

Format:
Book

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

August, 1980 University of South Florida Accent on Learning GENERAL CATALOG 1980-81

PAGE 2

DEGREES OFFERED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA Undergraduate Degrees Bache l or of Arts B.A. Bachelor of Engineering Technology B .E.T. Bachelor of Fine Arts B.F.A. Bachelor of Independent Studies B.I.S. Bachelor of Science B.S. Bachelor of Science in Engineering B.S.E. Bachelor of Science in Engineering Science B .S.E.S. Bachelor of Social Wor k B.S.W. Graduate Degrees Master of Accountancy Master of Arts Master of Business Administration Master of Education Master of Engineering M aster of Fine Arts Mas t er of Music Master of P u blic Administration Master of Science Master of Science in Engineering Master of Science in Engineering Science Advanced Graduate Degrees Educational Specialist Doctor of Education Doctor of Phi l osophy M Acc. M.A. M.B A. M.Ed. M E. M F A. M.M. M. P .A. M.S. M.S.E. M.S. E S. Ed.S. Ed D. Ph.D. B A C C AL AU R EATE D EG R EE PRO G RAM S R E Q U IR E 1 80 Q UA R TE R HO U R S O F C R E DIT FO R G R A D UA TI ON EXCE P T F OR T H E FOLL O WING P RO G R AMS: Degree Program Quarter Hours B .A. degree in Elementary Education 184 B.A. degree in ElementaryEar l y Childhood Ed u cation 193 B .F.A. degree in Theatre B .S.E. degree in Engineering 225 201 Professional Degree Doctor of Medicine M.D. B.S. degree in Nursing 190 (minimum) see index for individual degree programs

PAGE 3

.ACCENT ON LEARNING GENERAL CATALOG OF THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1980-81 Vol. 22, No 6 USF August, 1980 USF (ISSN 0164-3002) is publi s hed bimonthly by the University of South Florida, 4202 Fowler Ave., Tampa FL 33620 Second class postage paid at Florida This public document was promulgated at an annual cost of $66,666, or $.74 per copy, including preparation, printing, and distribution to provide comprehensive information on the University of South Florida (80161) 1 The University of South Florida is committed to the principles of equal educational and employment opportuni ties without regard to race, color, sex, religion, creed, national origin, political opinions or alTtllations, handicap, or age as provided by law and in with the University's respect for personal dignity. These principles are applied in the conduct of University programs and ac tivities and the provision of facilities and services. The anno.uncements information, policies rules, regulations, and procedures set forth in this Catalog are for information only and are subject to continual review and cha nge without notice

PAGE 4

Visiting the University Prospective s tudents and other interested persons are invited to visit the University whenever possible. Most University offices receive visitors from 8:00 a m. to 5:00 p.m Monday through Friday The Tampa Campu s of the University is located on Fowler A venue (State Route 582 ) approximately two miles east of Inter state 275 and Nebraska Avenue (U. S Route 41) and seven miles north of Interstate 4. Self-guided cassette tours of the Tampa campus are avail able at the University Center information desk The other campuse s of the Univers i ty are located in the places noted below and elsewhere in this publication with the University Communicatioqs regarding the serv.ices and programs listed below should directed by letter or by phone to the appropriate office on the Tampa, St Petersburg Fort Myers, Sarasota campuses Mailing addresses and general telephone humb ersfor the campu se s are g i ve n at the bottom o f th i s page The offices listed below (on the Tampa Campus unless otherwise indicated) may be dialed direct at the telephone numbers shown. Academic (for freshmen) Division of Upiversity Studies, SVC 255 974-2645 Academic Advising (for upperclassmen and graduate students) Office of the Dean of the appropriate college Applications and Admission Office of Admissions SVC 126 Freshmen Graduate Transfer Coll e ge o f Medicine : Associate Dean for Admissions MDC 1415 Ne w C ollege: Office of A'1missions (Sarasota) Athletics (Intercollegiate) Director of Athletics, PED 214 Bachelor of Independent Studies Program External Degree Program, FAb 149 Career Planning : and Placement Division of Cooperative Educalion and Placement, SVC 243 College Level E x amination Program (CLEP tests) Office of Evajuation and Testing Services FAO 201 Community College Relations (transfer students) 974-4026 974-4090 974-4035 974-2229 355-7671 974-2125 974-4058 974-2171 974 2741 Office of Community College Relations SVC 123 974-2506 Continuing Education Courses and Conferences Center for Continuing Education AOC 2.04 Cooperative Education Program Division of Cooperative Education and Placement SVC 243 I 974-2403 974-2171 Deceased Students Office of Student Affairs ADM 151 Financial Assistance (scholarships, loans employment) Office of Financial Aids SVC 262 Office of Student Employment SVC 262 Graduate Studies Division of Graduate Studies F AO 126 Handicapped Student Program and Facilities Office of Student Organizations, CTR 217 Health Services (Student) Health Center, CTR 411 Housing: Campus Residence Halls Office of Housing and Food Ser v ice RAR 229 Housing: Off-Campus Student Government Office, CTR 156A International Students Office of Student Organizations CTR 217 Library Resources Office of the Director of Libraries, LIB 207 Mature Student Advising Divis i on of University Studie s, SVC 122 Minority Student Advising Division of University Studies SVC 122 Orientation ("FOCUS") Office of New Student Relations, SVC 122 Pre-Admission Advising for Prospective Students Office of New Student Relations, SVC 122 Parking Traffic Services University Police Department UPB Records, Registration Office of Records & Registration, SVC 136 Speakers Service Office of Information Services, ADM 264 Student Affairs Office of Student Affairs ADM 151 Transcripts (USF) Office of Records & Registration SVC 136 Veterans Affairs Office of Veterans Affairs SVC 209 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA Tampa Campus 4202 Fowler A venue Tampa, Florida 33620 Telephone: (813) 974-2011 974-2151 974-2621 974-2297 974-2846 974-2615 974-2331 974-2761 974 2401 974 2615 974-2721 974-2076 9 7 4-2076 974-2076 974-2076 974-2628 974-4029 974-2181 9 7 4-2151 974-4080 974-2291 1 St. Petersburg Campus 830 First Street South St Petersburg, Florida 33701 Telephone: (813) 898-7411 Fort Myers Campus 2266 Second Street Fort Myers, Florida 33901 Telephone : (813) 334-3780 Sarasota Campus 5700 N Tamiami Trail Sarasota, Florida 33580 Telephone: (813) 355-7671 2

PAGE 5

CONTENTS Academic Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . 4 General Infonnation .......... . . . . ........ 1 7 Admissions and Related M a tters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Financial Information . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . 19 Stud e nt Serv i ce s and Student Affairs.. . .. .. . .. .. .. ...... . 24 Academic Policie s and Proc e dure s, Programs and Ser v i c es . . .... '..................... .. ..... 3 t Division of Graduate Studi es . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . 46 College o f Art s & Letters .. .. . . .. . . . .. . . .. .. .. .. .. . .. 53 College of Bu s ine ss Admini s tration . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 College of Education . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . .. . . . . 73 College of Engine e ring .. ................ .. .... ., . . . . . . . 102 College of Fine Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . 113 College of Medicine ........ .. ...................... . ....... .. 122 College of Natural Science s ................. .. .. ..... . . . . 124 New College of USF .. ............. ..... ..... : . . . . .. . . . 138 College of Nursing . -. .................... .......... . ..... . .. 141 College of S oc ial & Behavi o r a l Sci e nces ............ . ..... 146 Cour s e De s criptions .................. . ...... . . .. . . . .. 163 Organization & Per s onnel. . .. . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . 30 I Use the edge index by flexing the book t o locate the fir s t page of each section listed in the C onte nt s Faculty & Admini s trative Staff ......... . ...... . .... ....... : 304 '. Index .: ..... . ........ ............ .. .. . . .. .. ..... : ....... . .. 332 3

PAGE 6

D Dates of first and last classes Q Student holidays 1980 SMTWTFS May 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 June 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 July 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 90 30 31 August 1 2 :3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 September 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 17 18 19 20 21 2.2 23 24 25 2627 28 .. 30 October 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 I 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 2.728 29 30 31. November 1 2345678 9 10 12 13 14 15 16 17 19 22 23 24 25 26 2 8 29 30 December 1 2!W 4 5 6 1 8 9 10.11 12 13 14 15 16 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 ACADEMIC CALENDAR The Academic Calendar for New College of USF appears on page 138. The Academic Calendar for the College of Medicine appears o n page 123. **See separate calendar for Regional Campuses' regi s tration dates **May 19-23, Monday-Friday August 5-8, Tuesday-Friday *August 12, Tuesday August 18, Monday **September 16, Tuesday 5:00 p.m.-7:00 p .m. **September 17-18, Wed.-Thu 8:30a.m .-7:00p.m. **September 18, Thur sday 5:00 p m.-7 :00 p.m September 22, Monday September 26, Friday September 26, Friday *September 26, Friday October 3, Friday October 3, Friday October 10, Friday October 31, Friday November II, Tuesday November 27-28, Thur sday-Friday December 10, Wednesday **October 27-31, Monday-Friday *November 21, Friday December 8, Monday **January 5, Monday 5:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m. **Ja nuary 6, Tuesday 8:30 a.m 7:00 p.m. *January 6 Tuesday 5:00 p.m.-7 :00 p m January 7, Wednesday January 13, TuesdayJanuary 13, Tuesday **January 13, Tuesday January 20, Tuesday January 20, Tuesday January 27, Tuesday February 17, Tuesday February 17, Tue sday March 18, Wednesday Fall Quarter (I), 1980 Fall Quarter Early Registration for students enrolled Spring Quarter (tentative) Fall Quarter Early Registrat i on for students enrolled Summer Quarter (tentative) Last day to apply for admission Last day for USF Former Students Returning to make application for readmission to avoid extended delays at registration Evening Courses Only Registration Registration by appointment NonDegree Seeking (Si)ecial) Student Registration Classes begin Last day to withdraw/drop and receive full refund of registration fees Last day to add courses Last day for late registration (see late registration fee) ; last day to register as a NonDegree Seeking (Special) Student Last day to register for Continuing Education courses Last day for Continuing Education course refund Last day to apply for degree to be earned at the end of Fall Quarter Last day to drop 'co urses without academic penalty Veterans Day Holiday Thanksgiving Holiday End of Fall Quarter (I) Winter Quarter (II), 1981 Early registration for Winter Quarter (continuing and accepted Former Students Returning) (tentative) Last day to apply for admission L ast day for USF Former Students Returning to make application for readmission to avoid extended delay at registration Evening Courses Only Registration Registration by appointment NonDegree Seeking (Special) Student Registration Classes begin Last day to withdraw / drop and receive full refund of registration fees Last day to add courses Last day for late registration (see late registration fee); last day to register as a NonDegree Seeking (Special) Student Last day to register for Continuing Education courses Last day for Continuing Education course re fund Last day to apply for degree to be earned at the end of Winter Quarter Last day to drop courses without academic penalty Last day to withdraw without academic penalty End of Winter Quarter (II) Earlier deadlines may be required by soine graduate programs, the College of Education, and the College of Nursing. See appropriate sections for further information. **See separate calendar for Regional Campuses' registration dates. 4

PAGE 7

**February 2-6 Monday-Friday February 17, Tuesday February 23, Monday **March 25, Wednesday 5 :00 p.m.-7 :00 p.m. **Marc h 26, Thursday 8:30 a.m.7:00 p.m. *Marc h 26, Thursday 5:00 p m 7:00 p m March 30, Monday April 3 F ri day April 3, Friday **April 3, Friday April 10, Fr id ay April fO, Friday April 17, Frida y May 8, Friday May 8, Friday May 25, Monday June 10, Wednesday June 14, Sunday / Spring Quarter (III), 1981 Early regis tration for Spring Quarter (co ntinuing and accepte d Former Students Returning) (tenta tive ) Last day to ap ply for admission Last day for USF Former Students Returning to make app lic a tion for readmission to avoid extended delay a t regi stration Evening Courses Only Regi st ration Registration by appointment NonDegree Seeking (Special) Student Regi stra t io n Classes begin Last day to withdraw / drop and receive full refund of registration fees Last day to add courses Last day for late registration (s ee late regi s tr atio n fee) ; last day to regi ster as a NonDegree Seeking ( Spec ia l ) Student Last day to register for Continuing Education courses Last day for Continuing Ed uc ation Course refund Last day to apply for degree to be earned at the end of Spring Quarter Last day to drop courses without academic penalty Last day to withdraw without academic penalty Memorial D ay Holiday End of Spring Quarter ( 110 Commencement Convocation Summer Quarter (IV), 1981 NOTE : Dates apply t o 8 w eek sessii>ns. S ee Quarterly Uni v ersity Class Schedu l e for appropriate d e adli n es i n o th er than 8-week session *May 4-8, Monday-F riday May 11, Monday May 18, Monday **June 17, Wednesday 5 :00 p.m -7:00 p m *June 18, Thursda,y 8 :30 a. m .-7:00 p.m. **June 18, Thursday 5 :00 p m.-7 :00 p m June 22, Monda y June 26, Friday June 26, Frida y * June 26, Friday i July 2 Thursda y July 2, Thur s da y July 3 Friday July 10, Friday July 24, Friday August 14, Frida y Aug ust 28, Friday Early regi stra tion for Summer Quarter (co nt inuing and accepted Former Students Returning) (tentative) Last day to apply for admission Last d ay for USF Former Students Returning to mak e application for readmission to avoid extended delay at registration Eve ning Courses Only R egistratio n Reg istration by NonDegree (Specia l ) Student Registration C l asses begin Last day to withdraw / drop and receive full refund of registration fees Last day to add courses Last day for l ate registration (see l ate registration fee) ; l ast day to register as a NonDegr ee Seeking (Special) Student Last day to register for Continuing Education courses La s t day for Continuing Education course refund Independence Day Holiday Last day to apply for degree to be earned at the end of Summer Quarter Last day to drop cou r ses without academic penalty End of 8-week Summer Session End of Summer Quarter (IV) Earlier deadlines may be required by some graduate programs the College of Education and the College of Nursing. See appropriate Sections for further information see separa te cale ndar for Regional Campus e s registration dates 5 1981 S M T W T F S January 1 2 3 4 5 6 8 9 10 11 12 13 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 February 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 March 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 26 27 28 29 30 31 April 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 May 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17@ 19 20 21 22 23 24 26 27 28 29 30 31 June 1 2@ 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 16 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 30 July 1 2 @ 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Augu1t 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

PAGE 8

Fall Quarter (I), 1980 September 17-18, Wednesday & Thursday September 22-26, Monday-Friday Winter Quarter (II), 1981 January 5-6, Monday & Tuesday January7-9, 12-13, Wednesday Friday, Monday & Tuesday Spring Quarter (III), 1981 March 25-26, Wednesday & Thursday March 30-April 3 Monday-Friday Summer Quarter (IV), 1981 June 17-18, Wednesday & Thursday June 22-26, Monday-Friday Fall Quarter (I), 1980 July 28-31, Monday Thursday September 17, Wednesday September 22-26, Monday-Friday Winter Quarter (II), 1981 October 27-30, Monday-Thursday January 5, Monday January 7 8,9, Wednesday-Friday 12, 13, Monday-Tuesday Spring Quarter (III), 1981 February 2-5, Monday-Tuesday March 25, Wednesday March 30-April 3, Summer Quarter (IV), 1981 May 4-7, Monday-Thursday June 17, Wednesday June 18, Thursday Summer Quarter (IV), 1980 May 7, Wednesday June 17, Tuesday June 18, Wednesday June 23-26, Monday-Thursday Fall Quarter (I), 1980 July 29-31, Tuesday-Thursday September 16, Tuesday September 17, Wednesday September 22-25, Monday-Thursday Winter Quarter (II), 1981 October 28-30, Tuesday-Thursday December 29, Monday pecember30, Tuesday& January 5, Monday January 7-13 : Wednesday Tuesday Spring Quarter (III), 1981 February 3-5, Tuesday-Thursday March 24, Tuesday March 25, Wednesday March 30-April 2, Monday-Thursday Summer Quarter (IV), 1981 May 5-7, Tuesday-Thursday June 16, Tuesday June 17, Wednesday June 22-25, Monday-Thursday REGIONAL CAMPUSES Fort Myers Regular Registration Late Registration, staff Waiver, and Degree Seeking (Special) Student Registration Regular Registration Late Registration, Staff Waiver, and Non-Degree Seeking (Special) Student Registration Regular Registration Late Registration, Staff Waiver, and NonDegree Seeking (Special) Student Registra Registration Regular Registration Late Registration, Staff Waiver; and NonDegree Seeking (Special) Student Reg Registration St. Petersburg Early Registration Regular Registration Late Registration and Non-Degree Seeking (Special) Student Registration Early Registration Regular Registration Late Registration and Non-Degree Seeking (Special) Student Registration Early RegiS!fation Regular Registration Late Registration and NonDegree Seeking (Special) Student Registration Early Registration Regular Registration Late Registration and Non-Degree Seeking (Special) Student Registration Sarasota Eady Registration, Degree-Seeking Students Regular Registration, Degree-Seeking Students Regular Registration, Degree-Seeking & NonDegree Seeking (Special) Students Late Registration & Non" Degree Seeking (Special) Student Registration Early Registration, Degree-Seeking Students Regular Registration, Degree-Seeking Students Regular Registration, Degree-Seeking & NonDegree Seeking (Special) Students Late Registr ation & NonDegree Seeking (Special) Student Registration Early Registration, Degree-Seeking Students Regular Registration, Degree-Seeking Students Regular Registration, Degree Seeking & Non-Degree Seeki'!g (Special) Students Late Registration & Non-Degree Seeking (Special) Student Registration Early Registration, Degree-Seeking Students Regular Registration, Degree-Seeking Students Regular Registration, Degree-Seeking & Non-Degree Seeking (Special) Students Late Registration & Non-Degree Seeking (Special) Student Registration Early Registration, Degree-Seeking Students Regular Registration, Degree-Seeking Students Regular Registration, Degree-Seeking & Non-Degree Seeking (Special) Students Late Registration & Non-Degree Seeking (Special) Student Registration 6

PAGE 9

USF THE METROPOLITAN UNIVERSITY A BREAK WITH TRADITION The University of South Florida broke with tradition when it was founded over two decades ago. US F was not located in a small quiet town; USF was placed in one of Florida's-and the nation's-most d ynamic metropolitan areas and assigned re sponsibility for providing higher educational services to people of all ages within its 15-county service area. USF was the first State university in Florida loca ted purposely within convenient commuting distance of a large segme nt of the State's growing population The University of South Florida broke with tradition because it came to the people. USF-the metropolitan univer sity ... an idea whose time had come. USF AND YOU? USF calls itself Your University." And i t is. In a real sense, you are the "U" in USF bec ause the University was founded and located to meet you r higher educational needs. How it seeks to do that-the activities, services and programs it offers-are briefly described i n this publication. But, for you to feel that USF is your university, you must experience for yourself what it has to offer-what it is that makes it suc h a special place to so many people. WHAT IS USF? The University of South Florida is many things ... many people and programs ... a major force in the communities it serves USF is primarily people Within its boundaries it is a com munity of more than 25,()90 teacher-scholars and students and staff. Its principal purpose is teaching-teaching grounded-'in research and related to the needs of its students and society. USF is also places spacious, palm shaded campuses ... with libraries containing a measurable portion of human knowledge . with laboratories where scientists and students seek and test old and new knowledge ... with theatres and recreational facilities and residence halls and other facilities that make USF more than just another state university. And USF is an important social and cultural service force flowing through the communities surrounding and s upporting it ... a m ajor economic force on Florida's West Coast ... and an intellectual and information center where people can find practi cal solutions to perplexing problems an d share their experiences with others. USF is all of this-and more. USF-the metropolitan univers ity . an idea whose time ha s come ... i s a university with people who want to help you embody your own idea of w hat such an institution s hould be. After all USF is what you make it and can be affected by you as much as you are affec,ted by it. The faculty and staff are dedicated to ensuring that the University continues to be flexible enough to permit new ideas of itself to infuse new life into itself. That's why you are invited to consider USF When Did It All Begin? Speaking of new ideas and new life ... If you have visited the Tampa Campus, you probably have noticed that all of its build ings appear to be modern and new Well they are. But then, so is USF. The University of South Florida was founded on December 18, 1956, but the first students did not arrive until almost1four years later When USF was opened to a charter class of l,997 freshmen on September 26; 1960, it became the first major State 7 university in America planned and built entirely in this cen tu ry Moreover, as Florida's first State university located purposely in a major metropolitan center, ySF represented the first s tep in a broad and comprehensive expansion of the State University System The State University System, directed by the Florida Board of Regents, and a dministered by a Chancellor and staff of ovef 100 in Tallahassee, today consists of nine public universities.

PAGE 10

8 GENERAL INFORMATION Together with 28 public junior and community college s and a number of vocational-technical centers located throughout the State, these universities comprise public higher education in Florida. Regional campuses of US F were opened in St. Petersburg in 1965, Fort Myers in 1974, and Sarasota-in 1975. Dr. John S. Allen astronomer and educator, served as USF's first president from 1956 to 1970. Dr. Cecil Mackey, economist and lawyer, was president of the University from 1971 to 1976. Dr. John Lott Brown, psychologist and optical scientist, became our third president at the beginning of 1978. Continuity in administration has been provided by Dr. Harris W. Dean acting president, 1970; Wm. Reece Smith, Jr ., interim president 1976-77: and Dr. Carl D Riggs acting president, 1977. Now is its twenty-fourth year of existence the University has graduated more than 50,000 students-eighty percent of whom reside in Florida-and served over 10,000 persons in credit and non-credit courses Enrollment in the fall of 1979 to taled over 23,000 and projections indicate that USF will enroll more than 30,000 students by the end of thi s decade. The Uni versity s economic impact on the area is equally significant : now exceeding $137 million annually Because of its location and the composition of its student body, USF continues to be inextricably a part of and not apart from the modern metropolitan environment-and both affects and is affected by the communities s urrounding and s upporting it. Accreditation USF was fully accredited in 1965 by the Southern As sociation of Colleges and Schools, the official accrediting agency for educational institutions in the South. A self study of the University's programs and purposes pe riodically required for continued accreditation, was re c ently completed and provides a firm foundation for the future growth of the University Accreditation was reaf firmed in December, 1973. But the University Commun ity continues to reexamine its mission and goals and to ensure that it never loses s ight of its only reason for exis tence; serving you. USF: REGIONAL CAMPUSES ... PART OF THE MODERN METROPOLITAN ENVIRONMENT University of South Florida campuses form a string of anchor points for the rapidly growing metropolitan area along the Wes t Coast of Florida These campuses are within reach of more than two million people-roughly one quarter of the State s popu lation-in the 15county area they serve. The Tampa Campus of the Univer s ity is located on a 1694acre tract of land ten miles northeast of downtown Tampa a city of over a quarter of a million people. The Campus i s midway between U S. 41 and 301, on State Highway 582 (Fowler Av enue) two miles east of 1-275. The St. Petersburg Campu s, located in downtown St. Petersburg serves more than 620,000 people living in Pinellas County. The present campus, on a 12-acre peninsula jutting into Bayboro Harbor is being extensively rebuilt and enlarged. The Sarasota Campus i s adjacent to the State-owned Ringl ing Museum property located between the cities of Sarasota and Bradenton The campus serves a population of more than 320,000 persons in a four-county area. The Fort Myers Campus is located at the Gwynne Institute Building in downtown Fort Myers and serves more than 358,000 people on Florida s lower West coast. Growth of the campus will be accommodated on a 55-acre site adjacent to Edison Com munity College Current plans call for the first building on the new campus to be completed iri fall, 1982. ACHIEVING THE UNIVERSITY'S MISSION: MEASURES OF SUCCESS Mission As the State'sjirst metropolitan university, a prototype of the univer s ity of the future, the University of South Florida from its beginning has sought to apply the talents of its scholars and students to the peculiar ills be s etting modern society. In this way, USF has sought to accomplish the special mission in the State University System s et out for it in the Comprehensive D e vel opment Plan (CODE) o f the State University System of Fl o rida ( 1969): The creation and development of instructional, resear c h and public service programs oriented toward the solu tion of problems peculiar to the modern urban environment. Students Served Since opening its doors in September of 1960, the University of South Florida has been dedicated to accomplishing this special mission in the modern metropolitan environment. One measure of our success is reflected in the composition of our s tudent body : More than 85 percent of our students a re Floridians and over 80 per cent of our graduates reside in the State. More than two-thirds of our students commute to cla ss from their homes throughout the Tampa Bay area Over one-third of our student body are part-time students and 40 percent are employed from one to 40 hours per week More than two-third s of all USF students are 21 or older and almost one-third of our students are married. Almost 60 percent of US F's 45,000 graduates reside in the Greater Tampa Bay Area . The majority of upper division students are transfers from other institutions. Programs Offered A measure of success in accomplishing the University's mis sion-and one more significant than mere statistics-is the na ture of our academic programs. Through them we have sought to serve an increasingly urban State and nation These programs are in the Academic Affairs division of the University and, for the most part, are administered in one of our 10 colleges: Arts & Letters, Business Administration, Education, Engineering, Fine Arts Medicine, Natural Sciences, Nursinj!, Social & Behavioral

PAGE 11

Sciences and an honors-type college New College of USF on the Sarasota Campus In this publication are discussed the major academic pro grams in the University. Through them we serve the people of Florida through the instruction of students, the adv a ncement of knowledge, and community service . Degrees are offered in over 100 academic areas by the Uni versity's colleges Graduate degrees are offered in more than 80 of these areas The University's first Ph.D. program in Biology with em-GENERAL INFORMATION 9 phasi s on Marine Biology was established in 1968. Since then Ph.D. programs have been established in Chemistry, Education, English Engineering Science, Mathematics Medical Sciences, and Psychology. USF also offers the Ed D in Education, and the Ph. D in Oceanography (in cooperation with Florida State University). The University's teaching and research faculty, numbering more than 1,000, represents all major areas of higher learning, and nearly 60 percent hold doctoral degree s Academic Programs of USF Regional Campuses The academic programs of the regional campuses are designed to serve students of junior, senior, and graduate standing. They are offered at times chosen to meet the special needs of these stu dents, most of whom are residents in the campus area and are employed in full and part-time jobs. Selected courses and prog rams are offered on the campuses by the Colleges of Arts and Letters, Business Administration, Education, Engineering, Natural Sciences, Nursing, Social and Behavioral Sciences. Students may enroll on a full-time basis on any one of the regional campuses or elect to enroll on more than one USF cam pus simultaneously Dual enrollment on multiple campuses may provide students with a schedule both academically flexible and personally convenient. Resident faculty members and Student Affairs staff provide social, vocational, and academic counseling to students el'lrolled on the regional campuses. The resident staff is supplemented by professors and other staff members commuting from other USF campuses thereby providing additional scope to the academic programs and university services. The Fort Myers Campus of USF opened in September, 1974 and, like all regional campuses of the University, is designed to meet the academic educational needs of local area residents in the five-county area surrounding Fort Myers. The campus is currently located in the historic Gwynne In stitute Building in the heart of downtown Fort Myers. This facil ity is provided as an interim location through the cooperation of St. Petersburg Campus the Lee County Public Schools. Plans are now being completed to construct permanent facilities on the 55-acre site adjacent to Edison Community College Construction is expected to begin in 1980 and USF programs and services will move to the new campus in 1982. The Sarasota Campus of the University of South Florida was established in 1975. It offers students from Sarasota, Manatee, and neighboring counties the opportunity to enroll in junior, senior, and graduate level coursework in selected program areas. It also provides non-credit course offerings to meet the needs of the focal communities. The Sarasota Campus also is the home of New College of the University of South Florida New College of US Fis a liberal arts honors program residential in nature, designed for students of high ability who seek the atmosphere of a small college with its accompanying individualized instruction. (For deta'ils of New College of USF, see page 138). Acquired by the State University System in 1975, the Sarasota Campus has 26 buildings including a student center, classrooms, a library with more than 100,000 volumes, science laboratories, and recreation facilities. The campus is located in part on the grounds of the home of circus magnate Charles E. Ringling on the shores of Sarasota Bay It is bisected by U.S. 41 and thus is easily accessible to commuting students. The St. Petersburg Campus is within easy walking distance of many cultural and recreational facilities in Florida's Sunshine

PAGE 12

10 GENERAL INFORMATION City." The campus is in the process of expansion with two new buildings scheduled to open in 1981. Full programs in a broad variety of disciplines in the Colleges of Arts and Letters, Busi ness Administration, Education Engineering, Natural Sciences, Nursing, and Social and Behavioral S c iences are available on the campus Classes are offered both at day and in the evening Students at St. Petersburg have the opportunity to participate in the U S Army ROTC program (See Reserve Officer Training Corps page 41) The St. Petersburg Campu s also houses facilities for marine science research and training The USF Department of Marine Science with headquarters at the campus, is an interdi s ciplinary venture involving faculty from several departments in addition to about 20 full-time regular faculty members who are responsible for graduate research and teaching in marine science Probably no other marine science program has such excel lent facilities for teaching research and acces s to oceanographic vessels. The location of the campus at the central edge of the great continental shelf of the Florida Gulf Coast and in the midst of the metropolitan Sun Coast is a unique advantage In addition the Florida Institute of Oceanography, a special reseaich insti tute of the Florida State University System is located on the St Petersburg Campus. With these combined facilities, the Univer sity is destined to become one of the nation s leading ocean ographic centers While offering many of the positive characteristics of a small institution the Regional Campuses of the University of South Florida have access to the resources of a major university and their development is expected to keep pace with the continuing growth of Florida's West Coast. Students interested in attending a Regional Campus are in vited to visit the campus personally and discuss their interest with members of the faculty and staff. Continuing Education In addition to the academic programs offered on the Tampa and regional campuses a number of courses and programs are oper ated by the Univer s ity's Continuing Education office in 15 West Coast Florida counties In this area the Florida Board of Re-gents has designated the University of South Florida for all higher education requirements beyond those supplied by the State Community and Junior College System Special Programs A number of special programs offer USF s tudent s flex ibility and relevance They include the Off-Campus Term Program Bachelor of Independent Studies (External De gree Program) Cooperative Education Program, and New College of USF In addition freshmen students may earn up to one full year of academic cred i t (45 hours) through the College Level Examination Program tests high school students may apply for "early admission or take college courses while still in high ; school, and any interested person may earn college credit via radio and televised course sequence-:" Open sity" (0.U.). Each of these programs is described elsewhere in this publication You are encouraged to explore their potential for helping you attain your educa tional goals FACILITIES AND ATMOSPHERE ON CAMPUS The facilities of the University now including more than 40 major buildings, are currently valued at more than $1()6 million. The buildings are of similar modern architectural desis{iand all are completely air conditioned USF has a wide variety of recreational facilities, including three swimming pools an excellent gym with weight training room many tennis courts a beautiful golf course, well equipped University Center and others Its academic and residential facil ities are unexcelled in Florida-and all are air-conditioned and easily accessible from every corner of the well-kept campus, called by some one of the prettiest in the nation And parking spaces are always available somewhere on campus. The atmosphere on campus is one of easy informality. Stu dents-and faculty--Oress casually and enjoy an unusually close relationship for a school so large. Some classes are even held outs i de to take advantage of the extraordinary climate (average annual temperature 72'F) of the area And mo'st buildings have open hallways, which blend colorful interiors with spacious ex teriors, symbolically and architecturally suggesting the casual accessibility that has become a USF trademark. ORGANIZED FOR EFFECTIVENESS The University is organized into the four broad areas of academic affairs student affairs, administration & finance and university relations The vice presidents who head these four units serve with the President as the principal policymaking officials of the University In addition to the vice presidents advice and assistance to the President in the determination of policy is given by a number of advisory bodies, including University committees and organizations representing the faculty, staff, and student segments of the Univers i ty Community. At USF, your v iews count ; they are solicited and given serious considera tion. The President is responsible through the Chancellor to the Florida Board of Regents for internal policy and the procedures of the University More detailed information on these matters is available in the Special Collections Room USF Library \ Office of Alumni Affairs The purpose of the Office of Alumni Affairs is to stimulate and maintain alumni interest in the University of South Florida In completing its mission, the office works primarily through the USF Alumni Association. A professional staff maintaining of-fices in the Student Services Building is responsible for adminis tering alumni programs. In coordinating its effort through the Association, the Alumni Affairs office strives to interest in volve, and inform alumni. In addition the Alumni Affairs director serves as Executive Director of the Association and as such is responsible for man aging the Alumni Association business and other program affairs The Alumni Association existsp_ rimarily t _osupportthe

PAGE 13

University of South Florida. As a communication link between the University and its alumni, the Association provides the following: Alumni scholarships: currently awards 15 full one-year tuition scholarships. Alumni Century Club: An organization of alumni who contribute $I 00 annually as members of the Century Club Telefund campaigns : Each chapter conducts an annual telephone drive to raise scholarship dollars. Brahmam Alumni Network: Alumni throughout the nation serve as hosts for graduating seniors. Graduating class: The Association sponsors the USF Yearbook, honorary society socials, commencement, receptions, the King-0' Neal Award (for graduating seniors with a straight "A" average), outstanding senior award, and Distin guished Alumni GENERAL INFORMATION 11 Office of Development The purpose of the University Development office is to identify private funding and other resources to insure excellence and conduct expansion of selected new program s at USF for which State resources are not available or not available in quantities to meet program objectives. In completing its mission, the Development office coordinates all general University fund raising programs and other special fund-raising programs related to the activities of several University support groups The Development office also furnishes faculty and staff members with up-to-date private foundation information systems and solicits deferred gifts through the USF foundation 1

PAGE 14

ADMISSIONS AND RELATED MATIERS !. Admission to study at USF generally requires evidence of ability to handle academic work, capacity to think and plan creatively, and intense motivation Students, regardless of age, who have these abilities and skills and are seriously in terested in earning an education are the ones most likely .to succeed in college. 2 More specifically, as a public university, USF admits stu dents who meet the formal admission requirements of the University (noted below) and who can be expected to do suc cessful academic work 3. In considering students for admission, the University does not discriminate on the basis of race sex, color, creed, reli gion, handicap age, or national origin. 4. The University may refuse admission to a student whose rec ord shows previous misconduct not in the best interest of citizens of the University community. 5. The Office of Admissions, part of the Division of University Studies administers the application and admissions processes at USF. Applying for Admission As part of the State University System of Florida, US F utilizes the common application form required for admission as an undergraduate to any one of the nine state universities in Florida's If you are a student attending a Florida high school or a junior/community college you may obtain the form at your school guidance office You may also write to the Office of Admissions, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620. Please indicate whether you will be entering as a first-time -incollege freshman, an undergraduate transfer student, or a graduate student. Applications for admission to the College of Medicine should be requested directly from the Office of Student Affairs, College of Medicine, 12901 N 30th Street, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33612. 12 Applications for admission are accepted as early as 12 months before the anticipated enrollment date and must be sub mitted by the deadline stated herein (pages 4-5). Applicants are encouraged to apply early Each appli c ant is responsible for as suring that the ne cess ary academic records and credentials are sent to the USF Office of Admissions dir ec tly from the appro priat e institution or agency. These documents would include all transcripts from all schools attended and all test scores from testing agencies. Each application must be accompanied by a $15.00 non refundable fee unless you haye previously enrolled at USF as a degree-seekin g student. You must enter your Social Security Number on the application form : If your credentials are not received in time to process your application prior to registration you may update your applica tion for consideration for a future term. If you are accepted for admission and do not enroll in the term for which you are admitted or if you have not been accepted because of a late application or missing credentials, you must notify the University in writing within 12 months if you wish the application changed to a future date of entry and specify the new enrollment date. If a request for change of entry date is not received a new application and fee must be submitted. Request for change must be received before the deadline of the term desired An applicant will be permitted to request change of entry date twice without fee. After the second request a new applica tion and another fee will be required. Students who have been admitted on a provisional basis must submit the missing credentials which must substa,ntiate their eligibility for admission. All documents submitted become property of USF and will not be returned to applicant or forwarded to another addressee.

PAGE 15

ADMISSIONS AND RELATED MATIERS 13 I Opportunities for Accelerated Progress Toward Undergraduate Degrees The University of South Florida provides several options by which students may accelerate their progress toward completing the baccalaureate degree These options recognize knowledge which has been acquired prior to or during attendance at USF and provide the opportunity to earn university credit prior to admission to USF. Options which may be used include the following: I. Recognition of satisfactory performance on tests offered through the College Level Examination Program (see CLEP, page41). 2 Recognition of satisfactory performance in secondary school Advanced Placement Program s of the College Entrance Examination Board (see Advanced Placement Credit Pro gram, page 41) 3. Dual enrollment at USF prior to graduation from High School or a Community College (see Dual enrollment, page 15 and USF-Florida Public Community College Dual Enrollment, page40). 4. Early admission for high school seniors (see Fre s hman Early Admission on page 13). 5. Open University (0. U.) Courses by TV. (See page 41. ) Credits may be earned through a combination of the above options. Students should contact their college adviser for further information concerning the application of this credit their degree requirements. However internal devices utilized in the various depart ments for the sole purpose of determining a student's most appropriate area, level or section placement in a program of study (such as auditions portfolio reviews and placement tests) are not to be construed as being examining mechanisms for exemption of waiver for the granting of credit. Requirements for Admission Entering Freshman Normally a diploma from a regionally accredited high school or the state-approved General Education Development program shall be required for admission of beginning freshmen studedts _, Students admitted under the Early Admission Program are ex empted from this requirement. Other requirements are as follows: I. All stude11ts applying for admission will submit test scores from the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Exam ination Board or from the American College Testing program 2. Students applying for admission who have a satisfactory high school record, including at least a "B" average (3. 0 on a 4.0) scale) in all academic courses in high school, as computed by the University of South Florida, and who submit other appro priate evidence that the student can be expected to carry out successful academic progress in the University are aca demically eligible for admission. 3. Students applying for admission who have less than a "B" average as defined above, but have at least a "C" average (2. 0 on a 4 0 scale) in all academic courses in high school, as com puted by the University of South Florida and who present at least a total score of 800 on the combined verbal and quantita tive parts of the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College En trance Examination Board, with at least400on the verbal part, or a composite score of 17 on the American College Testing Pro gram, are academically eligible for admission Freshman Early Admission USF provides an early admission program for highly capa ble and mature students to enter the University as regular.ly en rolled students prior to high school graduation This program is designed to meet the educational needs of highly qualified stu dents, to help them realize their full potential and to support the State's commitment to "time-shortened" degree programs Along with the regular application form and $15.00 non refundable application fee, such students must submit a letter outlining reasons for seeking early admission to USF and their future academic plans, as well as a recommendation for early admission from the applicant's high school guidance counselor or principal (a copy of the Early Admission Recommendation form is available from the high school or from the USF Office of Admissions) Freshman Florida Community College System High school graduates pla nning to start their college educa tion at a Florida community college should confer with the com munity college counselor and ask that their academic program be planned with the assistance of the Community College Counsel ing Manual which is available in all the counseling offices This manual, prepared and distributed by the USF Office of Com munity College Relations, explicitly describes the undergraduate program requirements that should be followed to ensure maximum ease of transfer into the students' upper-level pro grams on a par with their native USF counterparts Undergraduate Transfer All transfor students should refer to the section on Com munity College Relations, page 17. USF will accept transfer credits only from those institutions accredited by one of the six regional accrediting agencies The admission decision will be based on the students' prior work, if any, at an accredited institution, if they are applying from a non-accredited school. Undergraduate transfer requirements are as follows : I Be in good standing and i:ligible to return to the last regionally accredited institution attended as a degree seeking s tudent. 2 An overall 2.0 grade point average on a 4 0 system in all college level work attempted and at least a 2 0 at the last regionally accredited school attended. 3 Transfer applicants for admission with less than 60 semester hours or 90 quarter hours must satisfy the same admission requirements as beginning freshmen. They should have their high school transcript and admission test scores sub mitted as well as transcripts of all work attempted at post secondary institutions Summer Enrollment Requirement All students entering the U niversity with less than 90 quar ter hours of credit should refer to the section of Graduation Requirements Baccalaureate Degree, page 36, for Summer Enrollment requirement. Articulation Agreement Abstract In the near future it is likely that more than half the students enrolled in the upper division of the state univer s itie s will have a community college origin As a result of this growth, an articulation agreement between state universities and public junior college in Florida was approved by the Board of Regents and the State Board of Edu cation effective April 13, 1971. At the core of any agreement between the community col leges and the State University System designated to establish an effective orderly transfer process for community college students is the mutual acceptance of the nature and purpose of the As-. sociate in Arts degree. This degree, which is the basic transfer degree of Florida junior colleges and the primary admission of transfer students to upper division study in a state university shall be awarded upon:

PAGE 16

14 ADMISSIONS ANO RELATED MATTERS I. Completion of a minimum of 60 seme ster hour s (90 quarter hours) of ac a demic work exclu s ive of o c cupational course s and basic required phy sica l education courses 2 Completion of an appro ve d general edu c ation program of not fewer than 36 seme s ter hours (54) quarter hours ) 3 Achievement of a grade point average of not less than 2.0 (C) in all courses attempted and in all courses taken at the junior college awarding the degree provided that only the final grade received in courses repeated by the student shall be used in computing this average The grade of D will be accepted for transfer (provided the overall grade average does not drop below the prescribed 2 0 level) and will count towards the baccalaureate in the same way a s D grades obtained by stu dents enrolled in the lower division of state universities, i e ., credits required for the baccalaureate ; however it is at the discretion of the department or college of the university of fering the major as to whether courses with D grades in the major may satisfy requirements in the major field. Once a student has been certified by such an institution as having completed satisfactorily its prescribed general education program no other public institution of higher learning in Florida to which he or she may be qualified to transfer will require any further lower division general education courses in his or her program If, for any reason, a student has not completed an approved general education program in a junior college prior to transfer to a state university, the general education requirement shall be come the responsibility of the university. A.A. Degree Graduates from Florida Community Colleges and SUS Institutions 1 Admission of these students will be governed by the Articu lation Agreement between the state univer s itie s and the pub lic junior / community colleges of Florida and the Administra tive Code respectively. 2. Within curricular space and fiscal limitations admission as a junior to the upper division of this institution will be granted to any graduate ofa state-approved Florida community / junior college or SUS institution who has completed the university parallel program and received the A A degree The Univer sity of South Florida has certain quqta/limited access programs These programs are so designated in the Community College Counseling Manual, in the Cat a log, and are on file with the Statewide Articulation Coordinating Committee 3 An application from a student who has a ttended another col lege after receipt of an A A degree will be processed as a regular undergraduate transfer a pplication Transient A transient student is one who is c oming from a regionally accredited institution and is permitted to enroll at the University for one quarter only before returning to his/her parent ins titution. The University requires a completed application, the $15.00 non-refundable application fee, and a statement from the parent institution ; indicating that the applicant is in good s tanding. Undergraduate lnterinstitutional Transient Registration USF participates in this State University System program to enable students to take advantage of special resources and pro grams available on another SUS campus but not available at their own institutions An interinstitutional transient student must be recommended by his/her academic dean who will initiate a visit ing arrangement with the appropriate dean at the host institution By concurrence and mutual agreement of the appropriate academic authorities in both institutions, the student will receive a waiver of admission requirements and application fee of the host institution. English Competency The University is also concerned with English competency and opportunities for success of any applicant for whom English is a second language In our desire to assist and provide advice \ and guidance we may require submis s ion of s atisfactory Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) scores. A score of 550 is required. The Univer s ity reserves the right to further screen any stu dent after arrival on campus for English International The University is concerned for the welfare and the academic success of the International Student. In keeping with this concern the University feels it is necessary that both the student and the adviser have a realistic understanding of the s tudent's academic ability and competence in English in the key areas of listening, reading writing and comprehension. Therefore, the University requires for non A A graduates the submission of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of 550 (exception, see College of Engineering, page 103). For undergraduate International Students presenting TOEFL scores between 500.550, if otherwise qualified, these students will be admitted to the University on final academic probation with the added proviso that they must take the course sequence ESL 1383-1384. In addition, colleges may require other testing programs prior to the student's first enrollment. International students must have earned a appropriate de gree to indicate that he / she is academically prepared and qual ified to undertake the studies requested. Applicants to the graduate programs must have earned, in an institution of higher lea'rning a degree which is equivalent to a bachelor s degree from a regionally accredited university in the United States International students must have earned an appropriate depreliminary information forms. Upon receipt of these forms, the Admissions Office will review the information provided and de termine if the student has the appropriate background to under take the studies proposed If not, the applicant will be so advised by the Admissions Office and the application process nl!ted If the student is eligible for further consideration, the Admissions Office will forward a formal application with addi tional instructions and information A complete admission appli cation should be received by US F at least 6 months prior to the desired entry date together with the non-refundable $15.00 ap plication fee Submission of a forrnal application does not guarantee admission Priority in admission will be given to applicants whose credentials indicate the greatest likelihood of success in the program requested. For all international students the following items are required as a part of the formal applica tion : I. Completed application 2. A $15.00 non-refundable fee submitted with the application 3 A letter of recommendation from the last institution attended. 4". A certificate of financial ability showing proof of financial resources sufficient to C?. over tuition, fees, room and board, and other expenses for the full academic year Travel costs must be assumed by the student in addition. 5. Applicants whose native language is not English are required to submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Lan guage (TOEFL). Applicants are responsible for making ar rangements with the Office of Educational Testing Service to take the examination and to have their scores sent .
PAGE 17

The University welcomes qualified students from other countries to the campus community This international exchange lends to the enrichment of life intellectual development, re search and understanding and exposes the students, faculty and staff to cultural and national differences in outlook experience and ideas. The International Student Adviser provides assistance in academic advising, personal and social counseling, events of individual and group interests, and aids the student(s) in meeting the requirements of the University, Department of Immigration and N a turalization Services, and other agencies. Dual Enrollment-High School Dual enrollment in USF classes is open to academically qualified students currently enrolled in high school who are recommended by their guidance or principal. (An applicant should secure the Dual Enrollment Recommendation form from the Office of New Student Relations.) High School students seeking dual enrollment status are preadvised by and obtain the NonDegree Seeking Registrati'on form (Special Stu dent} from the Office of Advising Division of University Studie s. r>ual enrollees register as special students and are ad mitted to USF classes on a space available basis during the first week of every quarter. Up to 20 quarter hours of college credits earned through dual enrollment may be applied toward the stu dent's USF undergraduate degree when he is regularly enrolled after high Non-Degree Seeking (Special) Student To serve the academic needs of people in its service area, the University has established the non-degree seeking (special) student classification. Individuals not desirous of earning a de gree but who would like to enroll in classes do not make formal application to the University Enrollment is by means of a NonDegree Seeking (Special Student) Registration Form avail able in the Office of Records and Registration and college ad vising offices NonDegree Seeking (Special) students may enroll only during the first five days of each quarter (see Academic Calendar for dates) Course prerequisites must be met and enrollment is on a space available basis. The NonDegree Seeking (Special) Student Registration Form must be completed for each term of enrollment. No more than 18 hours of credit earned in this status may be applied toward a graduate degree and no more than 20 hours of credit may be applied toward an undergraduate degree. Students having taken above 18 graduate hours as non-degree seekers must obtain approval from the appropriate graduate office and/or Graduate Council to have those hours counted toward their de gree requirements Former USF degree seeking students are eligible only if they have completed and earned a degree in the degree program for which they were previously enrolled. If the degree was com pleted at another institution, the student must have an official transcript from that institution on file in the Registrar's Office before registration will be allowed. Former non-degree seeking (special) students are eligible only if they wish to remain in the non-degree status Non:degree seeking students must adhere to deadline dates published in the quarterly University Class Schedule Non-degree Seeking (Special) students are subject to the same academic policies as undergraduate degree seeking stu dents Applicants denied admission to the University of South Florida as degree-seeking undergraduates will not be permitted to enroll as Non-Degree Seeking (Special) Students. Performance in -Courses taken as a NonDegree Seeking (Special) will not qualify an applicant for admission as a degree seeking student. Individuals wishing waiver of the above should petition the Faculty Committee on Student Admissions ADMISSIONS AND RELATED MATTERS 15 Graduate Students Graduate Students should refer to the section on Division of Graduate Studies," page 46 Good Standing USF students will be considered in Good Standing if they are currently enrolled or eligible to return to the University of South Florida. Readmission (Former Students Returning) A Former Student Returning (FSR) is any degree seeking student who has not earned his / her degree and who has not been in attendance at the University during either of the two quarters immediately preceding the quarter that enrollment is desired. Such students should secure a Former Student Returning Appli cation from the Office of Records and Registration and return it to that office by the deadline indicated in the Academic Calendar to avoid extended delay at registration Consult the quarterly University Class Schedule for any procedural changes. Former College of Educ ation majors must contact the Col lege of Education Advising Office for additional readmission requirements. To be eligible for readmission, a student must meet the following requirements : I. Be in good standing and eligible to return to the University of South Florida. 2. If attended another institution since last attending USF: a Be _in good standing and eligible to return to the last institution attended as a degree-seeking student. b Have achieved a grade point average ofat least 2.0 on a 4.0 system on all college level academic courses attempted at institution(s) previously attended and also at the last institution attended. Students who have attended another institution since their last enrollment must request that official transcripts of all work attempted at the other institution be sent to the US F Office of Records and Registration Attention : Evaluation Clerk. Former undergraduate students who have completed their baccalaureate degree, transient students, and non-degree seeking (Special) students who wish to enter graduate study for the first time as degree se ekers must file a Graduate application in the Office of Admissions prior to the deadline lis ted in this catalog An admission application fee is required for all students who have enrolled only for Continuing Education (off-campus) courses and for those who re-enrolled only as NonDegree Seeking (Special) students Students in the above categories are not considered Former Students Returning NOTE: Former USF students who have earned their bac calaureate degree at USF or at another institution and who now desire to return to USF to earn another undergraduate degree must file an ','Undergraduate Application with the Office of Admissions ; no fee is required. A student may not work on a sec ond under graduate major or degree if he / she ha s been accepted into a graduate program Evening Courses The admission requirements and achievement levels in the day and evening courses are the same Any student to the University may enroll in any courses offerei:t in the evening which are appropriate to his/ her program. Faculty Committee on Student Admissions The Faculty Committee on Student Admissions serves as an advisory body to the University administration 011 matters per taining to the establishment and maintenance of policies prin ciples and regulations affecting the s election and admission of undergraduate students It meets regularly to review petitions for waivers of. USF admissions s tandards submitted by those appli cants to undergraduate programs of the University who have been denied admission. I

PAGE 18

16 ADMISSIONS AND RELATED MATTERS To petition the committee, an applicant must secure the appropri a te form from the Office of Admi ss ions Completed form s s hould be returned to the Office of Admission s for review and appl i cants will receive notification of the committee s action from the Office of Admis s ion s Evaluation of Transfer of Credit I. Univer s ity of South Florida will accept credits only from those institutions accredited by one of the six regional !lC crediting ag e nc i es.* However USF reserves the right to deny credit for specific courses. The receipt and evaluation of transfer credit is the respon s ibility of the Un i versity Regis trar. The Office of the Registrar will evaluate the a cceptabil ity of total credit s tran s ferable to the Univer s ity The college of tlie s tudent's major will assign equivalent courses in deter mining which courses are applicable toward a specific degree at the Universit y. Transfer students should be prepared with a personal copy of their transcript of all past course work to dis cuss advisement and placement with the appropriate academic ad v i ser and s hould contact the college of their' major s oon after regi s tration SO that an official evaluation may be completed 2. Effective Fall Quarter (I) 1976, all course s from a Florida Community College / University, bearing the same State Common Course prefix and last three numbers, will be auto matically transferred and transfer s tudents may not be required to repeat the s e courses Excluded are graduate cour s e s studio cour s es in art, internships practicums and performing arts acting, vocal and instru mental music . 3. A transfer student from an accredited junior / community col lege may satisfy the General Distribution Requirements of the University by completing (before transfer) the general education program prescribed by that ins titution Transcript s mus t certify that the general education requirements have been completed and, if appropriate include graduation data 4 Once students have earned a total of90 quarter hours of credit from one or more institutions they may not transfer to USF any additional credit hour s earned at lower level institutions. Under special circumstances, students may petition through the Academic Regulations Committee for acceptance of subsequent lower level transfer work above the 90 hours 5. Credit will not be awarded for GED tests. 6. Service school courses will be evaluated with reference to the recommendation of the American Council of Education when official credentials have been presented Such recommenda tion howeve,r is not binding upon the University. 7 A maximum of twelve quarter hours of credit for ROTC and military science courses will be awarded Specific applicabil ity towards a degree will vary with each college. Student must confer wi. th his / her college adv iser to determine the accept ability for his / her major. This was effective Quarter I (Fall) 1975. ROTC and niilitary science taken prior to Fall, 1975 are not acceptable for transfer credit. 8. A maximum of 45 quarter hours of extension, correspon dence military service education and College Level Exami nation Program (general examinations) credits can be applied toward a degree. 9 When tran sferring courses from previous institutions USF will accept only the credit hours earned Grade s for those hours are not transferable. This means those grades will not be computed in the student's grade point average Accrediting Agencies: New Engl and A s soc ia tion of School s and Colleges M i ddle States Associati o n o f Colleg e s and Seconda r y Schools. Commissi o n o n Institution s of Hig her Ecl!tcation N o rth Central Associa tion o f College s and School s Commi ss ion o n C olle ges a nd U niversitie s N o rthwe s t A sSoc ia tion of Secondary and Higher Sc h oo ls Commissi o n on Higher Sch ools Southern A ssoc iation of College s and Schools Western A ssociation of Schools and C olleges Accrediting Commission for Senior College s and Uni v ersities and Ac c rediting C ommis s i o n for Junio r C ollege s. Academic Advising for Admitted Undergraduate Students The University seeks to provide all students with sufficient guid ance aqd advic e to select programs and courses best suited to their personal abilities educational interests and career objec tives To achieve this goal an academic advising office is main tained in each of the eight colleges offering baccal a ureate degrees and in the Divi s ion of University Studies Any student entering the University with fewer than 90 quarter hours and upper lev el tran s fer students without an academic major are initially as s igned to the Division of Univer sity Studie s for academic advising These student s may declare a major (in most instances ) by completing a form in the appropriate college advising office Because of the highl y s tructured nature of s ome programs it is important that s tudent s check the college s ection of the catalog for advi s ing or admission requirement s (e.g., see College of Fine Arts and College of Engineering). Stu dents w ho do not wis h to declare a major are advised b y the Division of Univer s ity Studie s A student must declare a major n o lat e r tha n the end of the junior year (135 qua rter hours) Student s transferring to the University with 90 quarter hours or more with a major are assigned to the college of that major for advising It is necessary however that all students check in with their college s upon arrival on campus. This can be accomplished during the Orientation Program The purpose of the initial con t act i s to assign an academic adviser and to provide the college with routine information which assist s the college in collecting and maintaining the necessary records to assure the student's proper progress toward educational goals . Iii a few cases only a limited number of students can be admitted to a particular major. Students planning to enter such programs should be aware of this situation and should be pre pared with alternative plans of action. are encouraged to establish an advising rela tto .nsh1p with a college or the Division of University Studies and periodiqllly visit their advisers to keep abreast of any policy, procedural, or curriculum changes which may affect them In fact, some college s require adviser approval of student programs each quarter To assure continuity high quality, and commonality in advising (to the extent pos s ible with widely varying programs) the coordinator of advising of each college and the Division of University Studies and representatives from the related offices of the Registrar New Student Relations and Community Col lege Relations meet periodically as the University s Council on Academic Advising. This Council i s concerned with assuring timely availability of accurate information on University courses programs procedures and regulations to prospective new and continuing students While the University provides advising service s to assist students with academic planning, the responsibilit y for s e eing that all graduation r e quirements ar e met rests with the student. Course Registration for Admitted Students Course registration is conducted in person by appointment dur ing both the early and regular registration periods each quarter. Appointment times and registration instructions are publisl;Jed quarterly in the Univer s ity Class Schedule Students are encour aged to register early to allow time for schedule adjustments by the college s.

PAGE 19

Schedule adjustments for students who register during early registration can be made during the early or regular drop / add periods. Students registering during regular registration may make schedule adjustments during the regular drop / add period (Deadline information is available in the Academic Calendar.) Any student wishing to enroll simultaneously in evening and daytime classes must register and pay fees in the manner pre scribed for students attending campus daytime classes. (See ADMISSIONS AND RELATED MATTERS 17 Schedule of Classes for evening registration dates and times.) students attending campus daytime classes Students who do not register for classes by the close of the regular registration period may register during late registration the first week of classes A $25.00 late regi s tration fee is charged for this privilege (See the section on fees for additional informa tion and the quarterty University Class Schedule for dates.) F ees must b e paid for all c ours es r eg ist e r e d for at the end o f the r e gular drop /add period (see Academic Calendar for dates) Office of Community College Relations All transfers should refer to other sections about undergraduate transferon page 13. Community/junior college and other under g raduate stu d e nts planning to transfer to the University should contact the Office of Community College Relations (both before and after transfer) for needed assistance. The primary concern of the Of fice of Community College Relations is to assist community / junior and other college transfer students (and staff members of those colleges) to better understand the University of South Florida; its philosophy; its programs; and its procedural opera tions. This office, conversely, has a responsibility for the in terpreta:tion of the community/junior and other colleges to the University The ultimate goal of the Office of Coi:nmunity Col lege Relations is to ensure equity for the transfer student. One significant contribution toward this goal is the annual delivery of the updated Community College Counseling Manuals to every Florida community / junior college-and to other institutions by request. Community College Relations works closely with Florida community / junior college students and staff, as well as with such USF offices as Admissions Student Affairs, Records and Registration and the various colleges and departments, while serving a coordinating function within the University by working with all areas concerned, in minimizing problems of transfer stu dents corning to the University The University of South Florida subscribes fully to all of the provisions of the Statewide Articulation Agreement It is strongly recommended that students transferring from community / junior colleges to the University of South Florida complete their Associate in Arts degree-or, in certain prior approved areas, the Associate in Science degree Special detail s for students who do not plan to complete the associate degree requirements are available from the Office of Admission s. It is recognized that enrolling in college is difficult for the freshman-in some respects it is more difficult for the transfer student. The freshman student experiences only one transition usually-that from high school to college. The college transfer student, on the other hand unlike the freshman, must relearn some of the information regarding institutional regulations grade point computations, financial aid institutional organization etc The Office of Community College Relations stands ready to lend any possible assistance in this important additional period of transition Office of Evaluation and Testing The Office of Evaluation and Testing serves three principal functions: 1. Admissions and Academic Testing : Tests required for adtnis sicin to colleges, graduate and professional schools as well as many other special tests are administered by this office Examples are the SAT, ACT, GRE Medical College and Law Scl!ool Admission tests 2 Test Development and Scoring Services: Analysis and advisory services are provided to aid in construction and validation of tests used in classes and instruments such as surveys and questionaires for research purposes. Test scoring and analysis by machine (NCS 7008) are available to all faculty and au thorized personnel. 3. Credit-By-Examination (see page 41) : The College-Level Ex atniqation Program (CLEP) is administered through this of fice as are other examination programs designed to provide alternative means for students to achieve credit. Continuing Education The University of South Florida offers both credit and noncredit educational programs to serve the in-service and continuing edu cation needs of it geographical area which encompasses Char lotte, Collier, DeSoto Glades Hardee, Hendry, Hernando, Highlands, Hillsborough, Lee, Manatee Pasco, Pinellas, Polk and Sarasota Counties. Both degree and non-degree seekers may participate in the University's Continuing Education credit program. Students de siring to obtain a degree must however apply for admission to the University as a degree seeking student (see Requirements for Admission) at an early date so that courses taken may be consi dered for inclusion i n a program of studies (see appropriate col lege programs). To assure quality of instruction, the Continuing Education credit courses for the most part, are taught by the regular faculty of the University. When this is not possible, outstanding instruc tional personnel are recruited from neighboring accredited institutions. In addition the University System Extension Lib rary makes available for ejch Continuing Education course the latest in reference materials The academic calendar for courses scheduled is essentially the same as for the University's on-campus credit program Classes are generally scheduled once a week Although some Continuing Education credit courses are generated by the University itself, most originate through re quests which are initiated by individuals or interested groups. Requests for Continuing Education courses in the field of. Edu. cation should be submitted to County Extension Coordinators designated by the county superintendents of schools. Requests for Continuing Education courses in all other areas should be transmitted by individuals, groups, companies, agencies etc ., directly to Continuing Education University of South Florida, Tampa Florida 33620. Enrollment in Continuing Education 'Courses Enrollment in a Continuing Education off-campus credit course is accomplished by mail only. Enrollment forms may be obtained at a Continuing Education office, from the local Co1,mty Extension Coordinator in county school board offices or from the course instructor at the first class session.

PAGE 20

\ 18 ADMISSIONS AND RELATED MATTERS I The enrollment form and payment of fees must be postmarked no later than the deadline announced in the University Class Schedule. 2 On-campus student s enrolling in a Continuing Education course must use the enrollment by mail procedure. 3. Fees for Continuing Education courses are assessed the same as fees for classified and unclassified students. Consult the Fees Section on page 20 for detailed information. 4. Enrollment forms for studepts whose fees are to be paid by school boards or state or federal grants must be forwarded in accordance with registration deadlines Payment of fees or purchase orders must be enclosed with enrollment forms. 5. It is the responsibility of the individual student to ascertain that he or she has met the course prerequisites as published in this Cata/of?. Mature Student Admission: Education for Adults Recognizing that education is a life-Jong process relevant to the needs of students over 25 years of age, the University of South Florida has developed programs and courses designed specifi cally for mature students. The University seeks to promote a better understanding of life in a changing world by means of instruction offered in a variety of ways-with and without academic credit. Programs are available for adults who wish to begin a college program, for those whp are seeking to complete their interrupted college education, and for those who have earned a community college degree and now wisli to earn the bachelor's degree In addition, a wide variety of courses is of fered in both the daytime and evening for those who wish to update a degree earned in the past or for those who are seeking to enrich their intellectual and cultural life. Students who are above traditional college age (18-24) often have unique educational considerations that require special ser vices. One of these services is ai;ademic advising in the Division of University Studies. There is also a pre-admission adviser for mature students in the Office of New Student Relations. (See page29.)

PAGE 21

FINANCIAL INFORMATION Resident Status Florida and Non-Florida 1. For the purpose of assessing registration and tuition fees a student shall be. classified as a 'Florida" or "non-Florida" student. (a) A "Florida student" is a person who has domicile in and who shall have resided in the State of Florida for at least twelve (12) consecutive months immediately preceding the day of classes of the academic term in which the student enrolls. In determining residency, the University may require evidence such as voter registration card, driver's license, automobile re gistration, location of bank account, rent receipts, or any other relevant materials as evidence that the applicant has maintained continuous residency. Physical presence for the entire twelve month period need not be required so long as the conduct of the student, taken in total, manifests an intention to make Florida his or her permanent dwelling place If such student is a minor, it shall mean that the parent or parents, or legal guardian of the student shall have domicile in and and have resided in the state of Florida for the period stated above. "Florida student" classifi cation shall also be construed to include students who hold an Immigration and Naturalization Form 1-15i, Resident Alien Registration Receipt Card, or Cuban Nationals or Vietnamese Refugees who are considered as Resident Aliens, provided such students meet the residency requirement stated above and com ply with subsection 2, below. The burden of establishing facts which justify classification of a student as a resident and domiciliary entitled to "Florida student" registration rates is on the app licant for such classification. A resident alien student, to qualify for Florida residency, must have resided in the state of Florida for 12 months after receipt of their resident alien status. This is to include a resident alien parent of a student who is under the age of 18. (b) In applying this policy: (I) "Student''. shall mean a person admitted to the institu tion, or a person allowed to register at the institution on a space available basis. (2) "Minor" shall mean a person who has not attained the age of 18 years, arid whose disabilities of minority have not been removed by reason of marriage or by a court of competent jurisdication. (3) for fee paying purposes shall denote a person's true, fixed, and permanent home and place of habitation. It is the place where the applicant lives and remains and to which he expects to return whe n he leaves, without intent to establish domicile elsewhere. (4) "Parent" shall mean a minor's father or mother, or if one parent has custody of a minor applicant it is the parent having court assigned financial responsibility for the education of the or if there is a court ap pointed guardian or legal custodian of the minor appli cant, it shall mean the guardian or legal custodian. (5) The term "dependent student", as used in this rule is the same as a dependent as defined in sections 151(c)(1)(2)(3) and (4) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954. A copy of these provisions in the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 is incorporated in this rule by re ference. (6) A "non-Florida" student is a person not meeting the requirements of subsection (a) above. 19 2. In all applications for admission or registration at the in stitution on a space available basis, a Florida applicant or, if a minor, the parent or legal guardian of the minor applicant s hall make and file with such application a written s tatement under oath, that the applicant is a bonafide citizen, resident, and domi ciliary of the state of Florida entitled as such to classification as a "Florida student" classification must be supported by ev idence as stated in Section 6C-7 05(1), Administrative Code of Florida, if requested by the registering authority 3. A "non-Florida student" or, if a minor his parent or guardian, after having been a resident and domiciliary of Florida for twelve (12) consecutive month s, may apply for and be granted reclassification prior to the first day of classe s of any subsequent term ; provided, however that those student s who are non-resident aliens or who are in the United States on a non-immigration visa will not be entitled to reclassification. A "non-Florida student" must have resided in the state of Florida with the intent to establish domicile for at least twelve (12) con secutive months after reaching the age of majority. An applica tion for reclassification as a "Florida student" shall comply with provisions of subsections 2, above. An applicant who has been classified as a "non-Florida student" at time of original enroll ment shall furnish evidence as stated in Sec 6C-7 05(1), Ad ministrative Code of Florida, to the satisfaction of the registering authority that the applicant has maintained continuous residency in the state for the twelve months required to establish residence for tuition purpo s es. In the absence of such evidence the applic ant shall not be reclassified as a Florida student. In addition, the appliction for reclassification must be accompanied by a cer tified copy of a declaration of intent to establish legal domicile in the state, which intent must have been filed with the Clerk of the Circuit Court, as provided by Section 222.17, Florida Statutes If the request for reclassification and the necessary documel)tation is not received by the Registrar prior to the last day of registra tion for the term in which the student intends to be reclassified, the student will not be reclassified for that term. 4. Unless evidence to the contrary appears, it shall be pre sumed by the registering authority of the institution wh i ch a student is registering that : (a) The spouse of any person who is classified or is eligible for classification as a "Florida student" is likewise entitled to classification as a "Florida student". This provision will not apply in the case of students who are non-resident aliens or who are in the United States on a non-immigratit>n visa. (b) If an applicant's eligibility for classification as a" Florida student" is based on the residency of the spouse, the spouse shall make and file with the application a written statement under oath that said person is the spouse of the applicant and a bona fide citizen, resident and domiciliary of the state of Florida enti tled as such to classification as a "Florida student (c) No person over the age of 18 years shall be deemed to have gained residence while attending any educational institution in this state as a full-time student, as such status is defined by the Board of Regents, in the absence of a clear demonstration that he has established domicile and residency in the state, as provided under S"1bsection 3, above.

PAGE 22

20 FINANCIAL INFORMATION (d) Any "Florida student" who remains in the state, after his parent, who was previously domiciled in Florida or stationed in Florida on military orders removes from this state, shall be entitled to remain classified as a" Florida student" so long as his or her attendance .at a school or schools in Florida shall be deemed "continuous." However, such student claiming continu ous attendance must have been enrolled at a Florida school, college or university for a normal academic year in each calendar year, or the appropriate portion or portions thereof, from the beginning of the period for which continuous attendance is claimed. Such a student need not attend summer sessions or other such intersession beyond the normal academic year in order to render his attendance "continuous." 5. Appeal from a determination denying Florida status to any applicant therefore may be initiated after appropriate ad ministrative remedies are exhausted by the filing of a petition for review pursuant to Section 120.68 Florida Statutes in the District Court of Appeal in the appellate district in which the institution maintains its headquarters or where a party resides. 6. Any student granted status as a Florida student" which status is based on a sworn statement which is false shall, upon a determination of such falsity, be subject to such disciplinary sanctions as may be imposed by the president of the university. 7. Categories-The following categories shall be as Florida residents for tuition purposes if adequate documentation is provided: (a) A member of the Armed Services of the United States who is stationed in Florida on active duty pursuant to military orders, the spouse and dependent students. Military duty must be verified by a copy of the military orders and a statement from the unit commander stating that the student is on active duty and the date stationed in Florida. (b) A veteran of the Armed Forces of the United States of America with twenty (20) or more years of active military ser vice, including the spouse and dependent students of such vete ran's immediate family, provided that the veteran is in Florida at time of retirement or moves to Florida within one year following retirement and files a declaration of Florida domicile. Military service must be verified by a copy of DD 214 and a notarized statement that the student has moved to Florida with the inten tion of making Florida his permanent home and the date moved (c) Full-time elementary, secondary, and community col lege faculty members under current teaching contracts in the state 'of Florida, and their spouses and dependent students. Contractual status must be verified by a written statement from school official or copy of teaching contract (d) Full-time faculty, administrative and professional, and career service employees of the University System and their spouses and dependent students Employment status must be verified by a statement from his employer. (e) A student certified by his respective state for participa tion in the Academic Common Market Program of the Southern Regional Education Board who is enrolled in a program ap proved by the Florida Board of Regents. (f) Florida domiciliaries living in the Panama Canal Zone who have not established domicile elsewhere, including the spouse and dependent students (g) Florida residents who had their residency in Florida interrupted by service in the U.S armed forces the Peace Corps or other similar volunteer organizations fostered by the United States government shall be deemed to have had residency in Florida during times of service in the aforementioned organizations. 8. Reciprocal Agreements. The Board of Regents may enter into agreements .with appropriate agencies ard institutions of higher education in other states and foreign countries providing for the reciprocal exchange of students enrolled apd prospective in higher educational institutions to facilitate 'utilization of public higher educational institutions in this State and other states or countries Such agreements may include P\OVisions for waiver or reduction of non-resident tuition for designated categories of students and may include contractual payments to such other state or country, subject to the availability of appropriations Such agreements shall have as their purpose the mutual im provement of educational advantages for residents of this State and such other states or countries with whom agreements may be made To establish Florida residence, a student applying for admission should complete the residence affidavit on the appli cation form. The Director of Admissions is responsible for and will make the residency determination for all new first time en tering students and for former students returning at a new level by means of a new application. Decisions may be appealed as designated in University rules to the Vice President of Student Affairs To change status from non -Florida, a student must da the fol lowing: I. Obtain a "Change of Residency Request" form from the Re gistrar's Office. Complete the form and attach all the re quested copies of proof of resid ency to the form. 2 Obtain a Declaration of Domicile at the county courthouse in the county of residency, have it notarized and recorded at that courthouse. Attach a "copy" of the recorded document to the Change of Residency form 3. Submit the above forms to the Registrar s Office. 4. The above forms and documents must be submitted no later than the fifth day of classes for the term requested, if re classification is to be considered Fees The following fee schedule applies to all University of South Florida students with the exception of those in the Bachelor of Independent Studie s, External Degree Program. For infor mation on the BIS Program fees, see page 40 All fees' are subject io change by action of the State Legis lh.tilre ; without prior notice The University will make every effort lO adv ertis'! any such changes if they occur I.' Initial Application Fee (Each application not refundable) $15.00 2. Registration and Tuition Fee Students who pre-register may receive a bill through the mail or be instructed to pick one up in the Student Services Building. However, the University is not obligated to send out such a bill. The student is responsible for paying fees in full by the appropriate due date stated in the particular quarter's "Schedule of Classes." Failure to do so will result in the student being assessed the $25.00 late payment fee A. Fee Structure Fees are assessed by course level not student classifi cation. Course L eve l Undergraduate Lower level (0001-2999) Upper level (3000-4999) Graduate (5000 and over) Thesis and Dissertation See Resident Statu s' Fees P er Credit H our R esiden t Non-Resident $15.00 16.50 22.00 24.00 $38.00 51.50 62.00 64.00 NOTE: I Ther is no ceiling (maximum) on the amollnt which a student may be assessed for a single quarter. 2 In addition to the above each s'tudent who enroll s for five or more credit hour s on the Tampa ca mpu s or six or more credit hour s on the Sarasota cam u s must p ay a $12.00 s tudent health fee for the quarter. A st udent en rolling for four or les s credit hou rs on the Tampa campus or five or less credit hou rs on the Sar aso t a campus may voluntarily pay the he a lth fee by the end of the first week of class

PAGE 23

3. Effective Quarter IV (Summer) 1977, the under graduate fees shown above were reduced by $6 00 per credit hour for courses taken during Quarter IV 4. Students who only register for a co-op assignment must pay a minimum of one (I) hour at the level of the co-op assignment. Students who are not registered for any courses and apply for graduation must pay for one hour at the level of graduation (i.e., $16.50 for a Bachelor s Degree or As sociate of Arts degree and $22.00 for a higher level degree). 5. Cashier's Qffice Hours Regular Registration-See regular registration dates and times in "Schedule of Classes" for appropriate quarter. First Week of Class-Monday throug!J Thursday, 9 1 00 a.m. through 6:30 p.m. Remainder of Quarter-Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. through 3 : 00 p.m. (;. Registration fee payment should be mailed to: Division of Finance and Accounting University of South Florida 4202 Fowler Avenue Tampa, Florida 33620 7 I .D. Card Validation Hours Regular Registration-See regular registration dates and. times in "Schedule of Classes" for appropriate quarter. First Week of Class-Monday through Thursday, Cashier's Office, ADM 131, 9 : 00 a m. through 6:30 p.m. Remainder of Quarter-Monday through Friday, Cashier's Office, ADM 131, 9:00 a.m. through 3:00 p.m. ; Accounts Receivable, .ADM 172, 3:00 p.m. through 5:00 p.m.; Information Desk, University _Center, 5:00 P.:m through 10: 00 p m B Off-Campus Courses Students taking off-campus (Continuing Education) courses will be assessed the same fees as stated in "A" above except for the Health Fee. Continuing Education courses are designated by the 0700 series" section number. The "Schedule of Classes," which is printed each quarter, can be used as a refei:ence for updated information 3. CoUege of Medicine Registration Fees A Florida student enrolled in the M. D. program in the Col lege of Medicine will pay a fee of $1,756 .00 per year in in stallments of $439.00 each to be paid in July, October, January, and April. A non-Florida student enrolled in the M. D. program in the College of Medicine shall pay a fee of -$4,028.00 per year in installments of $1,007.00 each to be paid in July, October, January, and April. 4. Late Registratfon Fee All students who initiate (i. e. those students who have not ehrolled for any courses during early or regular registration) their registration during the late registration period will be automatically assessed a $25 .00 late registration fee This is separate from the late payment fee S. Financial Aid Payments Financial aid warrants are available, after registering, during the first week of class in the Administration Building War rants must be picked up and fees paid by the end of the first week of class. Any recipient not responding by the-end of the first week of class will be subject'to a $25.00 late fee unless prior arrangements are made with the Office of Financial Aids. 6. Late Payment Fee All registration fees and all courses which were added during the Drop / Add period must be paid in full by the payment deadline date specified in the Schedule of Classes" printed each quarter A $25.00 late payment fee will also be assessed to students whose registration checks are returned and not FINANCIAL INFORMATION 21 cleared by the specified payment deadline The University can only charge a maximum of $25.00 in total late fees for a single quarter 7. Cancellation for Non-Payment of Fees Students not on an authorized deferred payment of fees and who have not paid their registration fees in full by a specified day (per "Schedule of Classes") may have their registration for that quarter cancelled This means specifically that a student will receive no credit for any courses taken during that quarter. Students who are allowed to register in error may have their registration cancelled Any f11es paid by that stu dent will be refunded to the student or credited against other charges due the University. 8. Reinstatement Fee There will be a reinstatement period from the beginning of the sixth week of class through the end of the seventh week of class Any student wishing to be reinstated must apply in writing during that period. All fees plus a $25.00 late pay ment fee and a $25.00 reinstateme,nt fee must be paid by cash, cashier's check, or money order immediately if the reinstatement is granted. There will be no reinstat
PAGE 24

22 FINANCIAL INFORMATION I. Issuance The proce ss ing of a registration refund will be detained for a two-week period immediately following the last d ay to pay fees without a late fee. 2. Withdrawals A When officially by a student a full refund of registration fees will be made if a student withdraw s from the Univer s ity on or before the final day of the regular Drop-Add period (First week of classes). B No refund of registration fees will be made if the student withdra\VS after the final day of the Drop-Add" peri o d except in the following cases: (I) If a student is involuntarily called back to duty with the armed forces. (2). Death of the student or death in the immediate family-parent, spouse, child, or sibling (3) Incapacitating illnes s of s uch duration and seve rity as to preclude successful completion of the academic program for the term for which a st udent is enrolled. In the instances stated above, the refund will have a $2.50 per hour withdrawal fee deducted, regardle ss of course level. 3. Cancellations A A student who at any time has his regi st r atio n cancelled by the University becau s e he was a llowed to register in error is entitled to a full refund of his regi s tration fee s B A s tudent may be cancelled b y the University when registration and tuition fees are not paid in full by the last day of the regular Drop / Add period (first week of classes) except when a deferment i s granted by the Uni versity. 4. Reduction of Cl$S Load A ; tudent must officially drop a course within the Drop / Add period in order to be eligible for a refund. A Registra tion Refund Request" form must be completed and presented to the Division of Finance and Accounting before any refunds will be initiated. The refund will be the amount paid les s proper charges per hour for each hour continued 5. Late Fees Late registration fees are not 6. Refund Monies Used to Clear University Debts Deduction s from authorized refunds will be made for unp ai d accoun t s due the Univers ity. Check Cashing Service The Un iversi t y offer s check ca s hing services under the following conditions : I. The University will accept per so nal checks for accounts due to the University Each student is urged to make his own financial arrangements through his choice of co mmer cia l banks. 2. The University Book s tore will cash person a l c hecks not exceeding $50.00. 3 A service charge of 25 cents is made for each check cashed. 4 Re sponsibility for the check r es t s with the final e ndor ser. 5 The University will not cash three-part y checks. 6. All checks returned by the bank must be cleared within 5 days from the date of notification to the student Failure to comply will result in cancellation of the student's registration There is a $5 charge for each returned check. Payments of Accounts n ue the University Charges against student s for lo ss or br eakage of University equipment book s, fines and other charges will be required to be paid upon notification that charges are due Delinquent accounts may be considered s ufficient cause for cancellation of registra tion University regulations prohibit registration or release of transcript for any student whose account with the University is delinquent. P ay ments should be brought into the Cashier's Of fice Administration Building. Pa y ments may be mailed to Fi nance and Accounting, University of South Florida, Tampa Florida 33620. Financial Aids The University of South Florida has an established comprehen sive Financial Aid Program that assists qualified U S. students with their educational expenses. Financial assistance is granted on the basis of financial need academic promise, and character. Generally speaking, academic merit combined with financial need, determines whether aid is given and t he financial need determines the amount Financial assistance includes scholarships and/or grants, long-term loans and on-campus employment. Students with a 3.0 or above grade point average may apply for sc holarship s as well as other types of assistance, while s tudent s with a grade point average below 3 0 will be considered for ass ist a nce other than scholarships. Short-term, or emergency loan s, are also available to help students in the event of a temporary unexpected short term requirement for educational purposes In order to be considered for financial aid the stu dent must complete a USF Financial Aid Applicati on, and file a Financi a l Aid Form (f AF) with the College Scholar s hip Service. These forms are available at the Office of Financial Aids priority will be given to st udents who are regi stere d full time i e ., 12 or more hour s as an undergraduate and 8 or more hour s as a graduate To have financial aid renewed or extended, the undergraduate stu dent must complete at leas t 36 new quarter hour s each academic year with a 2 0 or above, for a n average of 12 new quarter hour s each quarter The deadline for applying for sc holar s hip s i s February I for the academic year beginn ing the following September an d prior ity will be given to those students who apply for other type s of assistance prior to March I In awarding financial assistance, no student is discri minated against because of race, religion creed, age, sex, color, national origin, handicap or stat us Vehicle Regulations and Fees Motor Vehicles Students may use properly registered motor vehicles on campus Parking facilities are provided for resident and commu ter students All motor vehicles and bicycle s use d on campus must be registered with the Division of Public Safety This applies to full-time or part-time day or evening s tudents. Each motor vehicle registrant mus t pre se nt a vehicle registration cer tificate indicating proof of who o w ns the vehicle A booklet enti tled "USF Traffic and Parking Regulations will be iss ued to each student on registering a motor vehicle Registration fees (unless changed by State statute) for three or four-wheeled motor vehicles will be $20.00 for an academic year; $8.00 for an aca demic quarter. Yearly fees for st udent s registering after the first quarter will be adjusted proportion ally Students may park in remote areas for a le sser fee All decals expire on 31 Augu s t of the academic year Motorcycles The fee for motorcycles and mopeds will be $ 5.00 per y ear no matter what time of year they are regi s tered Bicycles The fee for bicycles is $1.00. Bicycle s need only be regis tered once The decal issued for bicycles is valid for four years.

PAGE 25

A booklet entitled "US F Bicycle Traffic and Parking Regula tions" will be issued to each student registering a bicycle. Handicapped Students with permanent disabilities which impede walking may register vehicles without charge, and receive a specially assigned parking space. FINANCIAL INFORMATION 23 Evening Students Vehicle registration requirements and fees apply to evening students as well as day students. Special Services Veterans Administration Benefits The University of South Florida is approved for the education of veterans, service members, and certain dependents of veterans who are eligible for benefits under public laws now in effect. All degree programs currently offered at USF are approved by the State Approving Agency Students who may be eligible for benefits are urged to con tact the Office of Veterans Affairs (refer to page 30) for informa tion, procedures, and forms as early as possible. To initiate, cbange, or renew benefits at USF, a request must be submitted through that office. To be eligible for full-time VA benefits at USF, under graduates and non-degree seeking (special) students must enroll for 12 or more quarter h ours and degree seeking graduate stu dents must enroll for 8 or more quarter hours each normal academic quarter (10-13 weeks). VA regulations require that you take only courses that are applicable to your degree program or other approved program, attend classes, and make satisfactory progress toward your de gree. There are many o(her VA rules and regulations of which you should be aware, including those regarding the following: Double Major, Double Degree, Major/Minor programs, the Bachelor of Independent Study Degree program Cooperative Education program, dual enrollment at two institutions, non degree seeking (special) student enrollment, courses/programs offered off campus, independent study courses, open circuit television courses, courses taken by audit (no benefits), and non-punitive grades ("W", "U/IU", "I" -unless removed within a calendar year) It is the student's responsibility to inquire con cerning all VA rules and regulations and to report any -change in status which affects their benefits. Additionally, VA benefits will be terminated for stur the effective period of enrollment at USF. Those students may contact the Office of Loans and Scholarships no earlier than the regular registration date for a book slip and ID card valida tion. Other VA benefits include additional amounts of compen sation and pension, which may be payable to eligible veterans and widows or widowers of veterans for the enrollment of de pendent children The students, parents, or guardians are re sponsible for notifying the VA Regional Office (where the vete ran s records are located) directly of enrollment and termination of enrollment. / Social Security Benefits Full-ti111e students between the ages of 18 and 22 who are eligible for Social Security checks should notify their local Social Security office to request enrollment certification through the Tampa Social Security Office. ; To be considered full-time at USF, students must enroll for a minimum of 12 quarter hours each quarter except summer quarter It is the student s responsi bility to notify the Social Security Administration when he/she ceases to be enrolled full-time. Railroad Retirement Annuity A ward The University maintains records on students receiving Railroad Retirement Annuity Award benefits and notifies the Board when a student ceases to be enrolled full-time. A student ceases to be enrolled full-time when he/ she is enrolled for less than 12 hours as an undergraduate and 8 hours as a graduate To initiate benefits students should contact the Railroad Retirement Board. Bookstores Textbook Center Textbooks are located in the Textbook Center adjacent to the Central Jleceiving Building. Every attempt is made to have all required and recommended texts 'available the first day of reg istration. USF Bookstore and Campus Shop The USF Bookstore and Campus Shop, located in the Univer sity Center, serves the University community by providing numerous goods and services. The Art and Engineering Department contains all course supplies of art, engineering, and science classes as well as many hobby and general pur:pose items Oil or water base paint, brushes, art paper, electronic calculators graph paper, drafting supplies, dissecting kits, and lab notebooks are among the many items in this department. The Supply Department stocks all the basic school supplies and course required supplies necessary to fulfill course needsnotebooks, notebook paper, pens, pencils, etc. The Customer Service Department stocks a large assort ment of items which includes candy cigarettes, tobacco pro ducts health and beauty aids This department provides many helpful services--film developing college ring order service fresh flower gift service magazine subscriptions at student rates ett. The Social Expression Department contains a complete selection of traditional and contemporary greeti'1! cards and stationery The General Book Department is located in the basement of the Bookstore and features approximately 13,000 different titles including the very latest in fiction non-fiction, reference, study aids, and children's boods. A copy center is also located in this area. Check Cashing The Bookstore provides a check cashing facility for stu dents staff and faculty Cash limit is $50.00. Student current fee card and picture ID or current staff card must be presented for identification

PAGE 26

STUDENT SERVICES AND STUDENT AFFAIRS The University of South Florida i s dedicated to the intellectual, social and moral development of students in order to provide re s ponsible leaders who can work effectively in a democratic s ociety The University has a concern for the total life of the student, both in and out of the classroom. Diversity of opinion criticism, and dissent are essential in discharging these respon sibilities, and this h as been set forth and safeguarded in the Board of Regents' policies (Sec. 6c Administrative Code of Florida). As a condition for a dmis s ion to one of the State Universities of Florida, students agree to abide by the policies of the Boa rd of Regents and by the rules and regulations of the institution. The University has the right and responsibility to determine who shall be a dmitted to the institution; the conduct or behavior ac ceptable to the institution : and under what conditions one may continue as a student. Administrative due process and the right of review in all disciplinary hearings are provided by the U niver sity. University officials and particularly the Vice President for Student Affairs and his staff are charged with the responsibility of interpreting the policies of the Board of Regents to students a nd others in the univer s ity community, and with developing positive s tudent personnel programs which further the intellec tual soc i a l and moral development of students. Office of Student Affairs The Vice President for Student Affairs, and the staff members in that area of administration, provide leadership and professional services nece ssary to m a intain a campus environment conducive to learning First, they offer se rvices enabling students to cope effectively with factors of personal and social living that affect academic work : academic advising, financial aid, health service individual and group counseling, career planning placement, cooperative education, sta ndard s of conduct and performance due pro cess in disciplinary action, procedures for redressing grievances and a dvice and assis\ance in time of trouble. Second, they provide program s enabling students to participate effec tively in the corporate life of the University : orientation (FOCUS), equal opportunity programs res idence halls student government student publications organizations, activities, and events of s pecial interest. The Office of the Vice Pre s ident for Student Affairs is responsible for notifying all involved parties in the event of the death of a s tudent. Standards and Discipline Ju st as the Univer s ity tries to maintain high standards of academic performance, its members try to support high stan dards of individual conduct and human relations. Responsibility for one's own conduct and respect for the rights of others are essential conditions of academic and per sonal freedom in the University. The University may deny admission or refuse continued enrollment to students whose actions are contrary to the pur pose s of the University or impair the welfare and freedoms of other members of the Univer s ity Standards of personal conduct are published in a handbook which is available to students in the Office of the Vice President 24 for Student Affairs, the information counter in the Student Ser vices Building and the information counter in the University Center. Disciplinary procedures are followed when a student fails to exercise his responsibility adequately or commits some offense against University standards. Local, state or federal law provide the safeguards of due process customarily enjoyed by American citizens These include a written description of the offen s e, participation in discussion of the matter and presenta tion of information in one's own behalf, the right to seek c ounsel in one s own best interest and the right of appeal. These procedures are also described in the handbook Self-discipline and sensitivity to the rights and interests of others are the princip a l elements of University discipline Stu dents are entitled to seek advice on any matter of judgment, conduct or human relations that may concern them, and to par ticipate in the development of standards of conduct supporting their interest in the purposes of the University Many students have asked for advice on standards of dress and personal appearance. Campus dress is expected to be appro priate to the activity in which the individual is engaged Student Government All regularly enrolled students are voting members of the Stu dent Government of the University of South Florida. They elect the college councils, the Student Government officers and the student representatives to the University Senate Student Gov ernment is an agency representing student interests in plans, programs, policies and procedures at the University and secur ing student representation in University governance. The Stu dent Government office also helps students deal with special problems in areas such as off-campus housing, veterans services, and referral for legal assistance Grievance Procedure In order to assure to students the right to redress of grievances the Office of Student Affairs is responsible for a grievance pro cedure. Any student may file a question, complaint or statement of grievance, in the Office of Student Affairs, in person or in writing. A course of action or other answer will be given by a member of the staff of the Office of Student Affairs within the week if possible. Students who do not wish to identify them selves or to provide local addresses win fjnd the reply published in the earliest possible edition of the Oracle St. Petersburg and Sarasota Campuses Student Affairs offices are also maintained at the St. Petersburg and Sarasota campuses. For information about the services and programs provided for these students, see page 9 Financial Aids The student financial aids program at the University of South Florida is a part of the Student Affairs program For detailed information about financial aids see page 22. Student Health Service Comprehensive health care is provided through the University Student Health Service for all students who have paid the Health

PAGE 27

Fee. The Health Center is loc at ed on the fourth tloor of the University Center building. A seve n-bed infirmary is ava ilable for st udent s with illnesses precluding class attendance. A walk-in clinic and medical labor atory a re maintained for outpatient treatment. University physicians have office hour s by appoi ntment, Monday through Friday Regi stered nur ses are on duty 24 hours a day, seven days a week while classes are in sessio n Handicapped Students The University of South Florida has good facilities for persons with disabilities and encourages their enro llment in the Univer sity Due to the mild climate, relatively !lat terrain, modern ar chitecture and recent modifications, many with sig nific ant disabi lities have bec:;n able to function independently a nd successfu lly in the University environment. All academic programs, campus orga nization s and activities a re open to st udent s who are h a ndic apped. The University at tempts to integrate students who are handicapped into the University as completely as possible The adviser to h a ndicapped s tudent s provides assistance in referral for academic advising personal and social counseling, and information concerning events of individual and group inter ests. Additional information will be provided upon request by the a dviser CTR 217, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620. Division of Cooperative Education & Placement One of the recognized goals of a college education is to maximize career satisfaction and the Univer sit y of South Florida has dedi cated itself to the purpose of assisting students in realizing their career objective Undergraduate students are encouraged to participate in the Cooperative Education Program and graduating students are urged to take advantage of the placement Ser vice. Cooperative Education Program The Cooperative Education Program is an academic pro gram open to majors in rrios t discipline s offered at the Univer s ity The program's objective is a balanced education where oc cupational experience is a n integral part of formal education and theory is blended with practice. In addition to regular classroom and laboratory exercises, it acquaints the student with the world of work and a professional environment. The ultimate objectives of the program are to provide relevance in the educational pro cess ; direction in career pla nning; bring business, industry, and governmental agencies close to the educational program of the University and have the graduates absorbed into permanent em plo yme nt of the leading employers. A student must complete a minimum of 45 quarter hour s of academic work with a grade point average of2. 5 or better before being assigned to an employer. Students transferring from other sc hool s must complete two full-time quarter s on the USF cam pu s prior to a work assignment in addition to a 2 5 grade point average and other re quirem ents Qualifying s tudent s are as signed to a team and alternate between quarters of training (paid employment) and quarters of s tudy until they complete a minimum of three q_uarters of off-campus work assignments All University of South Florida cooperl).tive program s are approxi mately four years in length except in the field of engineering, which is approximately a five-year program. The University will assign students to training programs rel evant to thei r educational and professional goals. Usually stu dent s are first placed on assignments where they can learn the fundamental s. They may then advance in the type of assignment from training period to training period Students are encouraged to make application for placement in the program at least one quarter prior to their desire to go on a training assignment. Once a s tudent is accepted into the proSTUDENT SERVICES AND STUDENT AFFAIRS 25 Army ROTC Students gram, the training assignments become a part of their acade mic program leading to a degree The stude nt s must rem ain on the alternating pattern of training and s tud y until they complete the three quarter requirement and are relea s ed from the Cooperative Education Program by the Director of the program. Students sig ning a n agreem ent covering training periods a re obligated to fulfill their agreement. Students who fail to report for a training period affer s igning an agreement or who fail to keep their agreement t o remain with an employer to the end of a given tr a inin g ass ignment will re ceive a "U" grade and will be dropped from the program. Cooperative Education stude nt s will be expected to meet deadlines for registering and for paying r egistration fees with any exceptions brought to the attention of the appropr i ate administractor by the Dir ec tor of Cooperative Education and Place ment. Cooperative Education student s may take cour s e work during their trai ning period not to exceed six hours. Details of the arrangements s hould be discussed with the Cooperative Education Dir ector or a Coordinator Graduating Students and Alumni Each year representatives from business and industry edu cational systems, and governmental agencies throughout the United States will conduct on campus recruiting interviews for graduating students In addition employers will list career em ployment vacancies throughout the year and request referrals of quatified candidates. Graduating studen t s should register with the office early in their graduating year to insure the estab lish ment of their placement credentials. R esume referral service s are available to a lumni desiring career relocations The Occupational and Emp l oyer Information Library pro vides materials on vocational guidance caree r opportunities, a nd employers. The following data conce rning the statistica l records of some of our 1979 graduates is provided for your information It i s hoped that this information will be helpful to you in making deci sio ns for your future academic pursuits. You s hould be aware that registration with the Office of Cooperative Education an d Place ment (by which the data is compiled) is entirely voluntary on th e part of the student and that the student i s not re quired to provide follow up information on employment. This s hould be considered when examining the different percentages of registered stude nt s the percentages that report employmi;nt, and the percentages remaining on active or

PAGE 28

26 STUDENT SERVICES AND STUDENT AFFAIRS inact i ve file, many of whom may have obtained employment without report ing it. This survey encompa s ses University of South Florida s eniors who graduated from August 1978 through July 1979. Only those students who registered with the Placement Office were surveyed for the placement and s alary information con tained in this report This information wa s gathered from employers students and survey letters. Of 4 ,446* graduating students, l ,45S or 32.8 % registered with the Placement Office. Of the 1,458 registered graduating students: '347-23. 8o/o-accepted positions 283-19.4%-remained on active file for referral 828-56. 8 %-are inactive NOTE: Que s tions concerning salary range s hould be directed to the Cooperative Education and Placement Office for explanation. In c ludin g 147 g radu a te s from th e Colleg e of Nursing who did not register with the C ooperat ive Educati o n and Pla cem e nt Office : SUMMARY 1978-79 'o "' c !:! 0 ... !:! ... ;; .ll B E c ... E"" 8 8 .g ; zo Arts & Letters B 370 83 22.4 M 32 5 15.6 D 2 Business B 794 441 55.5 Admini s tration M 58 32 55. 2 D Educ a tion B 729 439 60 2 M 475 42 08.8 D 9 2 22.2 Engineering B 214 158 73. 8 M 16 II 68. 8 D I Fine Arts B 108 9 08. 3 M 25 2 08.0 D Natural B 380 81. 21.3 Sciences M 47 14 29.8 D 17 4 23. 5 Social & B 857 126 14. 7 Behavioral M 146 9 06 2 Science s D 12 Sub-Total B 3 ,452 1 ,337 38. 7 M 799 115 14.4 D 41 6 15. 0 TOTAL +4,292 1,458 34. 0 Either Education Speciali s t o r doctoral degree + Excluding College of Nursing and Bachelor of Independent Studies + + 9 Month Salary Housing "' .D ; *-8 ... t: ... 0 8. 0.."' 9 I0. 8 9,418 .49 2 40. 0 10, 500.00 117 26. 5 12,377 .09 8 25. 0 16,287.50 89 20.3 ++9,509.45 9 21.4 ++ 10,672.89 I 50.0 12,250.00 85 53. 8 17,369 .89 7 63. 6 19,912.29 Excluded due to lack of data 13 16.0 3 21.4 4 03. 2 317 23. 7 29 25.2 I 16. 7 347 23. 8 12, 914.48 16,337 .33 8 ,172.50 B-Bachelor' s Degree M-Master's Degree 0.-Doctoral Degree The residence hall program at USF i s an integral part of the total educational experience at the University of South Florida It is within this residential environment of the campus that students experience ident i ty with the university community finding on going opportunities for intellectual social recreational and vo cational growth Within the functional pleasant surroundings of the residence halls professionM staff members are available to foster academic and personal adjustment and to facilitate inter personal communication as students from all over the country establish friendships and share in cultural exchange University residence hali space is limited but every regularly-enrolled student is eligible to apply Contracts are re leased on a first-come first-served basis upon receipt of the housing application form which each student receives with his/ her official university notification Residence Halls The twelve halls within the Division of Housing and Food Service are clustered around two centers of community activity-the Argos and Andros Complexes. Each of th i com plexes provides a core of services for its residents including a central communications desk, mail delivery, TV and study lounges, and complete cafeteria and snack facilities. This ar rangement has encouraged resident interaction while bringing tht; residence hall staff close to the needs of students Although both Argos and Andros Complexes provide the same basic services, they represent different options in campus living The Argos Complex of residence halls-Alpha, Beta and Gamma-represent traditional hall living. This arrangement provides attractive double-room accommodations designed for both studying and sleeping The 40-50 residents occupying a liv ing unit share common bath facilities which are attended daily by the hall's housekeeping staff Centrally-located lobby areas, laundry rooms and snack machines further describe the housing arrangements for the women of Gamma and Alpha (East Wing) and the men of Beta and Alpha (West Wing). The Andros Complex consisting of the nine small halls Delta Epsilon Kappa, and Mu for women and Iota, Lambda, Theta Eta and Zeta for characterized by the suite ar rangements. Suites are de s igned to accomodate eight residents-two sharing a bedroom four sharing a study area, and eight sharing bath facilities With five suites on each living unit, the 40 residents find that the small kitchenette / lounge and laun dry room become centers of floor activity. Whether residing in Andros or Argos Complex residents will enjoy the comfort, freedom and peace of mind that comes from living in fully air-conditioned halls with 24-hour security control. In addition, most rooms are carpeted throughout and all rooms are furnished to provide a bed, desk, chair, dresser, closet and bookshelf for each resident. Outside, two swimmillg ppols and numerous tennis handball, racquetball and basketb!lti courts await leisure-time recreation fans. And of course there are al ways opportunities for residents to become involved in the on going area of residence hall programming. Off-Campus Housing The Student Government office located in the University Center maintains a list of off-campus housing Listings are ac cepted only from householders and landlords who do not dis criminate because of race, color or national origin Rental ar rangements may best be made after personal inspection of facilities and conference with the householder before 'the Uni versity opens. Fall quarter arrangements may be made during the summer. Food Service A variety of food service facilities are provided at USF, including residence hall cafeterias, satellite snack bars through out the campus, complete vending services, and catering ar rangements for special events. The food service contractor en deavors in every way possible to meet the general and specific food service needs of the USF community University Center The University Center seeks to facilitate another dimension of thJ educational experience by providing an environment for in formal association outside the classroom .It provides facilities service s and programs to enhance the social, cultural, and re creational life of the University. The information service desk serves as the coordinating center for the numerous and varied

PAGE 29

services and activities of the University Center and out-of-class student life It is here that student organizations schedule facilities and request services for their various activities The master schedule of all student activities is maintained at this location. Many of the University center facilities and services provide for personal and social needs The University Center has some fourteen meeting and conference rooms to be used by student organizations and provides facilities for the various services of fered through the University Center Activities Office, composed of the games area, craft shop, photography lab, student organi zations office, and the program office For social activities, a ballroom is also located on the second floor. The first floor of the University Center has four social lounges for relaxation as well as a gallery lounge to exhibit student art work Other facilities on this floor are a television lounge cafeteria and coffee shop, a campus store, and student government offices. Student health services occupy the fourth floor of the University center. The basement level of the University Center is the recrea tional area. To be found here are billiard tables, table tennis tables, table soccer games as well as a table game room equipped with cards, and a variety of table games, as well as coin-operated skill games The crafts area has been expanded to include a large ceramics facility as well as leather work copper enameling, mac rame, and numerous other small crafts. Photography labs are also located in this area of the University Center Food Services, the Book Store, and Health Services opera tions are coordinated through their respective University ad ministrative areas, while the other facilities and services are coordinated by the University Center Director's office. The University Center not only includes Student Organiza tions but also a Program Office. The Office of Student Organizations provides services (mail, duplicating, advising, to some 250 registered Student Organizations Advising to the fraternities and sororities, minority organizations and mature students (25 or older) are also coordinated through this office The Program Office provides two professional acfvisers who are available to consult with student organizations regarding their programs and activities. University Police The University of South Florida Police Department, located at the intersection of Maple and Fletcher, provides the full range of public safety services to the community twenty-four hours a day seven days a week. All University Police Officers are commis sioned Law Enforcement Officers of the State of Florida The telephone number for on campus e mer ge ncies ( personal injuries, fires, crimes in progress) is 2911. The telephone number of on campus none m erge ncie s and business is 2628. Clubs and Qther Organizations Students have formed clubs, organizations, and councils in al most every field of interest. New groups are being formed and will continue to develop. Groups presently organized cover the most frequ.ently d qs in;d kinds of activities. Professional staff members are available to assist individuals iq fo1111ing new organizations and also to assist in the advising of currently recognized groups Since the creation and dissolution of organizations'.is a constant process, the list of active student organizations is always subject to change For complete lists and current information regarding all student organizations, please contact the Office of Student Dance, Music Drama Clubs The excellent . program in Fine Arts and its facilities, the Fine Arts Building the University T/Jeatre and the Theatre Centre offer m a ny opportunities for involvement of students both those who major in this area and those from other colleges, in a number of activities and organizations The Theatre departSTUDENT SERVICES AND STUDENT AFFAIRS 27 ment's production program is open to participation by students both on stage and off Most of the performing organizations in the Music department welcome student participation and offer opportunities for in strumentalists and singers through its or chestras, bands, and choruses Cultural Events Many of today's outstanding visual and performing artists are brought to the University of South Florida campus each year. The Artist Series provides unusual opportunities for ex periencing the finest professional talents in Music, Dance, and Theatre. The Exhibitions Program provides unusual oppor tunities to view many varied and significant works of art annually in the University's three galleries. These and other programs conducted by the College of Fine Arts significantly contribute to the education of students and the general vitality of the campus. In addition the College of Fine Arts arranges a full schedule of concerts, plays, lectures, films, and workshops which feature students, faculty and visiting artists. The events are presented both during the day and in the evening. Many are free of charge Most events are open to the general public. The University publishes a Calendar of Evertts which is available upon request to the Director of Fine Arts Events, College of Fine Arts, USF. Fraternities and Sororities There are currently 17 national fraternities and 9 national sororities functioning on the Tampa Campus. They carry out a program of social, education service and recreational activities for their members Membership is open to any studen t, by invi tation. Their programs are coordinated through the Interfrater nity Council, Panhellenic Council and National Panhellenic Council with the advice of faculty and staff members. The sororities are: Alpha Delta Pi, Alpha Kappa Alpha Chi Omega, Delta Delta Delta, Delta Gamma, Delta Sigma Theta, Kappa Alpha Theta, Kappa Delta, and Zeta Phi Beta. The fraternities are: Alpha Phi Alpha, Alpha Tau Omega, Delta Tau Delta Kappa Alpha Psi, Kappa Sigma, Lambda Chi Alpha Omega Psi Phi, Phi Beta Sigma, Phi Delta Theta, Phi Gamma Delta, Pi Kappa Alpha, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Sigma Chi, Sigma Nu, Sigma Phi Epsilon, Tau Epsilon Phi, Tau Kappa Epsilon and Pi Kappa Phi Associate Chapter. Religious Organizations The University has encouraged student religious organiza tions to develop associations and centers. Denominations have built centers in a reserved area on campus The Episcopal Center was dedicated in the fall of 1962 and the Baptist Center in the spring of 1964. The University Chapel Fellowship followed in 1966. (This center is an ecumenical campus ministry of the following denominations: United Methodist, Presbyterian, and United Church of Christ.) The Roman Catholic Center joined the others in the fall of 1967, in an adjacent location. Student religious organizations active on campus include : Baha'i Club, Baptist Campus Ministry, Campus Advance, Campus Bible Fellowship Biblical Studies Class Campus Cru sade for Christ, Canterbury Club, Catholic Student Center, Chabad House, Christian Science Organization, Hillel Club, Intervarsity Christian Fellowship; Latter Day Saints Student Association, Navigators, Pentecostal Student Association, People' s Christian Front, and the University Chapel Fellowship (Methodist Presbyterian, and United Church of Christ). Service and Honorary There are many organizations devoted to serving the Uni versity and the Tampa Bay Area These Service Organizations are : Alpha Phi Omega, Careteam, Circle K, Peer Management Rap Cadre, Sierra Club, Tape Bank Services, and Women's Peer Counseling Center. Membership to Honorary Organizations is usually by invi tation Honorary Organizations at USF are: Alpha Epsilon Delta (Pre-Medical), Beta Alpha Psi (Accounting), Beta Gamma Sigma (Business) Gamma Theta Upsilon (Geography), Golden

PAGE 30

28 STUDENT SERVICES AND STUDENT AFFAIRS Key, Kappa Delta Pi (Education), Lambda Alpha (Anthr<> pology) Mortar Board, Omicron Delta Kappa, Phi Alpha Theta (History), Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Sigma (Biology), Pi Mu Epsilon (Math), Pi Sigma Alpha (Political Science), Psi Chi (Psy chology), Sigma Pi Sigma (Physics), Sigma Tau Delta (English), Sigma Xi (Sciences), Society of Physics Students, Statistics Honor Society, Tau Beta Pi (Engineering), Themis, and College of Nursing Honor Society. Founded in 1897, Phi Kappa Phi is the most prestigious honor academic society on campus. With over 200 chapters throughout the United States it is the only national honor soci ety to recognize excellence of scholarship inall academic fields Membership is by invitation of the local chapter. Eligibility for membership is limited to those seniors and graduate students who rank in the upper 10 percent of their class One outstanding Junior from each college / divi s ion is also selected for member ship by the respective Coordinator of Advising These Juniors are awarded a $50.00 book scholars hip for their achievements. Among its many benefits, the Society offers undergraduate and graduate scholarships. National fellowship s are also awarded on a competitive basis Professional Fraternities Many profession-oriented groups exist at USF. These in clude : Delta Sigma Pi, Phi Beta Lambda, Phi Chi Theta, Phi Mu Alpha Pi Mu Epsilon Pi Sigma Alpha Pi Sigma Epsilon Special Interest Organizations Students have organized and continue to organize clubs and organizations covering a broad range of interests Included are those oriented to academic majors, departments and colleges ; groups providing programs, information, and governmental ex perience; and associations of students with a common interest in a specific recreational, technical, ideological, or other area of special concern Complete information is available at the Office of Student Organizations. Recreational Sports The University of South Florida provides a variety of physical and recreational activities designed to meet the needs and in terests of students Believing that a sound and complete edu cation includes a proper balance of work and study with physical activity the University program includes Intramural Sports competition, Sports Clubs and other recreational activities in addition to basic instructional programs in physical education The activities represent a broad selection of sports ranging from those of a highly competitive nature to those of a petitive type and include individual dual, team and aquatic sports. Through participation students, faculty and staff will increase physical fitness augment leisure time skills, and de velop a wholesome attitude toward physical activity. The Intramural Sports Program emphasizes activities that are especially suited to the Florida climate. Competition is sched uled in such individual sports as swimming, tennis track badminton. golf, cross country, table tennis, bowling billiards, handball., paddleball, wrestling and archery as well as the team sports of soccer, touch football basketball volleyball and soft ball. is scheduled fraternal societies, residence halls, and independent divisions. Team awards are pre sented The Sports Club Program includes groups of students, fac ulty, and staff who have a special interest in a particular sports activity They are organized for the purpose .of increasing skills and augmenting knowledge through a continuing in-service training and competitive program. Each sports club is assisted by the coordinator of sports clubs in the selection of a faculty ad visor, and the initial organization of the club is governed by University regulations Students with special sports abilities or interests are encouraged to make them known s 0 that when suffi cient need and interest warrant new sports clubs may be formed. Present clubs include: Aikido, bicycle, bowling fencing, frisbee gymnastics, karate, lacrosse, rugby sailing, soccer, sports car, scuba, sports _parachute, track volleyball, water skiing weight lifting wrestling and yoga The Special Events Program is geared to provide the Univer sity community with a variety of informal recreational activities. Some of the activities are: open tournaments splash parties, picnics camping, boating, coed activities, and other special project activities related to the development of campus recrea tion. Intercollegiate Athletics The University of South Florida fields intercollegiate teams in both men's and women's sports. The University is a member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association and competes in the University Division I level in baseball, basketball, cross coun try, golf, soccer, swimming, and tennis The University is also a member of the Association of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women, and competes in Division I competition in basketball, golf swimming, and tennis and Division II in softball and volleyball. Schedules are arranged to include quality competition which reflects the high standards of the University, and includes contests with regionally and nationally ranked teams. USF be came a charte f member of the new Sun Belt Conference in 1976. Student Publications The University has encouraged a program of campus communi cation through two publications. These publications are allUni versity in approach and coverage They are staffed by students under the general supervision of the Office of Student Pub lications A five-column tabloid campus newspaper the Oracle, is published five times weekly Monday through Friday, during Quarters I, II and III, and three times weekly, Monday Wednesday and Friday, during Quarter IV Containing 16 to 20 pages in each .issue, it provides professional experience for those students interested in journalism. Any student interested in working on the newspaper in any capacity is not only encouraged but urged to participate Omnibus a quarterly magazine, is published during Quarters I, II and III as a supplement to the Oracle. Omnibus is a tabloid magazine containing general interest features and photos pro duced by students. Interested students are invited to apply for s taff positions on either campus publication as well as make contributions to the quarterly magazine. Division University Studies The Division of University Studies contains the offices of New Student Relations, Admissions and Academic Advising. The Division is responsible for USF students at the point of initial contact in the community, during the process of admission at the undergraduate level, and until a choice of academic major is made with academic advising services. As an administrative home for the USF undergraduate student who has not yet declared an academic major the Division is a facility where the student receives the information, ser vices and counsel necessary for effective decision-making in regard to his or her academic and professional future It is through the offices of this Divi sion that high school students seek early adn:iission, effect dual enrollment between high schools and community colleges and the University and receive academic advisement until such time as they have chosen a major The Division provides information and specia l services

PAGE 31

for minority students and those who are above the trnditional college age. Referr a l s to other s tudent service unit s are freely made a s the Divi s ion s eek s to insure that all USF undergr a duate s tudent s will progre ss toward graduation with optimal u s e of their ti.me, inter es t s abilities, and the res ource s of the Uni ver s ity. Office of Academic Advising The centralized a c a demic advising office of the Division of Uni ver s ity Studies i s prim a rily concerned with the a s sistance of new lower level student s and students who h a ve not selected an a ca demic major. Good advice and careful planning are extremely important for the exploratory "Student. The office also serves as an initial point of contact for pro s pective students who are unfamili a r with the Univer s ity struc ture and who need academic information a bout this ins titut i on. Since the deci s ion a bout a major affect s many a s pects of a s tu dent s pre s ent and future life, the a dviser s in the Divi s ion main tain close liaison with other areas s o the y will be better equipped to use information from them in relation to the function of aca demic advising. Some of these resources are the college a dvising offices, the Counseling Center for Human Development the Divis ion of C o operative Education and Placement, and Finan cial Aids The advising office provides a program which i s c oncerned with the implicit as well as the explicit needs of minority stu dents Thi s program s responsibility' is to help these students get whatever assi s tance they need in addition to their academic ad visement. This office i s a lso responsible for checking requirements for the Associate of Art degree Office of New Student Relations The Office of New Student Relations a s sists pro s pective stu dents high s chool guidance counselor s, parents, and the general STUDENT SERVICES AND STUDENT AFFAIRS 29 public in securing information about the University of South Florida and its programs Members of the New Student Rela tions staff represent USF at college day programs in high schools throughout the State of Florida. Special programs are initiated to meet the needs and interests of prospective students Among these activities are preparation and distribution of printed information relevant to high school students mature students, and minority students; seminars for high school counselors ; and c a mpus vis itation days for prospective students These programs frequently represent a cooperative effort with other University divisions public school s ystems and community colleges in the local area. Invitations from schools, civic organizations and youth groups for information and presentations about the Uni versity of South Florida are welcomed. The office also serves as an initial point of contact for pro spective students who are unfamiliar with the University and who are seeking general information about any aspect of the insti tution. Services include pre-admission counseling for high school students minority group members, and mature, non-traditional college age individuals New Student Relations, in conjunction with the Admission Office and other University units, administers the Early Ad mission, Dual Enrollment New Student Orientation, and FOCUS: YOU AND USF programs. New Student Orientation Program At the beginning of each quarter prior to the beginning of classes, all new full-time undergraduate students are expected to participate in the orientation program of the University Nor mally a one day program orientation is designed to help new stu dents become acquainted with the University and includes aca demic advising. Students cleared for Quarter I (September) admission are urged to participate in FOCUS: YOU AND USF, a special summer orient a tion-early registration program in lieu of orien tation prior to the beginning of classes. Counseling Center for Human Development The Counseling Center for Human Development provides direct profession a l s erv ice s to USF s tudents in career coun s eling, per s onal c o un seling, p s ychiatric con s ultation and readings tudy s kills Special s ervice s are provided by the State Division of ,Voca tion a l Rehabilitation and the Division of Pro b a tion and Parol e, and each a gency m a intain s an office loc a ted in the Coun s eling Center . These service s are designed to assist students in achieving efficient learn ing habits and developing a satisfying in campus life. The Counseling Psychology Service helps students to de velop reali s tic career goals through testing, counseling, use of career information and the exploration of alternative edu cational and / or career goals and the means of reaching them Emphasis is placed on developing skills for solving educational and career problems in order to make constructive career de cisions A Career Information Library is maintained for student use. The Clinical Psychology Service is a student resource that provides a range of services aimed at the early detection and prevention of student mental health problems and the develop ment of skill-enhancing programs The following direct services are offered to US F students: Intake evaluation, psychiatric con sultation, time-limited psychotherapy and behavior group therapy, skill-enhancing programs and workshops, anxiety management, paraprofessional programs and referral services Professional psy1
PAGE 32

30 STUDENT SERVICES ANO STUDENT AFFAIRS Currently there are three paraprofessional programs func tioning at the Counseling Center. These program s recei ve pro fes s ional training an d s upervi s ion and ar e s taffed by volunteer s tudent s under the lea der s hip of trained and experienced graduate and und ergra du a te s tudents. The programs include the following : Behavior M o dification Helpline, and Rap Cadre Appl i cation for any of these s ervices may be made by all USF s tudent s by presenting themselves at the Counseling Center and requesting assistance. Center staff limitations will restrict servicing of new applications to emergencies during peak periods. Offices of Veterans Affairs Offices of Veterans A ff airs are m a intained on the Tampa, St. Petersburg Sa r aso t a, and Fort Myers campuses. These of fices direct th e University s PA VE program which stands for Programs to Advance Veterans Education. All v eterans and service m e mbers-and their d epe ndents-can utili ze the services of the se offices. Highlights of the PA VE program include veterans pre-admissions a nd pre-registration counseling and v eteran s benefit s advising These office s receive requests for VA edu cation benefits which a re proce sse d through the VA Certifica tion sec tion of the Regist rar s Office to the Veterans Admin istration. A VA V oca tional Reh a bilit ati on Speciali s t visit s oncampus o n a sc h e duled b as i s to provide s pecialized se rvices for vet erans w ith service-co nnected disabilities. VA s tud e n ts m ay be eligible for the VA Student D efe rment of registration a nd tuition fees or for th e VA adva n c e c heck Veter ans ca n a lso qualify to wor k on campus in the VA Work Study program assis ting the VA a nd USF to prov ide for veteran s serv ices VA students may a lso be eligible for a VA education loan on a financial need basis The Vet-to-Vet Tutorial Program affords VA s tudents the opportunity for tutoring in needed subject areas. Under the GI Bill s tudents can receive an allowance from the VA to pay for a tutor who may also be a veteran There is the opportunity for developmental course-work and GED certification on-campus a nd through cooperative effort s with local community college s and adult education programs. Active referral is made for finimcial as s istance, student job placement st udent housing personal and family counseling, career planning, academic advising, military se rvice schooling credit, and discharge review. As a Serviceman's Opportunity College, USF encourages ac tive duty personnel to participate in PA VE. For information on Project Ahead, degree completion, and tuition assistance st udents should first check w ith their local military education services office. Swimming Pool, Argos Center

PAGE 33

ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES, PROGRAMS AND SERVICES The Office of Records & Registration, a department of the Registrar's Office maintains the official academic records for all students and course registration s for currently enrolled students. Students are encouraged to contact the Office of Records and Registration about general questions concerning Academic Policies and Procedures or their current registration or academic record Note: Each student must be aware of the University's Academic Poiicies and Procedures in so far as they affect him/ her. General Academic Regulations and Information Quarter System The University of South Florida operates on a quarter system. The aca demic year begins in September and ends in August. Quarters begin in September, January, March, and June on the dates indicated on pp 4-5. Beginning in the fall of 1981, USF-along with the other institutions in the State Uruversity System of Florida-will oper ate on the semester system Details were not available in time to include them in this Catalog, but the change in academic calendar will have an obvious effect on credit hours courses, degree requirements, and fees Please consult with your academic adviser for current information. Academic Load The maximwn load for an undergraduate student is 18 hours, un less approval is received from the Dean of the student's college or an authorized representative. Students classified as Unde cided must receive approval from the Director of the Division of University Studies. The minimum load for a student to.be consi dered academically full-time is 12 hours for an undergraduate. For academic load for Graduate students, see Division of Graduate Studies, page 46 Availability of Courses The University does not commit itself to offer all the courses, programs and majors listed in this catalog unless there is suffi cient demand to justify them. Some courses, for example, may be offered only in alternate quarters or years, or even less quently if there is little demand Adds After a student has completed his/her registration on the date assigned, he/ she may add courses until the add deadline specified in the Academic Calendar. See the quarterly University Class Schedule for detailed instructions and dates. Drops A student may drop a course(s)"during the early drop / add period only if he participated in early registration Other drops may be processed during the regular drop/add period (first five days of classes). No entry of the course(s) will appear bn any records and a full refund of fees is due for course(s) dropped within these periods A student may also drop a course(s) between the second and sixth week of the quarter. However, registration fees must be 31 paid for the course(s) and the ac ademic record will reflect a W grade for the dropped course(s) Courses dropped aft e r the sixth week deadline (see Academic Calendar for date) w ill result in an automatic "F" g rade Auditing Privilege A student must register to audit courses during the regular or late periods (No audit regis tratio ns are processed during the early registration period.) Fee s for audit are the same as for full enrollment for credit. See quarterly University Cla ss Sched ule for detailed instructions and dates. Cancellation Before First Class Day Students may cancel their registration by notifying the Office of Records & Registration in writing prior to the first day of classes. If fees have already been paid, the student may request a full refund of fees from the Office of Finance & Accounting Withdrawal A student may withdraw from the University without academic penalty for the first six weeks of any term by submitting a com pleted Withdrawal Form to the Office of Records & Registra tion. For withdrawals submitted during the first week of the term, no entry is made on the academic record. All subsequent withdrawals are posted to the academic record with W grades assigned to the courses. After the end of the sixth week of the

PAGE 34

32 ACADEMIC POLICIES PROCEDURES PROGRAMS AND SERVICES term ,.a grade of" F" will automatically be assigned for all course work from which a student withdraws. Students who withdraw during the Drop / Add period as stated in the Academic Calendar may receive a full refund of fees All refunds must be requested in writing from the Office of Finance and Accounting No refund is allowed after this period except for specified reasons See Refund of Fees" under Fi nancial Information for complete details. Any student who withdraws a second time within four con secutive quarters of attendance must receive approval of the Coordinator of Advising from his college before he is allowed to reenter the University Transcript Information Transcripts of a student's USF academic record may be re quested by the student through the Office of Records & Regist ration. A student's academic record can only be released upon authorization of the studenL Students requesting transcripts may do so in person or by writing to the Office of Records & Regist ration Include in the request full name social security number and date of birth and indicate name and address to whom the transcript is to be sent. If grades for the current term are needed clearly indicate that the transcript request is to be held for grades No c harg e is made for trans c ripts Grades, Scholarship Requirements, and Review Procedures The Univer s ity is interested in each student making reason able progress towards his or her educational goals and will aid each student through guidance and faculty advising To make students aware of their academic progress, the University has enacted a system of grading and policies of Academic Probation and Academic Dismissal which indicates whether or not a stu dent i s s howing s ufficient progress towards meeting degree re quirement s. Notations of Grades Academic Probation and Academic Dis mis sa l are posted to the student s academic re cord When a s tudent is academically dismissed from the Univer sit y not eligible to re-enroll it may be in his or her best interest to re-ev a luate his educational goals with an academic adviser in his /her college. If the student's poor academ .ic performance has re s ulted from extenuating circumstances or if after a period of time the s tudent feels he or s he has gained adequate maturity and motiv a tion he / s he may petition the Academic Regulations Committee for readmission See "Academic Regulations Com mittee, ' page 35, for information ?n petitioning. Grading System A student's measure of academic achievement is recorded on his academic record based on the following grading system: A-Superior performance B-Excellent performance C-A verage performance D-Below average performance, but passing F-Failure I-Incomplete IF-Incomplete grade changed to Failure JU-Incomplete grade changed to Unsatisfactory N-Audit R-Course Repeated S-Satisfactory UUnsatisfactory W-Withdrawal from course without penalty Z-Indicates continuing registration in Thesis/Dissertation courses Grade Point Average The University has a four point system of grading used in computing grade point averages (A =4 grade points B = 3, C = 2, D = 1 F=O.) The grade point average (abbreviated GPA throughout this catalog) is computed by dividing the total number of quality points by the total hours attempted at the University of South Florida The total quality points are figured by multiplyin g the number of credits assigned to each course by the guality point value of the gi:ade given. Grades of S U, I, IU, Z, and grades which are followed by an R (indicating a repeat) are s ubtracted from the tdtal hours attempted S/U Grade System No-option Courses. Certain courses have been designated as S / U courses The "S" and "U" grades are used to indicate the student's final grade. These S / U only courses are identified with (S/ U only) after the course definition in thi s book No grading system option is available to students or faculty in these courses Option Courses. Any undergraduate course may be taken on an S I U basis by a student under the following conditions and re strictions: 1. Required courses in the major may not be taken on an S / U basis 2 Specifically designated required courses in the distribution requirements of the student's college may not be taken on an S / U basis 3 All elective courses for the major and all elective courses In the distribution requirements and all other free elective courses may be taken on an S / U basis except where: a The certifying \:Ollege restricts the number of courses which may be taken on an S / U basis in any one or all of the above areas or restricts the total number of S/U courses which can be accepted for all of the above areas. b. The certifying college specifies that certain courses may not be taken on an S/U basis. c The instructor of a course refuses to allow the course to be taken on an S / U basis Mechanism for Assigning SIU Grades. The method by which a student receives an "S" or U grade in an option course will consi s t of the following: 1 A written agreement signed by both instructor and student s hall be filed with such offices as may be designated by the College The college shall set the deadline (no later than the last day of classes for the term) for the student to decide if he wishes to take the course on an S / U basis. 2. 'int: insLru"mr shall assiWi final letter grades A B, C, D F or I, but will transmit to the Registrar Sor U consistent with the following : a Letter grades A B or C slJall be equivalent to a letter grade of "S". b Letter grades Dor F shall be equivalent to a letter grade of ''U''. S and "U" grades are not computed in the student's grade point average. "I" Grade Policy An "I" grade may be awarded to an undergraduate student only when a small portion of the student's work is incomplete and only when the student is otherw i se earning a passing grade. Until removed the I is not computed in the giade point average for either undergraduate or graduate students. The time limit for removing the ''I'' is to be set by the instructor of the course. For undergraduate students, this time limit may not exceed one academic quarter, whether or not the student is in residence and/or graduation whichever comes first. "I" grades not re moved by the end of the time limit will be changed to "IF" or "IU", whichever is appropriate Students do not re-register for

PAGE 35

ACADEMIC POLICIES, PROCEDURES PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 33 courses in which they are only completmg previous course re quirements to change an "I" grade. If a student wants to audit a course for review in order to complete course requirements full fees must be paid. (Change of policy effective Quarter I, 1977.) "Z" Grade The "Z" grade shall be used to indicate continuing registration in graduate Thesis/Dissertation courses, where the final grade to be assigned will be that of the completed sequence. Upon satis factory completion of the Thesis/Dissertation course, the last Z grade shall be changed to "S". The "Z" grade is not com puted in the grade point average. Grade Forgiveness Policy The University of South Florida Grade Forgiveness policy per mits an undergraduate to repeat a course and have the repeated grade computed in his/her GP A in place of the original grade providing the repeat grade is D or higher Normally, grade for giveness may only be applied to a specific course that ii student chooses to repeat. No course taken on the SIU grade basis may have the grade forgiveness applied Under unusual cir cumstances a different but similar course may be used if the substitute course has been previously approved by the college dean and is on file in the Office of Records and Registration. Any undergraduate student who wishes to implement grade forgiveness must: I. Complete a Grade Forgiveness Request Form" (available in the Office of Records and Registration) for each course to be repeated. 2. Adhere to the following conditions: a. A limitation of applying grade forgiveness to three USF courses with no more than one repeat per course. b With prior approval of the college dean a course different from a course on the approved list may be substituted in the following cases : I. The substitute course is a change in prefix number hours, or title, but not a substantive change in content from the original course. 2 The substitute course replaces a course no longer of fered by the institution c. The repeated course must be taken under the standard grading system (A-F) and the latest grade must be Dor higher. / d. All grades remain on the transcript. The original course grade will be annotated with an "R" to indicate that the course has subsequently been repeated and the original grade is not computed in the grade point average. e. Individual college may have further restrictions ; therefore, the student should consult with hi s/her college. This policy is applicable to undergraduate students only and applies to 1000-5000 level courses Once a student has been awarded a bachelor's degree from USF, he may not rei)eat a co1,1rse and be forgiven the original grade The policy applies only to courses taken originally at USF and repeated at USF. Academic Probation and Academic Dismissal for Undergraduate An undergraduate student whose USF c umulative grade point average (GPA) falls below 2 0 :1 in 0 to 89 hours attempted 2 in Quarter X3 will be placed on Academic Probation (AP) in Quarter X + will be placed on Final Academic Probation (FAP) in Quarter X + 2 will be academically dismissed (AD) in 90 or more hour s atte mpted 2 in Quarter X3 will be placed on Final Academic Probation (FAP) in Quarter X + will be academically dis missed (AD) 1 Grades fr o m prior institution s are not tran s ferable. 2Tota1 of hour s a ttempted a t USF and tran s ferred h ou r s from pri o r in stitutions. lQu arter X refers to any q uarter in which t h e stude nt' s cu mul a tive GPA faJls below 2. 0 Quarter X + t refer s tO the quarter in res idence immediately follow ing Quarter X etc. Any student admitted on Academic Probation whose GP A falls below 2.0 : in the s t Quarter will be placed on Final Academic Probation (f AP) in the next Quarter will be academically dismissed (AD) Any degree-seeking undergraduate student whose cumulative GP A falls below 1.0 after a ttempting a n acc umulated twelve or more USF quarter hour s will be dismissed for aca demic reason s (AD) at the end of the quarter in which it occur s. Note: Any s tudent who withdraws after the fifth day of clas s e s while on Academic Prob a tion will be placed on Final Academic Probation A.ny student who withdraws after the fifth d ay of classes while on Final Academic Probation or who has been placed on Con ditional Regi stra tion by the Academic Regul a tions Committee will be Academically Dismisse d Any student who received only I S or U grades while on Academic Probation will be placed on F i nal Academic Probation Any s tudent who receives only I, S or U grades while on F i nal Academic Probation will be Academically / Di smisse d Exception: Any student who i s on work tra i ning for Cooperative Edu cation will not ha ve his /her academic status c hanged during that term The determination and notification of probationary stat u s or academic dismi ssal will be made b y the Re gis trar' s Office on the st udent's quarterly grade report and academic record. An ex planat io n of any required procedures to be followed will be enclo s ed with th e gr a de report. Academic Probation and Final Academic Probation: Students are strongly encouraged to confer with their aca demic a dvi sers ro explore way s of improving academic performance Academic Dismis s al: A s tudent aca demic ally dismissed for the first time i s suspended for a two (2) quarter minimum. B y petition to th e Ac a demi c Regulations Committee the student may reque s t that his/her case be r ev iewed for readmission. A student accdemically dismis s ed a second time is penna nenlly dismissed from the University.

PAGE 36

34 ACADEMIC POLICIES, PROCEDURES, PROGRAMS ANO SERVICES A student who attends another college or university this intervening period will be classified as a transfer readmission will be based on the total record accumulated from all colleges and universities attended. If a student is academically dismissed or falls below a 2.0 GPA from the University of South Florida and subsequently achieves an AA from a Community College (or a four-year institution), that student when (re)admitted to the University will be credited with a maximum of90 quarter hours and have his/her academic record cleared Only with the endorsement of the Dean of the College of the student's major, and approval by the Academic Regulations Committee, may the student receive credit for hours beyond the 90 which were earned previously at USF or another four-year institution. If a student has earned credit beyond 90 hours at the Uni versity of South Florida and has a 2 0 or better GPA at USF and subsequently receives an AA from a Community College, the posting of the AA shall not remove the previous grade point average generated at USF. Graduate students should refer to the section on Graduate Studies for discussion of minimum academic standards. College Policies For Academic Progress Colleges may determine and implement standards of academic progress for undergraduate students (majors in the college) in addition to those established by the University Stu dents who do not meet the academic i;iandards of progress set by will be placed on probation and may be S1,1,ch students will not be permitted further enrollment in the University until they are admitted to another college or to the Division of University Studies (DUS) if appropriate. The college dean is responsible for implementing standards of academic progress and for notifying students of their probationary or disenrollment status. Undergraduate students who have been disenrolled from a college and wish to continue at USF should follow these steps: Students with fewer than 90 attempted hours may apply to be admitted to a different college or to DUS. Students who have attempted 90 hours but fewer than 135 hours may apply to be admitted by a college or petition the Academic Regulations Committee for admission to DUS. Students with 135 hours or more may apply to be admitted to a different college. Only those students admitted will be allowed to continue. Colleges may restrict the course selections and the number of hours a student may take which do not apply toward comple tion of degree requirements Students who exceed this limit may have part or all of their registration cancelled. Colle ges are responsible for publicizing and students are resppn s ible for knowing their college's policies for academic progress. Class Standing A student's class is determined by rhe number of credits he has earned without relatiori to his grade point average. O Special/Unclassified Non-degree seeking students I Freshman 0 through 44 quarter hours passed 2 Sophomore 45 through 89 quarter hours passed 3 Junior 90 through 134 quarter hours passed 4 Senior 135. or more quarter hours passed, however no baccalaureate degree earned here or elsewhere 5 Baccalaureate degree holder working on a second Undergraduate program or degree 6 Graduate student admitted to Master's Degree Program 7 Graduate student admitted to Specialist Degree Program 8 Graduate student admitted to a Doctoral Degree Program 9 Professional Program (M. D ) or PostDoctoral Status Admission to a College All new lower level students must be initially advised by the Division of University Studies. After that time, a student may declare a major and move to a degree granting college (Each college has specified in this catalog its requirements for admission.) . All undecided students are assigned to the Division of Uni versity Studies for purposes of advising until a choice of major is made. At that time, he/she may enter the college containing the major department. Undecided students may remain in this classification until a maximum of 135 quarter hours are earned. After that time, a major must be selected. Change of Major Change of Undergraduate Major: Undergraduate students desiring to change their major should consult the Ady1sing Office in the old and new college(s) of their interest. Change of Graduate Program: Graduate students desiring to change their program must complete an j ''.At;>plication for Graduate Change of Program" available in the 6ffice of Records and Registration. Students will be notified by the Office of Re cords and Registration of the college's decision concerning their acceptance into the new program. Change of Graduate Degree: Graduate students desirous of changing from one degree le'vel to another, i.e., M.A. to Ph.D., must make application in the Office of Admissions. Please refer to page 12 for further details. Pending Status A student may be placed on Pending by failing to meet obliga tions to the University. When a student is on Pending, he may not be allowed to register, receive a diploma, or receive a tran script. Settlement of financial accounts must be made at the Uni versity Cashier's Office. Each student placed on Pending should determine from the Office of Records and Registration which office placed him/her in this status and clear the pending obligation with that office Student Information Changes Notifications regarding changes of address, name, residency and citizenship should be filed promptly with the Office of Records & Registration. Final Examination There is no final examination period. Examinations in academic subjects are considered to be an integral part of the learning process and are not, therefore, separate from other aspects of the academic experience Each USF teacher determines the entire grade for students in his/her sections. If the instructor desires to administer a final examination, this must be done only during the regular class periods. Honors Convocation The Honors Convocation is to recognize for high aca demic performance during the previous academic year. To be eligible to participate in the Honors Convocation, a student must, during the academic year (4 quarters preceding the Fall Honors Convocation), have a University of South Florida grade point average of 3.5 or above for all completed hours; a minimum of 36 University of South Florida graded (A-F) hours; and no incomplete grades.

PAGE 37

ACADEMIC POLICIES, PROCEDURES, PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 35 The University Honors Program The University Honors Program is designed to challenge stu dents to develop their intellectual abilities to the utmost through a program of study featuring small seminars, individualized instruction by outstanding faculty, and individual research. The Program consists of four seminars offered under the prefix for interdisciplinary studies (IDS) plus individualized study in both required courses and in research in the major de partment. Admission into the Program is determined by the University Honors Program Committee In order to complete the Univer sity Honors Program the student must also be accepted into and complete work for his/ her departmental major program Dean's List u ndergraduate students who demonstrate superior academic achievement during one quarter will be honored on a Dean's List" To be eligible for the Dean's list, a student must be in a "pool" (defined hereafter) and must complete 12 hours of graded ( A-F) USF courses with no incomplete grades during the quarter The "pool" consists of all students who have registered for at least 12 hours of USF courses in a given quarter. The Dean's list shall consist of the fewer of: I) the upper 10% of the enrollment of the college, or 2) students in the college with a USF 3.5 GPA or above at the 90th percentile will be in cluded in the honors group). The Dean of the College in which the student is majoring will recognize this academic honor Students who are eligible should contact their College Advising Office for information. Although DUS is a non-academic unit, students with thi s cla s sification who meet the above criteria will be recognized in a similar manner Academic Regulations Committee The Academic Regulations Committee meet s regularly to review petit i ons submitted by undergraduate students to waive Univer s ity academic regulations Students must petition and secure ap proval of the committee to return to the University after having been academically dismissed or to waive academic deadlines The committee nqrmally meet s once a week. To petition the committee, a student must secure the appropriate form from the Office of Records & Registration. Coll\Pleted forms should be returned to the Office of Records & Registration by 5:00 p.m., Friday, to be reviewed at the next week's meeting. Students will receive notification of the committee's action the following week If the s tudent wishes a personal interview with the commit tee he should make arrangements with the representative from his college prior to submitting his petition Student Academic Grievance Procedure Student academic grievance procedures exist at USF to provide students the opportunity for objective review of facts and events pertinent to the cause of academic grievances. Such review is accomplished in a collegial, non -judicial atmosphere rather than an adversary one and allows the parties involved to participate. An Academic Grievance Committee composed of an equal number of faculty and student members exists in each college (exce pt the College of Medicine, which has established a sepa rate procedure) for the general purpose of considering st udent aca demic grievances and making recommendations based on these considerations to the dean of the college in which the al-leged grievance occurred. For information, contact the dean of the college in which the cause of the academic grievance occurred. Student Violations or Offenses Involving Alleged Academic Dishone8ty Violations of academic codes, cheating and plagiarism will be handled initially by the instructor who will discuss the incident with the s tudent. If the instructor decides that further action is warranted he will inform the student of the action that he is recommending to his department chairperson and the dean. The instructor will file a confidential statement and recom mendation through the department chairperson and with the dean of the colle ge responsible for the course, and will provide the student with a copy of that statement. The student, if dissatisfied with the instructor s rec ommendation, may ask for a meeting with the instructor, the department chairperso ,n, and the dean indicating his version of the incident. The final disposition of all cases of academic dishonesty rests with the dean of the college responsible for the course In reaching a decision, the dean may accept the instructor's rec ommendation or, if not satisfied after reviewing the statement of the instructor and the student, may request meetings with the student, instructor a nd department chairperson individually or jointly The dean may also appoint a student-faculty committee for advice prior to rendering a decision in the case. The student may also request of the dean that such an advisory panel be formed and if that request is made, the student thereby waives his / her right to a fo rmal hea ring as provided in Florida Statutes, 'If the issue remains open at the end of the quarter the instructor is to give the student an "I" grade in the course until all issues are resolved Once the dean has made a decision on the case, the student's right of appeal is to the Vice President for Academic Affairs General Distribution Requirements All standard transfert A.A. degree holders (from in-state or out of-state accredited institutions ) will be considered as having met our General Distribution Requirements and 90 quarter hours of work will be transferred. The determination of the prerequi sites for a given academic program will remain the prerogative of the college in which the student is majoring A wide dist ribution of academic areas _should be a part of a formal university education For that reason the following distribution requirements must be satisfied over the four-year period by the completion of 60 quarter hours with at least 8 quarter hours in each of these five areas : Area I-English Composition Freshman English (ENC 0013 or 1102, and ENC 1135, 1168) Area II-Fine Arts and Humanities Any course offered by the Departments (or Programs) of: American Studies; Art; Communication (excluding all LIN prefixes except LIN 2200, 3010 3801); Dance ; English (excluding ENC 0013, 1102, 1135, 1168, REA 0105, ESL 1385); Foreign Languages ; Humanities ; Liberal Studies ; Musi9; Philosophy (excluding PHI 3100); Religious Studies ; Theatre Area and Quantitative Methods Any course offered by the Department of Mathema tics and/or any Computer Service course (COC, COP, C DA) and/or any of the following courses: Business and Economic Statistics GEB 2111, 3121; Logic PHI 3100; Social Science Statistics STA 3122. Area IV-Natural Sciences Any course offered by: Astronomy; Biology (includ ing botany microbiology and zoology) ; Chemistry ; Geology ; Physics; and / or Introdu c tion to Oceanog raphy OCE 3001. Area V-Social and Behavioral Sciences Any course offered by the Departments (or Programs)

PAGE 38

36 ACADEMIC POLICIES PROCEDURES, PROGRAMS ANO SERVICES of: Afro-American Studies; Aging Studies ; Anthro pology; Criminal Justice ; Geography ; History ; Poli tical Science ; Psychology ; Sociology; Interdisciplin ary Social Sciences (excluding ST A 3122); Women's Studies ; and / or any of the following courses: Con temporary Economic Problems, ECP 1001; Edu cational Psychology, EDF 3210; Survey of Mass Communications MMC 3000. Acceptable in the total of 60 quarter hours but not part of any of the five areas: The Teacher in a World of Work, EVT 3063; Use of the Library, LIS 200 l ; Honors Program courses : Reading Seminars, IDS 3901, 3902; Seminar, IDS 3931; Independent Study IDS 4938. Since each college may recommend specific courses for the satisfaction of each area students should consult the distribution requirements as listed in each college section of the catalog. Courses required for a student's major program will not be counted in the total of 60 hours although areas of the general distribution requirements may be waived where appropriate. No more than 12 hours in a single department (or program) may be counted toward distribution requirements for any area. A student may appeal to the Coordinator of Advisil)g in his or her college for exceptions to these courses prior to registration in such courses A student must check with his/her college to be sure he/sh e is meeting general distribution requirements and special certifi cation or accreditation requirements where appropriate. College of Engineering is unable to accept these courses as a part of its engineering accredited program 1 t A s defined in the Florida Statewide Articulation Agreement. Note: Education majors must take courses in at least two different departments / under Areas II and V Major Progra m a. Speci a lizati9n : Those courses required to give the s tudent academic concentration and baccal a ureate identification such as M a them atics, Accounting. Psychology. etc b Supporting or Related : These courses may be prerequisites to the specialization co u rses. or they may s upport specia lized courses by giving preparation or breadth to the area of specialization These courses are often referred to as college or program core courses. c. Program Electives : The s e are usually a brood band r:i courses offered by the college offering the major to further enrich the s tudent in the general academic field of the major Freshman English Requirement in Freshman Year All first-time-in-college students are required to take Freshman English in accordance with the following conditions: I. First-time enrolled students a. who do not intend to the CLEP Freshman English Test or b. who have been notified of failing CLEP prior to registra tion and who do not intend to attempt the examination a second time, must take ENC 1102 the first quarter ENC 1135 the second quarter and ENC 1168 the third quarter of their freshman year. If one of the courses is failed that course must be repeated the very next quarter and the remaining courses attempted in immediately subsequent quarters. 2. First-time enrolled students a. who have not taken CLE P prior to their arrival on campus m I b. who have failed but wish to repeat the test, must attempt CLEP during their first six weeks on campus. During this quarter they should not enroll in EN" ll02. If the examination is failed or not attempted duri'rlg the student's first six weeks, he/she must take ENC 1102 during his/her second quarter and ENC 1135 and ENC 1168 in the im mediately subsequent quarters until the total requirement is fulfilled In this case, he/she will complete the sequence by the first quarter of his/her sophomore year. These policies do not apply to first-time enrolled students who can meet the Freshman English requirement with credit trans ferred from another institution Credit by Examination A student' who feels he has already acquired the basic content of a course on his approved schedule should inquire about cre dit by-examination. Some exams are offered through the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) and others may be offered within departments. Interested students should obtain additional information from their advisers or the Office of Evaluation and Testing Services. Graduation Requirements-Baccalaureate Degree Umversity Requirements While each college sets specific requirements for graduation, the basic University requirements must be met by every student upon whom a degree is conferred. These basic requirements specify that a student obtain at least 180 quarter hours of credit with at least a "C" average for all University of South Florida courses attempted in order to be eligible for graduation. At least 60 of his/her quarter hours must be for upper division level work (courses numbered 3000 or above) Effective September I, 1976, all students entering the Uni versity of South Florida with less than 90 quarter of credit are required to earn at least .15 quarter hours of credit prior to graduation by attendance during one or more summer quarters. The University may waive the application of this rule in cases of unusual hardship to the individual. (See Summer Enrollment Requirement below.) In addition to specific requirements of their major and Col lege, candidates for Graduation must also satisfy the University General Distribution Requirements and be recommended for graduation by the dean of the college granting the degree. Summer Enrollment Requirement As stated above, effective September 1976, all students en tering University of South Florida with less than 90 quarter hours of credit are required to earn at least 15 quarter hours of credit prior to graduation by attendance during one or more summer quarters The University may waive the application of this rule in cases of unusual hardship. A student who wishes to have the rule waived must comple te ,,a "Request for Waiver of Mandatory Summer Enr, ollment Foi;m" available at the Regis trar's Office. After submission of the form to the Registrar's Office, the student will be notified by mail of the action taken The requirement may be only by attending one of the universities in the State University System. They are: Uni versity of South Florida Tampa ; Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, Tallahassee; Florida Atlantic Univer sity, Boca Raton; Florida International University, Miami ; Florida State University Tallahassee; University of Central Florida, Orlando ; University of Florida, Gainesville ; University of North Florida Jacksonville; and University of West Florida Pensacola

PAGE 39

ACADEMIC POLICIES, PROCEDURES, PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 37 Major Fields of Study The University of South Florida offers curricula leading to the baccalaureate degree in the following fields. The degree is in dicated in parenthesis after each college ; the major code, after each major College of Arts and Letters: (B.A.) American Studies (AMS) Classics (Latin or Latin-Greek) (CLS) Classics and Foreign Language (CLF) Communication (SPE) Communication-English (ENS) Communication-Theatre (ST A) English (ENG) Foreign Languages (combination) (FOL) French (FRE) German (GER) Humanities (HUM) Italian (IT A) Liberal Studies (ALA) Mass Communications (COM) Philosophy (PHI) Religious Studies (REL) Russian (RUS) Spanish (SPA) College of Business Administration: (B.A.) Accounting (ACC) Economics (ECN) Finance (FIN) General Business Administration (GBA) Management (MAN) Marketing (MKT) College ot Education: (B.A.) Art Education (ARE) Botany Education (BOE) Business and Office Education (BTE) Chemistry Classics Education (CLE) Distributive Education (DEC) Elementary-Early Childhood (EEC) Elementary Education (EDE) English Education (ENE) Exceptional Child Education Emotional Disturbance (EE D) Mental Retardation (EMR) Specific Leaming Disabilities (ELD) Foreign Language Education (FLE) Health Education (HES) Humanities Education (HUE) Industrial-Technical Education (EVT) Mass Communications-English Education (MCE) Mathematics Education (MAE) Music Education (MUE) Physical Education (PET) Physics Education (PHE) Science Education (SCE) Social Science Education (SSE) Speech Communication-English Education (SE D) Zoology Education (ZOE) College of Engineering Engineering (EGU) (B.S.E.) Engineering Science (EGC) (B.S.E.S.) Engineering Technology (ETK) (B.E.T.) College of Fine Arts: (B.A.) (B.F.A.) Art (ART) Dance (DAN) Music (MUS) Theatre (TAR) Theatre (TFA) (B.F.A.) College of Natural Sciences: (B.A., B.S.) Biology (BIO) Botany (BOT) Chemistry (CHM) (B.A.) Chemistry (CHS) (B.S.) Clinical Chemistry (CHC) Geology (GL Y) Mathematics (MTH) Medical Technology (MET) (B.S.) Microbiology (MIC) Natural Sciences Interdisciplinary (INS) Physics (PHY) (B.A.) Physics (PHS) (B.S.) Zoology (ZOO) College of Nursing: (B.S.) Nursing (NUR) College of Social and Behavioral Sciences: (B.A., B.S.W.) Afro-American Studies (AF A) Anthropology (ANT) Criminal Justice (CCJ) Economics (ECN) Geography (GPY) History (HTY) International Studies (INT) Political Science (POL) Psychology (PSY) Social Sciences Interdisciplinary (SSI) Social Work (SOK) (B.S.W.) Sociology (SOC) External Degree Program: (B.l.S.) Bachelor of Independent Studies Academic Minor In addition to major programs many departments offer an aca demic minor that requires approximately one half the upper divi sion credits required for a major Students interested in a par ticular minor should obtain the specific requirements from the appropriate department. The department may require the same admission or retention standards as required for the major Each academic minor conforms to the University require ments: 1. No minor requires more than 32 credit hours. 2. A minimum of 12 hours of credit used to satisfy the requirements of a minor must be from University of South Florida courses 3 A student may not receive a major and a minor in the same program option 4. University of South Florida course work for a minor must have a grade point average of at least 2 .0. 5 Only an undergraduate degree seeking student at the Univer sity of South Florida is eligible for a minor 6. A minor can be applied for and received only in conjunction with applying for and receiving a baccalaureate degree. Minor Fields of Study The University of South Florida offers leading to an academic minor in the following fields : College of Arts and Letters: American Studies Oassics (Latin)

PAGE 40

38 ACADEMIC POLICIES PROCEDURES PROGRAMS AND SERVICES Communication English : Literature English : Writing French German Humanities Italian L i nguistics Philosophy Religious Studies Russian Spanish Spanish/Portuguese College of Business Administration: Economics College of Fine Arts: Art Dance Music Theatre College of Natural Sciences: Geology Mathematics College of Social and Behavioral Sciences: Afro-American Studies Option I Option II African Studies Anthropology Geography History International Studies Manual Communications (Communicology ) Political Science Sociology Women's Studies Academic Residence Candidates must be recommended for graduation by the dean of the college granting the i r degree and must have completed at least 45 hours of the last 90 hours of their undergraduate credit in on campus courses. The approval of the dean of ihe college granting their degree must be secured for any transfer credits offered for any part of these last 90 hours. Exceptions to, the above rules are students who are enrolled at other universities on approved exchange programs, Coopera tive Education students enrolled in other institutions (prio r iip proval having been secured from their USF advisers) while on their training periods and students taking correspondence work from the University of Florida Candidates at the graduate level should refer to the resi dency requirt
PAGE 41

ACADEMIC POLICIES, PROCEDURES, PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 39 Availability of Baccalaureate Degree for Students Enrolled in or Graduated from a Five-year Master's Program A student may enroll in a baccalaureate degree program while enrolled in or after graduation from a five-year master's degree program. In consultation with an adviser in the five-year pro gram and an adviser in the baccalaureate-level program, and with the approval of the College Dean(s) offering the programs the student is required to complete the following: a. Satisfy degree reqllirements for the five-year master's program . b . satisfy requirements for the baccalaureate level program B.A. Degree for Medical and Dental Students who are admitted to a medical or, dental school after completing their junior year at USF may be awarded the B.A degree in Interdisciplinary Natural Sciences from the College of Natural Sciences. (See College of Natural Sciences on page 124:.) Application for Graduation To be considered for graduation, a student must submit an Application for Degree" to the Office of Records & Registra tion within the first 15 class days of the term in which he expects to graduate. The application form is available in the Office of Records & Registration (Inquiries regarding approval or denial s hould be made to the colleges.) A student applying for a second undergraduate major must do so within the same deadline set for applying for a degree A student applying for a minor must: l File a separate request for certification for the minor in the department of the minor, during the quarter of gradu ation. 2 Apply for the minor on the Application for Degree", listing both the minor and college responsible for the minor on the application. Students who are not registered for any courses and apply for graduation must pay for one hour at the level of graduation (i.e., $16.50 for a Bachelor's Degree) Honors at Graduation Any baccalaureate canditate whose overall grade point average for all work attempted on the standard grading scale at USF is a 3 5 or higher shall be considered for honors. In addition, transfer students to be eligible for honors must have a grade point average of 3 5 or higher when combined with all work attempted at other institutions. The forgiveness policy will not be applicable in computing the grade point average for honors Candidates with a GPA of3. 5 but below 3.71 shall receive a diploma designation of "cum laude. Candidate s with a GPA of3.71 but below 3.90 shall receive a diploma designation of "magna cum laude." Candidates with a GPA of 3 .90 or above shall receive a diploma designation of "summa cum laude." Each Dean has the option to select on the basis of academic performance 1 % of the college's graduates or 1 student per quarter for graduation "with distinction." Commencement Commencement ceremonies at US F are held once a year in June, following the end of the Spri11g quarter. All students who have graduated the p r evious S'liln'ine r Fall and Winter quarters and candidates for degrees for the Spring quarter are eligible to participate. Information for those eligible will be mailed to t hem during the Spring quarter If information has not been recei9ed by early May the student should contact the Office of Records & Registration. Undergraduate students who anticipate graduating the subsequent Summer quarter may participate but must contact the Office of Records & Registration for informa tion. Graduate students (Master's, Education Speciali sts, and Doctorate) will not participate in commencement exercises until all requirements for such degrees have been fulfilled. Graduation Requirements--Graduate Programs For complete discussion of graduate programs and academic Division of Graduate Studies." policies and procedures, students should refer to the section on Certification Requirements--Associate of Arts Upon the student's successful completion of the minimum re quirements for the A ssoc iate of Arts, an appropriate degree will be awarded . To receive the Associate of Arts a student must complete 90 quarter hours of University credit ; the last 30 hours must be completed in residence at the University of Soutli Florida; the minimum grade point average must be 2.0 based on work at tempted at US F ; and the General Distribution Requirements of the University must be satisfied. Physical Education and Milit ary Science credits do not count toward the A .A. degree Application for the Associate of Arts degree is obtained from the Division of University Studies prior to the app lic ation deadline The degree must be awarded prior to the student's accumulation of 135. credit hours Detailed instructions to deter mine the s t'uden f s el\gibility to receive the A A degree are in cludd with t he application form Students wlio have completed their A A requirement s in a prior quarter and apply for the degree while not enrolled must pay the appropriate fee for one upper l eve l credit hour The fee is payable ;it the time of app.lication for an A A degree . The awarding of the Associate of Arts 9egree doe .snot alter the calculation of the grade point average certification for the A A in no way affects what the individual college s require for the completion of the major for a bachelOr's degree Limited Access Student Records The following student records are open for inspection only by the student, or parents of dependent students as defined by the In ternal Revenue Service, and such members of the professional staff of the instutition as have responsibility for working with the student or with the student's records. I Student Health and Medical Records 2 Student Disciplinary Records 3 Records of Student Personal Non-Academic Counseling 4 Required Student Financial Income Records 5 Student Permanent Academic Records (from which tran scripts are made) 6. Student Placement Records Except as required for use by the president In the discharge of his official responsibilities, the custodians of Umited access recorm may release information from such records only upon author ization, in writing, from the student, or upon order of a court of competent jurisdiction.

PAGE 42

40 ACADEMIC POLICIES, PROCEDURES, PROGRAMS AND SERVICES ---------Release of Student Information---------Pursuant to requirements of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (the "Buckley Amendment"), the following types of information, designated by law as "di rectory information," may be released via official media of the University of South Florida (according to USF policy): Student name, address, telephone listing, date and place of birth, major field of study, participation in of fically recognized activities and sports, weight and height of members of athletic teams, dates of attendance, de grees and awards received, and the most recent previous educational agency or institution attended. The University Directory, published annually by the University, contains only the following information, how ever: Student name, local and permanent address, tele phone listing, classification and major field of study The Directory and other listings of "directory information" are circulated in the course of University business and, therefore, are accessible to members of the public as well as to other students and members of the faculty and staff. NOTE: General release of the aforementioned types of "directory information" is accomplished pursuant to USF policy. USF policy prohibits use of s uch information for commercial purposes. Students must inform the USF Office of Records & Regi stration, in w ritin g (on 'forms available for that pur pose), of the information they wish withheld from the University Directory and other listings of "directory information." Such requests will be effective for the aca demic year during which they -.vere initiated unless earlier, wri/len notice to the contrary is received by the Office of Records & Registration. Notification to the University of refusal to permit release of "directory information' via the University Di rectory must be received no later than the end of the first week of classes in the Fall Quarter (Friday, September 26, 1980). Special Academic Programs USF /Florida Public Community College Dual Enrollment Some undergraduate students may find it advantageous to dually enroll at a Florida public community college while attending (iSF. Procedures to permit this type registration are available only during the host institution's regular registration period. Credit hours for the course(s) taken at the host institution will app ly toward graduation only if prior approval was received from the st udent' s USF adviser. The grade point average will not transfer to USF. See your USF college adviser for detailed registration instructions a_n_ d course approval. Students attending a Florida public community college may dually enroll at USF. Please contact your community college adviser for i!-dditional information and course approval. Bachelor of Independent Stu dies External Degree Program The Bachelor of Independent Studies (BIS) Program is an adult oriented, external degree program for individuals whose life styles preclude attendance at regular classes. The BIS student proceeds at his/her own pace and for the most part, in his/her own setting The exception is the seminars which require periodic, short term residence The curriculum consists of interdisciplinary studies which are divided into four areas: the Humanities, Natural Sciences, Social Sciences and Interarea Studies. The student approaches the first thre e areas of study via guided independent study and a seminar Directed reading or independent study requirements represent long term involve ment as compared with the short term duration of a seminar. The first three study areas are in free standing order. The student is encouraged to start in his / her area of strength. Studying in absentia -and usually on a part time basis, the student engaged in independent study relates with a faculty ad viser who furnishes directions regarding reading assignments, methods of reporting, and other study projects. The student dem onstrates that he/she has attained the level of proficiency re quired for completion of independent study in a particular area through the sat isfactory completion of an area comprehensive examination. The exam may be ta ken on or off campus. When certified as eligible for a seminar the student is in vited to attend a three week seminar in conjunction with each of the first three study areas (Humanities, Natural Sciences, and Social Sciences). Seminar residence requirements, in other words, add up to a total of nine weeks of periodic residence on the USF Campus. Each seminar represents a period of intensive, residential learning under the direction of a team of faculty mem bers. The fourth area of study, or inter-area studies, represents an opportunity to integrate the various insights ga ined from the first three study areas Fourth area study is essenti;illy a thesis oriented experience. Applicants must qualify for admission to the University of South Florida and for admission to the External Degree Pro gram. The USF Director of Admissions rules on the admission of an applicant to the University. The BIS Committee rules on admission of an applicant to the BIS Program. Fees for the BIS Degree Program are as follows: Application Fee ......... .................. $15.00 Pre-Enrollment Procedures . . . . . . . . . 60.00 I st Study Area Independent Study . . . . . . . . . . . 450 .00 Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 450.00 2nd Study Area Independent Study ................. .... Seminar ..... .............. ....... .... 3rd Study Area Independent Study .... ............. . : . Seminar .............................. :. Fourth or Inter-area Studies ... .... ......... Total* .......................... .... ..... 450.00 450.00 450.00 450 .00 975.00 3,750.00 Please note that the fees listed do not include such additional expenses as books, travel, and living expenses during seminars . Students may not transfer cre4its into or out of the BIS Program. Program policy does provide for recognition of prior learning which may have been achieved through formal study, leisure time reading, life or work experience, or a combination of these. More specifically, applicants who can demonstrate suffi cient competence may waive up to a maximum of two of guided independent study. Applications for waiver are processed following comp letion of the pre-enrollment procedures. Those who take an area comprehensive exam for waiver will be asses sed a fee of $75.00 Applicants who have sufficient competence in some but not all of the disciplines in a study area receive advanced placement or an abbreviated reading program based on the individual's background and needs. The concept of advanced placement is implemented by the study area adviser following the student's enrollment.

PAGE 43

ACADEMIC POLICIES, PROCEDURES, PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 41 Individuals with an A.A. degree, and Registered Dental Hygienists Registered Nuclear Medicine Technologists, Registered Nurses, Registered Radiologic Technologists, and Reg' istered Respiratory Therapists with an A S. Degree from a state approved program qualify for a two plus two interface with BIS requirements. Those with an appropriate associate de gree, in other w0rds, complete two study areas comprised of two units of independent study and two resident seminars. The two study areas, in these instances, (i. e Social Science or Natural Sciences or Humanities & Social Sciences or Natural Sciences & Humanities) are stipulated by the BIS Committee in keeping with the applicant's background and career plans. The study areas so defined are regarded as the curriculum contract compo nent of the "two plus two interface". Anyone choosing the "two plus two" option is ineligible to apply for waiver The BIS Program is academically responsible to the Vice President for Academic Affairs through the BIS Committee Brochures are available on request. For further information, write : Director, BIS Program University of South Florida, Tampa Florida 33620. Open University (O.U.) Open University bring s USF college credit courses to students through television and radio. Broadcast on WUSF-TV, Channel 16 (UHF) and WUSF (FM) 89.7 radio Open University is ideal for a working person, a parent with small children, a s tudent with elective hours to complete, or anyone with a desire to learn Classes are conveniently scheduled in the afternoons and eve nings with repeats on weekend mornings. Open University courses are available to anyone regardless of previous educational background. Tuition costs are identical to on campus courses and credit will appear on students' tran scripts accordingly. Non-degree seeking students may regi s ter using special student forms by mail. Please contact the Open University office for more information College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) The University grants credit for Distribution Requirements and for a number of specific courses through cLEP General Ex aminations and CLEP Subject Examinations. Performance levels necessary to achieve credit are established at a common level for all universities in the State system Generally the per formance levels are based on the average score of students who have already taken the courses. The following policies apply to this program: I In order to receive credit for the General Examinations of CLEP, students must take (or retake) the examinations not later than six weeks after the first enrollment in college level courses. Exceptions to this rule should be petitioned to the Academic Regulations Committee. 2 Although the General Examinations are not equated to specific courses there are two cases in whiCh the content is suffi ciently similar to be considered as duplicate credit. Thus credit may not be received for both in the following : Test Courses English Composition ENC 0013, 1102, 1135, 1168 Mathematics MGF 1113, 1114, 22oi 3. Students who transfer to USF will receive such CLEP credit as is posted on the official transcript from the institution the student is leaving and meets the SUS minimum score stan dard The receiving college will determine, based upon guide lines the applicability of these credits to the student's (bac calaureate) degree requirements 4. Credit for CLEP Subject Examinations will be awarded for passing scores only on those examinations which are recog nized by USF and do not constitute duplicate course credit. Applications for and additional information on CLEP are available in the Office of Evaluation and Testing. Advanced Placement Credit Program The University of South Florida participates in the Advanced Placement Program conducted by the College Entrance Ex amination Board Examination papers are graded by selected committees on a five-point scale. The University allows advanced placement credit for scores of3, 4 and 5. No credit is allowed for scores of I or 2 Additional information is available in the Office of Eval uation and Testing Independent Study Graduate or undergraduate students wishing to take a course by independent study must contact the instructor of the course for permission. The instructor specifies the requirements to be com pleted by the student including tests, periodic class attendance, term papers, etc Not all courses in the University can be taken by indepen dent study. The respective college s have jurisdiction in the determination of which courses may be taken in this manner. The regular grading system applies to all independent study students Grades earned by independent study have the same status as those acquired through regular clas s attendance Stu dent s taking a course by independent study must register for the specific course section in the regular manner. New College of USF New College, an honors-type educational program on the Sarasota Campus, offers students the opportunity to work in traditional liberal arts areas within an inno va tive curricular structure Students create their own-term-by-term educational con tracts, with the help of faculty sponsors permitting a maximum amount of self-direction and independent s tudy New College students have the option of completing their work for the bachelor s degree in three years. A residential college with its own admissions and graduation requirements and its own faculty, New College is partially sup ported by funds from the private New College Foundation (See full description of New College of USF on page 138. Army ROTC (Reserve Officer Training Corps) The University of South Florida is one of288 Army ROTC Host Institutions in the United States. All male and female University of South Florida students may participate in the Army ROTC Program Participants who successfully complete the ROTC program are commissioned Second Lieutenants (Regular and Reserve) in the United States Army ROTC graduates may elect to serve their commitment in an Army Re s erve or National Guard Unit. (Three years Active Duty on voluntary bas is only ) Features of the program include scholarship opportunities, a veterans program and an abbreviated curriculum for transfer students or others who did not participate in Basic (Freshman and Sophomore) ROTC. A special summer program is also available on the Tampa campus A contractual agreement may be made to provide ROTC graQuates a guarantee that they will serve only in a Reserve component (Army Reserve or National Guard) upon Selected students may serve as officer trainees within National Guard or Army Reserve units in a paid status concurrent with enrollment in Advanced ROTC. An early commissioning option is available for students with prior military or high school ROTC experience This option allows for com missioning prior to academic graduation Students who avail themselves of this option serve in a Reserve or National Guard unit while continuing their education. Upon graduation, students may request active duty in the United States Army

PAGE 44

42 ACADEMIC POLICIES, PROCEDURES, PROGRAMS ANO SERVICES Enrollment is open to qualified students at all levels, in cluding graduate students Students incur no military commit ment by participating in Basic ROTC. Military Science course offerings are available on both St. Petersburg and Tampa campuses Offerings are published quar terly. Interested students should contact the Professor of Mili tary Science or Campus Coordinator for enrollment information Marine Officer Program Qualified students may apply for an officer program leading to a commission as a Second Lieutenant in the United States Marine Corps. Commissions are offered in both ground and aviation components The Platoon Leaders Course (PLC) is offered to freshmen sophomores and juniors who attend precommissioning training during the summer. Financial Assistance and Flight In doctrination Programs are available. Qualified seniors attend 12 weeks of training in the Officer Candidate Course (OCC) after graduation. For details contact the placement office or the Marine Officer Selection Officer when he is on campus. University of Florida Correspondence Courses The University of Florida has been designated as the only institution in the State University System to offer correspon dence courses. Therefore, the Univer s ity of South Florida will consider such courses as resident credit, however grades earned are not transferable : Exception: Grades for University of Florida correspondence course taken by Cooperative Education students while on a training period are transferred and will be used in computing the USF grade point average Enrollment in Evening Courses Evening courses at the University of South Florida are part of the regular academic program; they are offered at times conve nient to people within commuting distance who wish to continue their education at night while occupied during the day with other responsibilities. Requirements for day and evening courses are the same. See the University Class Schedule for evening regis tration dates and times. Continuing Education University of South Florida Continuing Education serves an ever-widening community with a variety of credit and noncredit Public Service programs and special activities designed to meet individual and organizational educational needs Programs are offered in many locations, but are coordinated from Continuing Education's Offices located on the Tampa campus. Credit Courses: For a discussion of the credit course offer ings, refer to page 17. Noncredit Programs: A variety of noncredit educational pro grams (conferences, workshops, seminars, short courses, etc ) of varying lengths are scheduled through the year, making it pos sible for the University to serve greater numbers of adults with richer and more diversified programs. The programs vary in length from one day to ten weeks, and the subject matter is concentrated as needed for the group being served The Con tinuing Education Unit (CEU) is recorded for all noncredit prog rams and special activities conducted by the University The CE U is awarded to participants in select programs sponsored by Continuing Education and approved by an academic unit. Tran scripts indicating awarded CEU' s are available on request. Continuing Education develops programs for business and industry government, professional, civic, and service groups. A variety of instructional methods is used to assure maximum par ticipation in 1 the educational programs. Distinguished faculty members from the several colleges of the University, faculty from other institutions of higher educ ation, as well as national and international resource persons, serve as consultants, instructors, and lecturers for the programs. Professional program coordinators are available to provide technical assistance in program planning, budget preparation, and evaluation and to assist organizations in developing prog rams consistent with the needs of the group and the overall edu cational objectives of the University Continuing Education also offers a number of programs and courses designed to meet various educational needs of individu als. Emphasis is placed upon quality classes for professional ad vancement, personal improvement and cultural enrichment. Registration in these classes is open to all adults with a desire for knowledge and interest in the subject matter. Non-Degree (Special) Student. Enrollment Individuals not desirous of earning a degree but who would like to enroll in classes may register as non-degree seeking SpeCial students. For detailed information ; refer to page 15. Non-Degree Seeking (Special) Studenit-Dual Enrollment Dual enrollment in USF classes is open to academically qualified students currently ell{olled in high school. For detailed information, refertopage 15. Cooperative Education The University of South Florida participates in a Cooperative Education Program in which students can combine their formal education with an occupational For description of the program, refer to page 25. Upward Bound Upward Bound is a pre-college program for students from low income families who have academic potential but who have inadequate secondary school preparation or have not achieved success in school. Its purposes are to assist these students in developing goals and academic skills, and to provide the motivation necessary to obtain entrance and achieve success in a college or post secondary program. To qualify, the applicant must meet the following criteria: I. Family income must meet established federal guidelines. 2 Student must have <;ompleted the 9th grade and be presently enrolled in the I 0th or 11th grade in a high school. 3 Student should have approximate grade point average of C. Applications should be forwarded to Director, Project Up ward Bound, University of South Florida. Off-Campus Term Program The Off-Campus Term (Oen Program offers a program of ex perience-study whereby all students are encouraged to spend at least one quarter engaged in educational pursuits away from the University campus Students are offered a wide variety of opportunities for self-designed and self-implemented experi ence for academic credit. For example students may become involved in social action projects international travel or study, independent research-study work, or internship projects and many other personalized projects-all off campus and all for academic credit an y where in Florida the U.S., or the world. While most student activities are individually designed and implemented the OCT Program also provides for some group projects Foremost of these are four to six credit hour, faculty led, short term group projects in the Caribbean several times

PAGE 45

ACADEMIC POLICIES, PROCEDURES, PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 43 annually and Urban Survival projects for 12 to 16 hours credit in New York City or any other urban area The latter projects involve intense urban interaction and living in an inner-city hotel at most favorable student rates Academic credit is earned by students while engaged in offcampus activities through the OCT Program The number of hours of credit varies according to student interest and proposed activities. Students may enroll in a variety of projects and pay fees for variable hours of credit from 1 to 15 in a term. Academic credit activities are designed around the basic off-campus ex periences for the most part and projects resulting in academic credit are designed by the student and supervised by OCT or other appropriate faculty Credits may be earned which apply towards general education and elective requirements. Credit may also be earned in the major field of study in many cases The OCT Program has a variety of course projects designed specifically for implementation entirely off-campus using the community and it s people as the learning resource Examples of such offerings are three to five credit hour projects (each) in (I) community studies (2) inter-cultural studies (3) Jaw and society, (4) contemporary health problems (5) volunteers and society, and a four-hour project in international relations and three-hour project for working as a volunteer in some community program. These projects are the foundation of each student's academic plan, supplemented with a project in the major field of study where possible. Participation in the OCT Pro gram/or a t o tal of 15 hours during a summer term or t e rms satisfies the summer enrollment requirement for those affected by this requirement. Students may participate in the OCT Program anytime beginning with the freshman year through the final quarter prior to graduation Good standing at the University and a 2.0 grade average is required for acceptance into the Program The OCT Program operates throughout the entire year and students are urged to plan their off-campus experiences during the fall through spring quarters to avoid the traditional rush common to the summer term Early action is urged since quotas are placed on the number of participants accepted each term. Elective Physical Education This program provides the student with opportunities for identi fying developing and assessing various form s of vigorous movement which can contribute to his educational experience and personal growth Courses include well-known sports as well as individual assessment activities and special courses to prepare the interested student with skills and techniques applicable for conducting or directing community activities related to sport and movement. Exchange Programs National Student Exchange The University is affiliated with the National Student Exchange (NSE) which permits undergraduate students to study for up to one year in another public university as a part of their program at the University of South Florida. These exchanges can occur only at universities which are part of the National Student Exchange In addition to the University of South Florida, other univer sities participating in this program are Boise State University, Bowling Green State University (Ohio), Buffalo State College (NY), California State College at Bakersfield California State College at Chico, Eastern Montana College, Eastern Oregon State College, Humboldt State (CA), Illinois State University, Jackson State University Montana State University Moorhead State University (MN) Morgan State University (MD), Oregon State University, Rutgers University, Sonoma State (CA), South Dakota State University, West Chester State College, William Paterson College of :New Jersey, and the Universities of Alabama, Delaware, Hawaii (Hilo and Manoa) Idaho Maine at Ft. Kent, Massachusetts (Amherst and Boston), Montana, Nevada (Reno and Las Vegas) North Dakota, Northern Col orado, Oregon and Southern Maine The number of participating schools increases each year so this list must not be consi dered complete An up-dated listing is maintained by the NSE Office Under the National Student Exchange program University of South Florida students apply for exchange status at their home campus To qualify, students must be in their sophomore or junior year while at the exchange school, and have a 2.5 grade point average They pay in-state fees at the host campus and the credits and grades transfer back to the University of South Florida upon completion of the exchange Application deadlines for September exchange is March 1 annually Thereafter, no applications for exchange are processed until September for mid-year exchanges if such are possible Students are ur ge d to appl y early as there are quotas established for participation in the NSE Pro g ram The NSE Program is coordinated by the Off-Campus Term Program The OCT Pro gram maintains a library of materials about the program and the member institutions involved in the NSE Program Interested students should contact the Director of the Off-Campus Term Program for .information and application University of Maine Exchange Program The College of Education operates a student exchange program with the University of Maine, Farmington. This program pro vides opportunities for sophomores, juniors and seniors to exchange residence at both campuses. The student exchange pro vides a waiver ofout-of state tuition. University credit earned is applicable towards graduation Students desiring further infor mation should contact the coordinator of student activities in the College of Education Study Abroad Programs USF students are eligible, if they meet the specific academic requirements for enrollment in a wide variety of study abroad programs sponsored by the Florida State University System as well as by certain other U.S colleges itnd universiti,es national educational organizations, and foreign institutions of higher learning Programs of the Florida State University Systems are listed below. Administered by the University of Florida : year program at the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands ; year abroad program, University of the Apdes Bogota, Colombia. Administered by the Florida State University : two quarter and academic year programs at study centers in Florence, Italy and London, England; summer program in Belgrade, Yugoslavia Administered by the University of South Florida : separate summer programs in London Spain France; intersession prog rams in Mexico ; Ecuador and Peru. Through USFs institutional membership in the Institute of International Education, the Council on International Educa tional Exchange, and the American Association of State Col leges and Universities, students may participate in study abroad programs in France Spain, Italy Mexico Canada and other countries Students who prefer independent study abroad, rather than the formal institutional programs may do so through the OffCampus Term. The Off-Campus Term offers intersession pro grams in Jamaica and in the Cayman Island. The programs described in this section are approved ex change programs and will be considered toward on-campus ere -

PAGE 46

/ 44 ACADEMIC POLICIES, PROCEDURES, PROGRAMS ANO SERVICES dits. Students who plan to participate in study abroad progr'ams should consult their departmental advisers well in advance to determine whether the course of study they plan to pursue will be acceptable for meeting other degree requirements. Information about these and other programs as well as advising on study abroad, may be obtained from the Overseas Information Center in the College of Social and Behavioral Sci ences. Florida College Exchange Program Through an exchange agreement, students of the University of South florida, with the approval of their advisers, may elect courses at nearby Florida College. Credit for acceptable work may be transferred to the University and counted as elective credit toward graduation. Students from Florida College have a similar transfer arrangement. Costs for students under these dual enrollment plans are based on credit hours of work taken, and payment is made to the appropriate institution in accordance with its per-hour fee rate. Traveling Scholar Program The University System of the State of Florida has a Traveling Scholar program which will enable a graduate student to take advantage of special resources available on another campus but not available on his or her own campus; special course offerings, research opportunities, unique laboratories, and library collec tions For procedures and conditions, refer to page 48 Academic Support and Services University Library It is important that a library take into account not only the books on its shelves but also the people it serves This point of view is central in the philosophy of the University of South Florida Li brary. The Library staff wants students to regard books as a way of life and use the Library regularly One of the reasons for providing a library collection is to encourage students to buy, read and discuss books. The University expects students to be come familiar with the University Library book collection1 to master the techniques of using it, and-before graduation-to achieve a familiarity with books which will carry over into later life. The University Library building was completed in March, 1975; the seven floor building is the largest budgeted non-medical academic facility in Florida This centrally located building, with its open stacks, adjoining study areas and many individual car rels, has been designed to facilitate study, research and reading. When fully occupied, it will provide space for 2 ,500 readers and will ultimately accommodate over 800,000 volumes. The present library collection consists of about 500,000 vol umes and is constantly growing in order to serve the University community's need for materiaJS for instruction and research, as well as for personal knowledge and cultural advancement. All academic areas are served, with the exception of the College of Medicine which has its own library The card catalog and reference collection are located on the first floor. Reference service is provided at the Reference and Information desks. To assist students in learning about the re sources of the Library, the Reference staff offers a two-credit course Use of the Library The staff also gives orientation lec tures on library use and provides individual assistance to stu dents in search strategy and bibliographic form A descriptive guide to the Library and its services is also available. Circulating books are located on the third through fifth floors Patrons may check out books at the Circulation desk, first floor before exiting through the library security system in the lobby. The U.S. Documents collection is on the basement level. The Library is a depository for U S. Government publications and also receives the microprint edition of the United Nations documents and official records. The Document staff is available to assist in using these materials. The Reserve Department, containing books and articles reserved" at faculty request for the use of a particular class is also on the basement level. Adjoining the Reserve desk is the Reserve Reading Room, which serves as one of the Library's quiet study centers. The periodicals collection is on the second floor. In addition to more than 5 000 periodicals, the Library subscribes to news papers from Florida and major cities in the -United States, and from many foreign countries The Microform room also on the second floor, holds a large collection of material in microtext; this material provides access to many important sources other wise inaccessible. The fourth floor Special Collections Department houses the Library's rare books University Archives and the Florida Historical Society Library. This area contains an extensive col lection of books, maps, documents and manuscripts covering historical and contemporary Florida. These valuable items are in closed stacks but the materials and assistance are available at the service desk. Diyision of Sponsored Research Research is an essential aspect of the educational programs of the University of South Florida. All faculty members are en co1,1raged to pursue research activities, and many students are afforded the opportunity to participate in research and training projects supported by public and private granting agencies The Division of Sponsored Research is the central coordi nating unit for research and othc;r sponsored educational ac tivities on all the University's campuses. It provides information about granting agencies to faculty and students and serves as a consultation center for faculty who desire to submit proposals for funding All proposals for which outside support is sought must be transmitted through this office. From its beginning, USF faculty and staff have been active in the search for new knowledge and have consistently dem onstrated their concern about the world in which they live With the support of private and public agencies, they have con tributed to our knowledge about men and women and the world in which they live and applied their findings and skills to the solution of many contemporary problems. Since 1960, they have attracted over 1,500 grants, totaling more than $75 million, and have produced over 10,000 scholarly and creative works. Many of their contributions were basic research ; others were practical applications of new knowledge; still other projects made the specialized training and knowledge of US F faculty avail\lble to public officials organizations working for social betterment religious and educational institutions, and business and manufac turing organizations. Through their sponsored activities, USF faculty have made significant contributions to the University's instructional programs. The Division of Educational Resources The Division of Educational Resources offers the following services for US F faculty, staff and students : Audio-Visual Services-provides equipment and instruc tional material for classroom use University events and other functions. Such equipment includes public address systems, tape recorders, small format video, and projectors of all kinds Vari ous types of audio-visual equipment may also be rented

PAGE 47

ACADEMIC POLICIES, PROCEDURES, PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 45 The Film Library houses over 3,000 films which are avail able at no charge for utilization in scheduled USF courses, for rental to external agencies or non-academic internal utilization, and for preview in the films facility located on the Tampa cam pus The collection contains US F-produced films available for purchase Research and reference of other than USF owned films is available, as well as a catalog of films upon request. The Instructional Materials Center (IMC) is a resource center for instructional materials and non-book media. Non-print materials for use of all students are available as well as printed material for K -12. A Production Room provides graphics and photography facilities, duplicating equipment and a laminator for all USF personnel. The L e arnin g Lah provides study aids using assorted audio-visual media for USF students. Faculty members may convert portions of their classroom teaching to media for use in the Lab This facility is available certain evenings each week for evening students as well as the scheduled daytime classroom hours. Produ c tion Ser v ic es-Graphics, Photography, and Media Design and Production services for use in the classroom as well as the overall University program are available. WUSF-TV (Channel 16) is a public non-commercial UHF television station serving the University and the communities of the nine surrounding counties. [t is an affiliate of the Public Broadcasting Service. WUSF-FM (89.7 mhz) is a stereo, public radio station serv ing the University and surrounding communities within a twelve-county area, with twenty hours a day of fine arts, public affairs and educational l?rogramming It is a member of National Public Radio and Florida Public Radio. The sub carrier of the station is also programmed twenty hours a day with newspapers and other readings for the print-handicapped", requiring a spe cial receiver loaned to qualified listeners. Most of the reading is done by volunteers IDs-All identification cards for students, faculty and staff are produced in this area. ID service is available throughout registration and the first week of classes in each quarter. Duri11g the balance of the quarter, IDs are made on Monday and Friday from 2 :00-3:00 p.m and on Thursday from 9:00-11:00 a .m. There is no charge for the original I D nor to replace a damaged ID providing the damaged card is presented All other replacements are charged for at the rate of $5.00 for each replacement. University Library O.U. (Open University) provides opportunities for everyone regardless of previous education to earn college credit with courses offered through media, including television and radio (WUSF-FM and/or WUSF-TV). Courses are approved by the Department of Educ a tion for teacher certification or recertifica tion Course offerings are announced prior to each academic quarter. (For more detailed information, see page 41 ) Computer Research Center The University is the host institution for a large scale digital computer facility which provides administrative, instructional and research computing support for the University of South Florida and for the University of Central Florida at Orlando This combined operation has been designated as the Central Florida Regional Data Center within the State University System. The Computer Res earch Center make s computing services available to USF users. The professional staff includes Instruc tion and Research consultants who as s ist student and faculty users working on qualified projects. In the data systems area, services to University administrative units are through project teams composed of Systems Coordinators, systems analysts and programmers. The Center staff also contains Data Entry, Data Control and Compoter Operations personnel and Systems (software) technical specialists. Computing projects are estab lished through the CRC Office of Services. The Center operates as a service facility, is centrally funded and makes no charge for consulting and processing service s for internal University pur poses. Charges are made at published rates for grant-supported and externally-funded projects. Computing equipment includes an IBM System 370/165-11 with tape and disk storage units, card readers and printers and a plotter at the central site, Student Services Building Remote batch job entry stations and on-line keyboard terminals operate at various locations. Remote access units are also located at the St. Petersburg and Sarasota campuses. The Center maintains key punch machines and other equipment in "open use" areas to enable student and faculty users to prepare and check their pro grams and data These areas are accessible in general on a 24-hour basis daily while computer processing of academic work operates on a basic 8 a m. to midnight schedule (10 a m to mid night Sunday) seven days a week

PAGE 48

/ DIVISION OF GRADUATE STUDIES The Division of Graduate Studies is administered by a Director who coordinates the admission of graduate s tudents to the University advises on the budgetary reque s t and internal allo cation of state funds for the s upport of graduate training administer s graduate scholarships and fellowships alloc a tes graduate out-of-state waiver s, and certifies final approval of all graduate theses and dis sertations Admission to Graduate Study Graduate students are advised to apply early as the University accepts applications one year in advance Applic a tions for which all credentials are not received by the deadline for their specific program will not be considered for that term Some departments have different, earlier deadlines than those listed on pages 4-5 Students should check the requirements for the specific programs iii which they are interested A $15 00 non-refundable application fee must accompany the application unless the student has been previously enrolled as a degree-seeking s tudent and paid the fee at the University. Students who seek admission as first-time or transfer graduate students to a graduate degree program and to post baccalaureate professional programs in the State University System shall be required to meet minimal system-wide require ments. Programs may impose more restrictive admission policies if they so desire. These criteria are listed in the appropriate sec tion in this catalog In order to be considered for admission, a first-time graduate student or a student transferring from a graduate pro gram at another university must have a bachelor's degree or equivalent from a regionally accredited university and meet at least one of the following criteria : J. Shall have earned a B average or better in all work at tempted while registered as an upper division student working for a baccalaureate degree, or 2. Shall have a total Quantitative-Verbal Graduate Record Ex amination score of 1000 or higher or an equivalent score on an equivalent measure approved by the Board of Regents or 3. Shall have earned a graduate degree from a regionally ac credited institution. In addition, applicants must be accept able to the major program Each student who seeks admission as a first-time or trans ferring graduate student shall be required to present his or her score on the Aptitude Test of the Graduate Record Examina tion, or an equivalent score on an equivalent measure approved by the Board of Regents, to support the application for admis sion. The ORE may be waived in individual cases by the University. Applicants denied admission shall be given timely notice and reason for their rejection in writing. Applicants dc
PAGE 49

change the date of entrance, he /she must notify the Office of Admissions of his/her intentions to do so. Failure to enroll during the specified quarter without notify ing the Admissions Office will result in the cancellation of the admission and will necessi tate re-application. A graduate st udent enrolled for work in a program, who wishes to change : to another program at the same level, must make application through the Office of Records and Reg-istration. If, on completion of one graduate degree, a student wishes to begin work on another advanced degree at USF, he /s he must reapply at the Office of Admissions. Procedure for Applying 1 Applicants must submit application and fee prior to the dead line 2. Two official transcripts from every institution of higher learning attended must be submitted directly from the issuing institution to the Office of Admissions. 3. Admissions test results are required from every applicant. These must be sent directly to Gr a duate Admissions Office from the testing agency. a. Graduate Record Examination Aptitude Test. All appli cants except those applying to Bu siness Administration (see below), must submit scores from the GRE aptitude test taken within 5 years preceding application b Graduate Management Admission Test ( GMA n. All ap plicants to Business Administration, except those applying to Economics, must submit scores from the GMAT. Those applying to Economics must submit scores from the GRE aptitude test (see above) 4 Letters of recommendation may be required by the Colleges. See the individual College sectio n for particulars. 5. All credentials must be received in the Admissions Office prior to the deadline for application. 6. If a student is accepted for admission and does not enroll in the term for which he/she is admitted or if admission has not been granted because of a late application or missing creden tials, it is the student's responsibility to notify the Admissions Office in writing within 12 months if he/she wishes to be con sidered for a future term and to specify the new enrollment date. If a request for change of term is not received in the time specified above, a new application and fee must be submitted. Request for change in entry date must be received before the deadline of the term desired. An applicant will be permitted to request change of term twice without fee After the second request, a new application and another fee will be required. International Students The University is concerned for the welfare and academic suc cess of the International Student. In keeping with this concern, the University feels that it is necessary that both the student and the adviser have a realistic understanding of the student's academic ability and competence in English in the key areas of listening, reading, writing and comprehension. Therefore, the University requires the submission of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with a minimum acceptable score of 550 In addition, colleges may require other testing programs prior to the st udent's first enroll ment. International students must have earned an appropriate de gree to indicate that he/she is academically prepared and qual ified to undert ake the studies requested. Applicants to graduate studies must have earned in an institution of higher learning a degree which is equivalent to a bachelor's degree from a region ally accredited university in the United States International student s requesting an application will be sent preliminary information forms. Upon receipt of these forms the Admissions Office will review the information provided and deDIVISION OF GRADUATE STUDIES 47 termine whether the student has the appropriate background to undertake the studies proposed If not the applicant will be so advised by t!ie Admissions Office and the application process terminated. If thci student is eligible for further consideration, the Admissions Office will forward a formal a pplication with addi tional instructions 11nd information A complete admission appli cation should be received by US Fat least six months prior to the desired eotry date, together with the non-refundable $15.00 ap plication fee Submission of a formal a pplication does not guarantee admission. Priority in admission will be given to applicants whose credentials indicate the greate s t likelihood of success in the program reque s ted For all international s tudents the following item s are re quired as a part of the formal application : 1. Completed application 2 A $15.00 non-refundable fee s ubmitted with the a pplic a tion. 3. A letter of recommendation from the l ast i nstitution a ttended to the Director of Admission s 4. Three letters of recommend at ion sent directly to the program to which the s tudent is applying, a nd attesting aca demic per formance and capability 5. A certificate of financial ability s howing proof of financial resources s ufficient to cover tuition, fee s, room and board, and other e!lepenses for the full academic year. Tr ave l costs must be assumed by the student. A st udent w ho h as sig ned a statement indicating s ufficient financial resources cannot ex pect the unive rsity to assume responsibility if his/her funds prove inadequate. 6 Applicants whose native language is not English are required to submit scores from the Te st of English a s a Foreign Lan guage (TOEFL). A min i mum sco r e of 550 i s required for all colleges and program s Applioants are re s pon s ible for making arrangements with the Office of Educational Testing Service to take the examination and to have their scores sent directly from the te s ting s ervice to the Office of Admissions Student copies ar e not acceptable. 7 GRE/GMAT Test Scores: All app lic ants to graduate studies (exce pt those a pplying to the College of Business Admini s tr a tion ) must s ubm i t scores on the Graduate Record Examination ( G RE ) Graduate applicants to the College of Busines s Administration (with the exception of Economics ) mus t s ubmit sco re s from the Graduate Management Admi ss ion Test ( GMA T). Applicants for the program in Economics must submit sco res from the GRE. Application and information for the required te s t s may be obtained from the addresses listed below a. For information and to obtain an application for the Graduate Record Examination : Graduate Record Examination Educational Testing Service Box 955 Princeton New Jersey 08540 U S .A. b. For information and to obtain an application for the Test of English as a Foreign Langu a ge : Test of English as a Foreign Language Educational Testing Service Box 899 Princeton, New Jersey 08540, U.S.A c. For information and to obtain an application for the Graduate Management Admission Te st: Graduate Man a gement Admission Test Ed uc ational Testing Service Box 966 Princeton New Jersey 08540, U .S. A 8 International applicants must request all sc hool s attended to submi t directly to the Office of Admissions, transcripts of all work attempted. Transcript s and all other documents in a language other th a n English mus t be accompanied by a cer tified English translation signed and sealed by the U S. Con sul or other authorized government official. Applicants must submit certificates diploma s a nd transcripts s howing subjects and grades from the fir s t year of university work to the

PAGE 50

48 DIVISION OF GR ADU A TE STUDIES time of application. Documents submitted will not be re turned to the applicant or forwarded to another institution The University welcomes qualified students from other countries to the campus community. This international exchange lends to the enrichment of life intellectual development re search a nd understanding and exposes the stdents, faculty and staff to cultural and national differences in outlook, experience and ideas. The International Student Adviser provides assistance in academic advising, personal and social counseling, events of individual and group interest s and aids the student(s) in meeting the requirements of the University Department of Immigration and Naturalization Services and other agencies Non-Degree Seeking (Special) Students Students who are qualified to enroll in specific graduate courses but who do not intend to work toward a graduate degree may enroll as Special Students Special Students may enter classes on a space available basis during the first week of each quarter by obtaining consent of the course instructor. Special Students must meet all stated prerequisites of course s in which they wish to enroll. Certain classe s are available only to degree seeking majors and may not be available for Special Students No more than 18 hours of c r e dit earned as a Special Student may be applied to satisfy graduate degree requirements. Any application of such credit must be approved by the degree granting college and must be appropriate to the program. Those interested in enrolling as Special Students are urged to contact the Coordinator of Graduate Studies in the College offering the concerned for a description of requirements and procedures. The College of Business Administration has special procedures for Non-degree Seeking (Special) student registration Please refer to the College of Business Administra tion section of the Catalog for further information. Graduate Readmission (Former Student Returning) Degree-seeking graduate students who have not been in atten dance at the University during either of the two quarters immediately preceding the quarter enrollment is desired should follow the readmission procedure on page 15. Any graduate degree-seeking student who has not been in attendance at the University for eight consecutive quarters mus t reapply through the Office of Admissions by the appropriate deadline. The Traveling Scholar Program The University System of the State of Florida has a Traveling Scholar program which will enable a graduate student to take advantage of special resources available on another campus but not available on his own campus. Procedure A Traveling Scholar is a graduate student, who, by mutual agreement of the appropriate academic authorities in both the sponsoring and hosting institutions, receives a waiver of admis sion requirements and the application fee of the host institution and a guarantee of acceptance of earned credits by the sponsor ing institution. A Traveling Scholar must be recommended by his own graduate adviser, who will initiate a visiting arrangement with the appropriate faculty member of the host institution. After agreement by the Director of Graduate Studies at the University of South Florida and the student's adviser and the faculty member at the host institution, Deans at the other institution will be fully informed by the adviser and have authority to approve or disapprove the academic arrangement. The student registers at the host institution and pays tuition and registration fees according to fee schedules established at that institution. Conditions Each university retains its full right to accept or reject any student who wishes to study under its auspices Traveling Scholars will normally be limited to one Quarter on the campus of the host university and are not entitled to displacement allowance, mileage, or per diem payments. The sponsoring institution, however, may, at its own option, contri bute to the financial support of the Traveling Scholar in the form of fellowships or graduate assistantships Graduate Assistantships, Fellowships and Out-of-State Waivers (I) To be eligible to obtain a one-half time graduate teaching as sistantship a student must be degree-seeking and be registered for a minimum of eight credit hours each quarter toward degree requirements (2) To be eligible to obtain a graduate research assistantship, a student may be degree-seeking or a Special Student for one quarter of enrollment only and be registered for a minimum of eight credit hours toward degree requirements. Teaching and Research Assistantships are awarded by the individual programs/departments. The Graduate Council of the University of South Florida awards fellowships for graduate students The Florida Legislature has provided out of-state waivers to attract outstanding students. These waivers are available through the Colleges . FIELDS OF GRADUATE STUDY Master's Degree Programs of Arts & Letters American Studies-M. A. Communication: Communication-M.A. Linguistics (ESL)-M.A. English-M. A French-M A Mass Communications M.A Philosophy-M.A. Spanish-M. A College of Business Administration Accountancy-M. Ace Business Administration-M. B A Economics-M. A. Management-;-M.S. College of Educatibn Administration & Supervision-M. Ed Adult & Vocational Education-M.A. Adult Education Business & Office Education Distributive Education Industrial-Technical Education Art Education-M.A. Curriculum & Instruction-M. Ed. Elementary Education-M.A. Exceptional Child Education :-M.A. Emotional Disturbance Gifted Mental Retardation

PAGE 51

Specific Learning Disabilities English Education-M. A Foreign Language:-M.A. French German Spanish Guidance & Counseling Education-M.A. Humanities Education-M. A Junior College Teaching:-M.A. Biology Business Chemistry Economics Engineering Engl i sh French Geography Geology History Mathematics Physics Political Science Sociology Spanish Speech Communication Library, Media, and Information Studies-M. A Mathematics Education-M. A . Music Education-M.A. Physical Education-M. A Reading Education-M.A. School Psychology-M.A. Science Education-M.A. Social Science Education-M.A. Speech Communication Education-M.A. College of Engineering Master of Master of Science in Engineering-M. S.E. Master of Science in Engineering Science-M.S.E.S. College of Fine Arts Art-M.F.A. Music-M. M College of Natural Sciences Botany-M .A. Chemistry-M.S. Geology-M. S. Marine Science-M. S Mathematics-M. A Microbiology-M. A Physics-M.A. Zoology-M.A. College of Nursing Nursing-M.S. DIVISION OF GRADUATE STUDIES 49 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences Anthropology-M. A Communicology: Audiology-M. S Aural (Re)Habilitation-M S Speech Pathology-M.S. Criminal Justice-M. A Geography-M.A. Gerontology-M A History-M.A. Political Science-M.A. PsychologyM A Public Administration-M.P. A Rehabilitation Counseling-M. A. Sociology-M. A Intermediate Program College of Education Education Specialist-Ed. S Professional Program College of Medicine Medicine-M. D. Doctoral Degree Programs College of Arts & Letters English_.:. Ph.D College of Education Education-Ed. D Ph D College of Engineering Engineering Science-Ph. D College of Medicine Medical Sciences-Ph. D College of Natural Sciences Biology-Ph. D . Chemistry-Ph. D Mathematics-Ph. D Oceanography-Ph. D (Cooperative Program with Florida State University) College of Social & Behavioral Sciences Psychology-Ph. D. REGULATIONS GOVERNING GRADUATE STUDY The development of University policies and principles for gradu ate work is the responsibility of the Graduate Council. In addi tion, the Council exercises the right of inquiry and review to ins ure that high scholarly standards are being maintained It is responsible for the establishment of University standards and regulations for graduate students and faculty. The Council also reviews all new graduate courses and degree programs and mod ifications to existing courses and programs. The membership of the Graduate Council includes the chairperson nine faculty members, two graduate students, and three ex-officio members Major Professor An adviser or major professor will be appointed for the stu dent in his first term of work and will be designated by the chair person of the department or area in which the degree i s sought upon a mutual recommendation from the student and professor concerned Quality of Work Graduate students must attain an overall average of 3.0 (B) in all courses. No grade below" C" will be accepted toward a

PAGE 52

50 DIVISION OF GRADUATE STUDIES graduate degree, but all grades will be counted in computing the overall average. Any graduate student who at the end of a quarter is not in good standing shall be to be on probationary status Such a student may be dropped from degree seeking status after one quarter of probation by the dean of his college Notification of probation shall be made to the student in writing by his major professor with a copy to the college dean At the end of the probationary quarter, the major professor shall recommend to the college dean in writing, one of alternatives (I) removal of probationary status ; (2) continued probation ; or (3) drop from degree program Every effort will be made during the probation ary period to aid the student in reestablishing his standing. Appeals Graduate students may appeal actions regarding their aca demic s tatus: I. In a ctions b as ed on departmental requirements the student may appeal fir s t to his department through his major profes s or then to the college dean or his representative, and then to the Graduate Council if nece s sary 2 In a ction s based on the University minimum requirements, appeal shall be made directly to the Graduate Council. R e ports of actions and appeals will oe maintained in the student's permanent file. Enrollment Requirements-Minimum University Regulations A student taking eight or more hours toward his / her degree in a quarter will be classified as a full-time student. The normal graduate load i s 12-15 credit hours. Students who have completed their course work and con tinue to o c cup y s p ac e and to receive faculty supervision but who h a ve not made a final the sis/ di s sertation submission shall regis ter for a minimum of three hours of Thesis / Dissertation The exact number of hours i s determined by staff and facilities needed to support the student. Gr a duate student s having completed all requirements ex cept for comprehensive exams or completion of I and /or Z grades will be allowed use of Univer s ity Library facilities for one quarter, with a pproval of department chairperson Graduate students who receive financial support from the University other than fellowship recipients will hold their ap pointments for no more than six quarters (excluding summer quarter) while working toward the master's degree (eight quar ters for the MF A) and no more than nine additional quarters while working toward the Ph.D. degree. Transfer Credit Transfer of credit from another regionally accredited school i s limited to nine quarter hours All transferred credit must (I) be approved by the program or college concerned, and (2) have been completed with grades of "B" or better. Transfer (post-baccalaureate, tr a nsfer credits from other institution s ) and Special Student credit must be evaluated and tran s ferred by the time of formal acceptance and enrollment. The graduate department/program will be respon s ible for evaluating and initiating the tran s fer. Earned degrees are transferred in fu II. N o m o r e tha n 1 8 hours of c redit earne d as a Spec i a l Student in a n o n d egre e seeking s t atus may b e applie d t o satis f y graduate degree requir ements Grades in the Graduate Program No graduate student may take a course in his/her maj.or on an S / U ba s i s except for certain courses that are specifically desig nated in the catalog. A graduate student may take courses out side 9f his / her major on an S / U basis with prior approval of the professor of the course, his/ her major professor and the Dean of the College who will approve the degree The student may apply a maximum of six hours of such credit (exclud ing Directed Research Thesis / Dissertation, Design Practicum, or Internship) toward a master's degree. Directed Research (master's and doctoral level) and Thesis and Dissertation courses are designated as Credit Varies and are awarded credit on an S/U basis only Before a student under takes work under Directed Research a written agreement be tween the student and the professor concerned setting forth in detail the requirements of the course, shall be completed. The Z grade shall be used to indicate continuing registration in Thesis / Dissertation courses. Upon satisfactory completion of the Thesi s/ Dissertation course, the final grade to be assigned will be an S Undergraduates may not enroll in 6000-level courses or higher without written approval of the College Dean and the Director of Graduate Studies. Other procedures involving grades such as drops, with drawals, audits, etc are the same as those used for under graduates. Change of Graduate Degree Program A student who wishes to change his/her advanced degree pro gram at the s ame level must obtain a Graduate Change of Pro gram Application from the Office of Records and Registration The Change of Program is completed upon acceptance of the student by his / her new department. The new department may elect to accept all some or none of the previous graduate courses taken by the student. Courses accepted from prior graduate program must be listed by the new program on the Graduate Change of Program Application. If no courses are listed it is assumed no courses are accepted from prior program. For changes in level, i.e from Master's to Ed .S., Ed.D. or Ph .D., the applicant must submit a new application to the Admissions office. Application for Degree Each student who plans to complete his/her graduate require ments by the end of a term must complete the Application for Grac;luatiOn within 15 class days after tlie beginning of that term. A fee equivalent to one quarter hour is charged if the student is not enrolled Note special enrollment procedures for students s ubmitting theses/dissertations in sections on "Master's De gree and "Ph. D. Degree." Commencement Participation Graduate students may not participate in June commencement ceremonies unless al/ degree requirements have been completed . Exclusions Members or former members of the faculty who hold or have held the rank of Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, or Professor are not eligible to be granted degrees from the U niver sity of South Florida, except upon prior authorization of the Graduate Council, and approval of the Vice President for Academic Affairs In cases where the immediate family of the faculty are en rolled in graduate degree programs, the faculty member may not serve on any advisory or examination committee nor be involved in any determination of academic or financial status of that indi vidual. Faculty Eligibility In order to teach a graduate course at the University of South Florida, a person must have a current USF faculty appointment The director of a thesis or dissertation must be a USF faculty member with an advanced degree or equivalent professional qualifications, appropriate to the required level of supervision.

PAGE 53

DIVISION OF GRADUATE STUDIES 51 Master's Degree Program of Study and course Requirements During the first term of study, in consultation with his major profes sor, the student should plan a program of work to be com pleted for satisfaction of degree requirements A copy of this program signed by the student and professor should be main tained in the student's department file. A minimum of 45 quarter hours is required for a master's degree at least 24 hours of which must be at the 6000 level. At least 30 hours must be in formal, regularly scheduled course work, 15 of which must be at the 6000 level. Courses at the 5000 level are acceptable for credit toward the master's degree when taken as a part of a planned degree program A major professor may approve up to 8 hours of 4000-level courses if taken as part of a planned degree program. Additional graduate credit may be earned in 4000-level courses only if spe cifically approved by the appropriate dean and by the Graduate Council. Students enrolled in undergraduate courses as a part of their planned degree program will be expected to demonstrate a superior level of performance. Graduate students may not enroll for more than 18 hours in any quarter without written permission from the College Dean and Director of Graduate Studies Supervisory Committee Students working toward a thesis degree will have the ben efit of a supervisory committee. The committee, consisting of the major professor. and at least two other members of the de partment or area in which the degree is sought, will be appointed by the appropriate chairperson upon recommendation from the student and his major professor The director of a thesis or dis sertation must be a USF faculty member with an advanced de gree, or equivalent professional qualifications appropriate to the required level of supervision Notification of the committee ap pointment will be sent to the Dean of the College and to the Director of. Graduate Studies. The committee will approve the course of study for the student, supervise his research, and ac cept his thesis. Time Limitations The University o r' South Florida has definite time limits covering the following items: 1 Test scores for the Graduate Record Examination ( G RE) and Graduate Management Admissi9n Test ( G MAT) must be within five years preceding application. 2. A student's acceptance to graduate standing is granted for the quarter and particular program specified in the official accep tance notification. The student must validate his/her accep tance by enrolling that quarter or reapply In the event that a student wishes to change the date of entrance he/she must notify the Office of Admissions of his/her intentions to do so. 3. Graduate students who have not been in attendance during either of the two quarters immediately preceding the quarter enrollment is desired may file a Former Student Reiurning Application through the Office of Records and Registration Fornier students returning must apply by the deadline listed in the catalog : Any graduate degree-seeking student who has not been in attendance at the University for eight consecu tive quarters must reapply through ihe Office of Admissions by the appropriate deadline. 4 All work applicable to the Master's degree requirement must be completed within seven years from the time a student is admitted into his/her program. 5 Graduate students wh0 receive financial support from the University, other than fellowship recipients, will hold their appointments for no more than six quarters (excluding sum mer quarter) while working toward the Master's degree (eight quarter s for the Master of Fine Arts) and rio more than nine additional quarters while working towa r d the Ph.D. Final Comprehensive Examination Prior to clearance for the degree, the candidate must per form satisfactorily on a comprehensive examination in his/her m ajo r field. When graduate students take their comprehensive examination, they must be enrolled for a minimum of three (3) quarter hours of graduate work of their discipline. If all course work has been completed, such students should be enrolled in Independent Study Thesis When a thesis is required the thesis must conform to the guidelines in the Handbook of Graduate Theses and Dissertations available in the University Bookstore An Abstract must also accompany the thesis. The thesis must be submitted to the Di rector of Graduate Studies at least three weeks before the end of the quarter in which the student is to receive the degree. The Graduate Studies Office will not accept a thesis after the first day of the quarter unless the candidate is enrolled in the proper thesis course for at least three hours. If the student elects to turn the thesis in by the first day of the quarter he/she will not be re quired to register for three hours of thesis. However, the student must have been enrolled the preceding quarter for at least three hours of thesis. Only after the thesis has been approved for filing in the University Library can the student be certified for his/her degree Second Master's Degree A second master's degree may be granted so long as there is no duplication of credit. If there is any duplication of credit, the request must be considered by the Graduate Council. A student cannot be enrolled in two master's programs at the same time Ph.D. Degree The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is granted in recognition of high attainment in a specific field of knowledge It is a research degree and is not conferred solely upon the earning of credit and completion of courses or by the acquiring of a number of terms of residency. The amount of residence and the requirements sug gested below are a minimum. The degree shall be granted on evidence of proficiency and distinctive achievement in a specified field by the demonstration of the ability to do original independent investigation and the presentation of these findings with a high degree of literary s kill in a dissertation A minimum of 135 quarter hours after the bachelor's degree is required Student Committees An advisory Committee shall be appointed by the chairper son of the appropriate department or program for each student during his or her first quarter of residency at the University of South Florida This Committee shall advise the student on indi cated subject matter deficiencies and provide aid in choice of a major professor and an area of research. As soon as an area of research is determined and a major professor is chosen a Dis sertation Committee shall be appointed for the student by the chairperson of the department or program in which the degree is

PAGE 54

52 DIVISION OF GRADUATE STUDIES sought. Notice of the appointment of the Dissertation Commit tee shall be sent by the chairperson to the Dean of the College and the Director of Graduate Studies immediately after the ap pointment is made. The Dissertation Committee will approve the student's course of study, supervise the research, and the written comprehensive qualifying examination, and conduct the final examination. The Dissertation Committee shall consist of at least five members, at least three of whom must come from the academic area in which the major work for the degree will be done. Language Requirement Before a student is eligible to take the comprehensive qualifying examination, he must normally have completed a reading knowledge of two foreign languages. However, special work done outside the student's field of conce ntration, and related subjects may be substituted for one or both languages, provided this exception is recommended by the student's dis sertation committee and approved by his/her department's Graduate Committee. Residency The minimum requirement s hall be three academic years of work beyond the bachelor s degree. At least one academic year of residence must be on a campus of the University of South Flo rid a. An academic year's residency shall be defined as a minimum of eight hours of graduate work per term, or the chair person of the student's supervisory committee may certify that the student be considered as in fulltime residence. Time Limitations The University of South Florida has definite time l i mit s covering the following items: I. Test scores for the Graduate Record Examination ( GRE) must be within five years preceding application. 2 A student' s acceptance to graduate standing is granted for the quarter and particular program specified in the official accep tance notification The stude nt must validate his/her accep tance by enrolling that quarter or reapply In the event that a student wishes to change the date of entrance, he / she must notify the Office of Admissions of his / her intentions to do so. 3. Graduate st udents who have not been in attendance during either of the two quarters immediately preceding the quarter enrollment is desired may file a Former Student Returning Application thr oug h the Office of Records and Regi stration. Former st udent s returning must apply by the deadline listed in the catalog. Any graduate degree-seeking student who has not been in attendance at the University for more than eight con secutive quarters must reapply through the Office of Admissions by the appropriate deadline. 4. Any graduate work counted toward the fulfillment of the requirement of the Ph. D degree after admission to candidacy must be done within a seven-calendar-year period 5. Graduate students who receive financial support from the University, other than fellowship recipients will hold their appointments for no more than six quarters (excluding sum mer quarter) while working toward the Master's degree (eight quarters for the MF A) and no more than nine additional quarters while working toward the Ph.D. Comprehensive Qualifying Examination A s s oon a s a substantial majority of the course work is com pleted the student must pass a writtl!n comprehensive qualifying examination over the subject matter of the m ajor and related field s This examination may be supp lemente d by an oral e xami nation If the degree is not conferred within five calendar years of the comprehensive examination the examination must be taken again. Admission to Candidacy A graduate student does not become a candidate for the Ph.D. degree until he/she is formally admitted to candidacy and no student may enroll in Dissertation until he/ she has been ad mitted to candid&cy. This admis s ion is granted when the disser tation committee certifies that the student has successfully com pleted his/her comprehensive qualifying examination and in the opinion of his / her committee he/ she has demonstrated the qual ifications necessary to successfully complete his/her require ments for the degree The certificate of admission shall be issued by the dean of his/her college through the Director of Graduate Studies. Dissertation Students in the Ph.D. programs must take an appropriate number of credits for dissertation, the exact number to be deter mined by departmental and/or individual requirements At least two weeks before the end of the quarter in which the student is to receive his degree a candidate must submit to the Director of Graduate Studies a completed dissertation that has been signed by committee he dissertation must conform to the guidelines in theHandbookofGraduate The ses and Dissertations avai l able in the University Bookstore. An abstract is also re quired. The Graduate Studies Office will not accept a disserta tion after the first day of the quarter unless the candidate is enrolled in the proper Dissertation course for at least three hours. If the student elects to turn the dissertation in by the first day of the quarter, he / she will not be expected to register for three hours of dissertation However, the student must have been enrolled the preceding quarter for at least three hours of dissertation. Prior to college certification for the degree, the dis sertation must be approved by the Director of Graduate Studies. The two copies of the dissertation will then be deposited in the University Library. Each dissertation will be microfilmed with the student being assessed a fee for this service Final Oral Examination When the Dis sertatio n Committee ha s inspected the final draft of the dis sertation and finds it suitable for presentation, the Committee will complete a form requesting the scheduling and a nnouncing of the final oral examination. The request form with a draft copy of the dissertation will be submitted via the approp riate department chairperson to the college dean and the Direc tor of Graduate Studies for approval. The announcement must be received in the Graduate Studies Office at least two weeks prior to the scheduled oral examination The final oral examina tion must be held at least three weeks before the end of the quarter in which the student is to be awarded the degree. The chairperson of the examination shall be appointed by the dean of the college and shall not be a member of the st udent's Dissertation Committee or the department or program in which the degree is sought.

PAGE 55

COLLEGE OF ARTS & LETTERS The College of Arts and Letters studies culture in the broadest meaning of the word The College offers students a sense of themselves and their world, chiefly through courses and prog. rams involving human expression and communication. Students not only receive a liberal education but also explore vocational interests as they develop both the breadth of knowledge and precision of mind necessary for responsible leadership in our society. More specifically, the College seeks: I. To help students discuss new subjects, affording fresh ideas and talents enriching to life. 2. To enable students to work in several fields as a means of determining the best vocational choice. 3 To give sufficient development within the chosen voca tional field so that the student will be prepared to obtain a job upon graduation or to move successfully into a gradu ate or professional schooL 4. To join with the other colleges of the University in providing liberal arts courses to augment required train ing in professional schools. 5. To cultivate independent thinking, creative imagination and value commitment, so that students may become constructive leaders in their chosen activities Accordingly, the College is concerned with arts and letters, both as instruments and as ends in themselves. Language, liter ature, philosophy the forms of communication, interdisciplinary studies, and other humanistic subjects are studied not merely for their utility, but for their intrinsic merit as well, and for what they tell us about what is permanently and universally significant to mankind The departments and degree programs of the College are grouped in four divisions : 1. Communications a. Mass Communications b. Communication 2 Language Foreign Languages 3 Letters a American Studies b. c Liberal Studies d Philosophy e Religious Studies 4. Literature: English BACCALAUREATE LEVEL DEGREE PROGRAMS Admission to the College Admission to the College of Arts and Letters is open to all stu dents who have been accepted to the University of South Florida, who are in good academic standing, and who ha,ve de clared the mselves a major in a particular field within the College For entrance into the College each undergraduate must complete an application in the Dean's office. Foreign Language majors must specify on this form which language(s) they wish to major in. The student will then be assigned to an adviser from the major field and will be counseled in the selection of courses which will fulfill his/her educational needs and satisfy the re quirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree. Three programs (American Studies, Liberal Studies and Mass Communications) have additional requirements, listed under Programs and Curricula. General Requirements for Degrees The degree of Bachelor of Arts will be conferred upon those who fulfill the requirements for degrees with majors in the fields of: American Studies (AMS) Classics (Latin, Latin-Greek) (CLS) Classics & Foreign Language (CLF) Communication (SPE) Communication-English (ENS) Communication-Theatre (ST A) English (ENG) Foreign Languages, Combination (FOL) French (FRE) German (GER) Humanities (HUM) 53 Italian (IT A) Liberal Studies (ALA) Mass Communications (COM) Philosophy (PHI) Religious Studies (REL) Russian (RUS) Spanish (SPA) A minimum of 180 quarter hours credit with an overall average of 2.0 or better in all work done at the University of South Florida must be completed in order to earn the Bachelor of Arts degree, except for courses taken by majors in the Mass Communications department which requires a 2.5 in all its departmental work. 1'he degree program must include the completion of (1) General Distribution Requirements, (2) a departmental major, and (3) elective courses At least 120 quarter hours must be completed in courses outside the department/language of the major. A student must have a graduation check in the Dean's office one quarter prior to the quarter 'in which he /s he intends to graduate. 1. General Distribution Requirements This work comprises a total of sixty (60) quarter credits which (except for English) may be spread over the normal four year degree program. The requirement includes: Eight (8) hours credit in English Composition Eight (8) hours credit in Humanities/Fine Arts Eight (8) hours credit in Mathematics/Quantitative Method Eight (8) hours credit in Natural Sciences Eight (8) hours credit in Social and Behavioral Sciences The remaining twenty (20) hours are to be divided among the last four areas at the discretion of the student and adviser. See page 35 for details

PAGE 56

54 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND LETTERS 2. The Departmental Major A departmental major consists of a concentration of course work in a specific department. The number of credit hours re quired for a major will vary from department to department. There must be at least a cumulative grade point a verage of2. 0 in the major, with the exception of Mass Communications, which requires a 2 5 of its majors in all departmental work At least 120 quarter hours must be earned in courses out s ide the s tudent's major department (or language for foreign language majors) Freshman English and beginning and intermediate foreign lan guage courses will be counted toward this total. 3. The Departmental Minor Seven in the College offer minors : American Studies, Communication(2) English (2), Foreign Languages (7), Humanities Philosophy and Religious Studies. In general, these require half as many hours as are required for the major They are open to degree-seeking students with a major within another department in this college or elsewhere in the Univer sity. Specific requirements for the different minors appear under the departmental summaries that appear later in this section 4. Elective Courses Of the minimum of 180 quarter hour s required for a bachelor's degree in the College of Arts and Letters, sixty (60) are normally earned in general elective courses. This number varies with the credit requirement for the major and should be treated as an average figure Physical Education ( PE) credit earned before Quarter III, 1972, will not be counted toward the 180 quarter hours required for the degree. However up to four elective PE credits earned at USF in Quarter Ill, 1972, or later may be counted toward the 180.hour requirement. A maximum of eight hours of ROTC credit taken at USF may be counted as academic credit toward the B .A. degree. 5. Transfer Work No transfer ROTC credit will be accepted by the College of Arts and Letters. Work transferred from other schools will not be included in the grade point average computed for graduat i on, except in de termining whether students are eligible to graduate with honors. (See page 39 ) GRADUATE LEVEL DEGREE PROGRAMS Master's Degree Programs The College of.Arts & Letters offers graduate programs leading to the Master of Arts degree in: American Studies (AMS) Communication: Communication (SPE) Linguistics-English as a Second Language (ESL) English (ENG) French (FRE) Mass Communications (COM) Philosophy (PHI) Spanish (SP A) The University requirements for graduate work at the Master s level are des cribed on page 51. The departmental requirements are listed under the appropriate program descriptions Doctor of Philosophy The Department of English offers a program leading to the de gree of Doctor of Philo s ophy The University requirements for graduate work at the doctor s level are given on page 51. Specific requirements for the degree are listed under the Department of English. NON-DEGREE PROGRAM Certificate of Concentration The Certificate of Concentration is a short-term goal program for adults who are interested in taking a series of courses in a selected area of Art s and Letter s but are not nece s sarily interested in a degree The courses on an undergr a duate level are offered to adult s who may or may not have a degree The Certificate of Concentration is awarded when a minimum of 25 hours has been completed in a given area or in a combination of areas (In a c ombination of areas 12 hours must be 'in one partiCular area ) It is a program that may be taken on a satisfactory unsatisfactory or letter grade basis and may be applied toward an undergraduate degree in Arts and Letters Students working for a Certificate of Concentration register as special rather than as degree-seeking students. PROGRAMS AND CURRICULA AMERICAN STUDIES (AMS) The American Studie s major is designed for those s tudents interested in studying the relation s hips among the important elements which shape American civilization American Studies is a multi-disciplinary program drawing upon a variety of courses from outside the program and outside the college Bachelor s and master's degrees are available in Americ a n Studies. Requirements for the B.A. Degree: Required Core Courses (32 er. hrs.) AMS 3001 (5) AMS 4935 (4) AMS 3201 (5) AMS 4936 (4) AMS 3210 (5) AMS.4937 (4). AMS 3230 (5) Required Supporting Courses (12 er. hrs.) (n o m o r e than o n e co urse fro m e a c h de partm ent)

PAGE 57

AMH 3402 (4) or AMH 3403 (4) AMH 3571 (4) or AMH 3572 (4) AMH 4300 (4) AML 3102 (5) or AML 3107 (5) or AML 3111 (5) ENG 3156 (5) MMC 3700 (4) PHH 4700 (4) POT 4204 (4) Related Electives (21 er. hrs.) (no more than 9 hours fro m one d e paNm e nt ) Appropriate courses to be selected, in consultation with an American Studies adviser, from various departments including Afro-American Studies, American Studies, Anthropology Art, Communication, Dance, Economic s English, Geology Geog raphy, History, Philosophy Political Science Religious Studies, Sociology and Social Sciences. Students desiring to major in American Studies are reminded that an interview with a department adviser is mandatory. Requirements for the M.A. Degree Requirements for Admission. An applicant must (I) meet the general admission requirements of the University ; (2) have an academic average of "B" or better in all work attempted during the junior and senior years or a totar score of 1000 or better on the Graduate Record Examination ; (3) demonstrate (to the American Studies Graduate Committee) a satisfactory knowl edge of United States history literature, and government. In some cases, the students may be required to take extra under graduate courses before admission Course Work and Thesis: Total required hours 4'.s I. 12 hours: AMS 6155, AMS 6254, AMS 6805 2. 24 hours: To be selected from 5000 or 6000 level courses by related departments such as history, philosophy, English, sociology, and hu manities No more than 12 hours from any one department may be credited toward the de gree Work in AMS 6901, AMS 6915, AMS 6934 may be included Other Requirements: During the last quarter of course work each candidate must take a written examination on selected top ics, illustrating major aspects of civilization in the U.S.A. from colonial times to the present. Upon completion of the thesis, student must take an oral examination which may include relationships between thesis and material covered on the written examination Requirements for the Minor Required Courses (at least 27 er. hrs.) I. AMS 3001 (5) 2 Two of the following : AMS 3201 (5) AMS 3210 (5) AMS 3230 (5) 3. Three of the following: AMS 3302 (4) AMH 3402 (4) AML 3107 (5) AMS 3303 (4) AMH 3403 (4) AML 3111 (5) AMS 3930 (J-5) AMH 3571 (4) ENG 3156 (5) AMS 4930 (J-5) AMH 3572 (4) MMC 3700 (4) AMS 4935 (4) AMH 4300 (4) PHH 4700 (4) AMS 4936 (4) AML 3102 (5) POT 4204 (4) AMS 4937 (4) Students who wish to minor in American Studies must con sult with a departmental adviser before beginning their program. COMMUNICATION (SPE/ENS/ST A) The Department of Communication provides courses for all students within the University interested in increasing their understanding of and skills in human communication The de partment offers a major program in Communication from which the student selects an arena of emphasis in Communication, OF ARTS AND LETTERS 55 Language Science or Oral Interpretation of Literature In addi tion, combination programs with English and theatre are available Requirements tor the B.A. Degree in Communication: A major in communication requires a minimum of 48 credit hours from departmental offerings (excluding SPC 2023, to be completed as part of the general education requirements) The requirement s for majors in all arenas are as follow s : I. 12 hours: COM 3003 (4) LIN 2200 (4) or LIN 3801 (4) ORI 3000 (4) II. 12 hours from the following: LIN 4600 SPC 3301 SPC 3513 SPC 3633 SPC 3210 SPC 3441 SPC 3601 III. 12 additional hours from one of the following emphases : A. Communication arena: COM 3122 COM 4942 COM 3131 SPC 3210 COM 4110 SPC 3301 COM 4120 SPC 344, 1 B Language Science arena: SPC 3513 SPC 3601 SPC 3633 SPC 3641 SPC 3653 SPC 4640 SPC 4680 LIN 3010 LIN 4040 LIN 4377 C Oral Interpretation of Literature arena: ORI 3920 ORI 4120 ORi 4230 ORI 5145 ORI 3950 ORI 4140 ORI 4310 IV 12 hours of departmental electives Requirement s for Combination Pr og ram s A. Communication-English I 11, and III above, plus the following Two courses from : ENL 3010 (5) ENL3041 (5) ENL 3030 (5) ENL 3133 (5) One course from : AML 3010 (5) AML 3107 (5) AML 3102 (5) AML3111 (5) One course from : ENC 3466 (5) ENC3486 (5) One course from : ENG 3138 (5) ENG 4223 (5) ENG 3156 (5) ENG 4227 (5) Also required : LIN 4370 (5) THE 3080C (5) 8. Communication-Theatre I II, and Ill C above plus the following THE 2020 (2) TPA 2223 (3) TPA2200 (3) TPP2110 (3) Two courses from : THE.3110 (3) THE4401 (4) THE 4370 (4) THE 4442 (4) Two courses from: ENL 3320 (5) ENL 3351 (5) ENG 4464 (5) ENG 4744 (5) LIT 3150 (5) TPP 311) (4) TPA 3086 (4) TPA 3810 (4) TPP 3235 (4) TPP 4150 (4) TPP 3510 (3) TPP 4151 (4) TPP 3790L (3) One additional course from either of the last two categories Minors The Department of Communication has minors available to supplement majors in a variety of departments and colleges. The minors require 24 hours of course work at the 3000 level and above SPC 2023 or its equivalent must also have been com pleted. Option A provides for the student to select an emphasis area in oral interpretation, linguistics or rhetoric and com

PAGE 58

56 COLLEGE. OF ARTS AND LETTERS munication theory Option B provides for the opportunity for the student to emphasize linguistics only. Minor Option A (Communication) The following provisions must be met : I. COM 3003 2. At least twelve (12) hours of3000 level or above from one of the following areas of concentration within the department. a Oral Interpretation b Linguistics c. Rhetoric and Communication 3. In addition to the twelve (12) hours in an area of concen tration, at least eight (8) hours of course work must be taken in either one or a combination of the other two areas within the department. 4 Directed readings (SPC 3900, SPC 4900 SPC 5903) may not be counted toward the 24 hour requirement. 5. Courses may not be taken on an S / U basis. Minor Option B (Linguistics) The following provisions must be met : I. Total credit hours required : 24 2. Required courses: COM 3003 (4) LIN 4040 (4) LIN 3010 (4) LIN 4377 (4) 3. Plus 8 hours from the following LIN 4600 (4) LIN 4701 (4) LIN 4710 (4) SPC 3210 (4) Requirements for the M.A. Degree: Requirements for Admission. The Department of Com munication offers two graduate programs: Master of Arts degree in Communication ; Master of Arts degree in Linguistics [non thesi s track, English as a Second Language (ESL)). In-addition to the general requirements of the University, an applicant must have : (I) a baccalaureate degree in Communication, Linguistics, or related fields from an approved college or university; (2) .a 3.0 ("B" ) undergraduate average or better in all work attempted during the last two years of undergraduate work or a score of 1000 on the aptitude portion of the Graduate Record Exam. All prospective M A candidates must take the ORE whether or not they have the min i mum 3 0 average ; (3) review by the Depart ment of Communication graduate committee, and; (4) approval by the department chairperson Requirements for M.A. Degree in Communication (48 hours thesis, 52 hours non-thesis) I. Core requirements for all students (16 hours) COM 6001 (4) ORI 6410 (4) LIN 6715 (4) COM 6400 (4) or SPC 6231(4) II. Areas of Emphasis A Rh e tori c and communica tion theory option I. .16 hours from the following rhetoric and communi cation courses COM 6121 (4) SPC 6442 (4) COM 6312 (4) SPC 6515 (4) COM 6400 (4) SPC 6545 (4) or SPC 6610 (4) SPC 6231 (4) SPC 6682 (4) 2. Two elective courses outside the emphasis area (may include courses from other departments within the University with adviser approval)-8 hours. 3 Thesis or 12 hours of s upportive course work ap proved by adviser. B Oral Int e rpretati o n of lit e rature op tion I. 16 hour s from the following oral interpretation courses ORI 5145 (4) ORI 6146 (4) ORI 5210 (4) ORI 6350 (4) 2 Two elective courses outside the emphasis area (may include courses from other departments within the Uni versity with advisor approval)--8 hours. 3 Thesis or 12 hours of s upportive course work approved by adviser. C. Lin g uistic Theory and Drscription Option I. 16 hours from the following linguistics courses. LIN 6240 (4) LIN 6820 (4) LIN 6380 (4) Plus one of the follo w ing : LIN 6117 (4) I,.IN 6405 (4) LIN 6128 (4) LIN 6601 (4) 2. Two elective courses outside the emphasis area (may include courses from other departments within the University with adviser approval)-8 hours. 3 Thesis or 12 hours of supportive course work ap proved by adviser. 4 Foreign language requirement (see Department of Communication Graduate Haqdbook) D. General Communication Option l Completion of.24 hours with 8 hours from each of the following areas of emphases : rhetoric and communica tion oral interpretation, linguistics. 2 Thesis or 12 hours of supportive course work ap proved by adviser Requirements for the M.A. Degree in Linguistics English as a Secpnd Language (non-thesis only) The Master of Arts degree in Linguistics (non-thesis option) is designed for the training of teachers in the field of English as a Second La,nguage or English as a Foreign Language Student s who wish to obtain Florida teacher certification are referred to the College of Education. Entrance Requirements In addition to the foregoing admis sion requirements, ESL also requires all foreign student s and/or students whose native language is other than English to achieve a minimum score of 550 on the test of English as a Foreign Lan guage (TOEFL) exam, which will be administered after the stu dent arrives at the University. The Minimum 550 TOEFL score must be achieved on an exam administered at the University of South Florida regardless of whether the student has previously taken the TOEFL or equivalent examinations elsewhere, and regardless of the score(s) achieved on any previous exam(s). Foreign stude nts who fail to achieve a score of 550 on the TOEFL but who are otherwise qualified for admission to the program, may undertake remedial course work in ESL or other wise seek to improve their English language proficiency, and may apply to re-take the examination in the quarter following their arrival. However, in no case will such students be granted provisional admission to the program or be permitted to take graduate course work toward the degree until the TOEFL score requirement has been achieved Course work. A minimum of 53 graduate level credit hours is required for the specialization in ESL, 8 hours of which are concerned with ESL methodology and current teaching trends. However student s whose undergraduate preparation has not in cluded suitable introductory courses in English linguistics, gen eral and descriptive linguistics, and phonetics will be required to remedy these deficiencies before they will be permitted to take graduate level courses The following courses (or their equiva lents) are undergraduate prereqisites. LIN 4370 (5) or LIN 3010 (4) LIN 4040 (4) ENG 4512 (5) LIN 4377 (4) I. Core requirements (16 hours) COM 6001 (4) ORI 6410 (4) LIN 6715 (4) COM 6400 (4) or SPC 6231(4) II. The following required courses (24 hours) TSL 6371 (4) LIN 6380 (4) TSL 6372 (4) LIN 6601 (4) LIN 6240 (4) LIN 6405 (4) Ill. One course in curriculum development from the College of Education (4 hours). IV At least one 4 hour elective course at the 5000 or 6000 le vel.

PAGE 59

V Minimum of 9 hours of internship. Enrollment is in TSL 6945, which will involve planned observation and super vision of instruction in actual ESL setting. VI. Other Requirements. No thesis is required for the degree. However, the student must pass a comprehensive examina tion, both written and oral, demonstrating mastery of the core and specialization areas of the program. The field of Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL) is not one which the Department of Education of the State of Florida recognizes for teacher certification Therefore this pro gram has not been developed in conjunction with the College of Edu\:ation. Moreover although the program is designed to train TESL professiqnals, they must be prepared to teach in a variety of contexts other than traditional American public school set tings. Students who wish to obtain Florida teacher certification in another subject area while at the same time pursue a TESL degree are referred to the College of Education. ENGLISH (ENG) Freshman English Requirement in Freshman Year All first-time-in-college students are required to take Freshman English in accordance with the following conditions : I. First-time enrolled students (a) who do not intend to take the CLEP Freshman English Test or (b) who have been notified of failing CLEP prior to registration and who do not intend to attempt the examination a second time must take ENC 1102 the first quarter, ,ENC 1135 the second quarter and ENC 1168 the third quarter of their freshman year. If one of the courses is failed that course must be repeated the very next quarter and the remaining courses atte(llpted in immediately subsequent quarters. 2. First-time enrolled students (a) who have not taken CLEP prior to their arrival op campus or (b) who have failed but wish to repeat the test, must attempt CLEP during their first six During this quarter they should not enroll in ENC 1102. If the examination is failed or not attempted during the student's first six weeks, he must take ENC 1102 during his secorid quarter and ENC 1135 and ENC 1168 in the immediately sub sequent quarters until the total requirement is fulfilled. In this case, he will complete the sequence by the first quarter of his sophomore year. These policies do not apply to first-time enrolled students who can meet the Freshman English requirement with credit transferred from another institution Requirements for the B.A J Degree: The program in English provides the student with optfons in English and American Literature and in Creative Writing. Both options offer the student flexibility in choices of courses and variety in selections. Both options supply a logical, balanced, and complete sequence of courses in English studies. The English-Education and the Communication-English sequences are described under the section for Communication in Arts and Letters and the section for the College of Education Major re quirements are as follows (a g rade of D will not b e co unted t owa rd th e English major) : Option I: English and American Literature. Requirements: No more than 60 hours and a minimum of 55 hour s required. Required course : ENL 3133 (5) At l eas t one course from th.e following: ENL 3010 (5) ENL 3320 (5) ENL 3351 (5) At least one course from th e following : ENL 3401 (5) ENL 3430 (5) At least one course from the following: AML3102 (5) AML3103 (5) AML3107 (5) At least one course from the following: AML3111 (5) ENL3441 (5) LIT3150 (5) Two additional courses from among th e following 3000 l eve l co urses: COLLEGE OF ARTS AND LETTERS 57 AML3102 (5) 'ENL3010 (5) LIT3150 (5) AML 3103 (5) ENL 3320 (5) LIT 3252 (5) AML 3107 (5) ENL 3351 (5) LIT 3254 (5) AML 3111 (5) ENL 340 I (5) LIT 3257 (5) ENG 3294 (5) ENL 3430 (5) LIT 3311 (5) ENG 3371 (5) ENL 3441 (5) LIT 3431 (5) No more than one of the following four co ur ses: CRW 3230 (5) ENC 3466 (5) ENC 3486 (5) CRW 3321 (5) No more than o n e of the followin g thre e cou r se s : ENG 3133 (5) ENG 3138 (5) ENG 3156 (5) Two courses at the 4000 leve l in th e Major Autho r s from th e followin g : AML 4214 (5) ENL 4112 (5) ENL 4121 (5) ENL 4062 (5) Two cou rses at th e 4000 l eve l in two se parate G e nr es o r M o d es from the followin g: Satire : ENG 4113 (5) Novel: ENG 4321 (5) ENG 4325 (5) ENG 4345 (5) Fiction : ENG 4204 (5) ENG 4223 (5) ENG 4227 (5) Poetry : ENG 4742 (5) ENG 4744 (5) Drama : ENG 4421 (5) ENG 4453 (5) ENG 4464 (5) ENG 4424 (5) Genres & Modes : AML 4320 (5) ENL 4300 (5) ENL4311 (5) Literary Criticism : ENG 4814 (5) Linguistics: ENL 4331 (5) ENL 4344 (5) ENL 4406 (5) ENL 4415 (5) LIT 4930 (1-5) ENG 4.512 (5) LIN 4370 (5) LIN 4420 ( 5)o Beyond the r e quired 55 hours the major i s free to take 5 h o urs of an y co ur ses the department offe r s. Option II: Creative Writing. Requirement: No more than 60 hours ahd a minimum of 55 hours required This option is designed for aspiring writers of fictionor poetry. This program in addition to giving credit for writing through a variety of course offerings, atte mpt s to provide infor mation about procedure s for becoming published A FICTION OPTION Requir e d co ur ses (25 hours) : ENC 3486 (5) CRW 4240 (5) ENG 4223 (5) CRW 3230 (5) ENG 4204 (5) o r ENG 4227 (5) ENG 4906(1-5) One of the following : ENG 3294 (5) ENG 4325 (5) ENG 4321 (5) ENG 4345 (5) Five cou rs es from the followin g: AML 3010 (5) AML 3102 (5) AML 3103 (5) AML 3107 (5) AML3111 (5) AML 4214 (5) AML 4320 (5) ENG 3294 (5) .ENG 3371 (5) ENG4113 ( 5 ) ENG 4223 (5) ENG 4227 (5) ENG 4321 (5) ENG 4325 (5) ENG 4345 (5) ENG 4421 (5) ENG 4424 (5) ENG 4453 (5) ENG 4464 (5) ENG 4512 (5) ENG 4742 (5) ENG 4744 (5) ENG 4814 (5) ENG 4906(1-5) ENL 3010 (5) ENL 3030 (5) ENL 3041 (5) ENL 3133 (5) ENL 3320 (5) ENL 3351 (5) ENL 3401 (5) ENL 3430 (5) ENL 3441 (5) ENL 4062 (5) ENL 4112 (5) ENL 4121 (5) ENL 4134 (5) ENL 4300 (5) ENL 4Jl l (5) ENL 4331 (5) ENL 4344 (5) E NL 4406. (5) ENL 4415 (5) LIT 3150 (5) LIT 3252 (5) LIT 3254 (5) LIT 3257 (5)

PAGE 60

58 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND LETTERS Be yond the required 55 hours t h e maj or i s free to tak e 5 hours of any co urse s th e depar tm e nt offer s. B POETRY OPTION R equi r e d cou r ses (30 hours): ENC 3486 (5) CRW 3321 ( 5 ) ENG 4742 CRW 3310 (5) C!lW 4340 (5) ENG '4744 One of the following: ENL 3133 ( 5 ) ENL 3401 (5) ENL 3320 (5) ENL 3430 (5) Fou r courses from th e following: (5) (5) AML 3010 (5) ENG 4345 ( 5 ) ENL 3430 (5) AML 3102 (5) ENG 4421 (5) ENL3441 (5) AML 3103 (5) ENG 4424 (5) ENL 4062 (5) AML 3107 (5) ENG 4453 (5) ENL 4112 (5) AML 3lll (5) ENG 4464 (5) ENL 4121 (5) AML 4214 (5) ENG 4512 (5) ENL 4134 (5) AML 4320 (5) ENG 4744 (5) ENL 4300 (5) CRW 3230 ( 5 ) ENG 4814 (5) ENL 4311 (5) CRW 4240 (5) ENG 4906(1-5) ENL 4331 (5) ENG 3294 (5) ENL 3010 (5) ENL 4344 (5) ENG 4II3 (5) ENL 3030 (5) ENL 4406 (5) ENG 4204 (5) ENL 3041 (5) ENL 4415 (5) ENG 4223 (5) ENL 3133 (5) LIT 3150 (5) ENG 4227 (5) ENL 3320 (5) LIT 3252 (5) ENG 4321 (5) ENL 3351 (5) LIT 3254 (5) ENG 4325 (5) ENL 3401 (5) LIT 3257 (5) B eyond the r e quir e d 35 h o urs the maj or is free t o take 5 h o ur s of any courses th e department offe r s. Requirements for the English/Literature Minor The English Literature Minor requires completion of 25 credit hours distributed as follows: Two co urs es (JO) hour s f rom th e f o llowin g: ENL 3010 ( 5) ENL 3351 (5) ENL 3441 (5) ENL 3133 (5) ENL 3401 (5) or ENL 3320 (5) ENL 3430 (5) AML 3lll (5) One co ur se (5) hours from the following : AML3I02 (5) AML3103 (5) AML3I07 (5) Any t wo <,:ourses (IO h o ur s) at the 4000 level S / U grades will not count toward the minor. Requirements for the English/Writing Minor: The English Writing Minor requires completion of 25 credit hours dis tributed as follows : Two co urses (IO hours) from the following: CRW 3230 (5) CRW 3321 (5) ENC 3486 (5) CRW 3310 (5) ENC 3466 (5) ; ENG 2711 (5) Two cou r ses (IO hours ) from the folloiving: ENG 3294 (5) ENG 4453 (5) ENG 4814 (5) ENG 4223 (5) ENG 4464 (5) LIT 3150 (5) ENG 4227 (5) ENG 4742 (5) ENG 4345 (5) ENG 4744 (5) One co ur se (5 hours)from the following: CRW 4240 (5) CRW 4340 (5) ENG 4204 (5) S I U grades will not count toward the minor Requirements for the M A. Degree: The M A in English is designed primarily to train college teacher s. program includes study of college teaching, as well as the study of literature. Requirements for Admission. An average of B in the last two years of undergraduate work (a GRE total score of 1000 may be substituted for this requirement) It may be to require students who have not been English undergraduate majors to take extra undergr a duate courses before graduate admission to English Other exceptions may be made by the Graduate Com mittee of the Department of English. Course Requirements. I. ENG 6062 (2) (this must be taken early in the sequence) 2 Forty-five credit hours, which must include: a ENG 6917 (var ) (this must be taken in the student's first or s econd term in the program) b LAE 6375 ( 5) c. One of these: ENL 6304 (5) ENL 6333 (5) ENL 6315 (5) d One of these : ENL 6392 (5) ENL 6407 (5) e One of these: AML 6132 (5) AML 6137 (5) f LIT 6934 (1-10) ENL 6349 (5) ENL 6418 (5) Options: It is pos s ible at student option, to take ENG 6971 (thesis) in place of one of the elective courses. A student may transfer from another university up to 9 hours of graduate credit. He may take up to IO hours of credit in another department (the courses to be approved in advance by the Department of English Graduate Committee) A student receiving one grade of C or lower in a graduate course will be placed on academic probation A student receiving two grades of "C" or lower will be terminated from the program, subject to a review by the student's graduate a dvisory commit tee Comprehensive Examination i There will be a comprehensive examination The student will be asked to write on the following five areas: I. British literature before Shakespeare 2. British literature from Shakespeare to 1740 3. British literature from 1740 to 1900 4 American litc;rature before 1900 5. Twentieth Cebtury American and British literature Students will be graded 1 (Excellent), 2 (Good) 3 (Satisfactory) or 4 (Unsatisfactory). The Department will recommend students with a grade of 1 or 2 for admission to the Ph.D. pro gram A grade of 3 will satisfy the examination for the M.A. degree ; a grade of 4 will not. Public Presentation. Each student will be required to pre sent, before graduate students and faculty, a discussion of a major work or idea '.fhe performance will be evaluated by the student's examining committee. Thesis. Thesis optional (See Options above) . Requirements for the M.A. Degree in Junior College Teaching: This program is intended for those who ptan to teach in junior and community colleges It emphasizes lower-level college teaching. Requirements for admission. See M.A.. program above Course Work: 1. E DG 6947 (1-9) (Internship if re4uired-waivers must be endorsed by the College of Education) 2. EDH 6061 (4) 3. E DH 6938 (5) 4 RED 4337 (4) 5 The following English courses : a. ENG 6837 (5) (offering in advanced composition for teachets only) b LAE 6375 (5) c One of these : ENL 6304 (5) ENL 6333 (5) ENL 6349 (5) ENL 6315 (5) d One of these : ENL 6392 (5) ENL 6407 (5) ENL 6418 (5) e One of i these: AML 6132 (5) AML 6137 (5) f Five hours of English electives A student receiving one grade of '' C'' or lower in a graduate course will be placed on academic probation A student receiving two grades of" C" or lower will be terminated from the program, subject to a review by the student s graduate commit tee. Comprehensive Examination. There will be a comprehenisve examination. The student will be asked to write on the following five area s: 1. British literature before Shakespeare 2 Briti s h literature from Shakespeare to 1740

PAGE 61

3 British literature from 1740 to 1900 4 American literature before 1900 5. Century American and British literature Students will be graded 1 (Excellent), 2 (Good), 3 (Satisfactory), or 4 (Unsatisfactory). The Department will recommend students with grades of 1 or 2 for admission to the Ph D pro gram. A grade of 3 will satisfy the examination requirement for the M.A .; a grade of 4 will not. Public Presentation. Each student will be required to pre sent, before graduate students and faculty, a discussion of a major work or idea. The performance will be evaluated by the student's examining committee. Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree: Aim of the Program. The aim of this doctoral program is to produce teacher-scholars who have a good general knowledge of English and a special knowledge in their field of concentration. Each student in the program must take courses in teaching college English, and these courses include actual teaching experi ence The Ph.D. in English involves 50 hours of cour s e work beyond the M A degree exclusive of credits devoted to the doc toral dissertation In addition each student must achieve a grade of B or A in a foreign language course: FRE 2201, GER 2201, LAT 2231, RUS 2200, or SPN 2201; or must pass a reading examination in an appropriate language at an equ i valent level. A dissertation is required Requirements for Admission. M .A. degree and a grade of I or 2 on the University of South Florida English M A final examination. Transfer students who have the M.A in English must pre s ent a graduate average of at least B+. Students who do not have a M A in English will be required to take supplemen tary graduate work before being officially admitted to the pro gram Course work The following courses are required: ENG 6062 or its equivalent (2) ENG 7938 (5) ENG 7980 (var.) LAE 7376 (5) OR .LAE 7390 (5) and seven other courses in English at the 6000 or 7000 level. A student may transfer from another university up to 9 hours of graduate credit, Up to 10 hours of credit may be taken in another department (the course to be approved in advance by the Department of English Graduate Committee). A student receiving one grade of "C" or lower in a graduate course will be placed on academic probation. A student receiving two grades of C" or lower will be terminated from the program, subject to a review by the student's graduate advisory commit tee. COLLEGE OF ARTS AND LETTERS 59 Examinations After five courses beyond the M .A. the stu dent may take the required written doctoral comprehensive Examination in all periods of American and British literature (I. British literature to 1500; 2. British literature 1500-1660; 3. British literature 1660-1780; 4 British literature 1780-1890; 5 American literature to 1920; 6. American literature after 1920 and British literature after 1890)-writing for two hours on each period. The total exam will require twelve hours of writing Stu dents may take this examination only twice; a second failure disqualifies them from the Ph.D. program. Students passing this comprehensive examination and the foreign language course are admitted to doctoral candidacy. After completion of an approved dissertation the student will defend his dissertation in a two-hour oral examination and will be examined as well on his major field. The doctoral degree is awarded thereafter FOREIGN LANGUAGES (CLF/CLS/FOL/FRE/GER/IT Al RUS/SPA) Requirements for the B.A. Degree: Foreign Language major programs are designed to meet the needs of students who desire competency in a language and an expanded understanding of its culture and literature They are of particular interest to students who wish to teach languages, those who plan to further their studies in graduate school, and those who seek careers in various types of foreign or foreign-related employment either in government or business Major progf.llmS leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree are offered in Classics (Latin Latin-Greek), French, German Ital ian, Russian and Spanish All major programs in Foreign Language require a minimum of 48 hours of course-work above the intermediate level. The following languages may also be taken as a minor: French, German Italian Latin Russian, Spanish and Spanish / Portugese The minor consists of 24 hours of course work in the chosen language above the second year level. In order to begin taking courses for the minor, the student will have satisfactorily completed the intermediate level or have equiva lent proficiency in the foreign language Instruction in less comm'!nly taught languages is available upon sufficient demand. CLASSICS (CLS) Required courses for the Latin major 32 hours selected from the following : LNW 4311 (4) LNW 4381 (4) LNW 4312 (4) LNW 4500 (4) LNW 4322 (4) LNW 4501 (4) LNW 4361 (4) LNW 4660 (4) LNW 4362 (4) LNW 4665 (4) Supporting co urs es required for the major 16 hours selected from the following : ARH 4100 (4) CLT 3322 (4) ARH 4170 (4) CLT 3370 (4) CLA 4100 (4) EUH 2101 (4) CLA 4120 (4) EUH 2102 (4) CLT 3290 (4) EUH 3401 (4) CLT 3300 (4) EUH 3402 (4) LNW 4675 (4) LNW 4900(1-4) LNW 4930(1-4) EUH 3412 (4) EUH 3413 '(4) PHP 4000 (4) PHP 4010 (4) R equired cou r ses for the major, Latin-Greek option (36 er. hrs .) 24 hours in Latin (see Latin option above) and 12 hours in Beginning Classical Greek. Supporting cou r ses r equired for the major Latin-Greek o ption 12 hours selected from the list of s upporting courses given for the Latin major above. R equired courses for the Latin minor 16 hours selected from 4000 level courses in Latin Literature (LNW prefix )

PAGE 62

60 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND.LETTERS Supporting courses requiredfor the minor 8 hours selected from the following: CLT 3300 (4) EUH 3412 (4) EUH 3413 (4) CLT 3370 (4) Any of the following interdisciplinary electives are highly recommended for Oassics maiors and minors CLA 3000 (5) HUM 4433 (4) CLA 3851 (3) HUM 4434 (4) CLA 4930(2-5) LIT 3252 (5) CLT 3040 (4) LIT 3311 (5) HEB 3100 (3) LIT 3314 (5) HEB 3101 (3) LIT 3930 (1-5) HEB 3102 (3) PHM 4322 (3) HUM 3214 (4) REL 3210 (4) FRENCH (FRE) Required courses for the major (20 er hrs.) REL 3243 (4) REL 3310 (5) REL 3501 (4) REL 3502 (4) REL 3610 (4) REL 3936 (1-5) REL 4252 (4) REL 4265 (4) FRE 3240 (4) FRW 4230 (4) -FRW 4300 (4) FRE 3420 (4) FRW 4331 (4) Supporting courses required for the major 28 hours in 3000 4000, or 5000 level courses planned with the adviser. Required courses for the minor (eight er hrs.) FRE 3240 (4) FRE 3420 (4) Supporting courses required for the minor 16 hours in 3000, 4000 or 5000 level courses except courses in translation GERMAN (GER) Required courses for the major (16 er hrs.) GER 3240 (4) GEW 4100 (4) GER 3420 (4) GEW 4101 (4) Supporting courses required for the major 32 hours in 3000, 4000, or 5000 level courses planned with the adviser. Required courses for the minor (eight er. hrs .) GER 3240 (4) GER 3420 (4) Supporting courses required for the minor: -16 hours in 3000, 4000, or 5000 level courses except courses in translation ITALIAN (IT A) Required courses for the major (16 er hrs ) IT A 3240 (4) ITW 4100 (4) IT A 3420 (4) ITW 4101 (4) Supporting courses required for the major 32 hours in 3000 or 4000 level courses planned with the adviser. Required courses for the minor (eight er hrs ) IT A 3240 (4) IT A 3420 (4) Supporting courses required for the minor 16 hours in 3000 or 4000 level courses except courses in translation. RUSSIAN (RUS) Required courses for the major (16 er. hrs.) RUS 3400 (4) RUT 3110 (4) RUS4401 (4) RUT3111 (4) Supporting courses required for the major 32 hours in 3000 or 4000 level courses planned with the adviser. Required courses for the minor (eight er. hrs .) RUS 3400 (4) R US 4401 (4) Supporting courses required for the minor 16 hours in 3000 or 4000 level courses SPANISH (SPA) R equired courses for the major (20 er hrs ) SPN 3241 (4) SPW 4100 (4) SPW 4101 (4) SPN 3300 (4) SPW 4130 (4) Supporting courses required for the major 28 hours in 3000, 4000, or 5000 level courses planned with the adviser. Required courses for the minor (eight er. hrs .) SPN 3241 (4) SPN 3300 (4) Supporting courses required for the minor 16 hours in 3000, 4000, or 5000 level courses except courses in translatiQI_l_ Up to nine hours may be substituted for required courses and/or required supporting courses by successfully passing SPN 3470 (Overseas Study). Spanish/Portuguese Option Required courses for the minor Spanish/Portuguese option ( 16 er. hrs.) SPN 3241 (4) POR 3210 (4) SPN 3300 (4) POR 3211 (4) Supporting courses required for the minor Eight hours in 3000 or 4000 level Portuguese or Spanish courses except courses in translation Requirements for the M.A. Degree: Requirements for Admission. General requirements for graduate work are given on page 46 Students who do not fiave an undergraduate major in French or Spanish may be required to take additional undergraduate courses before being admitted to the M.A. program. The student must have a 3 0 grade point average over the last two years of undergraduate work attempted, or a total score of 1000 on the Graduate Record Examination. All applications must be ap proved by the Department of Foreign Languages Program Requirements. For a master's degree in French or Spanish, the following are required : 1. Reading proficiency in a second foreign language. 2 Satisfactory completion of a written comprehensive examination on French language and literature or Spanish and Spanish-American language and literature. The candidates will be given a reading list in their first quarter on campus to serve as a guide for their prepara tion Portions of the comprehensive examination must be written in the foreign language 3. A thesis written under the direction of an adviser and two additional professors. 4. Course work following one of the plans listed below: Plan A 40 hours in one language, plus eight hours of FRE 6971 or SPW 6971 (thesis). Plan B A total of 40 hours consisting of 28-32 hours of course work in one language, plus 8-12 hours in a second lan guage or in another department (the courses to be ap proved in advance by the Department of Foreign Lan guages' Graduate Committee), plus eight hours of FRE 6971 or SPW 6971 (thesis). HUMANITIES (HUM) The Humanities Program is an interdisciplinary curriculum that deals with the visual arts, music, literature and the culture from which they emerge. Secondary sources are used sparingly ; students are encouraged to make a vigorous, personal response to specific works of art, literature, and music. Requirements for the B.A. Degree: The curriculum for the Humanities major comprises inter disciplinary courses in the verbal, visual, and musical arts of specified periods and cultures. Course requirements are as follows : I. 41-53 credits among 4000 and 5000 level Humanities courses, with the option of up to eight hours being sub stituted from among the following four courses: CLA 3000, CLA 3851, CLA 4160, or CLA 4171. 2. HUM 4813, three credits. 3. HUM 4906, four credits. 4 Nine credits in the creative or performing arts

PAGE 63

Requirements for the Minor in Humanities: The curriculum for the Humanities Minor is comparable to that of the program for the B A. degree, but it i s less com prehensive Course requirements are as follows : !. Twenty-four quarter hour s of Humanities courses 2 Not over ten of these twenty-fou'r quarter hours may be taken at the 3000 level and no Humanities courses at the 1000 or 2000 leve l may be used to fulfill the minor requirement. 3 HUM 4813, 3 credits, is required. Requirements for the B.A. Degree in Humanities Education: A program designed to prepare secondary schoo l Humanities teachers is avai l able through the College of Educa tion For requirement s, see the College of Education, page 99 Requirements for the M.A. Degree in Humanities Education: A graduate program leading to the M .A. degree in Humanities Education (HUE) is availab le. For requirements see the College of Education page 99 LIBERAL STUDIES (ALA) Requirements for the B.A. Degree: The Liberal Studies Degree is conceived to fulfill the intent of the traditional Liberal Arts degree and is offered for students who require a broad academic approach for realization of their conceived academic or pre-professional goals. For admission to the program the student must (I) have a minimum of 30 (to a maximum of 120). qu arte r hours (2) have a minimum Grade Point Average of 3.0 at time of admission, and (3) submit a written proposal explaining the student's special academic circumstances and goals for which this major is air propriate Core Curriculum ( 16 hours minimum) IDS 3300 IDS 4344 (and 2 of the following three courses) IDS 3310 IDS 3320 IDS 4930 In the stude nt must complete the General Distribution Requirement s and four quarters of a foreign lan guage. The remaining 88 quarter hours will be devot e d to disci plinary study in the Liberal Arts disciplines. When admitted to the program, the student will formulate, in collaboration with the program director a program of studies to be pursued toward his or her particular academic goals LINGUISTICS (see COMMUNICATION) MASS COMMUNICATIONS (COM) The Mass Communications department, accredited by the American Council on Education for Journalism offers approx imately 70 courses varying in content from the highly technical and field-specialized in some cases to an essential liberal arts orientation in others. They introduce students to the theories principles, and problems of communications, emphasizing the concept of freedom of information as the cornerstone of Con stitutio nal Democracy and preparing students for future leader ship rather than yeoman roles in communication s media Graduates s hould under s tand the structure and functions of mass media s ystems as well as the basic processes of communication In addition, students specialize in an area of ma ss communica tions (advertising, broadcasting, film, magazines news-editorial public relations, or visual communications) to blend a strong COLLEGE OF ARTS AND LETTERS 61 introduction to profe ss ional skills with the theoretical orienta tion Majors seeking careers in the mas s medi a will be directed to the various media with which the department maintains close contact for summer internships and parttime work Requirements for the B.A. Degree: To be admitted to the core curriculum in Mass Communica tions student s must have completed 75 hours with a 2.5 minimum Grade Point Average and ENC 1102, 1135 and 1168 with a minimum grade of" C in each Both courses in the Mass Communications core curriculum (MMC 3100 and MMC 3602) must be completed with a minimum grade of C before any other Mass Communications course may be taken A 2.5 GPA in Mass Communications courses is required for graduation, and no grade lower than "C" in Mass Communications co. urses may be used toward graduation. A required core curriculu m Writing for the Mass Media" (MMC 3100) and "Mass Communications and Society" (MMC 3602), and a balance between required and recommended courses in the major sequence offer students a guided set of essential courses plus a number of options of their own choosing. Majors will take approximately 72 hour s of electives outside the department in addition to the 60-hour University distribution requirement. Students will be encouraged to u se a substantial number of their e lective s in courses which support their major. Required are 8 hours in the Mass Communications core curriculum (MMC 3100 and MMC 3602) and 40 hours in a major sequence-20 hours specified and 20 hour s to be selected from a restricted list of options-for a minimum and a maximum of 48 hours in Mass Communications courses within the 18(}.hour de gree requirement (132 hours outside Mass Communication courses) Eight hours in Mass Communications writing courses (four hours in addition to MMC 3100) are a part of"the 48-lioui graduation requirement. Certified typing ability of 35 words per minute is a prerequisite for admission to the department. A maximum of 12 quarter hour s in Mass Corrimunicalions courses will be accepted from a community college or other lower-level program toward s a degree in Mass Communications from the department. It is sugges ted that the 12 hours include the equivalent of the departmental core curriculum and one se quence introduction course Approval by an appropriate adviser is required At least twenty-four (24) hours of r esi d e nt departmental courses are required The departmental sequence requirements are : Departmental Core Curriculum MMC 3100 (4) MMC 3602 (4) Sequence Requirements Sequence Selections I. ADVERTISING Requirements ADV 3000 (4) ADV 3300 (4) ADV 3101 (4) ADV 3700 (4) Selective Requirements ADV 3103 (4) MMC 4200 (4) JOU 3100 (4) MMC 5400 (4) JOU 3205 (4) PUR 3000 (4) JOU 3206 (4) II. BROADCASTING Requirements New s Option JOU 3100 (4) RTV 3000 (4) MMC 4200 (4) RTV 3300 (4) Selecti ve R e quir e ments JOU 3101 (4) MMC 4300 (4) JOU 3306 (4) MMC 5400 (4) JOU 4104 (4) PUR 4601 (4) Programming and Production Option ADV 3000 (4) RTV 3100 (4) RTV 3000 (4) RTV 4500 (4) (8 er. hrs.) (20 er. hrs.) (20 er. hrs.) ADV 4801 (4) PUR 4601 (4) RTV 3000 (4) VIC 3100 (4) RTV 4700 (4) RTV 3230 (4J RTV 4301 (4) RTV 4700 (4)

PAGE 64

62 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND LETTERS Selecti v e Requirem e nts ADV 3101 (4) FIL 3100 (4) ADV 3103 (4) FIL 3200 (4) ADV 3300 (4) PUR 3000 ( 4 ) FIL 3004 (4) RTV 3210 (4) m. FILM Requirements FIL 3004 (4) FIL 4209 (4) FIL 4207 (4) FIL 4403 (4) Selective Requirements FIL 3100 (4) FIL 4205 (4) FIL 3200 (4) FIL 4206 (4) FIL 3201 (4) FIL 4208 (4) IV. J O URNALISM Requirements News-Editorial O ption JOU 3100 (4) JOU 4104 (4) JOU 3101 (4) JOU 4200 (4) Selective Requir e m e nts ADV 3000 (4) VIC 3100 (4) J O U 3300 (4) VIC 3102 (4) JOU 3306 (4) JOU 3205 (4) VIC 3000 (4) JOU 3206 (4) Magazine Option JOU3300 (4) MMC 4200 (4) JOU 3100 (4) JOU 4208 (4) Selecti v e Requir e m e nts ADV 3000 (4) JOU 3306 (4) JOU 3006 (4) PUR 3000 (4) JOU 3101 (4) VIC 3000 (4) v. PUBLIC R ELATIONS Require m ents JOU 3100 (4) PUR 4001 (4) PUR 3000 (4) PUR 4100 (4) Selective Requirements A D V 3000 (4) JOU 3101 (4) ADV 3101 (4) JOU 3205 (4) ADV 3300 (4) JOU 3300 (4) FIL 4300 (4) MMC 4200 (4) RTV 4205 (4) RTV 4220 ( 4 ) VIC 3100 (4) FIL 4404 (4) FIL 4300 (4) FIL 5601 ( 4 ) VIC 3100 (4) MMC 4200 (4) JOU 4500 (4) JOU 4202 (4) MMC 5400 (4) JOU 4200 (4) VIC 3100 (4) JOU 3205 (4) JOU 4104 ( 4 ) PUR 4601 (4) MMC 5400 (4) RTV 3000 (4) RTV 3300 (4) VIC 3100 (4) VI. VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS Requirements FIL 3004 (4) MMC 4200 (4) VIC 3100 (4) JOU 3205 (4) VIC 3000 ( 4 ) Selective R e qui r em e nts ADV 3000 (4) JOU 3100 (4) RTV 3000 ( 4 ) FIL 3100 (4) JOU 3101 (4) RTV 3100 (4) FIL 3200 (4) JOU 3206 (4) RTV 4220 ( 4 ) FIL 3201 (4) JOU 3300 ( 4 ) RTV 4301 (4) FIL 4207 (4) JOU 4208 (4) VIC 3102 (4) FIL 4300 (4) PUR3000 (4) VIC 4103 (4) Note: Most Mass Communications courses have prerequisite s They are specified in the course de s cription s pp 187. Refer to each prereq u isite listed to determine progressive prerequisites for each course. Note : There i s a M ass C o mmuni ca tions-Englis h Educatio n ( MCE ) majo r available through the Colleg e of Educati o n ( Sec page 97 for funhcr inform atio n ) Requ i r e ments for the M .A. D egr ee: The M A degree program in Mass Commun i cations i s de signed to serve the career objectives of persons experienced in mass media p r actice and of those who teach or who are interested in Mas5 Communications research The program requires a minimum of 48 quarter hours in course work including a thesi s Thirty-two of these hour s (including 8 hours for the thesi s ) are taken in the Department of Mass Communicat ions The remaining 16 hours are taken in graduate-level cour s es offered by other departments of the Uni versity Thu s a full time s tudent can c omplete the progr a m i n four quarters of work or longer for a part-time candidate Courses in the Department of Mas s Communication s will stress critical study of m ass medi a practice s and performance and the reciprocal effects of the media and the ir audience s on each other Cour s e s outside the department will be selected in the lib eral arts and/or bu s ine s s management area s to complement the student' s work in the major field of study For example, a s tu dent intere s ted in reporting urban affairs for a newspaper may elect supporting courses in and Politicar Science ; a student interested in advertising or public relations practice m a y elect courses in Marketing and Management ; another might choose to take courses in two or more disparate discipline s in several department s of the Univer s ity To be admitted to the program an applicant must: (l) have a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution and present a B or better average in undergraduate work ; (2) score 1000 or above on the GRE (Aptitude Test ) with 600 or above on the Verbal part; and (3) furnish a written statement of reasons for de s iring the graduate degree together with four letters of recom mendation Apply to the USF Director of Admissions for appli cation forms PH I L OSOPH Y ( P HI) Requ i rements for the B.A Degree: Majors in philosophy must complete at least 45 credit hours with the following courses required for graduation: PHI 3100, a nd four out of five of the following : PHH 3100 PHH 3272, PHH 3420, PHH 3440, PHH 4600. Majors must also take nine credit hours from among the following courses: PHH 4700 PHM 4340 PHP 4784 PHI 4320 PHP 4000 PHP 4788 PHI 4360 PHP 4010 PHI 5135 PHI 4800 PHP 4740 PHM 4331 PHP 4745 Require m ent s for the M i no r i n Philosophy : A minor in philosophy consists of the completion of at lea s t 25 credit hours which include three of the following course s o r an appro v ed sub s titute for one only: PHH 3100 PHH 342 0 PHH 4600 PHH 3272 PHH 3440 No credit taken on a n S / U ba s i s may be applied tow a rd the minor R eq u ire m e nts f or the M .A Degree: Requirements for Admi ss ion For a dmi ss ion s tudent s mus t have a "B" average in the last two years of undergr a du a te work or a score of at least 1000 ( composite) o n the GRE. Credit to ward the M .A. taken outside of the department or transferred from a n other in s titution must be approved by the Gradu a te Coordinator and the D epartment Chairper s on. Program Requirements. The following comprise the degree requirements in philo s ophy in addition to the general require ments for graduate work as specified on pag e 46 I. Reading knowledge of a foreign language approved b y the s tudent s a dvi ser. 2. 45 credit hours including 30 hour s of cla s sroom ins truc tion 3. A written or ora l comprehen s ive examination 4 A thesis type paper written under the direction of an adviser as s igned by the Graduate and approved after an oral defense by a three person supervi s ory committee Ho n ors Prog ra m The Department of Philosophy offers the philosophy major the opportunity of participating in the Philosophy Department Honors Program A student may graduate with departmental honors if he / she : (1) is accepted by the department as an honors candidate (2) completes four honor s courses with a grade point average of 3 5 or better and (3) completes the cours es necessary for a philosophy major with a grade point average of 3 2 or bet ter The four honors courses will con s ist of three upper-level courses in which t h e student attends regular class session s but ma)ces arrangements with the instructor for additional work The

PAGE 65

student will receive additional credit for honors work by enroll ing for one hour of directed study for each course taken as an honors course. The fourth honors course will be a research proj ect, and the student will enroll for the project under PHI 4905. RELIGIOUS STUDIES (REL) In Religious Studies students are afforded a variously dimensio ned field of study which should facilitate an educated per son's understanding of his presuppositions on the meaning of life, the nature of the religious-social milieu in which he lives, and the religious dynamic in human history It also aims toward an understanding of the religious thought and life-styles of people possessing religious heritages other than the Judaeo-Christian heritages Majors in Religiou s Studies will find, in addition courses designed to give depth in certain areas of religious investigation and to supply language tools and critical analysis methods which will prepare them for advanced graduate study Requirements for the B.A. Degree: A total of 49 credit hours are required for a major chosen from Religious Studies courses Of the 49 hours required for a major in Religious Studies, twelve hours may be selected from related courses in other departments, the prior approval of a departmental adviser. All Religious Studies Majors are required to take : I. REL 3000, 4 hrs 2 Two courses in the history and/or literature of the major western religions : e g., Judaism, Christianity Islam 8 hrs 3. Two courses in the history and/or literature of other major world religions: e.g ., Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, 8 hrs. 4. REL 4931, 4 hrs 5 Concurrently with REL 4931 or in the quarter following REL 4910, for I or 2 hours credit to be satisfied by the writing of a paper on a subject related to the REL 4931 seminar and supervised by an assigned faculty person. A stude nt majoring in Religious Studies may not apply to wards his major requirements more than twelve hours of credit from the directed readings course, REL 3900, or 'the under graduate research course, REL 4910. All transfer students must take a minimum of 37 hours in Religious Studies courses at USF. Each student s program must be planned with a faculty ad viser in Religious Studies. Requirements for the Minor In Religious Studies Twenty-four (24) credits in Religious Studies courses including the following: REL 3000, Introduction to Religion ; one course, 4 hrs., in a major Western religion ; one course, 4 hrs., in a major Eastern religion ; REL 4910, Undergraduate Research, 1-2 hrs ., a paper on a topic approved by the Department Chair person and supervised by an assigned faculty person. It is a Department requirement (intended to assist in the fulfilling of the above requirements) that the student declare him self as a Minor in the Department three quarters prior to graduation. Only letter grades will be counted toward the 24 credit hours necessary for the Minor. COLLEGE OF ARTS AND LETTERS 63 Ancient Studies Sequence Within the Dep a rtment of Religious Stud i es there is also a sequence of courses in Ancient Studies. This s equence provides a program for students interested in the civilizations of the Ancient Mediterranean a nd Middle Eas t. The seque nce in Ancient Studies requires 52-54 credits (of which 37 credits must be in Religious Studies cour ses) The pre requisite is normally two years of high school Latin or one year of college Latin (The latter can be taken concurrently with other required courses but without credit toward it It can be waived in special cases with the con se nt of the coordinator.) The sequence of Ancient Studies courses is to be arranged in consultation with the coordinator of the sequence and ap proved by the department chairperson For related interdisciplinary electives see Cla ssics. Judaic Studies Sequence The Department has a sequence of courses in Judaic Studies A student may fulfill the requirements of the Depart ment for the B .A. degree (49 hrs.) by taking the core courses in the Judaic Studies Sequence and the remainder of his/her c ourses from the listed electives CORE: REL 3000 Introduction to Religion REL 3610 History of Judai s m REL 3612 Modern Judaism REL 4221 Bible I Law REL 4224 Bible II Prophets REL 4228 Bible III Writings TOTAL ELECTIVES (select 26 hrs.): ANT 4367 Culture s of the Middle East ASN 3030 The Middle East HEB 3100 Basic Hebrew I HEB 3101 Basic Hebrew II HEB 3102 Basic Hebrew III LIT 3311 The Bible as Literature LIT 3314 The Talmud as Literature LIT 4930 Hasidic Literature to 4 hr s 4 hrs 3 hrs. 4 hrs 4 hrs 4 hr s. 23 hrs 4 hr s. 4 hrs. 3 hrs. 3 hrs. 3 hr s 5 hrs. 5 hr s. Yiddish Theater 5 hrs. LIT 4930 Modern European and American Jewish Literature 5 hrs. REL 3201 Land of the Bible 4 hrs REL 3280 Biblical Archaeology 4 hrs REL 3600 Introduction to Judaism 4 hrs REL 3900 Directed Readings 1 5 hrs REL 4295 Dead Sea Scrolls 4 hrs. REL 4910 Undergraduate Research 1-5 hrs. REL 4931 Seminar in Religion 4 hrs. With the approval of the Department Chairperson, substitutions may be made in both the core and elective courses where the changes are considered to be in the student's best interest. SPEECH COMMUNICATION (see COMMUNICATION)

PAGE 66

COLLEGE OF BUSll\JESS ADMINISTRATION The College of Business Administration offers courses of study leading to both undergraduate and graduate degrees. These pro grams are designed to prepare men and women for careers in business and public service. The undergraduate curriculum which leads to a Bachelor of Arts degree i s composed of severa l segments: (I) broad general education in the arts, humanities and sciences; (2) the common body of knowledge for management responsibilities: (3) specialized areas of concentration in Accounting, Economics, Finance, Management, Marketing and General Business including International Business ; and (4) opportunities for breadth in both business and nonbusiness s ubjects Through flexibility in its requirements the College is able to satisfy the different inter est and career objectives of students with diverse backgrounds. The undergraduate program is accredited by the American A s sembly of Collegiate Schools of Bu siness. Graduate programs in the College are designed to: I. Make graduate level professional education available to qualified men and women who seek managerial career positions in business government, or education 2. Support adequately the research activity so vitally neces sary to maintain a quality graduate faculty and program. 3. Foster independent, innovative thinking and action as a professional individual. 4. These programs include M B A ., Master of Accoun tancy, M.A. degree in Economics and M S,. degree in Management Baccalaureate Level Degree Programs General Requirements for Degree Satisfactory completion of 180 academic quarter hours Of the 180 hours, business course credits may vary from a minimum of 87 to a maximum of 100; non-business course credits may vary from a maximum of93 to a minimum of80. The variance depends upon the major field chosen and the mixture of General and Business Electives. The requirements for graduation are : Quarter Hours General Distribution I. English II Fine Arts & Humanities III. Mathematics and Quantitative Methods IV. Natural Sciences V Social and Behavioral Sciences Business Core ACC 2001 ACC 2021 ACC 3301 BUL 3112 coc 2201 ECO 2013 ECO 2023 ECO 3101 FIN 3403 GEB 2111 GEB 3121 MAN3010 MAN 3810 MAN 4720 MAR 3023 Elementary Accounting I Elementary Accounting II Accounting for Management Control Busine ss Law I Computers in Business I Economic Principles : Macroeconomics Economic Principles: Microeconomics I ntennediate Price Theory Principles of Finance Business & Economic Statistics I Bu siness & Economic Statistics II Principles of Management Introduction to Management Science Senior Seminar in Administration Ba sic Marketing 60 8 ( min .) 8 (min.) 8 (min.) 8 (min.) 8 (min.) 60 (3) (3) (3) (5) (3) (4) (4) (5) (5) (3) (5) (5) (4) (3) (5) 64 Major Areas* 20-36 (Accounting, Economics, Finance, General Business, Management, Marketing) Electives sufficient to reach 180 hours MAC 1104 or MAC 2242 or the equivalent is required for all s tudents enrolled in the College of Busine ss Administration. This course is a prerequisite to many courses in the College and must be completed early in the student's program A grade point average of2.0 must be achieved in a major field for students to be certified for grac!..:ation except in accounting where an average of 2.25 is required Students wanting to major in any specific area s hould refer to that department' s requirements. Admission to College Programs Undergraduate Programs New students and students currently enrolled at USF, with a grade point average of 2.0 or higher, may be admitted to the College by (I) attending a College orientation and (2) filing a signed declaration of major fonn with the undergraduate studies office. Transfers from Junior/Community Colleges: Junior / community college students should complete the program of general education at the junior/community college Students pursuing the associate degree in university trans fer/parallel curricula at the junior/community college should take two semesters of mathematics to include a course in pre-calculus mathem atics, two semesters of accounting principles, two se mester s of economics principles, and one semester of statistics. Students pursuing associate degrees in tenninaVcareer prog rams must be aware that some courses taken at the junior / community college may not be acceptable at the upper level institution toward baccalaureate programs Students should avoid taking any courses at the junior college which are listed as 3000 and 4000 level courses at USF. Normally courses in fi nance marketing, management and accounting as well as ot h er

PAGE 67

business administration and economic courses taken at the lower division level which are offered as upper division eourses at US F will not be accepted for upper division credit in business ad ministration or economics. Exceptions to this policy will be made only upon proper validation of such courses. Validation consists of CLEP or other written examinations prepared and administered by the College of Bu siness Administration, USF. Transfer Students From Other Colleges and Universities: Transfer credits ordinarily will be accepted from accredited institutions in the amount earned; however, all hours earned may not always be applied towards graduation. Indiyidual courses will be evaluated and appropriately credited toward require ments in the student's program at the University of South Florida. Student Advising and Records The Undergraduate Studies Office provides the following services for College of Business Administration students: l. Academic advising and program information for all un dergraduates. 2. Orientatiori for all students applying for admission to the College of Business Administration. Such orientation is mandatory prior to acceptance. 3. Registration, drop / add, and general College of Busine ss Administration and university policy information for business students, both graduate and undergraduate. 4. Evaluation of transcripts of transfer students sind main tenance of academic advising records on all admitted stu dents Programs and Curricula GENERAL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (GBA) Students with special objectives and career interests h ave the opportunity to develop a n undergraduate program to meet these needs. Working closely with a faculty adviser, students may design an approved plan of study which will contain 27 to 40 hours of business courses beyond the undergraduate Business Core. No more than 16 hours of these courses may be in any single business discipline The program shall a l so contain suc h non-busine ss electives as will contribute to the acade mic obje.: tives of the st udent. ACCOUNTING (ACC) The Accounting program offers st udent s the opportunity to enter directly into the fields of professional accounting, management account ing and not-for-profit accounting. The professional a1:counting option prepares the student for a career in public accountancy, the management accou nting option pre pares the st udent for a career in manufacturing, retailing, and/or service organizations, and the not-for-profit option prepare s the student for a career in federal, state, and/or local government as well as other not-for-profit entities Departmental advisers will assist st udents in designing programs to meet specific career ob jectives. Requirements for the B.A. Degree Students admitted to this program must complete 28-36 cred its in upper level accounting courses, 60 credits in the Business Core and 24-32 credits of General Electives. Of these electives, not less than 20 credits nor more than 32 can be taken outside the College of Business Administration. Students who are admitted to this program must take GEB 3211, Business Communications, COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 65 or ENC 3455, Advanced Expository Writing Accounting majors must take the course: Calculus for Busine ss Students. Account ing majors can use the forgivenes s policy only once in upper level accou nting courses. A grade point average of 2.25 in upper level co ur ses in .accounting is required to be certified for graduation. Accounting courses taken by accounting majors on an S / U basis will not be counted toward the 180 hour graduation re quirement. Independent Research ACC 4914, will not be ac cepted as credit toward the 28-hour minimum degree require ments in the accounting concentration. Required Accounting Courses (28-36 credit hours) ACC 3 IOI Intermediate Accounting I (4) ACC 3121 Intermediate Accounting II (4) ACC 3141 Intermediate Accounting III (4) ACC 3401 Cost Accounting and Control I (4) ACC 4501 Federal Taxes (4) ACC 4601 Auditing (4) plus 4-12 credits from the following : ACC 3730 Accounting Information Systems (4) ACC 4201 Advanced Accounting (3) ACC 4221 Consolidated Financial Statements (4) ACC 4421 Cost Accounting and Control II (4) ACC 4521 Federal Taxes (4) ACC 4934 Selected Topics in Accounting (1-5) ACC 5935 Selected Topics in Accounting (1-5) Total (28-36) Accounti n g majors must earn a .. C" grade in each of the sequential upper level accounting courses before being allowed to go on to the next course, i .e., ACC 3101, 3121, 3141; ACC 3401, 4421, 4501, 4521. Students wishing to qualify to take the CPA examination in the State of Florida must have earned a minimum of27 credits in upper level accounting courses if application is made prior to August 2, 1983. In order to be adequately prepared for tbe uni form CPA examination students should include ACC 3730, ACC 4221, ACC 4421, and ACC 4521 in their programs. If application for the CPA examination is made after August I, 1983, an additional 45 quarter hour s in excess of those required for the baccalaureate degree are required. The total educational program must include 54 quarter hours in upper level accounting and 58 quarter hours in general business education. Any further questions concerning the CPA exami n ation should be directed t o the faculty of the Department of Account ing. ECONOMICS (ECN) Economics is one of the vital disciplines investigating the complex problems and relationships in modem society. Indeed the very breadth of economics has l ed to major areas within the discipline including labor economics, international economics urb a n and regional economics, monetary economics, public fi nance, industrial organization, comparative economic systems, and the like. Students are grounded in economic theory and economic statistics to facilitate the investigation of the problems of human behavior, decision-making, and organizational effec tiveness in these problem areas. Student s majoring in economics are, encouraged to s upplement their programs with courses in other business and social science subjects Management, fi nance, marketing, accounting, political science, psychology, sociology, and others contribute greatly to an enriched plan of study. A student may plan the best possible program to help h_im achieve his particular career objectives Similarly, a variety of courses in economics are designed to permit students majoring in other disciplines to acquire the skills and insights provided in economics. Requirements for the B.A. Degree Within the 180 quarter hour program as listed on page 64 students must complete 26 to 28 hours of upper level economics beyond business core requirements.

PAGE 68

66 COLLEGE OF BUS.INESS ADMINISTRATION The economics courses required are: ECO 3203 Intermediate Income and Monetary Analysis (5) ECO 4303 History of Economic Thought (5) a dditional upper level economic courses (16-18) Total (26-28) Students a re encouraged to selec t 3000 level courses in sev eral of the app lied areas during their junior year. The remaining economics e lective s shall be se lected from those 3000 and 4000 level courses that provide the type of program that best suits the student's intere s t s and objectives. Additional flexibility in pur s uing these interests is provided by the ECO 4905 and ECO 4914 courses. However, not more than 10 hours of credit may be earned in ECO 4905 and ECO 4914. Students interested in majoring in economics are encouraged to contact the academic advisers for more information about the program In addition the department maintains a file describing the varied career op portunit ies for economists in busine ss, government, and educa tion Requirements for a Minor in Economics A student m ay minor .in economics by completing 26 or more credit h ours in economics as follows: (a) A mino r must include the se four courses in ba sic eco n omics: ECO 2023 Economic Principles I : Microeconomics (4) ECO 2013 Economic Principles II: Macroeconomics (4) ECO 3101 Intermediate Price Theory (5) ECO 3203 Intermediate Income & Monetary Analysis (5) (b) In addition, a minor must include two or more upper level cou r ses t aug ht in the Economics Department (ex cluding the variable cre dit cou r ses ECO 4905, 4914, and 4935), bringing the tot a l credit hour s in economics to a minimum of 26. GEB 3121, Business and Economic Statistics I I or its equivalent i s acceptable for credit in a minor. (c) Before being recognized as a minor in economics, a stu dent must obtain approval by the adviser in the Eco n omics Dep ar tment of the courses involved in the studen t s minor program. ( d ) A grade point av erage of 2.0 or better must be achieved in the minor coursework for a s tudent to be certified for graduation with a minor in economics. (e) At least 18 of the required 26 credits must be taken in re s idence at USF. FINANCE (FIN) The Fin a n ce program provides bro a d-gauged analytical training for s tudent s a nticip at ing a ca reer in the management of both large and small organizat ions. Students see king a financial career in business or with financial ins titutions or careers in the field of insurance and real estate s hould find the finance major particularly valuable In a ddition the program in finance is de signed to prov ide the flexibility needed by stu dents who seek professional degrees in areas s uch as l aw and public administra tion. The Finance program offers a pplied and theoretic .al courses directed t o the identification a nd so lution of such problems as the acquisition of and allocation of scarce funds as employed by economic units under co ndition s of uncertainty in both the pri vate a nd public sec t ors and in the domestic and multi-national environment. Finance uses an interdisciplinary approach which draws on economic theory acco unting information systems, and the quantitative decision framework of statistics and mathematics T h e required courses for finance major s focus on under sta nding the a n a lytical tools and instit utional e nvironment for deci s ion makers. It includes capital budgeting the concepts of asset and liability management, and the examination of the economic, social, and regulatory impact upon the decision making process Requirements for the B.A. Degree Within the 180 quarter hour program as listed on page 64, students must complete 20 to 27 hours of upper level finance courses. Required finance courses: FIN 3233 Money and Banking FIN 44I4 Advanced Corp<>ration Finance FIN 4504 Principles of In vestments Additional upper level finance courses Total MANAGEMENT(MAN) (4) (4) (4) (8-I5) The undergraduate program in the of Manage ment requires the integra tion of knowledge froli\ various course areas to manage human and technological resources Courses are offered in the basic areas of organizational behavior, industrial relations and quantitative and computer technology. Under graduate students majoring in management will have the oppor tunity to concentrate in special interest areas such as administra tive decision processes, management information systems, industrial relations, small business management, and organiza tional management Students interested in one of these areas should see a Management department adviser as early as possi ble to arrange a program of courses. It is recommended that students include courses in calculus, mass communications, sociology, political science, social psy chology and personality in their general electi ves. Requirements for the B.A. Degree Within the 180 quarter hour program as listed on page 64, students must complete 20 to 27-hours of management. Up to 6 credit hours of non-management upper level courses may be accepted toward the management major on approval by the department chairperson. Majors will also be required to take the integrative policy course (MAN 4933) in one of the final two quarters their program. This will be integrated into the stu dent's area of concentration in Required management courses: MAN 3I50 Organizational Behavior Analysis MAN 3401 Industrial Relations MAN 4933 Integrative Seminar in Management Additional upper level management courses (4) (4) (3) (12-16) 'total 23-27 MAN 4720, Senior Seminar in Administration, (3) may be substituted to meet this requirement. MARKETING (MKT) Marketing "is a dynamic field with many dimensions, including product selection and planning, product distribution pricing and promotion. Marketing ppses many challenges and yields generous rewards for those meeting these challenges Marketing operations are carried out domestically and interna tionally in virtually all business organizations offering a product or service. Many marketing concepts are applicable to the oper ations of non-profit organizations such as governmental, educa tional and health care institutions as well as charitable and politi cal campaigns. Marketing operations provide the most visible links between the firm or institution and its many publics Marketing in the end

PAGE 69

deal s with people people who are constantly changing in their needs, want s and de s ire s ; and coupled with these changing tastes i s a fier c el y competitive environment s u s t a ined by all the re source s of a ra pidly evolving technology These forces lead to much of the challenge-to much of the dynamic nature of mar k e ting The Marketing Program The market ing program at US F prep a res s tudent s for initial entry and management positions in many areas of marketing with a curriculum that i s concerned with : I. Understanding consumer behavior and the broader envi ronment within which the firm or institution operates ; : 2 Collecting analyzing and using information about cus tomers, competitors and the environment for managerial deci s ions; 3 Distributing products effectively and efficiently from pro ducer to user ; 4. Advertising and promoting the offerings of the firm or institution effectively ; 5 Creatively and effectively managing a s ales force selling industrial or consumer goods and services ; and 6 Managin g r etail and o/hole s ale operations including the conceptualization, implementation and evaluation of the buying merchandising and control functions Each student is strongly encouraged to set up his own plan of study with the assi s tance of a Marketing department faculty a dvi s er. Such counseling c a n lead to a better definition of career objectives and will result i n a plan of s tudy that is con s i s tent with each s tudent's career objective s Undergraduate students not majoring in marketing are en co uraged to take s elected offerings from the marketing cur ric ulum to broaden their backgrounds and to prepare for marketing-related po s it i ons in bu s iness or non-profit organiza tion s. Requirements for the B.A. Degree Within the 180 quarter hour progr a m as lis ted on page 64, s tudent s must complete 26 to 30 hours of marketing. A curriculum Planning Guide is available in the College of Business Administration Undergradutae Studies Office. It is s trongly recommended that students cons ult this guide before the i r fir s t quarter of study as market ing majors. Required marketing courses are: MAR 3503 Consumer Behavior MAR 3613 Marketing Research MAR 4713 Marketing Management Problems 4000 level marketing courses other than (3) (4) (4) MAR 4713 additional upper level marketing courses Total (9) (6-10) 26-30 The following sequences of courses are recommended for students with interests in industrial marketing and sales man a gement promotion, and retailing Other programs are possible and students are encouraged to consult with a Marketing de partment faculty member t q set up a plan of study to accomplish individual objectives. Industrial/Sales Management MAR 3403 Pnnciples rC>fSalesmanship-and $.ales Management MAR 4203 Marketing Institutions and Channels MAR 4453 Industrial Marketing plus 5-9 markeiing credits Promotion MAR 3303 MAR 4343 Principles of Advertising and Sales Promotion Management of Advertising and Sales Promotion (3) (4) (3) (3) (3) COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 67 MAR 4353 Public Relations and the Marketing Proce ss plus 6-10 marketing credit s Retailing MAR 3153 MAR 4203 Retailing Management Marketing Institutions and Channels plus 8-11 advanced marketing credits Regional Campuses (3) (3) (4) Due to limited enrollment and faculty only the following majors are offered at the R e gional Campuses: St Petersburg Accounting Man a gement and general Business Adminis tration Sarasota Accounting a nd Gen e r a l Bus ine ss Administration Fort Myers General Bus ine ss Administration Student s may other bus ine s s majors while attending these location s, but mus t be prep a red to finish their major study requi r ements a t a nother c ampus within the University Student Organizations Within the College of Business Administration All s tudents a re enc ou r ag ed to participate in extracurricular ac tivitie s The following org aniza tion s provide a means for stu dents to develop both profe ss ionally and s ocially while attending the College of Bus iness Administration : Beta Alpha PsiThe national professional accounting fraternity devoted to the promot i on of the profession, inspiring profes s ional ide a l s, and recognizing a cademic achievement. Beta Gamma Sigma Honorary society which encourages a nd rewards out s tanding s cholar s hip among bus iness students Black Business Student's Organization-Encourages and supports bla ck students in their efforts to achieve success in a demanding academic setting. Delta Sigma Pi-Fosters the study of business and a close a s sociation between students and the business world Economics Club-Provides a forum for discussion of economic issues, and actively encourages communication be tween the economics faculty and all students interested in economics. Phi Chi Theta-A career oriented professional organization that encourages the study of business Pi Sigma Epsilon-A professional society interested in mar keting s ales management and selling Student Accounting Organization-Promotes accounting both as an academic discipline and as a profession. Student Advisory Board-An organization who s e represent atives from each of the major fields advise the Dean of the Col lege and the faculty on student attitudes and goals Student Finance Association-An organization for finance majors providing expo s ure to the many facets and opportunities in the field of finance

PAGE 70

68 COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Management Institute College of Business Administration The com po sition of the Management Institute has provided the College of Business Administration with a vehicle for m aking specia l service s available to the community which could not be provided through the traditional academic program. In return for these services, the College receives the benefit of having real world applications for the knowledge and sk ills of its faculty and students. This Inst itute, which was created in 1979, hou ses three Centers which are designed to provide teaching research ; and information to the public and private sector communities served by the University of South Florida These Centers are: I The Center for Small Busines s Development ; 2. The Center for Economic and Management Services ; 3 The Center for Profe ssio n a l and Management Development ; The common o bjective of these Centers is to facilitate two-way communication between the University and the business/gov ernmental communities to share knowledge a nd solve problems. The Center for Small Business Development offers ass istance in facilitating the initiation and growth of entrepreneurial forms of private enterprise. It offers workshops and individual consul tation. A continued su pport system is provided for its clients to ensure successful implementation. Faculty member s stu dents under faculty direction provide assis t a nce on feasibility s tudies for new business organizations and for expansio ns of the product line s of existing business firms : The for Economic and, l\lanagement Services provides human and materi a l re sou rce s to assis t pr ivate and pt1blic enter prises to de a l with contemporary an d regional problems The Center has three primary m eans of providing service The first i s a data s upply function which publi s he s a periodic economic data news letter offers census data through a Summary Tape Proce ss ing Center assists other organizations in the development of data such as office space a b sor ption information, and offers in formation on a wide range of national economic dat a The seco nd mean s of providing service is an information retrieval function which employs traditional search procedures but goes far beyond that in the innovative "library without books" approach to information retrieval. This service provides the sort of computer-based research techniques employed by corporate inform a tion centers, but which typically are not found in universities In addition to teaching the College's students the kind of information which is available through non-traditional methods the Center is able to serve smaller corporations and busines ses who otherwise would not have ready access to this sort of information. The third funetion of the Center for Economic and Management Services is to provide the accessibility to faculty and students under faculty direction to perform research for busi nesses and public agencies. The Center for Professional and Management Development provides specialized credit and non-credit training and education opportunities to public and private sector decision-makers. These opportunities take the form of conferences, seminars, and short courses Programs on such topics as energy, government regulation, inflation, economic prospects for the future, and urban development are in demand. The Center also responds to the need in the community for courses of varying length to bring current development in their fields to professional people. A fourth center, The Center for Economic Education, not part of the Management Institute, is jointly managed by the Col lege of Education and the College of Business Administration to provide human and material resources to facilitate the under standing of the American free enterpri s e system by school teachers and students. It offers access to audio-visual and print materials, in-service training in the use of programs such as trade offs, and economic education consultants. The Center facilitates interaction between business persons, teachers, and students

PAGE 71

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 69 GRADUATE LEVEL DEGREE PROGRAMS The College of Business Administration at US F offers a number of graduate programs, including the Master of Busines s Administration Master of Accountancy, Master of Arts degree in Economics, and Master of Science degree in Management. Evening and day courses are scheduled in such a way as to a llow either part time or full time to complete all program requirements within a reasonable length of time. Applicants to graduate programs in the College of Business Administration should apply directly to the University Graduate Admissions Office and must meet the Univers ity requirements for admission (see page 46) Applications are expec ted to de monstrate the ability to perform s uccessfully in graduate studies in business. General inquiries should be directed to A s sociate Dean & Director of Graduate Studies, College of Business Ad ministration University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620. Admissions Admission to 'the graduate programs in the College of Busi ness Administra:tion is open to qualified men and women holding an undergraduate degree in arts, letters, science, humanities, engineering, or business from an accredited institution in the United States or from a recognized academic ins titution in a foreigh country. In making admission deci s ions the College does not favor any particular academic discipline nor does it make any distinction between applicants w i th experience and those coming directly from an academic program The important factors besides the GMAT (Graduate Management Admission Test) and GPA (Grade Point Average) are the applicant' s moti vation in undertaking graduate work and the degree of focu s in the applicant's career plans for the future. In addition, students are evaluated based on work or experience, maturity, and leadership qualities Students are admitted for any of the four quarters, however, Quarters I and III are the preferred starting quarters for the student who requires all or approxi mately all of the Foundation Courses. All applicants are expected to demonstrate the ability to perform successfully in graduate studies. To be admitted all stu dents must meet the requirements below: 1. Applicant must possess an undergraduate degree (any discipline) from a regionally accredited institution and follow General University guidelines for applying for graduate study as outlined in the current USF Catalog 2. Submit satisfactory GMAT scores for the M B A. M .Acc, and M S degree in Management. Applicant s for the M A. degree in Economics must satisfactory GRE scores. Scores on both the GRE and GMAT must be those taken within five years preceding application See information on specific criteria for admission (page 47) 3. Possess acceptable undergraduate grade point average. Candidates offering grade point averages less than 3 0 (B) are expected to achieve higher than normal scores on admission tests. 4. Submit three letters of recommendation (upon request only). Specific admission criteria by program are as follows : M.8.A. AND M.S. DEGREE IN MANAGEMENT 1. Minimum critena-ApPlieant \jiust score 1000 or higher using the formula: Undergraduate GPA (last two years) x 200 + GMAT total score. 2 The applicant who has a minimum Undergraduate Grade Point Average of 3 0 and a minimum GMAT score of 475 is usually admitted without additional supporting data. 3 An applicant may offset a low UGPA with a higher GMAT score or vice versa. When the applicant scores between 1000 and 1075 on the above stated formula, ad ditional evidence is required. Usually the applicant is invited for an interview and also asked to submit a written statement outlining goals and objectives, strengths and weaknesses. The applicant may also be asked-to submit letters of recommendation in support of the application TIIE MASTER OF ACCOUNTANCY 1. A score of 475 or higher on the GMAT, and 2. Cumulative 3 0 grade point average (B) in all work while registered as an upper division student working for a baccalaureate degree. 3. Cumulative 3 0 grade point average (B) in all accounting courses taken as an undergraduate. 4 Students who do not pave the equivalent of an undergraduate degree in accounting at USF, including an accounting s y stems course, may be required to take addi tional courses. The number of additional courses deemed necessary will depend on the a c ademic background of the individual student. M.A DEGREE IN ECONOMICS 1. Score of 1000 or higher on the G RE, and 2 3 0 grade point avera ge (B ) or better in all upper division undergraduate work. Students interested in specific program s within the college should contact the appropriate graduate studies adviser: M .B.A.-Associate Dean Charles A Mcintosh, Jr. Di-rector of Graduate Studies. M .Acc.-Associate Professor William H Parrott. M A degi;ee in Economics-Professor Howard Dye. M.S. degree in Management-Professor Harold Allen. Special Students See Special Students" paragraph in Graduate Studies Section (page 48) for general instruct i ons The College of Bu s iness Administration will accept no more than nine hours of credit earned as a Special Student, to satisfy degree requ irements, without the written permission of the Director of Graduate Studies in the College. To be eligible to register for graduate courses, he/she must meet the following conditions : 1 Be a graduate of a regionally accredited undergraduate institution 2 Have a completed application on file with the Office of Graduate Admissions This includes having the required academic transcripts. 3 Have an undergraduate GPA of 3.0 or better in the last two years of full academic study 4. File !\ Special Student application with the College of Business Admini stration at lea s t three weeks prior to the beginning of the quarter. 5 Be approved as a Special Student by the Director of Graduate Studies, College of Business Administration Approval is a selective proces s. The Special Student status is usually approved for only one quarter. The most common delay in an acceptance decision i s the lack of GMAT scores. Special Students are expected to take the G MAT at the next administration following entry in this category. Normally, no more than nine (9 ) credit hours earned as a Special Student may be applied toward the graduate degree Academic Standing 111 Masters candidates are expected to maintain a cumula tive grade point average of 3 0 (B ) throughout their program Failure to maintain the B average pl aces the 'student on aca demic probation. Any student on academi c probation for two consecu tive quarters i s subject to dismissal The part time student must earn a cumulative (B ) average in the first 12 credit hours of graduate study, otherwis e will be subject to dismissal

PAGE 72

70 COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AOMINISTRA TION THE MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (M.B.A.) DEGREE The Master of Bu s ines s Administration (M.B.A.) is a profes sional degree designed to prepare graduates for managerial roles in business and not-for profit organizations. Graduates will de velop the necessary skills and problem -s olving techniques that will permit them to make an early co ntribution to management and to eventually move into broad, general management responsibilities at the executive level. The program is designed to meet the needs of qualified men and women with degrees in the liberal arts engineering, the sciences, and humanities as well as those with prior preparation in business administration The College makes no distinction in the selection process between applicants with experience and those coming directly from academic life However experience is a meaningful background which will permit the student to better understand the subject matter to be mastered The faculty utilizes various delivery systems in the class room, namely, the traditional lecture / discu ssi on case method simulation, model building and laboratory techniques. These methods emphasize an analytical, conceptual, and theoretical balance throughout the program which helps sharpen students' resourcefulness in sorting complex problems and selecting opti mal courses of action Students are given many opportunities to demonstrate their writing and verbal competency and improve interpersonal communication Program and Curriculum The M B A program requires a maximum of 76 quarter hours and a minimum of 48 quarter hours. The full time student without course waivers will require two years (six quarters) to complete the program. Part time students who attend classes only in the evening can complete all work within a reasonable period. Students who have completed undergraduate courses in business and economics may receive course waivers and reduce their course load from the maximum requirement. Courses are scheduled to accommodate both full time and part time students. All cour s es are at the graduate level. Students are expected to have sufficient competency in mathematics and communication skills to make the academic transition a smooth experience The Curriculum consists of: Foundation Courses: These courses are designed to provide the basic background in the several functional areas in order to prepare for more advanced studies. The courses assume little or no prior knowledge in the field Students having adequate pre vious preparation in any of these courses may seek a waiver subject to the standards set by the faculty. The conditions for waivers are explained more fully below. Selective Courses: A select group of courses are identified that will insure breadth in the course of study. A limited number of courses are available from which the student will select three courses, one each in any three of the specified areas : Accountirig, Economics Finance Management and Marketing Elective Courses: These courses emphasize the flexibility of the program by continuing the breadth emphasis and pennitting the student to develop one or more areas of concentration. Stu dents are limited to 14 hours in a single field of concentration Integrative Course: All students are required to take a course in a dministrative business policy. The course is taken in the last sequence of courses to permit the student to integrate the subject matter acquired in earlier cour s es by the study of administrative processes.'under conditions of uncertainty including integrating analysis and policy determination at the overall management level. General: All students must satisfactorily complete a com prehensive examination A six credit hour thesis is optional and may be taken as an elective Program Foundation Courses GEB 6705 Financial Accounting for GEB 6716 GEB 6725 GEB 6745 GEB 6756 GEB 6757 GEB 6775 MAN6065 MAN6715 Managers (4) Microeconomic Analysis (4) Financial Management (4) Marketing Management (4) Statistical Methods for Management (4) Quantitative Methods for Operations Management (4) Information Systems for Management ( 4 ) The Management Process (4) Social, Legal and Political Environment of Business (3) Sub-total Other Required Cour:ses ACC 6412 Management Accounting and Control Macroeconomic Analysis Business Policy GEB 6717 GEB 6895 (4) ( 4) (4) Sub-total Selective Courses One course from each of three of the following areas (One course may be in the field of concentration.) Accounting Advanced accounting course Economics Finance ECO 6436 Advanced Business Fluctuation and Economic Forecasting (3) ECP 6705 Advanced Managerial Economics (3) FIN 6246 Advanced Money and Capital Markets (3) FIN 6446 Financial Policy (3) Management MAN 6107 Managerial Behavior (3) MAN 6409 Management of Conflict (3) MAN 6569 The Management of Operations (3) Marketing MAR 6708 Analysis for Marketing Management (3) 35 12 Sub-total 9-12 Elective Courses Limited to 14 hours in a single field of concentration Sub-total 17-20 Total Credit Hours: Maximum 76 qtr hrs. Minimum 48 qtr hrs. General 1 At least 23 quarter hours beyond the Foundation courses and Business Policy must be in departments outside the field of concentration. 2 When a course from the Selective Group is taken as part of the field of concentration, this will be included as part of the 14 credit hour limitation 3 A minimum of 48 quarter hours of graduate courses is required for graduation (See Waiver Policy below) 4. At least one course with an emphasis in international business is required. 5 Student must take at least one course within the program in each 'of the academic departments Waiver Policy A reduction of the 76 credit hour program may be accom plished by waiver of Foundation Courses and Macroeconomics as determined by the appropriate department based on : (1) tran script analysis if the student has completed a minimum of six semester hours or nine quarter hours (departments may require

PAGE 73

additional hours) in the field, with grade of "B" or better from an AACSB accredited school and completed within the last five years; or (2) subject examination requested by the student. International Business Students are required to take at least one international busi ness course in their programs. The student may also obtain a concentration in the field by taking the several courses offered by the various departments. Concentrations Students are encouraged to have at least one area of concentration in their overall graduate programs. These concen trations may be in Accounting ; Finance, Management, Market ing and International Business Thesis Students may elect a 6 credit hour thesis subject to departmental approval in any of the areas of concentration of the College. M.B.A. with Concentration in Finance Students seelqpg;, graduate education with a concentration in the field of Finance should enroll in the Master of Business Ad ministration Program. In addition to the M.B.A Core, students would choose a finance course in the selective category as well as a minimum of 9 elective hours in Finance. Areas of interest in the finance program include Corporate and Managerial Finance, Banking and Financial Institutions Money and Capital Markets, Investments International Finance, and Finance Theory A thesis can serve as part of the elective course work; however no thesis is required. Students electing the M.B .A. with concen tration in Finance should meet with the chairperson of the Fi nance departmt'.nt at the beginning qf their M.B.A. Program. M.B.A. with Concentration in Marketing Students in the Master of Business Administration I:'rogram may concentrate in the iu;ea .of Marketing by selecting 9 hours of electives in Marketing. Course topics include: marketing re search; problems and strategies in industrial marketing con sumer marketing and international marketing ; and marketing in public and private non-profit organizations. A thesis can ser-ve as part of the elective course work; however, no thesis is required. Students electing the M B.A with concentration in Marketing should meet with the chairman of the marketing department at the beginning of their M B.A. course work. THE MASTER OF ACCOUNTANCY (M.Acc.) DEGREE Requirements for the Master of Accountancy Degree: The Master of Accountancy Program is designed to meet the increasing needs of business, government, and pu blic ac counting for persons whc i' have professional training in account ing as well as backgroun d in such ill'eas as quantitative methodology economic analysis and management science. All students are required to satisfy the Common Body of Knowledge as indicated in ihe M B A Program (page 70) This may be satisfied through completion of coursework in the various areas. The academic adviser will determine the specific courses and number of hours required. For the student who has the equivalent of an undergraduate major in accounting at USF, the program consists of approx imately 48 quarter hours A minimum of 18 quarter hours of the program is devoted to the study of professional accounting. Another 19-21 -quarter hours of the program consists of study in the related areas of financial management, economics, manageCOLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 71 ment science quantitative decision models the soc ial, legal, and political environment of business, and business policy. The re maining 9-11 quarter hour s of the program are elected by the student in consultation with his/her graduate adviser. Elective courses taken in the area of accounting may not exceed 8 quarter hours Required Courses are: Accounting Courses (18 er. hours) ACC 6451 Management Cost Analysis and Control ACC 6511 Federal Tax Re searc h and Planning ACC 6691 Ethics and Responsibilities in Professional Accountancy ACC 6745 Systems Theory and Quantita tive Applications ACC 6805 Contemporary Accounting Thought ACC 6811 Development of Accounting Thought Business Courses (19-21 er. hours) ECO 6414 Managerial Statistics FIN Advanced Money and Capital Markets GEB 6716 Microeconomic Analysi s (o r ECO 6115 -3 er.) GEB 6717 Mac roeconomic Analysis (or ECO 6206 -3 er.) GEB 6895 Business Policy MAN 6715 Social, Legal and Political Environment of Busine ss depending upon sJudent's background in economics Electives (9-11 er. hours) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (4) (4) (4) ?;'-'(3) At least one of the elective courses must be taken outside the field of accounting. The Master of Accountancy program may be modified to meet the new State of Florida CPA requirements. THE MASTER OF ARTS (M.A.) DEGREE IN ECONOMICS Requirements for the M.A. Degree: The M A degree in Economics is offered by the College of Business Administration Applicants should submit results of the Graduate Record Examination Aptitude Test and meet other University requirements spec ified on pages 46-51 The prir:nary requisites for success in graduate study are s trong motivation, aptitude, and basic intellectual ability. An undergraduate major in e c onomics is not required but a sound background in eco nomic theory, mathematics and statistics will permit completion of the master's program in the normal time span of one y ear The Master of Arts degree in Economics permits students to select one of three approaches. The first emphasizes terminal professional training to prepare the s tudent for decision making and problem solving roles in business and other organizations. The second approach prepares the student for doctoral work and teach jng in secondary and junior college educational institutions In the third a pproach students may emphasize public sector economics. The primary object ive here is to provide the skills necessary for the performance of a nalysis and policy formulation in the public sector-particularly at stat e and local levels. The fields of economics s tres sed are public economics urban economics, and industrial organization. Particular atten tion is devoted to such topic s as pla nning programming, budgeting, cost-benefit analysis public revenue sources issues in fisca l federalism technique s of income redistribution, models of urban growth and development intra-urban location patterns analysis of urban social patterns and problems anti-trust and other forms of government regulation business

PAGE 74

/ 72 COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AH three approaches involve preparation in economic theory and quantitative methods. Students in the professional programs then supplement these skills with courses in applied economics Students preparing for doctoral studies normally take additional courses in economic theory, mathematics and statistics. Students selecting public sector economics emphasize applied economics Work in other areas, particularly the social sciences may be an integral part of these programs. Research and the writing of a thesis may be incorporated into any of these approaches. The nature of the thesis subject indicates the area of specialization and interest. The economics department participates in the Junior Col lege Teaching Program jointly with the College of Education as outlined qn page 86. Students must satisfy all University requirements listed on' page 51. In addition, the department requires students to com plete 45 hours of graduate credit selected with the approval of the graduate adviser of the department. At least 35 hours must be in economics These 35 hours must include : ECO 6115 Micro-Economics (3) ECO 6206 Aggregate Economics (3) ECO 6305 History of Economic Thought (5) ECO 6414 Managerial Statistics (3) Prior to clearance for the degree, each candidate must perform satisfactorily on a comprehensive examination TllE MASTER OF SCIENCE (M.S.) DEGREE IN MANAGEMENT Requirements for the Master of Science Degree The purpose of the graduate program in Management is to develop excellence in the practice of managing people and resources in the pursuit of shared goals in task-organizational environments. Students will be admitted who have already dem onstrated high motivation and excellence, or the promise of ex cellence in managing in public or private organizations. Courses offered in the graduate program in management will be integrated through the completion of projects in ongoing organizational settings. A proportion of class time is devoted to the development of skills in managing, and students will be re quired to demonstrate excellence in the practice of managing as well as in knowledge about management. The Management department offers a variety of innovative delivery methods in the M.S. program Special interest sections or classes have been formed in the fields "of urban management and in health management. In these sections classes are block scheduled; that is, all students in a special interest section take approximately the same set of courses and remain togethe1 for the duration of the program In some sections the department also offers non-traditional scheduling designed to fit the needs of participating students; e g., some sections meet for eight (8) hour periods on weekends. These methodologies facilitate learn ing through team interaction and other laboratory procedures
PAGE 75

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION The College of Education places an emphasi s on students learning what is relevant for the world today and on their getting deeply involved in their own educ a tional process. Thus, the emphasis is on s tudents learning to do their own thinking about themselves and their universe. The College of Education is committed to a continuous and systematic examination of the professional program of teacher education. Promising programs are examined experimentally under controlled conditions, which make possible an objective appraisa l of effects in terms of learning outcomes. The University of South Florida follows a University-wide approac h to teacher education Its programs for the preparation of teachers represent cooperative effort in planning and pr a ctice by faculties of all academic areas. Courses needed by teacher candidates but de s igned also for other s tudent s are offered out side the College of Education. Cour ses in the University which are primarily de s igned for teacher cand id ates are taught by the College of Educ a tion. In the total teacher education program there is a s pecial concern for developing in the s tudent a deep interest in intellectual inquiry and the ability to inspire thi s interest in others It is the ta s k of the College of Education to give leadership to the instruction in subject matter and process which means the total teacher education program. College of Education Student Organizations and Activities College of Education Student Council The College of Education Student Council represents the interests of education majors in regard to policies and needs of the college. The Council consists of four officers (Presi dent, Vice President, Secretary-Treasurer, Secretary Assistant) representative s from the various area s in the College of Educa tion, and s even Senators representing the College of Education. Elections are held a nnu a lly in January and all education majors are eligible to vote for all officers and the representatives of their respective areas Any student majoring or coded in the College of Education with a minimum GPA of 2.0 can be a candidate for election as a n Officer, Representative or Senator Student Florida Education Association The Student Florida Educ a tion Association is the profe s s ional organization that represents all the pro s pective teachers on the USF campus. As a member of SFEA, you also become a member of the Florida Ed u cation Association and the National Education Association. These organizations comprise the largest suc h group in the world Many benefits a re available to you through the organization and, in addition, you are working with a club dealing with your main interest-education. All students in the field of Education, including freshmen, are encouraged to join this professional organization Association for Childhood Education International The Association for Childhood Education is a non profit professional organization concerned with the education and well-being of children two to twelve years of age. Members are located throughout the United States an d other countries 73 The USF chapter works directly with chi ldr en through ob servation, projects, and programs In addition, it provides opportunity for students to attend study conferences throughout the state of Florida which allows the student an opportunity for profes s ional growth and exchange of professional ideas. Membership is open to all students, including freshmen, con cerned with chi ldr en two to twelve Student Council for Exceptional Children The Student Council for Exceptional Children i s an organi zation of tho s e members of the University int erested in the edu cation of the exceptional-"different"-child. Various ex ceptionalities included are Gifted Emotionally Dis turbed, Physically Handicapped Ment ally Retarded, and Culturally Different. Activities of the USF Chapter include field trip s to various special education facilities, prominent s peakers se m i nars sta te and national conventions, and social events. The s pecific activi ties are determined by the member s and the exceptionalities in which they are interested. All interested s tudents are invited t o join. Student Music Educators National Conference Student Music Educators Conference i s an affiliate of the Music Educators National Conference and the Florida Music Educators A ss oci a tion. It is devoted to the furtherance of knowledge and understanding of music education on all levels. Membership is open to any student in the University of South Florid a who is interested in the te ac hing of music Phi Beta Lambda Phi Beta Lambd a is a business fraternity open to all stu dents, including freshmen, expressing an interest in Business The emphasis is on promoting free e nt erprise and instilling leade r s hip qualities Kappa Delta Pi Kappa Delta Pi is a national co-educational honor society in Education. The society was founded to recognize and encourage excellence in scholarship, high personal standards, improvement in teacher preparation and distinction in achieveme nt. Physical Education Association (PEA) The Physical Educat ion Association (PEA) is open to all students enrolled in the Physical Education Progr am. Social and professional meetings are conducted throughout the year to pro mote interaction within the organization Student Guidance Organization (SGO) The Student Guidance Organization i s a Guidance Organi zation for graduate students presently enrolled in the Guidance Program. Social and professional meetings are conducted throughout the year. Members also participate in annual retreats and attend district and state meetings. Mathematics Education Clinic The Mathematics Education Clinic is mission-oriented in a broad sense in that it is primarily concerned with children a nd youth who evidence learning problems in mathematic s How-

PAGE 76

74 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION ever, an important purpose of the clinic is one of obtaining hypotheses that can be studied to obtain generalizable pro fessional knowledge to improve the teaching and learning of mathematics. Clinical, corelational, normative and experimental ap proaches are used in the study of the etiology and symptoma tology of mathematical learning disab'ilities General models and specific teaching strategies are provided the classroom teacher and the student-clinician for carrying out effective diagnostic and prescriptive programs. Close professional relations are maintained between the Mathematics Education faculty and the appropriate faculties in the College of Education whose interests and professional skills are related to the work of the Clinic. Library Student Association (LSA) LSA is a professional organization associated with the Library, Media and Information Studies Department and is open to all members of the university community interested in librarianship The USF group provides programs and guest speakers of interest to the campus cbmmunity and publishes a newsletter for its members. It is the official voice of students in the department and members of the association are included on faculty-student committees within the department. The Distributive Education Clubs of America (DEC.A) The College Chapter of DECA is an integral part of the Distributive Education Teacher Preparation Program at the University of South Florida and provides Distributive Education majors with leadership opportunities, social experience, learning activities and professional involvement. The participation in the many activities of Collegiate DECA is required of undergradu ate majors and is encouraged for graduate students. Black Organization of Students in The Black Organization of Students in Education was or ganized Quarter III, 1978. A constitution was written and sub mitted for approval. BOSE stands provisional as a university organization until confirmation. BACCALAUREATE LEVEL DEGREE PROGRAMS Admission to the College While students admitted to the University are expected to have the qualifications to graduate, this does not necessarily mean they have the qualifications to become teachers. The College of Education administers the admission policies to all teacher programs Of the University. All students who plan to teach must apply for admission to a teacher education program through the Student Personnel Office of the College of Educa, tion Prospective secondary and K-12 teachers are enrolled in teacher education programs involving both the College of Edu cation and various other colleges of the liberal arts areas Admission to an upper level teacher education program is contingent upon meeting the following minimum college re quirements: I Completion of a College of Education upper level appli cation form. 2. Completion of the General Distribution requirements for Education majors. Provisional admission may be granted if no more than three individual General Distribution courses remain to be taken, provided Freshman English has been completed 3 Completion of a minimum of 90 quarter hours. 4. An overall grade point average (GP A) of 2.0 5. Students must submit a score from the American College Test (ACT) that was completed no longer than three years prior to their application It is recommended that this test be taken not more than one year prior to the application deadline. Admission to the programs will be based upon the applicant's performance on either the ACT (minimum score of 17) or the SAT (minimum score of 835) Students who meet all other admission require ments but who do not achieve the ACT or SAT minimum test score may still be considered for admission as a11 exception. 6 Additional criteria established by each program. (See Admission to Programs below ) Admission to Programs Admission to some programs is based on additional selection criteria beyond the College requirements stated above Some programs accept a limited number of students. Additionally, selected programs admit student s only in specified quarters Stu dents should refer to the specific program descriptions for addi tional admissions Information regarding admission requirements for the program(s) of your choice may be obtained from the Student Personnel Office, College of Education, US F Appro v al of these program a dmissi o n criteria i s pending Admission Deadlines to the College Physical Education and Health Education programs only admit students for Quarter I of each year. The application deadline for Quarter I is April I for both of these programs. Students applying for Elementary or Exceptional Child Education programs are encouraged to apply at least one month prior to the University deadlinesfor the quarter of intended ad mission. Admission to Internship Experience The internship experience is observing and teaching in ele mentary, secondary, or exceptional schools Time, sequence, and location of experience may vary among the programs. (Refer to specific prpgram for further information.) Special requirements for enrollment in the internship and seminar courses are: I Admission to the College of Education. 2. Completion of General Distribution Requirements. 3. Completion of an application for internship 2 quarters before desired quarter. 4. Completion of the professional education sequence and a minimum of two-thirds of specialization, varying with the program, and a minimum of 2.0 grade point average 5. An overall 2 0 grade point average 6. Successful completion of proficiency exams. Areas of examination vary with programs. See program for spe cific requirements. 7. Acceptance by a school approved by the College of Edu cation and the Florida Department of Education Application for internship must be made two quarters prior to term in which experience is desired, except when the program has specific tracks and dates for applications to be submitted. The applications may be obtained in the Internship & Field Experience Office. Fall Quarter (I) applications are due QY last week of the Winter Quarter (II) of the previous school year. Winter Quarter (II) applications are due by last week of the Summer Quarter (IV) of the previous school year Spring Quarter (Ill) applications are due by last week of the Fall Quarter (I) of the same school 'yea r :

PAGE 77

Summer Quarter (IV) applications are due the last week of the Winter Quarter (II) of the same school year if and when summer internships are available. Admission to Classes The control of entry to all classes on all campuses will rest with the department chairperson. Each department will establish and publish priorities for allowing College of Education, other university, and special students to enroll in classes. Students who are registered in a class but fail to attend classes during the first week may be dropped from the class roll. College Requirements for Graduation A student to be certified by the College of Education as having completed its requirements must have earned 180 quarter hours credit, including the last 45 credit hours on campus, with a minimum overall grade point average of2.0. An average of 2 0 or better also must be made in the student's professional education sequence and in his teaching specialization courses. Satisfactory completion of the internship is also required. A student must also have completed the majpr requirements in an approved teaching program (which includes general preparation, teaching speciali zation, and professional preparation). A minimum of 12 credits in professional co urses in addition to internship and 18 credits in specialization courses must have been earned in residence The student must complete a minimum of 45 hours after admittance to an upper level program. Since 15 hours is considered a normal full-time load, stu dents are reminded that programs requiring more than 180 credit hours may require additional quarters for completion of the pro gram COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 75 Specific Requirements A minimum of 180 credit hours including the following: General Distribution .. ................................... 60 credit hours Professional Education Core .. .................... 40-48 credit hours Teaching Specialization ...... .................. .41 to 73 credit hours Program Requirements .............. .... Check individual program descriptions for requirements beyond the College minimum As part of the 180 credit hours minimum requirement for graduation, students may include elective courses. These courses should be selected in consultation with a faculty adviser. The College of Education permits students to count, as part of the 180 hour requirement, courses in Elective Physical Edu cation and up to 12 hours of USF Army ROTC credits. The College of Education will not permit either USF lower level students or transfer students to transfer '' D'' graded course work which is part of the professional core or specialization re quirement. However, a "D" grade earned for such work taken after the student has been admitted to the college will be ac cepted for credit. Department of Education Requirements for Teacher Certification College of Education programs are reviewed by the Florida Department of Education. Those programs meeting the require ments of Chapter 6A-5, Rules of the State Board of Education of Florida, are given" Approved Program" status These rules are subject to rapid changes and programs must change accordingly to maintain their "approved" status. Program requirements listed in this catalog are those necessary for graduation. Students wishing to graduate and to be eligible for teacher certification must complete all requirements as listed on current program checklists maintained in the Student Personnel Office. All graduates who apply for initial regular certification on or after July l 1980 will be required to pass the written teacher certification examination. Additional information on this ex amination is available in the Student Personnel Office. Programs Leading to the Baccalaureate Degree The College of Education has programs leading to the Program_ Department Code Bachelor of Arts degree in the following fields: Industrial-Technical Adult & Vocational Education Education (EVl) Program Department Code Mass CommunicationsSocial Science/Letters Art Education Art & Music Education (ARE) English Education Education (MCE) Botany Education Science & Health Mathematics Education Mathematics Education (MAE) Education (BOE) Mental Retardation Exceptional Child Business & Office Adult & Vocational Education Education (EMR) Education Education (BTE) Music Education Art and Music Education (MUE) Chemistry Education Science & Health Physical Education Professional Physical Education (CHE) Education (PET) Classics Education* Social Science/Letters Physics Education Science & Health Education (CLE) Education (PHE) Distributive and Adult & Vocational Science Education Science & Health Marketing Education Education (DEC) Education (SCE) Elementary-Early ChildChildhood and Language Social Science Education Social Science/ Letters hood Education Arts Education (EEC) Education (SSE) Elementary Education Childhood and Language Specific Learning DisExceptional Child Arts Education (EDE) abilities Education Education (ELD) English Education Social Science/Letters Speech CommunicationSocial Science/Letters Education (ENE) English Education Education (SED) Emotional Disturbance Exceptional Child Zoology Education Science & Health Education Education (EEO) Education (ZOE) Foreign Language Social Science/Letters Educationt Education (FLE) Departmental Section for specific program requireHealth Education Science & Health ments. Education (HES) Humanities Educati<>n Social Science/Letters LatinEnglish Education or Latin-Foreign Language Education Education (HUE) t In a single language two foreign languages or Foreign Language-English.

PAGE 78

76 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION Teacher Education Programs There are three distinct areas in the teacher educational pro gram, and all teacher candidates must meet certain minimum requirements in each. The three areas and their requirements are as follows: 1. General Distribution (60 er. hrs.) The five areas of General Distribution and the specific re quirements are as follows: Area I English Composition: Freshman English (ENC 0013 or 1102, and ENC 1135, 1168) Area II Fine Arts and Humanities: Any course offered by the Department of American Studies, Art, Communication (excluding all LIN prefixes except LIN 2200, 3010, 3801), Dance, English (excluding ENC 0013, 1102, 1135, 1168, ESL 1385, REA 0105), Foreign Languages, Humanities, Liberal Studies, Music, Philosophy (excluding PHI 3100), Religious Studies, Theatre. Area III Mathematics and Quantitative Methods : MAE 3810, MAE 3811, MTG 3204 for any program requiring MAE 4310 ; a minimum of eight hours of courses offered by the Depart ment of Mathematics and/or any computer service course (COC, COP, CDA) and/or any of the following courses : Business and Economjc Statistics (GEB 2111, 3121), Logic (PHI 3100) Social Science Statistics (STA 3122 ) Area IV Natural Sciences: A minimum of eight hours of courses in Astronomy, Biology (including botany, microbiology and zoology), Chem istry Geology, Physics and/or Introduction to Oceanography (OCE 3001) Area V Social and Behavioral Sciences: (A minimum of 16 hours is required in AREA V as speci fied below) I. Behavioral Science a) For all programs PSY 2012 and SOC 2000 II Social Science a) For programs requidng SSE 4313, AMH 2010, 2020. b) For all other programs a minimum of eight hours of courses offered by the department (or programs) of Afro-American Studies, Gerontology, Anthropology, Criminal Ju s tice, Geography, History, Political Science, Psychology, Socioiogy Interdisciplinary So cial Sciences (excluding ST A 3122), Women s Studies and /or any of the following Contemporary Economic Problems (ECP 1001) Educational Psychology (E OF 3210), Survey of Mass Communications (MMC 3000) Courses required for a student's major program will not be counted in the total 60 hours although areas of general distri bution requirements may be waived where appropriate A stu dent will be limited to 12 hours in a single department toward distribution requirements in any area. Students may not elect to take any of the above S I U. 2. Professional Education Core (40-48 credit hours) The required courses in thPprofessional education core are as follows : EDF 3214 Human Development and Learning ( 4) E OF 3604 Socil,ll Foundations of Education or EDF 3542 Philosophy of Education E DG 4200 Curriculum & Instruction Methods Course(s) Internship & Seminar Reading Requirement Educational Measurement Requirement (4 ) (5 ) (4-12 ) (15) (4-9) (4) 3. Teaching Specialization Preparation (41-73 credit hours) Course requirements in the area of teaching specialization vary according to subject field of These speciali zation requirements are listed with the programs that follow in the Departmental Section MASTER'S LEVEL DEGREE PROGRAMS Admission Candidates for admission to gradu ate study must present satisfactory evidence of : I. Undergraduate grade point average of 3 0 (B) minimum on the l ast half of the baccalaureate degree; or QRE aptitude score -1000 minimum 2 Any additional requirements specified by the program 3. Receive favorable recommendation from department chairperson. Filing of Program During the first term of graduate study the candidate for the master s degree must file a planned program of studies. This Graduate Planned Program is to be completed in consultation with the adviser. The completed report should be filed with the Coordinator of Graduate Studies in the College of Education. Quality of Work Candidates for the master's degree must maintain a 3.0 GPA. If at any time the student's GP A falls below the minimum, the student will be placed on probation. During the probationary status the student's academic progress will be reviewed to determine : I) removal from probation. 2) continuation on pro bation 3) drop from graduate program. Residency The candidate for the master's degree will be required to meet the residency requirement established by each program area Consult the appropriate program area for details. Comprehensive Examination During the last term of enroliment, prior to completion of degree requirements, the candidate must perform satisfactorily on a comprehensive examination Process Core Examination Graduate students with sufficient undergraduate back ground may take the Process Core Examinations after consulta tion with their advisers Successful performance on the ex amination enables a student to waive the course requirement but he must take elective courses in .lieu of the hours required The Process Core Exa'minations are in the Foundations of Measure ment, Psychological Foundations and Social Foundations of Education. Graduate students on a Plan II Master's Program (see below) are not eligible to take the Core Examina tions unless they have had a comparable course at the under graduate level.

PAGE 79

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 77 Master of Education Programs Administration and Supervision Requirements for the M.Ed. Degree (ESA): Thi s Master of Education (M.E d.) degree is to prepare admin istrator s an d supervisors with organizational manage ment, and instructional leadership skills. Admission require ments include: (I) certification in a teaching field, (2) at least two years of successful teaching experience or Rank II certification in an instructional area, (3) current US F graduate admission re quirements, (4) College of Education requirements for admission to graduate study. Successful completion of the program lead s to the M.Ed degree and Florida certification in Administration and Supervision. Curriculum and Instruction Requirements for the M.Ed. Degree (CUR): This is a practitioner rather than a research degree No spe cific research and thesis will be required. The objective of this program is to prepare classroom te ac hers in instructional leader s hip and te a ching skills through graduate study in a se lected variety of courses in curriculum, method s, s uper.vision lea rning principles, hum an interaction and areas of specialization which m ay include courses in other colleges. To be admitte d to this program the applicant must be certi fied and have two years of teaching experience. The degree requires at least 50 quarter hours with 60 percent or more at the 6000 level. Programs will consist of 16 quarter hours of Process Core and will a l so contain E DG 6667, Analysis of Curriculum and Instruction For all students the remainder of the (minimum) 12 quarter hours of required concentration and (minimu m ) 18 quarter hour s in area of specializatio n will be determined by and with the student and the student's committee Successful com pletion of the program will lead to the Master of Education de gree. The Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction is avai l able in most curricula areas in which the M.A. is offered See the Departmental section for more detailed descriptions. Programs Leading to the Master of Arts Degree Qualified persons may pursue graduate study in the follow ing majors : Program Department Code I Adult Education Adult and Vocational Education (A DE ) Art Education Art & Music Education (ARE) Business and Office Adult a nd Vocational Education Education (BTE) Distributive and MarketAdult and Vocational ing Education Education ( DEC) Elementary Education Childhood/Language Arts Education (E DE) Emotional Disturbance Exceptional Child Education Education (EED) English Education Social Science/Letters Education (ENE) Foreign Language Social Science/Letters Education* Education (FLE) Gifted Education Exceptional Child Education (EGI) Guidance & Counseling Counselor Education (EOG) Educa tion Humanities Education Social Science/Letters Education (HUE) Industrial-Technical Adult and Vocational Educatio n Education (EVT) Library, Media and Library, Media and InformaInformation Studies tion Studies Education (LIS) Mathematics Education Mathematics Education (MAE) Mental Ret a rdation Exceptional Child Education (EMR) Music Education Art & Music Education (MUE) Physical Education Profe ssional Physical Education (PET) Reading Education Re a ding Education ( RED) School Psychology Psychological an d Social Foundations of Education ( PSE) Science Educationt Science & Health Education (SCE) Socia l Science Education Social Science/Letters Education (SSE) Specific Learning Exceptional Child Disabilities Education Education (ELD ) Speech Communication Social Science/Letters Education Education ( SPH) Department Code Junior College Teaching Educational Leadership Biolog y (BI090) Business (BUS90) Chemistry (CHM90) Economics (ECN90) Engineeringtt (EGP90) English (E G N90) French (FRE90) Geography ( G PY90) Geology (GL Y90) History (HTY90) Mathematics (MTH90) Physics (PHY90) Political Science (POL90) Sociology (SOC90) Spanish (SP A90) Speech Communication (SPE90) See Departmental Section for specific program requirements Frenc h German or Spani s h t With co n centratio n s in Biolog y, Chemistry. or Physics tt E ngineering bachelor's degree req u ired College of Educat i on

PAGE 80

78 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION Program Plans of Study Plan I Plan I is a program of graduate studies designed for those with appropriate certification who desire to increase their competence in a subject specialization or receive professional preparation in one of the service areas of education. A. Process Core (4-16 hours) Students will take a minimum of one Process Core (Foundations) course. Substitution for the remaining courses may occur upon the advice of the Degree Pro gram and concurrence of the College Program Policy Committee. Process Core: a EDF6431 b. EDF 6481 c. EDF 6211 or EDF 6215 d. EDF6517or EDF6544or EDF6606 8. Current Trends Course in Teaching Specialization ( 4 hours) C. Specialization (27 hours minimum) The areas of specialization beginning below are suggested programs of study. Individual programs will vary with background experience and s pecific interest. Plan II Plan II is a program of graduate studies designed for the holder of a non-education baccalaureate degree who desires to meet initial certification requirements as part of a planned program leading to the Master of Arts degree. (This program is not avail able in the area of elementary education : ) A. Core (21 hours) a. EDF 6431 b EDF 6481 c. EDF 62tt or EDF 6215 d. EDF 6517 or EDF 6544 or EDF 6606 e. EDG 5206 8. Current Trends Course in Teaching Specialization ( 4 hours) C. Specialization (27 hours minimum) This is an individually planned graduate major in the teaching field or. in an appropriate College of Education program for K-12 specialists. D. Internship (9 hours) Enrollment will be EOG 6947 which involves planned observation and supervision by a member of the U niver sity faculty and a secondary school staff member. In service teachers are required to complete this assign ment over two quarters. Students should have completed the professional requirement and 2/3 of the requirements in the area of spc cialization at the graduate level or an equivalency (using hours taken in the field of specializa tion taken at the undergraduate level to complete the 2 / 3 requirement). Plan Ill Plan III is a program of graduate studies for holders of a non education baccalaureate degree who do not wish to meet teacher certification requirements in the State of Florida. The primary difference in t.his plan from Plan II is that students will not be required to take EDG 5206 and EDG 6947. A. Process Core (16 hours) a EDF 6431 b EDF 6481 c EDF 62tt or EDF 6215 d. EDF 6517 or EDF 6544 or EDF 6606 8 Current Trends Course in Teaching Specialization ( 4 hours) C. Specialization (27 hours minimum) This is an individually planned graduate major in the teaching field or in an appropriate College of Education program for K-12 specialists. ADVANCED GRADUATE EDUCATION Goals: The College of Education is a professional school which offers advanced degree programs for a variety of specialized educational practitioners and for researchers. A major goal of the advanced graduate program is to contribute to the improvement of public schooling through the preparation of highly competent practitioners and preparation of researchers. All programs have as their central focus the development and the application of disciplined inquiry skills Rigorous inquiry expands and improves the theoretical and the informational bases upon which instructional and administrative practices are developed From this orientation the following objectives are derived: I. To foster disciplined and rigorous inquiry into educa tional practices, theories, and proposals. a To create a vigorous community of scholars having complementary proficiencies in inquiry b. To promote and to encourage conclusion-oriented inquiry to provide a base of veiified concepts and theories for education. c. To promote and to encourage decision-oriented in quiry as a means for extending the validity of find ings from conclusion oriented investigation and to aid in the development of verifiably better practices and policies in education d To promote the development of alternatives to existing theories and practices. Such alternatives developed out of an a-political criticism of existing practiaes contributes to the development of an educational system which is responsive rather than wedded to practices on "non-educational grounds. 2 To conduct training programs which will a Contribute to the maintenance of the proficiency of the membership of the system through in-service traini'ng and eonsultation. b Maintain the performance level in the systems and extend professional / personal opportunities by pro viding programs for personnel in teaching areas and in the areas of administration, supervision other school services (guidance school psychology, etc.), curriculum. c Train personnel to conduct different types of in quiry so that the system is self-correcting. d. Produce personnel able to design training programs based on the results of both conclusion-oriented and decision-oriented inquiry so th;lt school sys tems can be both self-sufficient and responsive. 3. To form a center that can assist educational clientele in the design of in-service training programs, in planning, in evaluation of projects, and in developing strategies for coping with other unanticipated problems related to schooling and education.

PAGE 81

Programs: Ed.S. Program The Education Specialist (Ed.S.) program offers specilization in Curriculum and Instruction with emphases in curricular areas such as Adult Education Communication Education, Early Childhood Edu cation, Exceptional Child Education, Guidance and Counseling Education, Library, Media, and Information Studies, Mathematics Education, Measurement and Evaluation, Reading and Language Arts Education, Science Education, and Vocational and Technical Education The Ed S degree is also available in Educational Administration and Supervision and Educational Program Development. This degree consists of a minimum of 48 quarter hours (includes 8-12 hours specialist pro ject) beyond the master s degree and is more flexible in its re quirements. Candidates for admission to Ed.S. study must present satisfactory evidence of: I. Undergraduate Grade Point Average of3.0 (B) minimum on the last half of the baccalaureate degree; or GRE ap titude score-1000 minimum (Quantitative and Verbal), or a master's degree. 2 Three letters of recommendation. 3. Favorable recommendation from program chairperson. 4 An earned master's degree. 5. Any additional requirements specified by the program. Application deadlines for admission to Ed.S. study are May 15 (for quarters IV and I) and November 14 (for Quarters II and Ill). School P syc holoay is a n exception to this requirement Ed.D. Program The Doctor of Education Degree is available with specializa tions in Educational Administration/Supervision and Edu cational Program Development. The focus of this degree pro gram is on the improvement of educational practice Program content and method designed to improve practice shall be plan ned within the context of four basic components: I) Specializa tion, 2) Foundations, 3) Research, and 4) Language / Computer Science. Although research skills are recognized as being the basis of any doctoral program the Ed. D. is considered less a research thari a practitioner degree. A partial list of existing professional roles for whom the Doctor of Education is designed is as follows: I. Central Administration a. Superintendent b. Assistant Superintendents : Finance Federal Programs Research Personnel Instruction c. Supervisors of Services: Guidance Research School Psychology Staff Development d Supervisors of Instruction: Elementary and Secondary Reading Mathematics Social Studies English Art Adult/Vocational Education Exceptional Child Education Physical Education Library /Media COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 79 2. Building Per so nnel a. Principals b Assistant Princip als: Administration Curriculum c. Deans : Boys Girls d Guidance Counselors e Curriculum Speciali s t f. Leaming Specialist g. Departmental head s or team l ea der s h. Teachers 3. Other Professional Roles a. Private School Per so nnel b. Junior College Sy s tem Personnel c Coordinators of s pecial local and State Educational Program s s uch as Adult Education and Rehabilitation Education d Personnel of municipal and county recreation pro grams children's services program s, socia l welfare programs, and other community based organiza tion s implementing informal education programs e Te ac her-educators in institutions of higher lea rning f. Business and Indu stry Candidate s for admission to Ed. D. s tudy mus t present satisfactory evidence of: I Undergraduate grade point average of 3.0 (B) minimum on the last half of the baccalaureate degree; and G RE aptitude score-10000 minimum (Quantitative and Verbal) 2. Certification in the field of study in whic h the ca ndiate is see king the Ed. D 3 A master's degree from a n accredited institution of higher learning 4 Three letters of recommendation 5 Favorable recommendation s from the program co ordinator 6 Any additional r e quirem ents specified by the program Ph.D. Program The Doctor of Philo s ophy degree is available in Education. Spe cialization is in Curriculum and In s truction with research em phasis on problems related to specific areas of curriculum s uch as Early Childhood Education Exceptional Child Education, Mathematics Education Reading and Language Arts Education Science Education and Communication Etlucation. In addition to the curriculum content emphase s, there are also emphases in Measurement and Evaluation, Guidance and Counseling Edu cation, and Adult Vocational, and Technical Education within the Curriculum and Instruction Ph.D. program For information on additional emphases within the Curriculum and Instruction specialization, contact the Director of Gradu ate Studies in the College of Education Candidates for admission to Ph.D. study must present satisfactory evidence of: I. A grade point average of 3.0 (B) minimum on all work attempted while registered as a n upper level s tudent working for a baccalaureate degree and a G RE apti tude score of 1000 (Verbal and Quantitative) 2. Three letters of recommendation. 3. Favorable recommendation from program c h a irper son. 4 An earned master's degree 5. Any additional requirement s s pecified by the progr am. Application deadline s for admission to Ph.D. study are May 15 (for Quarters IV and I) and November 14 (for Quarters II and Ill). Ph.D. Program Structure I. Major Area A. Specialization 24 quarter hours

PAGE 82

80 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION B. Cognate Area* C. Dissertation I I Statistics/ Measurement/ Research Design 16 quarter hours 24 quarter hours 16 quarter hours III. Foundations 16 quarter hours *TOT AL 96 quarter hours Supporting courses ootside area of s pecialization Post master s quarter hours COLLEGE OF EDUCATION DEPARTMENTS AND PROGRAMS The College of Education is organized into 14 departments. Each department has one or more programs which are listed alphabetically and by degree level in the following departmental section Department of Adult and Vocational Education The Adult and Vocational Education Department at the Uni versity of South Florida offers degrees through the College of Education aime!i at preparing teachers and leaders in the various fields of Vocational Education. Certifi
PAGE 83

Requirements for the M.A. Degree (BTE): In consultation with the graduate adviser, a program will be planned which will include a minimum of 48 credit hours at the graduate level. In addition, students entering the program who have not yet met competency requirements for business educa tion certification will complete course work in any needed comarea \ This degree may be completed with a thesis op tion. 1. Process core requirements include: EDF 6431 and EDF 6481 EDF 6211 and EDF 6215 and one of the following : EDF 6606, EDF 6517, or EDF 6544 2. A minimum of24 credit hours in the specialization area of Business and Office Education is required. Specialization courses include: BTE 5171 BTE 5245 BTE 6385 BTE 6386 BTE 6387 BTE 6944 EVT 6563 Thesis 3. Selected courses from which to choose in Vocational and Adult Education: ADE 5385 ADE 6197 EVT 5190 EVT 5367 EVT 6300 EVT 6385 EVT 6386 EVT 6926 EVT 6930 4 Selected courses in one related area such as Guidance Exceptional Child Education, Business Junior College Administration or Supervision (4-12 cre dit hours). 5 Graduate instructional improvement courses are required as listed in individual student programs. Distributive and Marketing Education Requirements for the B.A. Degree (DEC): Professional Education Core (40 credit hours): DEC 4362 (4) EDG 4936 (3) EDF 3604 (4) DEC 4382 (4) E DG 4940 (12) or EDE' 3214 (4) EVT 4540 (2) EDF 3542 (4) EDG 4200 (5) RED 4360 (2) Specialization (45 credit hours) : ACC 2001 (3) MAR 3023 (5) ECP 1001 (5) DEC 4174 (4) MAR 3303 (3) or DEC 4941 (8) MAR 3403 (3) ECO 2023 (4) EVT 4065 (4) MAR 4203 (4) Plus electives in Education or Business Administration and Marketing as approved by Distributive and Marketing Education adviser to bring specialization total to at least 45 hours Distributive and Marketing Education undergraduates are required to accumulate a total of eight hours of credit in DEC 4941-Supervised Field Experience. Students will enroll for a minimum of two quarter hours the first quarter they enter the program and for at least one quarter hour each subsequent quar ter they are in attendance as a Distributive and Marketing Edu cation major not to exceed a total of eight hours Students may not enroll in more than four credit hours of field experience in any one quarter The eight credit hours oftield experience will be used for individual and group assignments and projects to round out and broaden the vocational background of the student to COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 81 properly fulfill certification requirement s. Students will also be able to receive credit for participation in the req uired profes sional activities of the USF Collegiate Chapter of the Dis. tributive Education Clubs of America, which is an integral part of the Distributive and Marketing Education teacher preparation curriculum Requirements for the M.A. Degree (DEC): I. In consultation with the graduate adviser, a program will be planned which will include a minimum of 45 credit hours. Required courses are: EDF 6431 and EDF 6481 EDF 6211 or EDF 6215 and one of the following : EDF 6606, EDF 6517, or EDF 6544 2. Appropriate College of Business Admini s tration courses in marketing management, economics, finance, and ac counting for Distributive Education teacher certification (22 credits maximum). 3. Specialization requirements of 16 credit hours in Distributive Education are designed to provide competen. cies in administration, supervision, curriculum develop ment program management, methods of teaching and research techniques as each of these rel a te to distributive education programs Generally, specialization courses will be selected from the following depending upon the individual's background of experience : ADE 5385 DEC 5185 EVT 5367 EVT 6926 DEC 4382' DEC 6945 EVT 6300 EVT 6930 nEC 4941 EVT 4065 EVT 6385 DEC 5175 EVT 5190 EVT 6386 4. Selected courses in a related area s uch as Business Administration Admini s tration Supervision, Guidance Exceptional Child Education (4-12 credit hours) Industrial/Technical Educatfon Requirements for the B.A. Degree (EVT): Enrollment in the Industrial-Technical Education program is restricted to per s ons with employmen.t experiences qualifying them to teach Industrial Technical, or Health Occupations Special provision is made for students to satisfy four (4) of the required six (6) years of work experience by completing an Associate of Science degree program in a technological specialty from one of the Community Colleges Acceptability of work experience will be determined by the State Department of Education Division of Certification Talla hassee, Flonda. Students m ay validate up to 45 quarter hours of credit through the Occupational Competency Testing Program In addition to the professional core requirements, s tudents must complete 20 quarter hours in Adult and Vocational Edu cation as follows : Required : EVT 4065 (4) EVT 4367 (4) Electives : 16 hours selected with adviser approval from the following : ADE 5385 (4) EVT 4263C (4) EVT 4084C (4) EVT 4946 (1-8) EVT 5176 (4) EVT 4061C (1-4) EVT 5366 (4) EVT 5817 (4) In a ddition students must meet the General Distribution Requirements of 60 credit hours. Acceptability of work experiences will be determined by the Adult and Vocational staff at the University of South Florida.

PAGE 84

82 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION Requirements for the M.A. Degree (EVT): Plan I-Before being admitted to the degree program, a prospective student must have met the work experience re quirements for certification in Industrial, Technical or Health occupations. In addition to the process core requirements of EDF 6431 and EDF 6481 EDF 6211 or EDF 6215 and one of the following: EDF 6606 EDF 6517, or EDF 6544, specialization requirements ll)ust include EVT 6948 and EVT 6930 Courses totaling a minimum of 45 credit hours will be a part of the student's program which he will plan with the graduate adviser for industrial education. Related electives (0-16 credit hours). See areas of special ization listed above The Plan U program in Vocational and Adult Education is designed primarily for teachers. The candidate is required to complete additional professional education courses EDG 5206 and EDG 6947, which are in excess of the normal Process Core requirements. A student will be advised of other courses which he must complete. Master's degree candidates wishing to be certified must meet the state's minimum certifica tion requirements in the area of specialization. Department of Art and Music Education The Art and Mus ic Education Department offers baccalaureate and graduate degree programs designed to meet certification re quirement s as outlined in the following program descriptions. ART EDUCATION Requirements for the B.A. Degree (ARE): At the time of application to upper level, each Art Education student must submit slides or portfolio to the head of the depart ment. To a ss ist transfer students in selection of courses, they must s ubmit work prior to or during registration. After completing studio requirements for state certification each s tudent may elect to emphasize painting, gr a phic s, ceramics or photography / cinematography for the re maining s tudio electives Student must attain a minimum of a C grade in Art Education and Studio Art courses The following cour s e s constitute a program of study : Art Educ ati o n (25 C r e dit hours) ARE 3044 (4) ARE 4260 (2) ARE 4443 (4) ARE 3354 (5) ARE 4440 (5) ARE 4642 (5) In these courses s tudents will have the opportunity to work at the elementary s chool and high s chool levels Sp ec ializatio n (52 e r hrs) ART 2202C ART 2203C ART 2205C 2 8 e r. hr s. from the following courses as approved by the advi ser: ART 3110C ART 4111C ART 4631C ART 5472C ART 3301C ART 4320C ART 4702C ART 5532C ART 35IOC ART 4421C ART 5125C ART 5604C ART 3600C ART 4431C ART 5340C ART 5642C ART 3630C ART 4471C ART 5422C ART 5730C ART 3701C ART 4520C ART 5432C ART 5936 ART 4601C Pl us the following: ARH 4450 (4) ART (Art Histor y Elective ) (4) Four hours from any Music, Dance Theatre (4) Requirements for.the M.A. Degree (ARE): In consultation with a graduate adviser, a student may de velop a program in art education with a specialization in one of three areas: a Studio / new media b Art Administration, Supervision & Curriculum Innovati on c. Res e arch Methods for Art Education A portfolio or sli des of recent creative work must be sub mitted prior to admi s sion into the program The departmental requirements for all degree-seeking candidates are: Art Education (12 credits: ARE 6262, ARE 6706, ARE 6844) Art Studio (12 credits minimum) Art Hi s tory (4 credits minimum) The remainder of the credit hours, totaling a minimum of 54, may relate to one of the three areas of specialization. An inno vative master s paper or project developed under the guidance of a faculty committee is required before graduation. MUSIC EDUCj\TION Requirements for the B.A. Degree (MUE): All students seeking a degree in music education are re quired to take a placement examination in music theory-history and to pass an audition in their respective perforinance area. Students must obtain the dates for these examinations from the Music Office; completion of the examinations is required before registration in music courses can be permitted. Special requirements for all music education majors; suc cessful completion of the piano proficiency requirement as de fined by the music and music education faculties; participation in a major performing ensemble each quarter the student is enrolled in applied music; and the presentation of a one-half hour recital in the major performing medium during the senior year. Students enrolled in the professional sequence (MUE 4050, MUE 4130, MUE 4314, MUE .jj31 and MUE 4332) may have required pre interning observations and/or assignments in addi tion to the class meetings. Students are encouraged to attend on-campus musical events (major ensemble concerts, student and faculty recitals, and Artist Series concerts). A. Specialization {115 er. hrs.) Music Education courses (25 er. hrs.) MUE 2420 (2) t MUE 3414(1) MUE 3411 (I) MUE 4050 (4) t MUE 3413(1) MUE 4130 (4) t must be taken up to 3 hours Elective for band emphasis Music courses (90 er. hrs.) MUT 1111, MUT 1112, MUT 1113 MUE 4314 (4) MUE 4332 (4) MUE 4480*(2) (9) MUL 2111, MUL 21l2, MUL 2113, MUT 1241, MUT 1242, MUT 1243 (12) MUT 2116, MUT 2117 MUT 2118 (9) MUT 2246, MUT 2247, MUT 2248 (6) MUG3Wl W MUH 3211, MUH 3212, MUH 3213 (9) Applied Music (minimum 3 hrs. senior level) (30) Applied Music Secondary (5) (one each: woodwind, brass, string, percussion, voice) Art, Dance, Theatre (8) (to be selected from at least 2 programs) Performing Ensembles (Minimum of one per quarter of applied music) Piano proficiency requirement Graduating recital B. Vocal Specialization (112 er. hrs) Music Education courses (23 er. hrs) MUE 2420 (2) MUE 3414 (1) MUE 43,4 (4)

PAGE 85

tMUE 3411 (I) MUE 4050 (4) MUE 4331 (4) MUE 3413 (1) MUE 4130 (4) tmust be taken up to 3 hours Music courses ( 89 er. hrs) MUT 1111, MUT ill2, MUT 1113 (9) MUL ?111, MUL 2112, MUL 2113, MUT 1241, MUT 1242, MUT 1243 (12) MUT 2116, MUT 2117, MUT 2118 (9) MUT 2246, MUT 2247, MUT 2248 (6) MUG 3101 (2) MUH 3211, MUH 3212, MUH 3213 (9) Applied Music (minimum 3 hrs senior level) (30) Applied Music Secondary (4) (one each : clarinet, trumpet, violin, percussion) Art, Dance, Theatre (to be selected from at least 2 programs) (8) Performing Ensembles (minimum of one per quarter of applied music) Graduating Recital COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 83 Requirements for the M.A. Degree (MUE): Plans in both instrumental and vocal music are offered. A placement examination is required of all new registrants in musical s tyles Each candidate must meet the undergraduate level of piano proficiency before the quarter in which he expects to grad uate. Participation in ensembles is required for at least three quarters. Three plans are available to the candidate: 48 hours plus thesis, 51 hours plus recital or 54 hours without thesis or recital I Vocal Music: 11 credits in music education including MUE 6780, MUE 6415, and MUE 6640; 12 credits in music theory literature, and at least 4 credits in applied music. I Instrumental Music : 14 credits in music education, including MUE 6780, MUE 6189, MUE 6418, 17 cr e dits in music theory literature, including MUL 6505; and at least 4 credits in applied music Department of Childhood/ Language Arts Education The Childhood/Language Arts Education department has the responsibility for the development and supervision of programs leading to a B achelor of Arts degree in Elementary/Early Child hood Education and Elementary Education at the undergraduate level. At the graduate level, the department coordinates the M A. degree in Elementary Education; Ed.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Curriculum and Instruction with emphasis in Early-Childhood and Elementary Education. Elementary Certification Programs Students may complete a program of studies to be eligible for certification in either Elementary or Elementary-Early Childhood Education. The program of studies includes both course work and extensive field experiences in school to enable students to integrate theory with teaching practice. Con current with taking program courses, students are enrolled in a sequence of internships in which they work directly with children to acquire and demonstrate teaching competencies in school set tings Therefore, students electing to pursue either the Ele mentary or an Elementary c Early Childhood major must be pre pared to spend time in schools with children as required in at least six quarters of their enrollment in the program. Upcin successful completion of the requited courses and the associated internships, Elementary majors will be eligible to apply for certification grades one through six Elementary-Early Childhood majors will be eligible to apply for certification for nursery school through 6th grade upon completing the require ments of this program Part-time students (students planning to take 11 hours or less per quarter) must participate in a modified program schedule and plan to meet internship requirements associated with the programs These requirements include being available to partici pate in the internships during regular school hours as specified in the modified program. Students desiring to complete either of these certification programs on a part-time basis are advised to contact the Student Personnel Office in the College of Education for additional in formation Field Experiences and Internships Beginning with Quarter I 1980, the Elementary and Elementary-Early Childhood preservice teacher epucation pro grams will require all students to part i cipate in field work in conjunction with enrollment in program courses. Field work ex periences are provide
PAGE 86

84 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION EDE 4942 EDE 4943 EDE 4936 Two credit hours to be repeated in stu dent' s 3rd and 4th quarter of enroll ment for a total of 4 hours (4) (3) To be taken concurrently with EDE 4940 (3) EDE 4940 To be taken student's final quarter of program enrollment (12) Reading Requirements RED 4310 (5) RED 4515 (4) Measurement Requirements All students must complete a sequence of 4 one-credit hour courses in mea s urement and evaluation to be specified (4) TOTAL 56 In addition to the Professional Core the student will complete the following elementary specialization course ,s: ARE 4313 (4) MAE 4310 (4) SCE 4310 (5) HLP 4460 (4) MAE 4311 (3) SSE 4313 (5) LAE 4314 (4) MUE 4313 (2) LAE 4414 (4) MUE 4315 (3) Total 38 hours Elementary Specialization Total 94 hours Student s are advised that the Elementary Education spe cialization will require an enrollment of more than the traditional six quarters of the junior and s enior year in order to complete the program s pecialization courses and the required sequence of in ternship s Requirements for the M.A. Degree (EDE): This program requires full certification as an elementary teacher for admission. Students pursuing the master's degree in elementary education are required to present credit in the following courses: EDE 6305, EDG 6935, RED 6116 A minimum of 48 hours is required Tbe student will choose from one of the following areas of emphasis: A. Elementary Curriculum Emphasis: At least three courses must be selected from : ARE 6358 LAE 6616 SCE 6616 SSE 6617 LAE 6415 MAE 6116 Additional work is available through consent of the ad viser as part of a planned program. B. Laflguage Arts Emphasis: The following are required: LAE 6301 LAE 6415 LAE 6616 RED 6516 C. Supervision Emphasis: Required courses are : EDA 6061 EDS 6050 EDS 6930 D. Early Childhood Emphasis: Prerequisites are EEC 4203, EEC 4706, or equivalent certification. Courses in the program include: EEC 5406 EEC 5926 EEC 6261 EEC 6405 EEC 5705 E. Elementary School Mathematjcal Emphasis: Individually planned emphasis to incluc1e four courses from the following: MAE 5636C MAE 6337 MAE 6356 MAE 6549 MAE 6116 MAE 6338 MAE 6548 Additional worlc in related areas may be planned with the adviser. F. Social Studies Emphasis: SSE 6617 and any four courses from: SSE 6117 SSE 6354 SSE 6445 SSE 6647 SSE 6795 SSE 6939 Elementary /Early Childhood Education Requirements for the B.A. Degree (EEC): Student s interested in early childhood teaching, which in cludes children ages 3-8, should pursue a program leading to certification both .in early childhood and elementary education (K-6). All students wishing to enter the Elementary/Early Child hood program must participate in the selective admissions pro cess and satisfactorily complete the testing program described in the introduction to the Elementary Education Certification Pro grams The major consists of an Elementary / Early Childhood Education specialization of 47 hours as well as 56 hours of the Professfonal Core, for a total of 193 hours. The Elementary and Elementary/Early Childhood Education Professional Core are identical in sequence and content. EDF 3214 (4) EDF 3604 EDG 4200 (5) EDE 4301 or EDF 3542 (4) Reading Requirements: RED 4310 (5) RED 4515 {4) Internships: EDE 4941 EDE 4942 EDE 4943 (2,2) (2,2) (3) EDE 4936 EDE 4940 Measurement Requirements: (4) (3) (12) Professional Core Total: 56 hours The Elementary-Early Childhood specialization courses are as follows : ARE 4313 (4) EEC 4203 (5) EEC 4303 (4) EEC 4706 (4) HLP4460 (4) LAE 4414 (4) MAE 4310 (4) MAE 4311 (3) MUE 4313 (2) MUE 4315 (3) SCE 4310 (5) SSE 4313 (5) Total: 47 TOTAL Elementary-Early Childhood : 103 Students are advised that the Elementary Early Childhood specialization will require an enrollment of more than the tra ditional six quarters of the junior .and senior year in Order to complete the program specialization courses and the required of internships. Requirements for the Ed.S. Degree The Childhood Education/Language Aris department offers the Education Specialist (Ed.S.) degree programs in Curriculum and Instruction in two areas. Candidates for admission to Ed S. study must meet general admission requirements stated in the catalog as well as those listed below. 1. Early Childhood Education a Admission (1) Grade point average of3.5 in post baccalaureate work (2) Graduate Record Exam (GRE) score of 1000 on Ap titude. (3) Three (3) years experience in programs for young chil dren b Program of Studies (1) Early Childhood Specialization (includes 8-12 hours of a specialist project) (2) Cognate component (3) Electives Total c Comprehensive Examination 24 hours 16 hours 10 hours 50 hours Candidates for the Ed.S. degree are required to dem onstrate mastery in Early Childhood Education on the written and oral comprehensive examination. 2. Elementary Education a. Admission (1) Eligibility for certification in Elementary Education. (2) Two or more years of successful work experience with children. (3) Grade point average of3.5 in post-baccalaureate work (4) One degree must be in Elementary Education

PAGE 87

(5) Be recommended for approval by the program faculty b Program of Studies (I) Curriculum and related areas 8-10 hours (2) Childhood Education Curriculum 16-17 hours (3) Measurem ent 4 hours (4) Elementary Education Specialization 20-21 hours (includes 8-12 hours of a specialist project) Total 48-52 hours c. Comprehensives Requirements for the Ph.0. Degree: The Childhood Education / Language Arts department offers the Ph.D. degree in Curriculum and Instruction with speciali zation in both Elementary Education and Early Childhood Edu cation Candidates for admission to either specialization must meet general catalog requirements for admission to the Ph.D. degree as well as the additional requirements listed below : I 1. Early Childhood Education a. Admission (I) Grade point average of 3.5 in post coursework (2) Graduate Record Exam (GRE) score of llOO on the Aptitude. COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 85 (3) Minimum of three (3) years experience in programs for young children. b Program of Studies (I) Early Childhood Education concentration (2) Dissertation (3) Elementary Education component ( 4) Measurement / Stati sties (5) Foundations Total I 2. Elementary Education a. Admission 55 hours 24 hours 13 hours 24 hours 12 hours 128 hours (I) Eligibility for certification in Elementary Education. (2) Grade point average of 3 5 in post-baccalaureate work. (3) Recommendation of program faculty. (4) One degree must be in Elementary Education. b. Program of Studies (I) Foundations and Curriculum (2) Statistics / Measurement / Research Design (3) Elementary Specialization 16 hours 16 hours 24 hours 24 hours 16 hours ( 4) Dissertation (5) Cognate area (6) Language / Computer Science Total no course credit 96 quarter hours Department of Counselor Education The Counselor Education department offers the Master of Arts degree (M A.) in Gu idance and Counseling Education and the Education Specialist degree (Ed.S.) in Curriculum and In. struction with emphasis in Guidance and Counseling Education. The purpose of the M A. program is to prepare students to be come counselors in schools and human services agencies. The purpose of the Ed S program is to improve the skills and competencies of practicing counselors. Students in this department represent a variety of under graduate majors vocational experiences and age levels Grad uates work in many settings including public and private ele mentary and secondary schools, colleges and universities the State Employment Service, rehabilitation counseling, drug and alcohol abuse treatment programs and private counseling prac tices. Others have completed doctoral programs in various edu cational and psychological specialties. Guidance and Counseling Education Requirements for the M.A. Degree (EOG): In addition to meeting the University and College require ments, applicants to the Guidance and Counseling Education program must present three (3) letters of recommendation, a per sonal statement of professional g9als al!d an interview with a member of the Guidance and Counseling faculty. Applications for admission are processed each quarter. The deadline for all requirements to be met is usually four weeks before the quarter ends. Applications are processed in the quarter preceding the one in which the applicant expects to begin the program. The applicant should contact the Guidance and Counseling Edu cation program to ascertain the dead.line dates for specific quar ters and to obtain instructions regarding the transmission of let ters of recommendation and the arrangements for the interview Plan I A. Process Core Requirements: (minimum of 16 hours) I. EDF6431 orEDF7437 2 One of the following : EDF 5136 EDF 6120 EDF 6213 EDF 6215 EDF 6217 3 EDF 6354 4. One additional Foundations course B Specialization Requ irements: Elementary School Guidance Emphasis (38 hours) EGC 6005 EGC 6225 EGC 6305 EGC 6464 EGC 6506 l EGC 6625 EGC 6830 EGC 6935 (2 credits) Plan II Five hours of Elective credit. Secondary and Adult Guidance Emphasis (38 hours) EGC 6005 EGC 6225 EGC 6305 EGC 6435 EGC 6507 EGC 6835 EGC 6935 (2 credits) Eight hours elective A. Process Core Requirements: (minimum of 16 hours) I. EDF 6431 or EDF 7437 2 One of the following: EDF 5136 EDF 6120 EDF 6213 EDF 6215 EDF 6217 3. EDF 6354 4 One of the following : EDF 6517

PAGE 88

86 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION EDF 6544 EDF 6606 B. Specialization Requirements: (Same as Plan I) C. Additional Requirements: (14 hours) EDG 5206 and EDG 6947 The Guidance and Counseling Education program has no full-time residency requirement. Students who are employed on a full-time basis are limited to 8 hours per quarter. Exceptions are made only with permission of the Guidance and Counseling Education Program Committee. Requirements for the Ed.S. Degree: The Education Specialist program in Curriculum and In struction with an emphasis in Guidance and Counseling Edu cation is designed to improve the skills and competencies of practicing counselors. The program comprises 48 quarter hours and is designed to be completed in two years by part-time even ing students. Students will be admitted once per year and will begin with the Fall term. The application procedures should be completed by June 1. In addition to meeting the University and College requirements for admission to Ed.S. programs, the applicants must meet the following departmental requirements: 1. A master's degree in Guidance and/or Counseling or a master's degree with current Florida Certification in Guidance 2. One year post-master's degree experience as a counselor 3. Three letters of recommendation 4 An interview with a member of the departmental faculty 5. Sbmission of an audio tape recording of a counseling session conducted by the applicant Contact the departmental office for application procedure de tails Courses in the Ed.S program include the following: Area I: Counseling, Consulting and Supervision EGC 7437 EGC 7446 EGC 7455 Area II: Philosophy, Issues and Research EGC 5105 EDF 6481 EGC 7935 Area III: Minor Area (determined by student and ad visor) Area IV: Project EDG 6971 Department of Educational Leadership The Department of Educational Leadership prepares per' sonnel for positions in Educational Administration/Supervision. The major purpose of these programs focuses on the improve ment of practice Program content in the specialization com ponent of these degrees is founded in the functions of admin istration where relationships between tested practice and applied theory are stressed. Three degrees are offered in Educational Administration/Supervision: the degree of Master of Education (Plans I and III), the Education Specialist Degree, and the Doctor of Education degree. The Department also offers a Master of Arts degree in Junior College Teaching in cooperation with the other colleges in the University ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION Requirements for the M.Ed. Degree (ESA): Admission Application for admission to the program is made in the Office of Admissions : Admission requirements include: 1. Certification in a teaching field (except Plan III stu dents). 2 At least two years of successful teaching experience (exception Plan III students) 3. Current requirements for admission to graduate study at U.S.F. 4. Current requirements for admission to graduate study by the College of Education. 5. Approval from the Department of Educational Leader ship. Program The program consists of a mm1mum of 50 credit hours Typically, the students' program will of the following: 1. Process Core (8-9 credit hours) EDF 6431 and one other Foundation course 2. Administration (25 credit hours) EDA 6061 EDA 6931 EDA 6106 EDA 6242 EDA 6232 3. Supervision (9 credit hours) EDS 6050 EDS 6239 EDA 6262 EDA 6945 4. Curriculum (9 credit hours) EDG 5206 EDG 6251 EDG 6667 EDE 6205 EDM 6235 ESE 6215 JUNJOR COLLEGE TEACHING PROGRAM Requirements for M.A. Degree: Areas of specialization in the Junior College elude : Geology History Mathematics Physics Political Science Sociology Spanish Program in-Biology Business* Chemistry English Engineering* Economics French Geography Speech Communication Business specialization requires, in addition, a minimum score of 475 on the G MAT plus a minimum of 3.0 GPA for the last two years o f baccalaureate study Engineering bachelor s d egree required.

PAGE 89

Admission Bec aus e of the unique character of the Junior Colleg e Pro gram which integrally involves two colleges of the University, there are admis sio n and advisory regulations which go beyond those listed in the section de a ling with Graduate Study. Application for admi ssi on to the program is made in the Office of Admissions Action on all applications is the joint re sponsibility of the two colleges Admission to the progr a m re quires a minimum score of. 1000 on the combined verbal and quantitative aptitude test s of the Graduate Record Examina tion .* Duplicate sets of the student's complete record will be on file in both offices with the College of Education charged with the responsibility of making official recommendations for the granting of the degree to the Vice President for Academic Affairs and to the Registrar. *Business specializa tion requires, in a minimum score of 475 on the GMAT plu s a minimum of 3 0 GPA for the last two y ears of b acc alaureate s tud y Program Consists of a minimum of 45 credit hour s, plus an internship of 9 hour s. 1. Specialization Typically, the student's program will include 36-45 cre dit hours of graduate work in a field of specialization. The specialization sequence to be completed will be worked out in consultation with a designated major field adviser. This typical" program is based on the assumption that the student has an undergradu ate back ground in his speciali zation are a which is roughly equivalent to the pattern of the appropriate University of South Florida major. Students admitted without s uch preparation may be required to correct deficiencies By the same ,token the unusually well prepared student may be permitted to take fewer courses in his speciali zation area, substituting approved electives from other fields of s tudy. 2. Professiona l Edu c ation Typically, the student's program will include approx imately 18 hours of graduate work in professional edu cation, as in the example below Additional hours may be required if the student's background is weak in rele vant areas. EDH 6061 (4) EDH 6938 (5) EDG 6947 (9) Typically the intern ship will consist of full-time super vised teaching for one quarter or part-time teaching for two quarters. At least one-half of the internship must be in the junior college, the other half being left to the discretion of the student's a dviser. The internship fol lows the completion of profe ss ional education course work COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 87 Requirements for the Ed.S. and Ed.D. Degrees: Admission All candidates are initially admitted to the Ed.S. program. Admission to the Ed. S. program is based upon : I. A minimum G RE of l 000, or a minimum G ra de Point Average of 3 0 in the last two years of undergraduate study, o r a master's Degree from an accredited institu tion. 2. Ce rtification in Administration / Supervision 3. Screening by the Leadership Department on the ba sis of criteria which includes: a Bachelor s and Master s Grade Point Average b. Verbal and Quantitative GRE s cores c. Experience in Education d A diagnostic examination of writing skills e. An i nt erview with a Departmental selection com mittee Once a candidate ha s completed a minimum of forty five (45) hours of course work in the Ed.S. prQgram he/she may a pply for admission to the Ed. D. program. Admission to the Ed. D program is based upon: I. Attaining a minimum of a 3.5 Grade Point Ave r age in the Ed.S course work 2 Attaining a minimum of 3 0 i n EDF 7 407 (Statistics). 3. Favorable review by the Departmental Committe e. Program The major components of study in the Ed.S. and Ed D degree programs are: I. Specialization i n Educational Administration / Supervi sio n Required courses Electives Project / Dissertation II. Foundations Social Foundations Psychological Foundations Curriculum III. Measurement and Statistic s IV Computer Science These programs are organized on the cl u ster concept Stu dents are selected by cluster at de s ignated times and block scheduled through the fir st forty-five hour s of in st ruction Oper ationally this means that groups of s tudents enter their study programs jointly in geographically convenient loc atio n s Whereas students are counselled individually nio s t course selections are made by component as a cluster in con sultation with the Leadership Department. Application for admission is initiated by completing a pre liminary application form that can be obtained from the Leader ship Department.

PAGE 90

88 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION Department of Educational The Department of Educational Measurement and Research 'provides core courses in educational measurement for the undergraduate programs in the College of Education It also pro vides core courses in educational measurement, statistics, and Measurement and Research research for the graduate and advanced graduate programs in the College of Education. A Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction with an emphasis in Measurement and Evaluation is also offered. Department of Exceptional Child Education The Exceptional Child Education Baccalaureate Level Degree Program offers students three tracks leading to certification in th a t specific area of emphasis. Students are admitted to the Exceptional Child Education programs any quarter. Those entering in Quarter I find the optimum sequences of courses. Students admitted to the Exceptional Child Education pro grams are required to demonstrate basic skills in English and Mathematics AU students are required to take the basic skills te s t during the fir s t quarter of enrollment in the program. Stu dent s who earn unsatisfactory scores on cither test will be given an opportunity to undertake remediation but must pass both te s ts by the end of the second quarter of enrollment-. Students who do not pass both tests by the end of the second quarter of enrollment will not be permitted to continue. Internship may be taken only after all other requirements have been sa tisfied EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCE Requirements for the B.A. Degree (EEO): This course of study is de s igned to prepare students to become competent and Florida certified teacher s in the two areas of (a) elementary education (b) emotionally handicapped The planned program includes : Specialization R e quirem e nts (63 credit hours) ARE 4313 (4) EEX 4221 (4) SCE 4310 (5) EED4011 (4) HLP4460 (4) SPA2001 (3) EEO 4321 (5) LAE 4414 (4) SSE 4313 (5) EED 4941 (12) MAE 4310 (4) EEX 3010 (4) MUE 4313 (2) Requirements for the M.A. Degree (EEO): The purpose of this program is to train educators for emo tionally disturbed children. Programs are available under both Plan I, for certified and experienced teachers, and Plan II, for those with a baccalaureate degree. Plan I-Through a Plan I program, a certified, experienced teacher may satisfy the requirements for graduation within four quarters Of the minimum 49 hours, at least 32 hours are allo cated to the area of specialization. The following or equivalents are required: EEO 6201 EED 6211 EED 6221 EEO 6222 EED 6943 EEX 6201 EEX 6936 Additional courses, including electives, are planned jointly by the student and his adviser. Students who have not completed an unc;lergraduate Elementary or Exceptional Child Education degree or the following courses must take: MAE 4310 RED 4310 RED 4515 Plan IIThe student with a non-education baccalaureate de gree may meet initial certification through a Plan II program. The individually designed course of study will include the minimum 32 hours of specialization (as outlined above) plus: EDG 5206 MAE 4310 RED4515 EDG 6947 RED 4310 and any other courses necessary to meet requirements GIFTED Requirements for the M.A. Degree (EGI): The Gifted Child Teacher Training program provides ad vanced training for experienced teachers to work with gifted and talented children and to work with other teachers on a consultant or teacher-leader basis. An inexperienced teacher-training pro gram is also provided which is designed to prepare non-certified liberal arts majors to work with classrooms of gifted children. Emphasis is on the development of subject matter special ization and specific skills to: 1. identify the gifted, 2. make an individual diagnosis of cognitive and affective strengths and weaknesses, and 3. modify the educational program to develop the gifted child's potential. Plan I-Through a Plan I type of program an experienced certified teacher can anticipate preparing for teacher-consultant roles in the area of the gifted in four quarters. A minimum of 28 credit hours in the area of specialization is required. Included among the courses required are courses such as: EDE 5391 EEX 6201 EEX 67;32 EGI 5051 Education courses to include EGI 5232 EGI 5942 EDF 6431 EDF 6211 EDF 6606 arid or or EDF 6481 EDF 6215 EDF 6517 and or EDF 6544 EGI 6936 EGI 6937 An individually tailored liberal arts sequence of 12 quarter hours is also provided in the gifted teacher training program. Plan II-An individual' with a non-education undergraduate major may prepare a:s a teacher-consultant of the gifted through Plan II. The student will be expected to take a minimum of 28 quar ter hours in the area of specialization. In consultation with his adviser,' he will choose from the following: EDE 5391 EEX 6732 EGI 5232 EGI 6936 EEX 6201 EGI 5051 EGI 5942 EGI 6937 An individual may meet certification by taking the process core courses, EDG 5206, an appropriate methods of teaching course, and completion of an internship in a liberal arts area. MENTAL RETARDATION Requirements for the B.A. Degree (EMR): I The planned program includes: Specialir.ation Requirements .(62 er. hrs.) EDF 3228 (5) EMR 3011 (4) HLP 4460 (4) EED 4011 (4) EMR 3800 (6) LAE 4414 (4) EEX 3010 (4) EMR 4310 (4) MAE 4310 (4) EEX 4221 (4) EMR 4313 (4) SPA 2001 (3) ELD 4011 (4) EMR 4321 (4) Elective: four credit hours agreed upon jointly by student and adviser.

PAGE 91

Requirements for the M.A. Degree (EMA): The course of study is designed to prepare the student to become a more effective teacher or supervisor of teachers for the retarded. It is highly recommended by the Mental Retardation Pro gram that any student who is about to apply for Graduate work in the area of Mental Retardation contact that office for advising purposes before any courses are taken or application made for admission. Plan I-Through a Plan I program, a certified teacher may satisfy the requirements for graduation within four quarters. Education courses to include: EDF 6431 EDF 6211 EDF 6517 and or or EDF 6481 EDF 6215 EDF 6544 and At least 28 hours are allocated to the area of specialization with an emphasis on Mental Retardation Basic Course Requirement : EEX 6936, or the equiv alent. Courses required: EMR 6932 LAE 6415 EMR 6934 or EDF 6217 EEX 6201 EEX 6303 EEX 6934 LIS 6586 SPA 6930 Two electives, chosen fFOm the following (8): EDG 6971 (8) EEX 6511 (4) EMR 5012 (4) EED 6201 (4) ELD 6141 (4) EPH 5051 (4) Plan II-Process Core Requirements (21-22 hours) At least 40 hours are allocated to the area of specialization with an emphasis on Mental Retardation. Prerequisites: EMR 3011 EMR 4321 MAE 4310 EMR 4310 EVT 3063 RED 4310 or or EMR 4313 PET 6645 Basic Course Requirements: EEX 6936 LAE 6415 or equivalent Courses required : EDF6217 EDG6947 EED6201 or EPH5051 or LIS 6586 EEX6ZOI ELD6115 ELD6141 EEX6934 MAE 6549 RED6546 RED6548 SPECIFIC LEARNING DISABILITIES Requ irements for the B.A. Degree (ELD): The course of study is designed to prepare the student as a competent learning disabilities teacher. The planned program includes : Specialization Requirements (59-64) EDF 3228 (5) 4110 (4) MAE 4545 (4) EEC 4706 (4) ELD 4944 (6) SPA 2001 (3) EED 4011 (4) EMR 3011 (4) EGI 3011 (4) EEX 3010 (4) HLP 4460 (4) or EEX 4221 (4) LAE 4414 (4) EGI 3941 (1-6) ELD 4011 (4) MAE 4310 (4) Requirements for the M.A, Degree (ELD): The course of study is designed to prepare the student to become a more effective learning disabilities specialist. Plan I-Process Core Requirements (16-17 hours) At least 40 hours are allocated to the area of specialization with an emph'asis on Specific Leaming Disabilities. Basic Course Requirement : EEX 6936; or equivalent. COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 89 Courses required : EDF 6217 EED 6201 or EEX 6201 ELD 6115 ELD 6141 EEX 6934 MAE 6549 LAE 6415 RED 6546 or EPH 5051 RED 6548 LIS 6203 or LI S 6586 Plan II-Process Core Requirements (21-22 hours) At least 48 hours are allocated to the area of s pecialization with' an emphasis on Specific Leaming Disabilities Prerequisites: EEX 4221, MAE 4310 MAE 4545, RED 4310 RED 4515, SPA 2001. Basic Course Requirements: EEX 6936 LAE 6415 MAE 6548 or LIS 6203 or LIS 6586 One Elective c h o sen from th e followin g : ARE 4313 MUE 4315 SCE 4310 SSE 4313 HLP4460 EXCEPTIONAL CHILD EDUCATION Requirements for the Ph.D. degree in Curriculum and Instruction with an emphasis in Exceptional Child Education Additional Requirements for Admission: A. Evidence of three years successful teaching experience below the college level with exceptional students. B. A letter of recommendation to the Departm e nt Ch a ir person from the Department Selection Committee for admission of the student to the Ph. D Progr a m The Selection Committee shall operate under the following regulations : (1) the number of students admitted mus t match the available resources of the department neces sary to maintain a quality program (2) sele c tion of those students must be competitive from among tho s e applicants of that Iii-annual selectio n period Criteria for competition must be the following : (a) ranking on GRE aptitude scores (b) ranking on grade point averages from accredited institutions of the last half of the baccalaureate de gree and aU graduate work attempted (c) ranking on the selection committee's evaluation scores of the candidates effectiveness and motiva tion in their previous professional activities. Evi dence for these evaluations will come from letter s of recommendation, a written profe s sional autobiog raphy and, if desired an interview. (d) equal weighting is to be given to each of these areas. Further information and clarification can be s ecured by con tacting the Department Chairperson .

PAGE 92

90 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION Department of Library, Media, and Information St udies Goals and Objectives The Library Media, and Information Studie s department prep a re s stud e nts to assume a wide variety of s ervice and leader s hip role s in academic, publi c, school, and special libraries and ass i s t s them to d e velop the profess i onal attitudes necessary fqr their involvement in the s ocial intellectual cultural, economic, and s ci e ntifi c int e r es t s of the community where they will work reg a rdle ss of the type of library in which they will be employed ; enc o u rages s tudent s and graduates to e s tablish high standards of inl e lle c tual inquir y through schol ars hip and research; promote s the adv ance ment t>f libr aria n s hip through re s earch and publicatio n ; provid es an intelle c tual env i ronment in which the s tudent m ay d eve l op c re a tive se lf-dire c tion ; impr esse s upon s tudents the s o cia l signific a nc e of librarie s and rel a ted agencies in a democra tic s o cie t y and the importance of maintaining freedom of expre s s i o n as gua r a nteed by th e Fir s t Amendm"nt 'io the Constitution of th e U nited Sta tes. Th e g o a l s are s upported b y the follo wing departmental obj e cti ve s : 1 Providing a c o mmon core c urri c ulum a s well as s pecifi c learni n g ex perience s to ena ble s tudent s to meet the needs of group s the y will s erve in librarie s. 2 Prep a ring st udent s to apply th e benefit s of technology in th e r a pidl y c h a nging field of l i brarian s hip 3 Es t ablis hing condition s and providing opportunities for s tud e nt s to make choi c e s solve problem s, and arrive at appro judgment s and deci s ion s relating to their future roles as libr aria n s a nd media s peci a lists 4. Te ac h ing s tudent s to make maximum use of the re so ur ces and fac i litie s of libraries in the development of progr a m s to s upp o rt the goals intere s t s and needs of the clientele their libr a rie s will s erve. 5 Combining practical with theoretical knowledge through experi e nces. 6 Working cooperatively with s tudents in organizing and conducting work s hops i nstitutes and s ymposia to provide new and/or continuing educational experiences 7 Prov i ding a s ystem for the c ontinuou s evaluation of the total progr a m of educ a tion for librarianship by students as well as faculty member s and the re s tru c turing of the program s cur riculum when change s must be made to meet the needs of li brar i e s. 8 Helping students to under s tand the concept that educa tion i s a continuing proces s. 9 Promoting professionali s m among faculty and students by en c ouraging research and publi c ation and participation in the activities o f profe ss ional organizations. 10. M a king s tudents aware of the contributions of library and rel a ted org a nizations to librarianship and to library' education LIBRARY, MEDIA AND INFORMATION STUDIES Requirements for the M.A. Degree (LIS): Criteria for admission a nd graduation include those general criteria s pe c ified by the College of Education for admission into master's level degree progr a m s. In addition the Library, Media and Information Studies department a s ks for an interview with the program chairperson the program s admission committee or an individual designated by the cha i rperson The department also require s that each applicant s ubmit a typewritten statement expressing personal reason(s ) for wanting to pursue graduate study in librarianship Gradu a tion requirement s include the completion of six core cour s e LIS 5404, LIS 6520 LIS 6260, LIS 6608, LIS 6271, and LIS 6735, plu s a planned program of electives developed for e a ch s tudent in conjunction with his/her The minimum length program is ordinarily 55 quarter hour s. Requirements for the Ed.S. Degree: The sixth year Ed.S degree in Curriculum and Instruction with a n emphasis in Library Media and Information Studie s provides librarians with an opportunity to s pecialize in particular aspe c t s of library media a nd information s ervices in different types o f libraries In addition to requirements of the College of Education for admis s ion to Ed.S. programs the department re quires that students have a mas ter's degree from an ALA ac credited program, an interview with a relevant professor in the department, and an application letter on file in the department. Graduation requirements are completion of a minimum of 48 hours of approved cour s ework including at least eight hours in cognate courses outside this department a minimum of eight hours for a the s is or project and a final comprehens i ve exam Accreditation and Certification The Library, Media, and Information Studies department ma s ter s degree program is fully accredited by the American Library A ss ociation. In addition completion of the required program of studie s for the s chool medi a librarianship specializa tion results in Florida certification as an Education Media Specialist. Students may al s o plan electi v es to meet the certifi cation requirements of other s t a tes if they wish t d do so. Additional Information Even though degree-oriented undergraduate study is not offered by the department, the faculty will counsel those under graduates intere s ted in exploring the kind of program most appropriate as a ba s is for graduate s tudy in librarian s hip at USF. Details concerning the graduate program including information on the profess i on are available from the chairperson, Library Media, and Information Studies Department, University of South Florida Tampa, Florida 33620. Department of Mathematics Education 1,l j The Dep a rtment of Mathematics Education offers programs lea ding tci the B.A. and M A degrees; an M.Ed ., Ed S and Ph. D deg r ee i n Curriculum a nd In s tru c tion with an emphasis in Mathem atics Education. The unde r gr a duate program is d es igned to prepare students to meet the State certification requirements and to become highly c ompet e nt s e co ndary m a thematic s te a cher s. Specialized courses in the t eac hing of mathemati cs a re offer e d for student s majoring in element a ry e a rly childhood and exceptional child education At the g ra du a te level s tudent s may concentrate in either elementary s e c ondary or K -12 program s. The ma s ter s pro gram s a re i ntended mainly to i mprove the skills of the cla ss room teacher and/or to prep a re s t uden ts for ent r y into advanced graduate programs. The advan c ed degree programs are designed ,. ".r'1 to develop matheinacs education leaders for a :variety of positions s uch as matl\ematics supervisor s mathem,atics clinicians researchers and uriiversity professors The Mathematics Education Department has seven faculty members who are actively engaged in: research, textbook writing and/or curriculum developm e nt. Currently advanced graduate s tudents in mathemati cs education can engage in research, under faculty supervi s ion, in such area s as problem s olving, reading mathematics diagnosis and prescrip tion, development of skill and concept hierarchie s use of c omputing devices as in s truc tional aid s, the validation of specific teaching strategies and other s The facilities include acce s s to the 360-375 compu ter in the Computer Re s earch Center as well as small micro computers within the Department the Mathematics Education

PAGE 93

Clinic, and the Instructional Materials Center Further, excel lent opportunity exists for conducting applied research in elementary and secondary schools within the USF 15-county service area. MATHEMATICS EDUCATION Requirements for the B.A. Degree (MAE): This program is designed to prepare secondary school mathematics teachers. Admission Requirements: The minimum requirements for acceptance into this program include the following: 2 5 overall grade point average and 2.5 grade point average in mathematics courses ; completion of at least two calculus courses. Course Requirements: The typical program for prospective mathematics teachers consists of a minimum of 47 credit hours in mathematics above the 2000 level. The specialization require ments are: MAC 3411 (5) "MAC 3414 (4) MTG 4212 (3) MAC 3412 (4) MAS 3103 (4) MTG 4213 (3) MAC 3413 (4) MHF 3102 (3) Upper level mathematics electives (STA 3023 and MAS 4301) are strongly recommended. Two special methods courses (MAE 4320 and MAE 4330) needed for certification are included in the professional educa tion sequence. The student has the option of completina an inter disciplinary Natural Science major with a concentration in mathematics This requires a minimum of 36 credit hours in mathematics and a minimum of 24 credit hours in the College of Natural Sciences outside of mathematics. These latter 24 hours must be approved by the s tudent's adviser and must include a minimum of three courses at the 3000 level ov above Students must complete all major courses and all mathema tics education courses with a grade of C or higher. Requirements for the M.A. Degree (MAE): ELEMENTARY-This M.A degree i s de s igned to improve the skills of the classroom teacher i n teaching mathematics to elementary school youngsters. Requirements: The program requires full certifi cation as an elementary teacher for admission in addition to the minimum Board of Regents requirements ( undergraduate grade point average of 3 0 (B) minimum on last half of the bac calaureate degree ; or GRE aptitude score-1000 minimum) Course Requirements: A minimum of 48 quarter hours: 1. Students pursuing the master's degree in Elementary Education are required to present credit in EDE 6305, EDG 6935, and RED 6116. 2. Twelve quarter hours in foundations of education : EDF 6431, EDF 6481, and EDF 6120 or EDF 6215. 3. Mathematics Emphasis: Individually planned emphasis to include four courses from the following : MAE 5636, MAE 6116, MAE 6337, MAE 6338, MAE 6356, MAE 6548, MAE 6549. 4. Eight quarter hours of elective s in related areas Comprebens,ve Examination: The comprehens i ve examina c tion is a written examination covering the foundation s of educa tion elementary education (general) and the mathematics emphasis. SECONDARY-This M.A in Mathematics Education is de signed mainly for high school mathematics te achers The degree requires a minimum of 51 quarter hours with at least 27 hours in mathematics at the 5000 level or above. Requi.rements: In addition to the minimum Board of Regents requirements, candidates mus t have a strong back ground in mathematics This program is offered under both plans I and II. Course Requirements: This program requires a minimum of 51 quarter hours MAA 4211, MAA 4212, MAA 4213 and any COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 91 Mathematics courses from the 5000 and 6000 levels may be included in the planned program Education courses include: EDF 6431 EDF 6211 EDF 6606 and or or EDF 6481 EDF 6215 EDF 6517 or EDF 6544 and MAE 6136 / Comprehensive Examination: The comprehensive examina tion will consist of a written examination of foundations of edu cation and curriculum and insturction on foundations of educa tion and curriculum and instruction and an oral examination on mathematics and mathematics education Requirements for the M.Ed. Degree in Curriculum and Instruction (CUR) with an emphasis In Mathematics Education: The M.Ed is a flexible degree program intended to improve the skills of the classroom teacher. The degree requires at least 50 quarter hours with 60% or more at the 6000 level. The pre> gram will be planned on an individual basis by the student and an advisory committee. Admission Requirements: In addition to the qiinimum Board of Regents requirements prerequisites are two years of teaching experience and certification in mathematics. Course Requirements: 1. Twelve to sixteen quarter hours in mathematics educa tion selected from the following courses : CAP 4100, EDG 6931, ESE 6306, MAE 4885, MAE 5636, MAE 6136, MAE 6337, MAE 6338. 2. Sixteen to twenty quarter hours in mathemat ics. Courses in mathematics will be selected based upon the student's background in mathematics. 3 Four quarter hours in graduate curriculum and instruc tion (EDG 6667). 4. Sixteen quarter hours in foundations of education (Measurement Research, Psychological and Socie> Economic Historical or Philosophical). Comprehensive Examination: The comprehensive examina tion will consist of a written examination on foundations of edu cation and curriculum and instruction and an oral examination on mathematics education Requirements for the Ed.S. Degree in Curriculum and Instruction with an emphasis in Mathematics Education: The Ed.S. degree is designed to prepare specialists in mathematics education for classroom instruction or leadership and supervisory roles. The Ed.S. is a terminal degree and leads to Florida Rank 1-A Certification The program requires a minimum of 49 hours beyond the master's degree.including the development of a project under the direction of a major pre> fessor. Requirements: Candidates must present satis factory evidence of: 1 Undergraduate grade point average of 3 0 (B) minimum on the last half of the baccalaureate degree ; or GRE aptitude score-1000 minimum. 2 Three letters of recommendation 3. Favorable recommendation from program chairperson. 4 A master s degree with an emphasis in mathematics or mathematics education with a 3 .25 GPA or equivalent. Course Requirements: 1. A core of 16 quarter hours consisting of EDF 7493 and 4 quarter hours in each of the following areas: computer technology supervision and educational psychology. 2 Twenty-four quarter hours in mathematics and mathe matics education A mathematics education seminar is

PAGE 94

92 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION required Other c ourse s will be s elected ba s ed upon the s tudent's background. 3. Nine quarter hours devoted to an approved project. Comprehensive Examination: The comprehen s ive examina tion will consist of a written examination The candidate will be required to make an oral defense of the project. Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree in Curriculum and Instruction with an emphasis in Mathematics Education: The degree is gr a nted on evidence of proficiency and dis tinctive achievement in mathematics education and by th demonstration of ability to do original, independent investigation culminating in a dissertation. Admission Requirements: Candidate must' present satisfactory evidence of: I. GRE (Quantitative and Verbal) 1000. 2 GPA (Last h a lf of B.A.) 3.0. 3 Three letter s of recommendation 4 A ma s ter's degree in mathematics or mathematics edu cation 5. Favorable recommendation from the Departmental Admi ss ion s Committee. Course Requirements: This program is highly indi vidualized. Candidate's programs are planned (with approval by a fa culty committee) based upon previous experiences and future goal s The following area s mus t be included: 1 Major Area A. Mathematics Education B Cognate Area C D i ssertation 2 Statistics/Mea s urement/Research 24 Quarter Hours 16 Quarter Hours 24 Quarter Hours Design 16 Quarter Hotirs 3 Foundations (Curriculum) 16 Quarter Hour s *TOTAL 96 Supponing co ur ses o ut s i de ar ea of specializatio n Post ma s ter's quarter hour s. Department of Professional Physical Education PHYSICAL EDUCATION The Professional Physical Education program prepares teachers of physical education K-12. Requirements for the B.A Degree (PET): A two-year program is offered at the junior and s enior year level which provides a daily internship experience in the local schools for prospective physical education teachers. In order to be considered for program admission all students must partici pate in a selective admissions procedure which includes an on campus conference as enrollment in this program is limited. During each of the three quarters of the junior year student s should be prepared to spend a minimum of two hours per day in an elementary s chool physical education situation in addition to their on-campus study In the senior yelll' students participate in both part day and whole day teaching experience s at the second-' ary level. Those requirements (see admission to internship ex perience) which are nece s sary for admission to supervised teaching experience must be met before a student will be allowed to register in "Semin a r and Internship in Physical Education." After applying for admissi on to the Univer s ity all students must apply directly to the department on or before April 1. No student will be admitted to the program unless application has been made prior to this d a te. Direct request s to: Coordinator Professional Physical Education Program College of Education The following are the required courses education program of study (71 er. hrs.) : Jr Y e ar Sr Year HES 2400 PET 4943C PE;T 3001C PET 4944C PET 3381C PEL 4942C PET 3372 PET 4346C PET 3377C PET 4361C PET 3434C PET 4362C PET 3435C PEQ 3101C PEP 3205C PET 3942C -PET 3943C PET 3944C in the physical Requirements for the M.A. Degree (PET): The master s degree program in Physical Education focuses upon the teaching-learning process. It I s a program geared to the practitioner Areas within the program in which a student may focus study are Elementary Physical Education Secondary Physical Education, or Physical Education for the Handicapped. Enrollment in PET 6051C Profes s ional Assessment, is re quired of all students Preferably this course will be completed during the first quarter of study in the program and not later than the completion of eight quarter hours of credit in the physical education curriculum area Department of Psychological and Social Foundations of Education The P s ychological and Social Foundation s provides core courses for the undergraduate and graduate teacher training programs in the College of Education and also elective course s for non-Education s tudents. The School Psychology Master' s/ Education Specialist degree is the only degree program operated by the Psychological and Social Foundations Department. The student's academic record will reflect this emphasis as part of the degree statement. SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY Requirements for the M.A. (PSE)/Ed.S. degrees: Graduate Studies in School Psychology is a program offered jointly with the Department of Psychology in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences. Although a master's degree is awarded after approximately 50 qua,rter hours of study, this i not considered to be a terminal degree and does not qualify one for certification. A s suming s ati s factory work atcompletion of the 50 quarter h 0urs, the s tuden t then continues work towards the Education Spec ialist degree in Curriculum and Instruct i on with an emphasis i n School Psychology For the be8inning gradu a te student, the entire program in cluding the master's and specialist degrees consists of approxi mately 100 quarter hour s For the s tudent who has previously completed pertinent graduate trainiqg, the program may be shorter These hours include thesis and a full-time internship, which is usually paid for one academic year. The curriculum h a s been carefully sequenced to assure the s ystematic development of the complex concepts and skills necessary for the competent practice of school psychology. The fine cooperation of several local departments of school psychological services provides almost continuous field ex-

PAGE 95

periences for our students. These experiencc;s assure a strong reality orientation which complements formal conceptual de velopment. Our program of studies is designed to meet all recog nized national and state accreditation requirements, and our graduates are eligible for Florida Department of Education cer tification which is reciprocal with some 30 other states. We be lieve our curriculum would also make one eligible for certifica tion in most states which Florida does not have certification reciprocity. the curriculum is carefully sequenced, the program requires full-time study for students without pertinent prior graduate work. It is assumed that full-time study would allow time for an assistantship or part-time job of up to 20 hours per week. Per so ns with pertinent prior graduate work ma y pursue the program on a part-time basis to the extent that the prior graduate work is accepted as equivalent to part of the regular program. The comprehensive practice of school psychology requires close interaction with several disciplines, and our program of studies is appropriately interdisciplinary. This curriculum is or ganii:ed within Interdisciplinary Studies in Advanced Graduate Education, and policies are developed jointly by the College of Education and the Department of Psychology, College of Social and Behavioral Sciences. The emphasis of this innovative effort is on consultation oriented interventive and preventive psychol ogy in addition to advanced diagnostic and prescriptive pro cedures. The program faculty believes organized research data form the best available basis for the practice of school psychol ogy, and they are further committed to the development of leadership and innovation within the profession. The faculty is dedicated to producing highly trained psychologists througb the use of positive techniques. This posi tive approach can be especially seen.in the following policies and procedures: 1. Thorough admission procedures result in the selection of outstanding students. This makes possible a faculty commitment to do everything possible to guide each student to a high level of professional competence. This strategy opposes that of accepting large numbers of students with the assumption that some will "flunk out." 2. The curriculum is well organized and explicit so that the student is always aware of program expectations and of her/his progress in relation to these expectations. 3. The student body is kept small, resulting in greater student-faculty contact than would otherwise be possi ble. COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 93 4. Skills of practice are developed through a non threatening apprenticeship network established with local school systems This model encourages the stu dent to "as sist several professors and practicing school psychologists throughout her/his training. The notion here is to provide positive envifonments con taining rich feedback, in which competent psychologi cal skills develop. 5 Thesis guidelines have been established for the purpose of reducing the anxiety and ambiguity so often as sociated with research efforts The goal is to increase the probabilities that thesis research will be a positive experience while producing quality data with reason able energy expenditure Continuing Education. Elements of the school psychology curriculum will be made available to qualified practicing school psychologists who wish to upgrade their knowledge and skills without necessarily working toward a degree Other courses and workshops also will be developed for this purpose as the need arises, and a list of pertinent courses available from other de partments will be maintained. The faculty will provide appro priate advising. Curriculum. Except where equivalent courses are transfer red into the program the student must meet the following minimum requirements : Diagnosis and Prescription (15 quarter hours); Behavioral/Preventive Consultation (14 quarter hours) ; Developmental/Cultural Diversity (13 quarter hours) ; Theoretical/Research Context (27 quarter hours) ; Thesis and Internship. University and college admissions requirements may be found elsewhere in this catalog Since more persons apply than we can accommodate, admission to the school psychology program is competitive. The student should apply directly to the Office of Graduate Admissions, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620. The school psychology program will request further information from the student upon notification that the application is on file. Admission is for sum mer and fall quarters of each year and applications received by March I get priority attention. Each student accepted into the program will automatically be considered for financial aid. If separate application is necessary, forms will be forwarded to the stu dent upon admission. Further Information. Details of the program may be ob tained by writing the Director of Graduate Studies in School Psychology, FAO 295, University of South Florida Tampa Florida 33620. Department of Reading Education The Reading Education department has four major func tions .. The first is our service to undergraduates and inservice teachers which includes training every undergraduate student in the college in the teaching of reading, aspects of classroom cor rective reading, and the utilization of reading in the content areas. The second area of endeavor is our degree programs which involve the continuing education of teachers at the M.A., Ed.S. and Ph D levels in Reading/Language Arts. Our third function entails work in US F's 15-county respon sibility area which includes Teacher Education Centers and Continuing Education. We work with the various public and pri vate agencies and families, as well as the community at large. The fourth area involves our relationship with the com munity through the Reading Center. The College of Education Reading Center offers diagnostic and remedial services to chil dren and youth. Parents are given the opportunity to learn about reading and how to help their children. The Center provides training for students earning certification and/or degrees in reading. A large collection of diagnostic and remedial materials is housed in the Center. READING EDUCATION Requirements for the M.A. Degree (RED): The master s degree in Reading Education is designed to prepare special reading teachers, reading clinicians, and super visors-directors-coordinators of reading for school systems In addition to meeting the University and College require ments, applicants to the Reading program must present three (3) letters of recommendation, and a personal statement of profes sional background, experience and goals. The Board of Regents requires that applicants to a graduate program have at least a 3 0 grade point average from their last two years of undergraduate work OR a minimum of 1000 on the GRE. A limited number of students can be admitted to the program who do not meet these' minimum requirements. Applications for admission are proce s sed once each quarter The deadline for all requirements to be met" and all materials to be in the Reading Department office is usually 4-5 weeks before the quarter ends. Applications are pro cessed in the quarter preceding the one in which the applicant

PAGE 96

94 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION expects to begin the program. The applicant should contact the Reading Department to ascertain the deadline dates for specific quarters and to obtain instructions regarding the transmission of letters of recommendation and statements of goals. Education courses include: Plan I-EDF 6431 and EDF 6481 and one of EDF 6211 EDE 6215 EDF 6606 EDF 6517 EDF 6544 EDF 5136 or EDF6120 EDG 5206 EDF 6213 EDE 6205 Plan II requires all four of the process core: EDF 6211, EDF 6431, EDF 6481, and EDF 6606. Specialization in Reading Education shall include a minimum of 29 credit hours: RED 6116 RED 6365 RED 6548 RED 6748 I RED 6247 RED 6S46 RED 6747 RED 6838 There is the option of writing a thesis which would substi tute for some of the course work required in the previously de scribed programs. Students entering the program with an undergraduate major outside elementary education normally will be required to take RED 4310 RED 4515, and LAE 4414 before beginning the specialization sequence. Electives must be chosen by conference with adviser. Selective retention policies require that the student maintain' a "B" average with no more than five hours of "C" work in the major area* (Reading) courses and a total of no more nine hours of "C" work in the program If either of these criteria is not met, the student will be immedfately dropped from the pro gram The student may then petition to the faculty to be reiri stated. Reinstatement will occur when the student retakes one of the courses which a "C" was earned and earns an "A" in that course. Major area courses are RED 4 310, RED 6116 and all Reading Education courses. Requirements for the Ed.S. Degree In Curriculum and Instruction (CUR) with an emphasis In Reading/Language Arts Education: The purpose of the Ed S. in Reading/Language Arts (R/LA) area is to prepare in school leaders in the field. Specific roles which graduates could fill would include directors of R/LA pro grams for school systems, clinical directors in private or public settings, or supervisors of R/LA curricula. The program is de signed to provide experiences to acquire expertise in R/LA pro cess, designing and evaluating R/LA instructional materials and teaching techniques, and the treatment of R/LA problems. A student may elect to acquire more depth in some of these areas than in others, however, a basic knowledge in all will be re quired. The Ed.S involves course work, written compre hensives, and a project. The Ed.S. program is separate from the PhD. program and is planned as a terminal degree. Applicants should realize that Ed S. course work Is noi neces!ianly applicable to the Ph.D. degree. Admission Requirements: 1. Meet the general requirements as specified in the current USF catalog. 2. Have certification in at least one related area of educa tion. 3. Have at least one year of successful experience in a pro fessional school role. 4. Have a Master's in Education with a minimum of 16 graduate hours in R/LA or related disciplines. If this is not met, admission may be granted if the student is will ing to lengthen the program to make up deficiencies 5. Submit an official record of the GRE score which must total 1000. 6. Submit an official transcript of post-baccalaureate work showing at least a 3.25 grade point average. 7 Submit a statement of professional history and goals and three letters of recommendation to the Reading Depart ment. 8. Be recommended for approval by the R/LA faculty. 9 from foreign countries will be appraised indi vidually. Exceptions: A limited number of applicants to the program can be ad mitted as exceptions to requirements 5 and 6 In order to be considered for this exception group, the candidate must have compensating qualifications which are documentable. Some ex amples of these qualifications might be: 1. GPA of 3.9 in post-baccalaureate work. 2. Scholarly publication. 3. Creative program development. 4 Designing of creative instructional methods and/or materials . Ed.S Program Structure: Specialization in R/ LA 20 quarter hours* Electives 16 quarter hours* Project :. 12 quarter hours* Total '' . 48 quarter hours All represent postmaster' s credit and are_ minimal Requirements for the Ph.D : Degree In Curriculum and ln. structlon (CUR) with an emphasis lh Reading/Language Arts Education: The purpose of the Ph. p. in Reading/Language Arts (R/LA) is to prepare leaders in t he field. Specific roles -rhich graduates could fill would include college and university faculty directors of R/LA p.rogi-ams for school systems, or clinical directors in private or public settings. The program is designed to provide experiences to acquire expertise in research into R/LA process, designing and evaluating R/LA instructional materials and teaching techniques, university and college teaching, and the treatment of disabled learners (R/LA). A student may elect to acquire more depth in some of these areas than in others ; how ever a basic knowledge in all will be required. The Ph.D. in volves course work written comprehensives and a dissertation. Admission Requirements : 1. Meet the general requirements as specified in the current USF catalog 2. Have certification in at least one related area of education. 3. Have at least one year of successful experience in a profes sional school role. 4. Have a master's degree in education with a minimum of 30 graduate hours in RILA or related disciplines. If this is not met, admission may be granted if the student is willing to lengthen the program to make up deficiencies. 5. Submit an official record of the G RE score which must total 1100, with at least 500 on the quantitative section. 6. Submit an official transcript of post-baccalaureate work showing at least a 3.5 grade point average . 7 Be recommended for approval by the program faculty. 8. Applicants from foreign countries will be appraised individu ally. Exceptions: A limited number of applica,nts can be admitted to the pro gram as exceptions to requirements 5 and 6. In Qnf.er to be con sidered for this exception group, the candidate mtist have com pensating qualifications which are documenta:ble : Some ex amples of these qualifications might be : 1. GPA Of' 3.9 in post-baccalaureate work'."' 2. Scholarly publication. 3. Creative prografll development 4. Designing of creative instructional methods or materials. Program Structure: Reading/Language Arts Specialization R/LA Cognate Area** Dissertation Statistics/ Measurement / Research Design Foundations and Curriculum Total 24 quarter hours* 16 quarter hours 24 quarter hours 16 quarter hours* 16 quarter hours Minimum Hours. All represent post-master s credit and are minimal requirements *Supporting course s ou tside major area.

PAGE 97

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 95 Department of Science and Health Education Degree programs are available with majors both in Science Education and in Health Education In Science Education de gree programs are offered at all levelsBaccalaure.ate (B.A .); Master s (M.A. and M.Ed ); Education Specialist (Ed S .); and Doctoral (Ph D). In Health Education, an undergraduate (B.A.) program is offered. Descriptions of programs in both fields are provided on the following pages. SClENCE EDUCATION Requirement& for the Baccalaureate Programs (B.A. Degree): Two baccalaureate degree programs are offered which are designed to prepare students for teaching secondary school sci ence. In addition to College requirements the minimum re quirement for acceptance into either program is the completion of 24 quarter hours of required science courses with no grade less than a C". A. Botany (BOE), Chemistry (CHE), Physics (PHE), :ZOOiogy (ZOE): A student planning to teach science at the secondary level may the departmental major in the corresponding science area (in Botany, Chemistry Physics or Zoology) Requirements for these programs are listed in the catalog under the science departments of the College of Natural Sciences B. Science Education (SCE): An alternate program is available in which the prospective teacher must meet the minimum requirements of an inter disciplinary major in the Natural Sciences. This requires a minimum of 36 credit hours in the discipline of major con centration and a minimum of 24 credit hours within the Natural Sciences and outside the concentration area. These latter i4-32 hours must be approved by the student's adviser and include at least three 3000 level courses. (Total pro gram, 68 credit hours minimum) Concentrations are avail able in biology physics, and chemistry A typical program for a biology concentration includes: Minimum credit within concentration credit hours) BSC 2010C (4) MCB 3010C(5) PCB 4023C (5) BSC 2011 C (4) PCB 3063 (4) or BSC 2012 (4) PCB 4043C (4) PCB 5ll5C Additional selections from: BOT 3010 (5) zoo 3203C (5) zoo 4303C (5) BOT 3713C (5) Minimum credits outside of concentration (24-32 hours) Courses outside biology would normally include: BCH 3033 (4) CHM 2046L(l) CHM 3210 (3) CHM 2045 (3) CHM 2047 (3) CHM 3210L(2) CHM 2045L(l) CHM 2047L(l) CHM 3211 (3) CHM 2046 (3) PHY 2050, 2050L (4:1) and PHY 2051, 2051L (4:1) or PHY 2b52, 2052L (4 :1) Electives (0-!!) Additiona1 courses 5elected, from Chemistry Mathematics, Physics, and Geology are recommended The student with either a departmental or inter disciplinary major must earn a grade of or higher in all courses required in the program, both in the major concent ration and in supporting courses of the major For either program, SCE 4631 is recommended for students with a Biology concentration and SCE 4630 is recommended for students with a Physics or Chemistry concentration. College requirements for graduation must also be completed satisfactotily. In the Professional Education Core, a minimum of 36 credit hours is required which includes SCE 4330 (Science and two courses for diagnosing reading problems-RED 4360 and SCE 4305. Requirements for the Master s Degrees: A. Master of Arts (M A.) An M.A degree program i s offered w i th a m ajor in Scien ce Education (SCE). Three plan s a re avail able. Collc:;ge a dm i ssion and graduation requirements for all three plans are s pecified in the sections Master s Level Degree Pro grams and Master of Arts Programs. In addition to College admi ss ion requirement s, applicants mus t have a baccalaureate degree (or equivalent) i n the area to be the specialization Biology, Chemi s try or Phy sics. Specialization in each of the s e three dis cipline s i s available in a cooperative program with the College of Natural Sciences. In each instance before admi ss ion to the degree program the stu dent must satisfy the Biolog y, Physi c s or Chemi s try a dvi ser th a t he has the competence to undertake the program Educ a tion courses include : EDF 6431 EDF 6211 EDF 6606 and or or EDF6481 EDF6215 EDF6517 or EDF 6544 and SCE 6634 Specialization s hall con s i s t of at lea s t 2 7 credit hour s, a ppro v ed by the adviser in the discipline S atisfa ctory c ompletion of th e progr a m must be certified by both the College of Natur a l Sci ences and the College of Education. B. Master of Education (M.Ed.) An M.Ed. degree in Curriculum and In s truction (CUR) i s offered w i th a concentration in Science Edu c ation. This con ce n tration is designed to i mprov e te a ching comp e ten cies in Scien ce for teacher s who are certified in Science and who hav e s ucc ess fully completed two years of teaching In addition to the gener a l college requirement s, lis ted under Mas ter of Educa tion Pro grams, a concentration in Science Education r equi res: Proces s Core Science Methods (and related education c ourses) Science Total Minimum Qua rter Ho u rs 20 12-16 18-2 2 50 Requirements for the Education Specialist Degree (Ed.S.): An Ed.S. in Curriculum and In s truction with emph as i s in Science Education is offered for tho s e with a master's deg r ee who wish to extend their knowledge and skill s in Science Educa tion Admission requirements and the Progr a m of Studie s are described below A'. Admission requirement s I. Master s degree 2. Either a minimum s core of 1000 (Verb a l plus Quantitative) on the Graduate Record E-xamination (GRE) ; OR a minimum grade po i nt average of 3.0 (B) for the last two years of undergr adua te s tudy 3. Full teacher certificat i on within grade s K-14. 4 Two or more year s teaching experience within grades K-14. 5. Minimum credits in Science: a Major (Biology Chemistry Earth Science or Physics) 65 quarter hour s. b. Supporting Science disciplines-one full year of each of the other three Science disciplin es (other than the major as lis ted in ( a ) above ). B Program of Studie s. Area Minimum Quart e r H ou r s I. Major a. Science Education 1 2 b. Science 12

PAGE 98

96 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION c. Ed.S. Project 2. Statistics/Measurement/ Research Design 3 Foundations of Education Total Credits (Post Master s Hours) 12 8 8 52 Requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy Degree (Ph.D.): A Ph.D. degree program in Curriculum and Instruction with emphasis in Science Education is offered. It is designed for those with a master's degree who wish to prepare for leadership roles in Science Education. The program places emphasis on developing ability in education research, Science curriculum evaluation and development, conducting teacher-training programs, arid decision-making as it pertains to Science Education. Admission and program requirements are listed below. A Admission Requirements. I. Master's degree in Science Education or Science. 2. Full teacher certification within grades K-14. 3 Two or more years teaching experience within grades K-14. 4. A minimum score of 1000 on the Graduate Record Examination (ORE). 5. A minimum grade point average of 3.0 (B) for the last two years of undergraduate study 6. Minimum credits in Science: a. Major (Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science or Physics) 65 quarter hours b. Supporting Science disciplines-one full year of each of the other three Science disciplines (other than the major as listed in (a) above). B. Program of Studies Ar e a Minimum Quarter Hours I. Major a. Science Education 24 b.Science (Cognate) 16 c Dissertation 24 2. Statistics / Measurement/Research Design 16 3 Foundations of Education 16 4 Computer Language Competence Total Credits (Post Master s Hours) 96 C Residency Requirement. Minimum of three years beyond Bachelor's Degree one year full-time residency . HEALTH EDUCATION Requirements for the B.A. Degree (HES): The two-year Health Education program is designed to prepare health educators for the public schools or community health programs through combined course work and field work / internship in public schools and community health programs This program is a competency based curriculum with an S (Satisfactory) /U (Unsatisfactory.) grading system. Prerequisites for entering the program include admission to the College of Education, a survey course in health science (HES 2000 or equi valent), biology with laboratory and an interview for program guidance. The Health Education Selective Admissions Committee will base its admission decisions on the following: I. Applicant's preyious scholastic record and performance on the American College Test. 2. Interview for program guidance. 3 References (3). 4. Related work experience. 5. Written statements by student about reasons for wanting to become a Health Educator. The following are courses required in the Health Education Program (61 hours): HES 2400 HES 3122 HES 3123 HES 3140 HES 3141 HES 3300 HES 3730 (3) HES 4142 (3) HES 4143 (3) HES 4722 ( 4) HES 4940L (4) HES 4943 (3) I HES 4944 (3) (4) (4) (4) (12) (5) (5) The following courses are required in the Professional Edu cation Core: EDF 3214 EDF 3604 or EDF 354i Measurement (4) (4) (4) Courses (4) EOG 4200 RED 4360 SCE 4305 (5) (2) (2) For students not seeking teacher certification the following courses are deleted: EDF3604 EDF 3542 EDG 4200 (4) (4) (5) The following courses are teacher certification: HES 3244 (4) HES 3510 (4) HES 4940L RED 4360 SCE 4305 (12) (2) (2) added for those not seeking HES 4276 (4) Department of Social Science/Letters Education The following programs are housed in the Department of Social Science / Letters: English Education Foreign Language Education Humanities Education Social Science Education Speech Communication Education ENGLISH EDUCATION The English Education Section of the Department of Social Science / Letters has as its primary undergraduate mission, the preparation of teachers of English for junior and senior high schools (Teachers of middle school English ordinarily enroll in Elementary Education and acquire additional background in the English Education section.) The primary graduate missions of this section are to advance the skills of people already teaching English in the public schools and to train them for responsibilities in language arts leadership as department chairs curriculum coordinators, and consultants in the public schools or as teacher and researchers of English methods in college s. The section offers the B .A. degree in both English Educa tion and English-Mass Communications Education and the M A degree in English Educ ation the M Ed. degree in Curriculum and Instruction with an emphasis in English Education and the Ed S and Ph.D. degrees in Curriculum and Instruction with an emphasis in Communication Education (The latter two degrees

PAGE 99

degree s offered in conjunction with other communication education specialties: Speech Communication, Drama Education Foreign Language Education Humanities Education, and Reading Education Requirements for the B.A. Degree (ENE): The minimum req1;1irement for acceptance into this program is a 2.5 grade wint average. Graduation requirements: "C" grade or better in Methods Course Specialization Requirements (61-64 er hrs.) AML 3010 (5) ENL 3041 (5) ENC 3466 (5) ENL 3133 (5) or or ENC 3486 (5) ENG 3133 (5) ENL 3 0 30 (5) Two additional 4000-level literature courses One of the following: LIN 4370 LIT 3150 ORI 3000 SPC 2023 (5) (5) (4) (5) ENG 3130 (3) MMC 3000 (3) MMC 3700 (4) One of the following: EDG 4451 (4) LIN 3801 (4) LIN 4600 (4) ENG 4512 (5) or approved substitute Two special !Dethods courses LAE 4335 and LAE 4642 and two reading courses, (RE D 4360 and LAE 4530), are inclu ded in the professional education se quen ce. Requirements for the M.A. Degree (ENE): Plan admission: A bachelor's degree i n English Education from a recognized institutio n or Rank II certificatim) in Secondary English from the State of Florida or other equivalent certification Course Sequence : Process Core (4-16 hours), English Edu cation (4-16 hours) English courses (6 courses se lected under advisement as preparation for terminal examination over a read ing list i ncluding selected works from most periods of English and American literature; students may select one course each in linguistics and advanced composition for teachers), Educatio n Electives (selected under advisement to bring the program to a total of 48 hours) Plan II-Requirements for admission: A bachelor s degree in English from a recognized Liberal Arts Institution of higher l earning Course sequence: Process Core (16 hours), Curriculum (5 hours) English Education (4 hours), English courses (28 hour s se lected as for Plan I, above), Internship (9 hours) In addition the State Department of Education requires a course in Re ading in the content areas for certification or re certification. 1 MASS COMMUNICATIONS-ENGLISH EDUCATION Requirements .for the B.A. Degree (MCE): The minimum requirement for acceptance into this program is a 2 5 grade point average Specialization Requirements (63 e r. hrs.) Mass Communications (23 er. hrs. ) JOU 3100 (4) JOU 4800 (4) ENG 3156 (5) MMC 3 000 (3) or MMC 3700 (4) Two of the following or one of the following plus a more advanc ed course in that area. ADV 3000 (4) JOU 3006 (4) RTV 3000 (4) ENG 3130 (3) JOU 3205 (4) VIC 3000 (4) FIL 4300 (4) PUR 3000 (4) VIC 3100 (4) Two special methods courses LAE 4335 and LAE 4642 are included in the professional education sequence English ( 44 er. hrs. ) AML 3010 (5) ENL 3041 (5) LIT 3150 (5) COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 97 ENL 3030 (5) LIN 4370 (5) SPC 2023 (5) LIN 3010 (4) or approved s ubs t itute Two additional English courses in literature or o n e English literature course and ORI 3000. Foreign Language Education Foreign Language Education offers programs leading to the B .A. degree and certification in the secondary area in the fol lowing languages: French German, Italian, Latin, Portugese, Russian, Spani sh The program when success fully completed makes the graduates of these programs auto matically eligible for teaching certification in the State of Florida. Programs are offered leading to the M A degree in the sec ondary area in the following languages : French, German, ish. The master's programs are designed primarily to improve ihe skills of the person already certified in Foreign Language Education Combination programs leading to the B A. degree and Cer tification are offered in the following areas: Latin-English Edu catio n ; LatincForeign Language Education; Foreign Language Englis h Education; Dual Foreign Language Education (any combjnation o f two different foreign languages) Requ ire ment s for the various degrees follow CLASSICS EDUCATION Requirements for the B.A Degree (CLE): LATIN-ENGLISH EDUCATION Specialization Requirements (71 e r hrs.) Latin (36 er. hrs.) Select three courses from th e following : CLA 3000 (5) CL T 3370 (4) CLA 4100 (4) EUH 2101 (4) CLA 4120 (4) EUH 2102 (4) CLT 3290 (4) EUH 3401 (4) CL T 3300 (4) EUH 3402 (4) CLT 3322 (4) EUH 3412 (4) EUH 3413 (4) HIS 3930 (4) PHP 4000 (4) PHP 4010 (4) S e lect six additional upper le ve l Latin courses from the following : LNW 4311 (4) LNW 4312 (4) LNW 4322 (4) LNW 4361 (4) LNW 4362 (4) English (35 er. hrs.) LNW 4381 (4) LNW 4500 (4) LNW 4501 (4) LNW 4660 (4) LNW 4665 (4) LNW 4675 (4) LNW 4900 (1-4) LNW 4930 (1-4) ENC 3466 (5) or ENC 3486 (5) 'LIN 4370 SPC 2023 (5) (5) Two of the Jo/lo wing: ENL 3010 (5) ENL 3133 (5) ENL 3401 (5) ENL 3030 (5) ENL 3320 (5) ENL 3430 (5) ENL 3041 (5) ENL 3351 (5) ENL 3441 (5) One of the following : AML 3010 (5) AML 3102 (5) AML 3107 (5) AML3111 (5) One of the following: ENG3138 (5) ENG 4744 (5) LIT 3150 (5) ENG3156 (5) LANGUAGE EDUCATION: Specialization R e quir ements (72 er. hrs ) Latin (36 er. hrs ) S e lect thre e courses from the following : CLA 3000 (5) CLT 3370 (4) EUH 3412 (4) CLA 4100 (4) EUH 2101 (4) EUH 3413 (4) CLA 4120 (4) EUH 2102 (4) HIS 3930 (4) CLT 3290 (4) EUH 3401 (4) PHP 4000 (4) CLT 3300 (4) EUH 3402 (4) PHP4010 (4) CLT 3322 (4)

PAGE 100

98 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION Select six additional upper l eve l Latin courses from the following: LNW 4311 (4) LNW 4312 (4) LNW 4322 (4) LNW 4361 (4) LNW 4362 (4) LNW 4381 LNW 4500 LNW 4501 LNW 4660 LNW 4665 (4) LNW 4675 (4) (4) LNW 4900 (1-4) (4) LNW 4930 (1-4) (4) (4) Foreign language course requirements are 36 hrs. beyond in termediate courses i ncluding : Compos i tion I and II Conversation I and II FRW 4230 (4) GEW 4101 (4) SPW 4100 (4) FRW 4300 (4) ITW 4100 (4) SPW 4101 (4) GEW 4100 (4) ITW 4101 (4) FOL 5752, FOW 5405, LIN 3010, LIN 3801, LIN 4377 may be among the selected courses to total 36 hours. FOREIGN LANGUAGEEDUCATION Requirements for the B.A. Degree (FLE): FOREIGN LANGUAGE-ENGLISH EDUCATION: Specialization Requirements (71 er. hrs.) English (35 er. hrs.) ENC 3466 (5) LIN 4370 .(5) SPC 2023 (5) or ENC 3486 (5) Two the following: ENL 3010 (5) ENL 3133 (5) ENL 3401 (5) ENL 3030 (5) ENL.'3320 (5) ENL 3430 ,(5) ENL 3041 (5) ENL 3351 (5) ENL3441 '(5) One of the following: AML 3010 (5) AML 3107 (5) AML3111 (5) AML 3102 (5) On e of the following : ENG3!38 ( 5) ENG4744 (5) LIT 3150 (5) ENG 3156 (5) If an elective is needed, ORI 3000 is recommended Foreign Language requires a minimum of 36 credit hours beyond intermediate courses. Course requirements are: Composition I and II Conversation I and II FRW 4230 (4) GEW 4101 (4) SPW 4100 (4) FRW 4300 (4) ITW 4100 (4) SPW 4101 (4) GEW 4100 ( 4 ) ITW 4101 (4) Student and adviser will select the additional foreign lan guage courses to total a minimum of 36 credit hours. FOL 5752, FOW 5405, LIN 3010, LIN 3801, and LIN 4377 may be among the selected courses. Two special methods courses (FLE 4333 and LAE 4335) are included in the professional education TWO FOREIGN LANGUAGE EDUCATION: Speciali z ation Requirements (63 er. hrs.) Begi1;1ning and intermediate foreign language requirements (or equivalents) must be completed. In the major language (French German Italian, Russian, or Spanish), the student must earn a minimum of 36 credit hours, and in the minor lan guage 27 credit hour s. The required upper level foreign language courses for the major language are : 36. Composition I and II Conversation I and II FRW 4230 (4) ITW 4100 (4) SPN 5790* (4) FRW 4300 (4) ITW 4101 (4) or GEW 4100 (4) SPW 4100 (4) SPW 4130* (4) GEW 4101 (4) SPW 4101 (4) Plus additional selected h o urs in the major language to total T he minor language requirements in upper level foreign lan guage courses are: Composition I and II Conversation I and II FRW 4230 (4) GEW 4101 (4) SPW 4100 (4) FRW 4300 (4) ITW 4100 (4) SPW 4101 (4) GEW 4100 (4) ITW 4101 (4) Plus additional hours'in the minor la ng uage to total 27. Spanish majors only SINGLE FOREIGN LANGUAGE EDUCATION After consultation with a foreign language education ad viser, the Dean may give permission for a student to elect a single foreign language major. A minimum of 45 credit hours beyond intermediate course requirements must be earned in the single foreign language Among the 45 hours must be the follow ing: French (45 er. hrs ) FRE 3240 (4) FRE 4241 (4) FRW 4230 (4) FRE 3420 (4) FRE 4421 (4) FRW 4300 (4) Plus additional selected hours of upper leve l courses to total 45 hrs.* German (45 er. hrs.) GER 3240 (4) GER 4241 (4) GEW 4100 (4) GER 3420 (4) GER 4421 (4) GEW 4101 (4) Plus additional selected hour s of upper level courses to total 45 hrs.* Italian (45 er. hrs.) ITA 3240 (4) ITA 4241 (4) ITW 4100 (4) ITA3420 (4) ITA4421 (4) ITW4101 (4) Plu s additional selected hour s of upper level courses to total 45 hrs.* Russian (45 er. hrs.) RUS3400 (4) RUT3110 (4) RUT3111 ( 4) RUS 4401 (4) Plus additional selected hours of upper level courses to total 45 hrs.* Spanish ( 4 5 er. hrs ) SPN 2240* *(4) SPN 4301 (4) SPW 4101 (4) SPN 3300 (4) SPW 4100 (4) or SPN 3241 **(4) SPW 4130 (4) Plus additional selected hours of upper level courses to total 45 hrs .* FOL5752, FOW 5405, LIN3010, LIN3801 LIN 4377 maybe used to satisfy selecteJ course requirements of th e foreign l anguage These courses will not count in major for students who are fluent in Spani s h Requirements for the M.A. Degree (FLE): (FRENCH, GERMAN, SPANISH) Plan III i s a program of graduate studies for holders of a non education baccalaureate degree who do not wish to meet teacher certification requirements in the State of Florida. The primary difference in this plan from Plan II is that students will not be required to take EDG 5691, Curriculum & Instruction and EDG 6947; Internship. A. Process Core (16 hours) EDF6431 EDF6211 or or EDF 6481 and EDF 65'i7 EDF 6544 EDF 6606 B Current Trends Course in Teaching Specialization (4 hours) C. Specialization (27 hours minimum) This is an individually planned graduate major in the teaching field or in an appropriate College of Education program for K-12 specialists The M.A. in Foreign Language Education requires 20 to 25 quarter hours in Education courses : EDF6431 EDF6211 EDF6606 and or or EDF 6481 EDF 6215 EDF 6517 or EDF 6544 and FLE 6665

PAGE 101

In addition, Plan II requires an internship in the Foreign Lan guage. A minimum of 27 quarter hours are required in the For e i gn Language cour s es on the 5000 and 6000 levels However, depending upon the candidate s background and strengths, For eign Language course requirements can go as high as 36 quarter hours Unless otherwise approved by adviser, at least 21 hours in French should be on the 6000 level ; in Spanish at least 18 hours should be on the 6000 level. HUMANITIES EDUCATION: The Humanities Education Program seeks to prepare sec ondary school humanities teachers who have extensive academic work in the humanities B.A. and M.A. degree programs are available. At the B A. degree level, students develop teaching strategies materials, and curricula to u s e in teaching the human ities to students in grades 7-12. Although emphasis is placed upon meeting the requirements of the State of Florida, students also are encouraged to gai n sufficient experience to allow them to move on to other states as qualified humanities teachers. When ever possible, students are en couraged to gain a second certi fication area to allow even greater professional mobility. At the M.A level, experienced humanities teachers are of fered continued work in their professional area to expand their understanding of man s accomplishments and enlightenment. The degree also is available to individuals who wish to gain certification in the humanities but whose undergraduate degree wa s in another academic area. Students are expected to demon strate research and writing abili ties in relation to synthesizing information on man s accomplishments in the humanities. Hav ing demonstrated this ability, they are expected to be able to show how the material may be taught to students in secondary s chools and/or community colleges Although all graduates in Humanities Education are ex pected to demonstrate teaching abilities in the area neither de gree limits its products to teaching The work in this area is considered to be a good general background for any profession which deals with human evaluation perpetuation of man s a ccomplishments, and the production of creative or artistic pro ducts Requirements for the B.A. Degree (HUE): The minimum requirement for acceptance into this program i s a 2 5 grade point average Graduation requirements : 2.5 GPA in major and C grade or better in Methods Course Special i zation Requirements (4 er hrs in HUM 4906 3 er. hrs in HUM 4813, and 42 er. hrs from the HUM 4433, 4434 (4,4) HUM 4435, 4436 (4,4) HUM 4437, 4438 (4,4) HUM 4440 .4441 (4,4) HUM 4442, 4443 (4 ,4) HUM 4444 4445 (4,4) HUM 4471, 4473 (5,5) HUM 4905 (l-5) HUM 5452, 5454, 5456 ( 4 4 ,4) HUM 5485, 5486 (4,4) HUM 5412 (4) HUM 5414 (4) HUM 5415 (4) HUM 5465 (4) Also required ( a m i nimum of 9 er. hrs in the creat i ve or performing art s from the follow ing areas: Theatre Art, Music Dance and English ) Academic w6rk in these areas taken prior to entering the College of Education will b e con sidered toward the satisfaction of thi s requirement. Course work to meet Florida reading requirements is re quir e d. M a jors are en c ouraged to gain certification in a s econd area COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 99 Requirements for the M.A. Degree (HUE): Plan I-Re quir e m e nt s for a dmission : A bachelor s degree in Humanitie s Education or a related area which included teacher certificat i on ; 1000 on the GRE and an academic average of B in the last two years of undergraduate work; approval of Humanit i es Education adviser. C o urse Sequence: HUM 4813 (if not taken previously) (4 hours) ; EDF 6431 and EDF 6481 (8 hours) ; 2 courses from EDF 6211 or EDF 6215, EDF 6606 EDF 6517, EDF 6544 or other Education are as app r oved by the Humanities Education adviser (minimum of 8 hours) ; HUM 4870 (4 hours) ; HUM 6909 (3 hour s); and 6 graduate courses from the Humanities Depart ment 2 of which may be at the 5000 level (24 hours). Candidates mus t complete a comprehensive examination successfully after completing written papers for the Human i ties Department. Plan fl-Re qu i r e m e nt s f o r admi s s i o n : A bachelor s degree in Humanities or a related s ubject area ; 1000 on the GRE and an academi c average of at leas t B in the l a s t t wo year s of undergrad uate work ; approval by the Humanities Education advi s er Any entrance requirement waiver s must be approved by both the Humanities Department and the Human i tie s Education adviser. C o urse S eque nce: HUM 4813 (if not taken previou s ly) ( 4 hours ) ; Proce s s Core (21 hours ) ; HUM 4870 ( 4 hours); RED 4337 ( 4 hour s ) ; HUM 6909 (3 hours ); E DG 6947 ( 9 hours) ; and 6 gr a duate course s from the Humanitie s Department, 2 of which may be at the 5000 level (24 hours ) Candidate s must complete a comprehensive examination s ucces s full y, after completing writ ten papers for the Humanities Department. The examination should be scheduled during a quarter when the candidate is not interning. SOCIAL SCIENCE EDUCATION The goals and object i ves of the secondary Social Science progr a m at the undergraduate level are designed to prepare stu dents to meet state certification requirements In work ing toward s tate certification requirements candidates for the undergraduate degree enroll in course s for the purpose of ac quiring subject knowledge in the social sciences as well as knowledge and skills related to social science methodology and curriculum. The Social Science program at the elementary level i s for the purpose of providing candidates in elementary education with the knowledge and skills needed in developing a competent So cial Science program at the elementary school le v el. At the graduate level students may elect to pursue an M .A. degree in secondary Social Science Education or an M .Ed. de gree in Curriculum and Instruction with specialization in Social Science Education The master's programs are i ntended mainly to improve the skills arid knowledge of the classroom teacher Requirements for the Degree (SSE): The College of Education provides a program of study which enables students to attain a degree in secondary social science education (7-12). To teach at the secondary level the minimum requirements of a sileial science education major must be met. All programs i n the s ocial science education major specify 64 credit s or more in the social science s. A teaching emphasi s requires a minimum of 24 c redit s in one discipline within an approved s peciali za tion whic h will lead to certification in the broad are a of s o c ial s ciences However a student may concentrate his study in one of the s eparate s ubject area s (politi cal sc i ence history geograph y American his tory) Each pro gram contains b oth required and electi v e course s which each s tudent i n consul ta tion with his ad viser will select. Gr a duation requirements : 2.5 GPA in major and C grade or better in Methods Cour se Requirements for the M.A. Degree (SSE): Advanced train i n g for the purpos e of becom ing better teacher s in g rade s 7-12. P l an I i s for certified teacher s, and Plan

PAGE 102

100 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION II for those with a social science baccalaureate degree but not certified to teach. Plan I-For teachers who are certified to teach general secondary social studies or one of the separate subject areas. Education courses include: EDF 6431, SSE 6636 and 9-12 hours of electives. Each st'udent in consultation with his adviser will select at least seven courses at the 5000 or 6000 level from courses offered in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences. Three or more of these courses must be at the 6000 level. Plan II-Students will complete all of the Plan I require ments, take SSE 4333, EDG 5206 and EDG 6947, plus any other social science courses which the Social Science Education department deems necessary for fulfilling minimum state certifi cate requirements. Speech Communication Education The program in Speech Communication Education offers B.A and M.A. degree programs leading to secondary school certification in speech. It cooperates with other areas in the Uni versity that have graduate courses in human communications, to offer the Ph. D degree in Curriculum and Instruction with an emphasis in Communication Education to qualified and ex perienced communication educators. At the undergraduate level emphasis is placed upon pre paring students with a liberal arts background to teach speech communication courses in grades 7-12. Although particular at tention is devoted to the needs and requirements of Florida, a genuine effort is made to assist majors at all levels to gain a diversified background in communication skills that will allow easy national and international mobility among English speaking schools. Whenever possible, majors are encouraged to obtain the necessary courses and skills to permit them to be certified in more than one academic area The M.A degree program in Speech Communication Edu cation gives advanced in-service education to experienced teachers and also provides a route for liberal arts graduates with considerable course work in speech communication to attain an advanced degree and state certification in speech simultane ously. The M A. program also offers opportunities to teachers of other secondary school subjects to gain certification in another academic area. Thus prospective language arts supervisors and English or Language Arts Department chairpersons are encour aged to increase their competencies in areas not permitted in their undergraduate programs, in order to understand more of the areas they will be expected to supervise. The Ph .D. degree in Curriculum and Instruction with an emphasis in Communication Education encourages highly qual ified experienced teachers to pursue a program of research in several different areas of human communications. It requires a study of interrelationships among those various areas in theoreti cal and applied situations Although the primary emphasis of this program, at all degree levels, is the preparation and continued education of teachers the program recognizes its graduates are suited to many other professions that require oral language facility. A degree in this program offers training in human relations group processes, aesthetics, research methodologies, and public presentations / SPEECH COMMUNICATION ENGLISH EDUCATION Requirements for the B.A. Degree (SEO): The minimum requirement for acceptance into this program is a 2 5 Grade Point Average Graduation Requirements are a 2.5 GPA in the major and a "C" grade or better in Methods Course. Specialization Requirements (66-68 credit hours) Communication (37-38 credit hours) COM 3003 (4). LIN 2200 (4) ORI 3000 (4) S .PC 2023 (5) One of the following: SPC 3441 (4). SPC 3513 (4) Two of following: (8) SPC 3210 SPC 3441 SPC 3601 SPC 3301 SPC 3513 At least two electii ( es from: (8-9) COM 4120 ORI 4120 ORI 4310 LIN 3010 ORI 4140 ORI 5145LIN 3801 ORI 4230 SPC 3633 English (29-30 credit hours) Two of the following : (10) ENL 3010 ENL 3133 ENL 3030 ENL 3320 ENL 3041 One of the following: (5) AML 3010 AML f 102 One of the following: (5) ENG 3138 ENG 3156 One of the following : (5) ENC 3466 ENC 3486 The following: (4) ENL 3351 ENL 3401 AML 3107 ENG 4744 LIN 4600 SPC 3653 SPC 4680 THE 3080C ENL 3430 ENL 3441 AML3111 LIT 3150 LIN 3010 (if not taken under communication above) The following special methods courses are included in the professional education sequence: LAE 4642 (4) SED 4335 (4) SED 4374 (2) RED 4360 (2) SE D 4371 (5) SPEECH COMMUNICATION EDUCATION Requirements for the M.A. Degree (SPH): Plan 1-Requirementsfor admission: A bachelor s degree in Speech or Communication Education, Theatre or Drama Education, or English Education from a recognized institution ; or current certification in Speech/Communication, Theatre, or English and a minimum of 30 quarter hours of college course credits in oral communication. Course Sequence: EDF 6431 and 3 electives in Education approved by the adviser (13-16 hours) ; SED 6070 and SED 6670 (10 hours) ; and 7 courses in the Department of Communication including COM 6001, 3 courses in rhetoric and/or communica tion, 2 courses in oral interpretation, and I course in speech sicence or linquistics (minimum of 27 hours). Candidates must complete a comprehensive examination successfully Plan II-Requirements for admission: A bachelor s degree from a recognized institution and a minimum of 30 quarter hours of college course credits in oral communication. Course Sequence: Process Core (21 hours); SED 4371, SE D 6070, and SE D 6670 (15 hours); SED 4374 and RED 4360 (4 hours) ; 7 courses in the Department of Communication including COM 6001, 3 courses in rhetoric and/or communication, 2 courses in oral interpretation, and I course in speech science or linguistics (minimum of 27 hours) ; and E DG 6947 (9 hours) Candidates must complete a examination suc cessfully. COMMUNICATION EDUCATION Requirements for the Ed.S. Degree: The Ed.S. program in Curriculum and Instruction with an emphasis in Communication Education is intended for practicing educators who seek a broader understanding of human com munication Candidates must hold a master's degree in an area of Comtnunication Education or be certified as a teacher and

PAGE 103

have a master's degree in one of the content areas of human communication (including Communication/Speech, English, Linguistics, Mass Communications and Theatre) Candidates should expect to study areas different from their previous aca demic specialization, if they have prior degrees in only one area of human communication. Each candidate s program will be reviewed by the graduate faculty in Communication Education. Programs will be indi vidualized for each candidate, based on existing proficiencies and anticipated future needs. A typical pt_ogram would include: I. Curriculum, Supervision, and Related Areas (S-10 hours) II. Evaluation/Research (8 hours) III. Specialty in Communication and Education A Content Area Courses other than prior specialization (8 hours) B. Communication Education courses with primary em phasis in areas other than prior specialization (12 hours) C. Project (12 hours) Minimum Hours Required : 48-50 Interested candidates should contact: Coordinator of Ph D./Ed.S. Programs ; Communication Education, Department of Social Science and Letters Education College of Education, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620. Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree: The Ph. D degree in Curriculum and Instruction with em phasis in Communication Education is intended for individuals who have had considerable academic work in one or more of the areas of human conmunication. Candidates will be expected to a re as different from their previous fields of specialization COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 101 in order to gain a wider understanding of the field of human communication. Each candidate's program will be based upon the individual's current academic proficiencies and presumed needs by the graduate faculty in Communication Education. This program does not permit narrow specialization in only one area of Communication Education. This program encourages Communication Educators to develop new forms of communication; refine, preserve, and under st and older forms of communication; and prepare future educa tors who will be capable of teaching the content and practice, form and process, of communication as an art and science. The structure for this graduate program normally will be as follows provided the student has the necessary prerequisites for all courses in this program: I. Educational Foundations (16 hours)" II. Statistics/Measurement/Research Design (16 hours) Ill. Specialization/Major : A Content Area Courses (12 hours) B Communication Education Courses (12 hours) IV. Dissertation (24 hpurs) V Cognate Area VI. Language/Computer Science/Personal Proficiency (no credit) Minimum Hours Required: 96 hours In addition to admission requirements specified under Uni versity and College requirements, each candidate must have completed two years of full-time teaching experience . Interested candidates should contact: Coordinator of Ph. D./Ed.S Programs, Communications Education, Depart ment of Social Science and ,;, Letters Education, College of Education University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620.

PAGE 104

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Have you ever felt you would like to be the "somebody" who will do "something" about the many problems we face? Our modern' society requires new, practical solutions to its many complex technological problems. Spearheading this action will be the engineer and the engineering profession The engineer, as always will continue to be responsible for and obliged to use his/her knowledge for the benefit of 11\ankind. The increasingly rapid changes in life style place an ever stronger responsibility to society and our future on both those who are providing the engineering education as well as those who are being educated. The .. College of Engineering recognizes this in its approach to the education of tomorrow's engineers as well as in the content of the other programs under its direction which are vital to the technological progress of our society. Its curricula provide for an individual' s development in both technical com petency and human values The programs offered by the College of Engineering to meet the diverse requirements of the future can be broadly divided into three areas: Professional Engineering, Applied Science, and Technology The degrees and services associated with these areas are as follows: Professional Engineering Degree Programs Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree (Professional Program)-various options Master of Science in Engineering degree (Thesis or Proj ect) Master of Engineering degree (Non-Thesis) Applied Science Degree Programs Bachelor of Science in Engineering Science degreeComputer Science Option Bachelor of Science in Engineering Science degreeother options Master of Science in Engineering Science degree-Com puter Science Concentration Master of Science in Engineering Science degree--0ther concentrations Doctor of Philosophy degree in Engineering Science Technology Degree Program Bachelor of Engineering Technology degree Computer Service Courses (Undergraduate and Graduate) The above spectrum of program offerings provides the pros pective student with a choice of avenues depending upon individual interests and capabilities for a significant technological contribution These programs are described in more detail under their respective catalog headings. Laboratory experience as well as real-world participation in technological problem-solving is a key aspect of a professional engineer s or a technologist's college education. The College of Engineering, in implementing this need, augments its own mod ern laboratory and research facilities by close contact with the professional societies and the many industries in the metropoli tan Tampa Bay area. Students interested in particular programs offered by the College of Engineering should address their inquiries to the Col lege of Engineering marked for the attention of the following : Area of Interest Engineering Professional Program Engineering Science Computer Science, Engineering Technology Computer Service Courses Contact Specific department or Office of the Dean Office of the Dean Assistant Chairman for Computer Science, Department of Electrical Engineering Director of Engineering Technology Department of Industrial and Management Systems Engineering PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERING The Engineering programs of the college have been developed with an emphasis on three broad aspects of engineering activity-des ign, research and the operation of complex tech nological systems. Students who are interested in advanced design or research should pursue the Five-Year Program leading to the Master of Science in Engineering degree Other students interested more in operational responsibilities may wish to com plete their initial engineering education at the baccalaureate level. For this purpose a Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree is offered which provides the student a broad education with sufficient technical background to effectively contribute in many phases of Engineering not requiring the depth of know ledge needed for advanced design or research. The College of Engineering recognizes that modern engineering solutions draw on knowledge of several branches of engineering. It also recognizes that future technological and societal developments will lead to shifting of the relative em phasis on various branches of engineering triggered by new needs or a reassessment of national goals. For this reason the program includes a strong engineering foundation (core) portion designed to equip the prospective engineer with a broad base of fundamental, technical knowledge. To this found ati{>n is added the student's specialization (option) of sufficient depth to prepare him/her to successfully embark on a profes sional career. While the baccalaureate degree is considered the minimum educational experience for participating in the Engineering pr<> fession and as such the first professional degree, students are strongly encouraged to pursue advanced work beyond the bac calaureate either at this or other institutions. It is becoming in creasingly evident that a large segment ofloday's engineering profession is involved in some form of post baccalaureate study Engineers are earning advanced degrees in ever increasing num bers in order to obtain the information and training necessary to meet tomorrow's technological challenges All are faced with the continuous problem of refurbishing and updating their itlrorma tion skills and most are obtaining advanced information by means of formal grad uate study. seminars, si)ecial institutes and other such systems designed for this purpose The Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree program, which requires 201 quarter hours, and the five year program leading to the Master of Science in Engineering degree, which is 102

PAGE 105

an integrated program of 246 quarter hours, are the programs specifically designed to prepare an individual for a professional career as an engineer. Both programs have as their foundations a 152 quarter hour core of subject material encompassing Humanities, Social Science, Mathematics, Science, and En gineering which is required of all students. In addition to the core subject material each student will complete a specialization op tion under the direction of one of the acjministrative departments of the college. Those options which are availabJe and the ad ministrative unit responsible for the options are as follows : Option Department General All Departments Chemical Chemical and Mechanical Electrical Industrial Mechanical Structures, ',, Engineering Electrical Engineering Industrial and Management Systems Engineering Chemical and Mechanical Engineering .. 1 Civil Engineering and Mechanics Materials & Fluids The Joint Council for Professional Development has inspected and accredited the curricula of the College of En gineering defined by; the Chemical, Electrical, Industrial, Mechanical, and Structures .. Materials & Fluids options. Preparation for Engineering The high sch,ool student anticipating a career in engineering should elect the strongest academic program that is available while in high school. Four years each of English, mathematics and science (preferably including Chemistry and Physics), as well as full programs in the social sciences and humanities, are most important to success in any engineering college A foreign language, while not a necessity, provides a desirable background for students, many of whom will continue for advanced study. Prospective students who are considering engineering at the University of South Florida who lack certain preparation in high s c hool should elect to follow a program which will assist them in overcoming their deficiencies. One alternative might be that such a student select a summer program at the University of South Florida to update knowledge in mathematics and the physical sciences. Another alternative might be for the prospective En gineering student to take some remedial work and a less acceler ated program at the University of South Florida. For financial or other reasons, students may wish to avail themselves of the state's system of junior / community colleges which offer a wide range of remedial course work, and many of which also offer full programs in preengineering (first two years course work.) The University of South Florida offers all required pre-engineering courses every quarter. Therefore, every student can start the program at that point where his/her prior education terminated, and can proceed from that point at a rate commensurate with the student' s capability and time availability Junior/community college students planning to transfer to the University of South Florida s engineering program at the junior leyei from a State of Florida. operated college or university should follow a pre-engineering program leading to an A.A. de gree. All transfer students should complete as much of the mathematics, science and engineering core course work as is available to them. Transfer students should be aware that the college expects them to meet the college regulations listed on pages 104-105 ; just as it expects its own students to meet these requirements. The University's College of Engineering is avail able to assist junior / community colleges in the development of course material and in the training of staff for their offering of applicable core pre-engineering course work. Junior / community college transfer students should note that in addition to freshman and sophomore level courses, all required junior level courses are given each quarter, thus permitting full continuity in studies for the student at all times COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 103 The College of Engineering can assist students who are planning to obtain an Engineering degree from the University of South Florida and who have started their studies elsewhere in formulating a sound total program. Interested students should contact the Dean's Office furnishing sufficient detail to permit meaningful response. Admission to the College Freshmen and transfer students may elect to enter the College of Engineering s professional engineering program upon initial entry into the University by declaring the Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree program as their major. If not declared on initial entry, a student can at any time declare his/her intent to pursue the Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree program by applying in person in the Advising Office of the college To qualify for admission a student must have been accepted by the University as a degree-seeking student must be in good academic standing and mu' st be otherwise acceptable to the col lege More stringent requirements may be invoked by the college to limit enrollment to a level which is compatible with available resources. For information on supplementary admissions re quirements contact the Office of the Dean, College of Engineer ing. Undergraduate and graduate students whose native lan guage is other than English entering the College of Engineering must have taken, during the last year, the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), and have the score sent to the University's Admissions Office. A score of 550 or better is re quired Potential engineering students should note that the critical course structure of the engineering program makes it desirab-Je to enter the program as soon as the interest in and potential abf!ity for engineering is recognized. Students should note that the characteristics of the engineering program do not require an identification of the area of engineering specialization (option) at the time of declaring engineering as a major. Students need to make this decision no later than their junior year. Engineering coursework identified as 3000 level or higher is considered professional level work and students enrolling for this work must have been admitted to the college or have received prior permission from the Office of the Dean or the department chairperson sponsoring the coursework. Engineering Advising Effective pursuit of engineering studies requires careful attention to both the sequence and the type of courses taken The engi neering curriculum differs in key respects from the study plans of other majors-even in the freshman year It is therefore im portant, and the college requires, that each student plan a cur riculum with, and has it approved by a faculty adviser in the College of Engineering Students transferring from other colleges within the Uni versity must contact the Coordinator of Engineering Advising in the Dean's Office for a faculty adviser assignment prior to ac ceptance into the college. New students must attend the Univer sity s Orientation program. They are assigned an engineering adviser during this program and receive advisement for their first quarter at that time. Students who ha1Ve made a decision regarding the e ngineer ing option they plan to follow may be assigned a faculty adviser in the department corresponding to their interest. Students who have decided to follow a program of engineering studies but who are undecided on the specialty are advi s ed in the Dean's Office. The student and adviser jointly work out a plan of study which meets both the student's career objectives and the College of Engineering s degree requirements. A student may change advisers with the concurrence of the new adviser and the Dean s Office. The advisers maintain the College of Engineering s stu dent records. A student transferring within the University nor mally starts the process to change majors in the advising office of the college where the old major is housed.

PAGE 106

104 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Departments & Programs The supervision of the academic programs for the college is the function of the four administrative departments together with several coordinators. The departments are responsible for the professional program in engineering. Specific positions are responsible for the special programs in Engineering Science and Engineering Technology Each department is responsible for programs, faculty, laboratories and students assigned to it. Chemical and Mechanical Engineering This department offers study pertinent to the analysis and design of machines and systems needed by our modern society through courses dealing with the classical Mechanical and Chemical Engineering subjects of lubrication vibration and fatigue analysis, machine design, thermodynamics, heat transfer, environmental control, transport phenomena and reactor dynamics In addition it provjdes iqstructip11 in ot!ter fields of increased importance to the engineers of the future Somp of these fields are computer simulation inst r umentation, automatic control power utilization, acoustics l\n4 n clear processes and the design and evaluatioq pf innovative systems for energy utili zation and pollution This depaqmpnt ;idmjpisters the Chemicpl and the Mechanical Op.lions of the Bachp!qr of Scj in Engineeriog (B.S.E.) degree as well iis the ai-pa pf Mechanjcal jind Chemical fof the Mastfjr of Scj en!:'.e in ( M.S E ) 4i:8fee .. Evening gra4atc; pro grams are availablp. The depi-t!I)ent administers the Pit. D pro gram Qiv!I Engjneering {lAd Tgis departQ\el)t pffers work and study to Civil Engineering, Engineering Mechanics and Materials Sci ence Topics included are structural analysis, design and optimi zation; metals, polymers, ceramics; solid and fluid mechanics, stress analysis, vibrations, continuum mechanics, aerodynamics, gas dynamics, wave propagation numerical methods ; water re sources, waste treatment environmental engineering, ahd hydrospace engineering The department administers the Struc tures, Materials and Fluids option of the Bachelor of Science in Engineering (B.S.E ) degree prdgram and offers several con centrations within this option It also admi n isters the area of Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics for the Master of Science in Engineering (M.S.E.) degree including a three year evening program The department administers the Ph .D. program Electrical Engineering This department offers study in all areas fundamental to f'.lect rica! and the electrical l\n\I coqiputer sciences: c1rcu1f analysis and desigit, electronics, \:Omniunicatjo,ns, co qtrol, solid state, systems analysis elec tronic compter design, software eni1ineering, el\:. Basic con cepts are augmented with V'ell-equipped labor&tories in neh works, automatic control, digital systems, electro micrnwave techniques and communicatjqns. In ad dition, a small general purwse computer microproces sor laboratory, amt ii i:nicroelpctronics fabrication laboratqry are l\Vailable t.o. undergrljdUate and graduate stu9ents TIW 9epart ment admimsters the f:le c trical Option Qf the aachelor of Sci ence in Epgineering (B. S E ) degree progra,m, the Master of En (M.E.) degree program in Electrical Engineering, and the area of Electrical Engineepng for the Master of Science in Engineering (M .S.E ) degree. This department also administers the bachelor's level Computer Science Option and the master's level Computer Science Concentration in Engineering Science. Evening graduate programs are available. The department ad ministers the Ph. D program. Industrial and Management Systems Engineering This department offers study pertinent to the design eval uation and operation of a variety of industrial systems ranging from service areas, such as data processing to manufacturing plants. Topics include production control, inventory control data processing systems design statistics a nd operations re sea rch models. The department administers the Industrial Op tion of the Bachelor of Science in Engineering ( B.S .E.) degree program, the Master of Engineering (M.E. ) and the Master of Science in Engineering (M.S.E.) degree programs in the area of Industrial Engineering. Evening graduate programs are avail able The department administers the Ph.D. program. The de partment also instructs students in Computer Service courses offered by the University of South Florida. EQgineering Core Both the four-year and five-year curricula of the College of Engi neering are founded on a common core of course work which is required of all students. This course work is designed to give each student a thorough foundation of knowledge on which speciiilization studies and ii professional career can be based. Emphasis is placed on foqr key elements; a soijd foqndation in and a basic understanding i n all major en gmeenng disc1phnes, familiarity with Social Science and Humanities-to develop the whole individual, and good communication skills. ' This c!:!mmon foundation of 152 minim"um qljarter hours breaks down as follows: Science and <:;ore 47 credit hrs. min. (including communication Mathematics and Science Core 49 creclit hrs. min Engineering Core 56 credit hrs min $pecial requirements exist for the Chemical optipn. Students selecting this fii:ld should {llake sure they familiarize them with these. Detailed inform1.1tion can be optl\ j ned from the Chemical and Mechanical Engineering department or the col lege's Advising Office 1. Social Science and Humanities Core Requirements (47 credit hours minimum) Prospective Engineering majors must take 9 credit hours of Freshman English (ENC 1102, I 135, 1168). An additional 38 credit hours of course work is required in this core area,. of which at least 34 hours must be selected from the current Approved Social Science and Humanities Courses" list for Engineering and Engineering Science students A minimum of 12 credit hour s of this course work must be of 2000 level or higher. At least 8 credit hours must be taken in each the Humanities / Fine Arts area and the Behavioral and Social Sciences area (to meet the University's General Distribution Requirements). It is recommended that the student pursue specific subject areas to some depth, since this develops areas of knowledge and interests which aid fuller development of the in \livi,:Iual and later assist in relating a professional clj.feer to non technical eqvironments and situations It is desirable that at least 35 ho\JrS of this course work be jn the first two years. Students are resP.onsible for check jng with ti\eir advisers to be sure that the course& they are taking meet the requirements of the Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree program. Studeqts who tran &fer. from a State of Florida community college with an Associate of Arts and wht6 h11ve met t!tat college s General E9uc;ition Reqajrement will pormally fiqd tpat General E!fucation cour s e \\'Ork satisfies the major portion-but not all-of the Soci1.1I Science and Humanities Cqre requirement. Credit by Examination caq be obtained for some of thi s cour&e worlc.. CLEP General Examination <;redit accept;ible to the University is accepted for the areas of E11gfish Composition Humanities and Social Science Credit for CLEP Subject Ex aminations and CEEB Advanced Placement Tests can be ac-1 cepted when the subject covered is recognized to be equivalent to USF course(s) on the Approved Social Science and Humanities Courses list. Questions in this area should be ad dressed to the Coordinator of Engineering Advising in the Dean s Office.

PAGE 107

2.'Mathematics and Science Core Requirements (49 credit hours minimum) The student with a satisfactory high school preparation must take 49 credit hours of mathematic s and science course work ( Some credit towards thi s core requirement can be obtained by pa ssing applicable CEEB Advanced Placement Te sts or CLEP Subject Examinations.) In mathematics thi s course work consists of a Calculu s for Engineers (or a calculus sequence of equivalent level), differential equations and six hours of advanced mathematics co urses supportive of the s tudent's selected field of specializati on (op tion) . In science the course work consists of one year of General Chemistry and one year of Physics (with calculus), and normally one additional advanced science course supportive of the stu dent's area of specialization (option). Chemical option students should their department for s pecial advanced chemistry requirements in this area. Students whose high school preparation is insufficient to enter the Calculus for Engineers and/or the General Chemistry se quence are required to take supplementary mathematical (algebra and trigonometry) and/or chemical foundation course work. 3. Engineering Core Requirements (56 credit hours minimum) The prospective engineering major must take 56 credit hours of engineering foundation course work drawn from the major disciplines This course work is designed to equip the student with a sound technical foundation for later inore advanced specia lized course work and the eventual formation of profes s ional judgment. This course work includes introductory s tudies in such areas as engineering analysis and computation, electrical engineering principle s thermodynamics statics, dynamics and fluids and properties of materials All but 10 credit hours of the engineering core are common to all areas of specialization (option) of the Bachelor of Science in Engineering program. The remaining 10 credit hours of course work must be chosen with concurrence of the departmental ad v i ser to fit the option selection of the student. Details on this selection are available in the departmental office of the option selected, or in the college's Advising Office. FOURYEAR PROGRAMBACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING DEGREE (EGU) The Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree is awarded upon successful completion of a program consisting of the re quired three areas of core course work-minimum of 152 credit hours-which is described above and an additional 49 credit hours of course work in a designated area of specialization (op tion). Details covering the options are available on request from the responsible department, or from the college's Advising Office. Options are offered in the following disciplines of engineer ing. 1. General Option (49 credit hours) All profes s ional departments may offer the general option which consists of 49 credit hours of course work individually arranged by the s tudent with the approval of the s tudent's ad vise r This option is used where a stu dent wishes to deviate from a prescribed disciplinary option utilizing course work from sev eral different disciplines both within and without the College of E ngineering. Pre-medical students follow th i s option It accommodates up to 49 hrs of special pre-med course work (Biology Organic Chemistry, etc.) selected by student and adviser to meet normal ad missions requirements of medical schools. Pre-law students find this option permits a strong technical and legal academic preparation COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 105 2. Option in Chemical (49 credit hours) Students pursuing the Chemical Option take designated, s pecialized course work in advanced chemistry, thermo dynamics, energy conversion, separation processe s, trans port phenomena, heat and mass transfer, reacting systems, pro cess control systems, as well as approximately 15 credit hours of chemistry and technical electives. Students must also satisfac torily complete a design a nd / or case study as part of their pro gram. Special characteristics of the c h emica l option make it imperative that students retain constant close contact with their adviser. Students completing this option normally pur s ue careers in chemical process industries, in public s ervice (regulatory, plan ning and/or environmental) or in consulting or research Prod ucts covered include paper and pulp, petroleum and petro chemicals polymers and fibers, sy nthetics, pharmaceuticals foods, fertilizers, etc. Such modem societal problems as control ling pollution handling wastes advancing medical technology providing food and energy more efficiently etc., depend on the chemical engineer among others for their solutions. 3. Option in Electrical (49 credit hours) Students pur s uing the El ectrica l Option take de s ignated s pecialized cour s e work in network analysis, electronics, com munications, electromagnetic theory, linear sys tem and control sys tem analysis, and microelectronics This course work is s upplemented by electives in logic, sequential circuits, digital system de sign and microprocessors ; distributed networks and UHF principles ; and / or electromechanics and power system analysis. Students must also complete a Design Project prior to graduation Students completing this option normally pursue industrial careers in the power, electrical, electronic, or information in dustries or in related governmental laboratories and public ser vice agencies. The e lectrical graduate may apply his / her edge to such diverse areas as television communications, remote guidance, sensing (of people vehicles, weather crops, etc.) automation, computer and information sys tems electric power generation and transmission, electrically propelled trans portation, etc The graduate may do this by performing needed engineering functions related to the research and development (often requires also an advanced degree) design, production, operation sales, or management of these products /se rvices. 4; Option in Industrial (49 credit hours) Students pursuing the Indu s trial Option take designated specialized course work in industrial processes and production control; engineering valuation; network modeling, computer simulation and systems analysis; operations research ; design of experiments and engineering statistics. This course work is supplemented by courses in production and facilities design ; computer languages, systems, and projects; and quality control. Students completing this option enter careers in a broad range of industries, businesses and governmental and public ser vice areas Their preparation covers activities common to all types of organizations ; planning, analysis, implementation, and evaluation. In addition to traditional career opportunities in pro duction and process areas of high-volume industries, the indus trial graduate nowadays finds challenging careers in hospitals, transportation and s ervice industries and in municipal, county, state and federal administration. 5. Option in Mechanical (49 credit hourS) Students pursuing the Mechanical Option take designated, specialized course work in thermodynamics and heat transfer ; physical measurements and energy conversion ; machine analysis and design ; mechanical design and controls; and fluid machinery This is supplemented by elective coursework in such areas as power plant analysis, nuclear and reactor engineering; refrig eration and air conditioning; acoustics ; lubrication; and vibration and balancing

PAGE 108

106 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Students completing this option normally enter careers as design, consulting, research and development, or sales engineers in a wide range of indu.stries which either turn out mechanical products or rely on mechanical machines, devices and systems for their production Thus, mechanical graduates may follow careers in such fields as transportation, power generation and conversion instrumentation, automatic control, machine design and construction, refrigeration, heating, and air conditioning These opportunities occur in many industries because mechani cal processes are required for most industrial production. 6. Option in Structures, Materials and Fluids (49 credit hours) Students pursuing the Structures Materials and Fluids Option take designated coursework in solid mechanics stress analysis and structures ; materials; fluid mechanics; water re sources; engineering analysis applied to this discipline and a senior research/design project from the Department of Civil En gineering and Mechanics. This course work is supplemented by courses in one of the following areas of concentration, plus elec tives a Materials concentration-courses in engineering mate rials polymers corrosion, and materials processes. b. Structural En ginee ring concentration-
PAGE 109

in their mathematical ability will refer such cases to the Office of the Dean 4. Continuation Requirements A!l undergraduate students registered in the College of En gmeenng are expected to maintain the minimum of 2.0 average ("C" average) for alf work attempted while registered in the college, as well as a minimum 2 0 average for all Engineering course work attempted of 3000 level or above, or the more strin gent requirements of limited access programs, where applicable. Students who do not maintain this requirement will be declared ineligible further registration for course work and degree programs m the college unless individually designed continuation programs are recommended and have been prepared by the stu dent's adviser and approved by the academic committee of the co llege Key courses, including but not limited to Freshman En glis h Calculus, Phy sics, Engineering, and courses in the student's :ea of specialization, must be passed with a grade of "C" or better before taking the next course in the sequence. Students pursuing an engineering degree program are ex pected to take courses a graded (ABC DF) basis (Ex ceptions are required courses not available on a graded basis ) Students receiving "I" grades must remove this deficiency at the first opportunity in accordance with a written agree ment between stu dent and instructor. Continuation in the program after 3 withdrawals and/or failures in a specific engineering course of 3000 level or higher requires specific approval from the college. A minimum average of 2.0 or C for engineering course work of 3000 level or above attempted must be maintained while registered in the college. 5 Requirements for Graduation In addition to the completion of the cour s e work and /or project requirements of the respective programs of the college, s tudents must be recommended for their degrees by the faculty of the college. It is expected that students completing their mas te r s program would have completed their advanced work with a mini average of 3 .0 or "B." Students attempting but not completing their master's requirements may elect to request the awardi ng of the bachelor's degree provided they have met that degree's requirements. The college requires that a s tudent complete the Mathe and Science Core, Engineering Core, and specialization reqmrements for the baccalaureate degree in seven years Deviations require specific prior permission from the Dean of the college addition to the college requirements listed above degree candidates are expected to meet applicable special departmental requirements Cooperative Education Program A wide varie ty of industries and government agencies have established cooperative programs for engineering s tudents to provide them the opportunity to become familiar with practical aspects of industrial operations and engineering careers Stu dents in the Cooperative Education (C<>-op) Program alternate one or two quarters of paid employment in their major field with like periods of study. Students following the C<>-op program usu ally no problems in scheduling their program since reqmred Social Science and Humanities Mathematics and Sci ence, and Engineering Core courses are' offered every quarter. Students normally apply for participation in this program during their freshman year and pursue actual Co-op employment during their so phomore and junior years The senior year is generally pursued on a full time study basis since many s pecialization courses are not offered every quarter. COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 107 Florida Engineering aitd Industrial Experiment Station (USF) The Florida Engi neering and Industrial Experiment Station de veloped from earl y research activities of the engineering faculty at the University of Florida and was officially established in 1941 by the Legislature Its mandate is to "organize and promote the prosecution of research projects of engineering a nd related sci ences with special reference to suc h of the se problems as are to the industries ?f Florida." In 1977 the University of Flonda extended the pro v i s ions of the Engineering and Indust rial Experiment Station to the Engineering College of the Uni versity of South Florida and the other two State engineering The legislature supported this extension with an ap The four colleges of engineering now work together m a JOmt effort through EIES to assist industry with specia l problems that can be appropriately solved by engineering col leges It is estimated that during the 198(}.81 a s ponsored re searc h volume of approximately 1.1 million dollars will flow through EIES (USF), All department s, faculty as well as s tu dents, contribute to thi s research at the University of South Florida. The direct exposure of s tudent s to real re searc h needs of the State adds ex tr a meaning and depth to the engineering education offered by the college. FloridaNASA State Technology Applications Center (ST AC) The State Univer sity System the National Aeronautic s & Space Administration and certain cooperating co llege s of engineering of Florida, inc luding the University of South Florida h av e jointly developed the State Technology Applications ST AC offe r s rapid acc es s to more t h a n 10 million modern published articles related to almost every field of human en dea vor and thus provides information to help s olve vexing prob lems at significant savings in man hours and money This s ervice i s a bright new resource for Florida busines s and industry Ju st a short decade ago this concept would not have been feasible Through perseverance the computer minded co mmunit y de veloped a remarkable system of key wording" information which .is s tored in the memories of computers Using these "key the computer locates pertinent and required publica tions, at times with titles far removed from the s ubject matter in -:--titles that may be passed over in the usual library mve s tlgatlon. ST AC charges a minim a l fee for its search since it s operation is partially sup ported through NASA and State funds. The ST AC Office at the College of Engineering, Room 304, Engineering Building University of South Florida Tamp a, FL 33620, tel. 813/974-3499 serves the south central area of Florida.

PAGE 110

108 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Engineering Master's Degree Programs The College of Engineering offers three professionally oriented programs leading to a degree at the master's level. These are the post-baccalaureate Master of Science in Engineering degree pro gram, Master of Engineering degree program, and the Five-Year Master of Science in Engineering degree progT;im. Each pro fessional department may elect to award one of these degrees depending upon prior arrangements with the student. Admission to the master s program is dependent upon a favorable evalua tion by the department concerned. Applicants are expected to meet the minimum requirements of the University and those outlined below and in addition any special requirements specified by the departments and reported to the Dean of the college Other requirements may be considered. POST-BACCALAUREATE MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING DEGREE (EGP) This graduate program of the college is designed for those students wishing advanced study which is research or design oriented. Entrance Requirements I. A baccalaureate degree in Engineering from an approved in stitution is required. Degrees in Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry and other fields may be accepted on an individual basis to meet this requirement. In such cases it is probable that supplemental remedial work in engineering will be neces sary. 2. A minimum total score of 1000 on the verbal and quantitative portions of the Graduate Record Examination and/or a mini mum grade point average of 3 0 out of a possible 4.0 for all work attempted during the last two years of undergraduate work is required 3 Those who do not meet the regular entrance requirements may attempt a trial program as a Special (non-degree seeking) Student. Up to 18 hours of work attempted on this basis may be accepted into a graduate program upon satisfactory com pletion. Before attempting such a trial program the student should determine from the departmental adviser a list of courses and performance criteria for admission. Program Requirements I. A minimum of.45 credits of approved course work is required. 2. An overall grade point average of 3.0 is required for all work attempted in the program No grade below "C" may be ac cepted in a graduate program. In the event that a student's average drops below 3.0 the student will be placed on a probationary status and must obtain a directed program from his / her adviser approved by the Dean, prior to continuing course work toward the degree. 3 All students are required to pass a final comprehensive examination which may be written or oral prior to awarding the degree. These examinations are arranged and adminis tered by the student's graduate committee 4 Students in this program must complete a design or research project on which up to 9 credits may be used to fulfill degree requirements The course titled Masters Thesis" in the student's department is to be used. 5. If a thesis is submitted it must be in accordance with the Handbook for Graduate Theses and Dissertations, Univer sity Graduate Council. For design projects a comprehensive report must be filed with the Office of the Dean of Engineer ing following, where practical, the guidelines of the hand book Students worJdng on design and research projects must register for a minimum of 3 credits of the course titled "Masters Thesis'' in the student's department each quarter the staff, facilities and laboratories of the University are used whether or not the stu dent has accumulated the maximum credit allowed for research or design toward the degree All students must register for 3 credits of the course titled Masters Thesis" in the student's department during the quarter in which they submit their thesi s or project report. MASTER OF ENGINEERING DEGREEPROGRAM(EGM) This non-thesis degree program is designed primarily to meet the needs of engineers actively engaged in the profession who wish to pursue graduate study at the master's level. Entrance Requirements Entrance requirements for the Master of Engineering pro gram are the same as those for the Master of Science in Engineering degree program. It is expected that those applying to this program will be experienced or actively engaged in the engineering profession. Program Requirements 1. A minimum of 45 credits of approved course work is required 2. Students must maintain overall grade point average of 3.0 out of possible 4.0. No grade below "C" will be accepted in a graduate program. In the event that a student's average falls below 3.0 the student will be placed on probationary status and must obtain a directed program from his/her adviser and approved by the Dean prior to continuing further course work toward the degree. 3 All students are required to pass a final comprehensive examination which may be written or oral prior to awarding the degree. These examinations are arranged and adminis tered by the student's department. 4. Students in this program must register for and take a com prehensive examination during the quarter in which they apply for the degree. This credit may not be used as part of the course work requirement Contact Department for de tails. THE ENGINEERING FIVEYEAR MASTER'S DEGREE PROGRAM (EGG) This program consists of a minimum of 246 credits of course work and results in concurrent awards of the Bachelor of Science and Master of Science in Engineering degrees. Unlike traditional master's programs following the baccalaureate degree, in this program both the fourth and fifth years are open to graduate level study and additional calendar time is available for research or design projects. Entrance Requirements I. Students who have senior standing (135 credits) with at least 24 credits completed at the University of South Florida in the engineering curriculum may apply for admission to the Five-Year Program. 2. A minimum total score of 1000 on the verbal and quantitative portions of the Graduate Record Examination is expected 3. Above-average performance in the engineering program is expected. I Students apply for admission to this program through their department. They should consult their adviser when they need additional information. Program Requirements 1 A minimum of 246 credits of approved course work must be

PAGE 111

compiled. Of this total 152 credits must comprise the engineering central core with an additional 94 credits of specialization A maximum of 18 credits may be allowed for design and research. 2. Students admitted to the five-year program are expected to maintain a superior level of academic performance. A 3.0 out of a possible 4 0 grade point average is expected in the courses in the student's graduate course of study A student in the Five-Year Program who fails to maintain the required academic standards will be placed on probation. Failure to comply with the terms of the probation will result in the stu dent being dropped from the program. 3. Students in this program must complete a design or research COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 109 project for which up to 9 credits of 4000 level project course work of appropriate departmental prefix and up to 9 credits of the course titled Masters Thesis in the student's depart ment may be used to fulfill degree requirements. 4. If a thesis is submitted it must be in accordance with the Handbo ok for Graduate Theses and Diss e rtations Univer sity Graduate Council. For design project s a comprehensive report must be filed with the Office of the Dean of Engineer ing, followirig where practical the guidelines of the handbook. 5. All students are required to pass a final comprehensive examination which may be written or oral prior to awarding the degree. These examinations are arranged and adminis tered by the student's graduate committee. APPLIED SCIENCE (ENGINEERING) Degree programs in Engineering Science are offered by the Col lege of Engineering which are designed for students who do not wish to pursue the professionally oriented degree programs in engineering but who wish to obtain a strong technical background coupled with other interests Engineering Science is an applied science discipline which relates to new and innovative areas of endeavor at the frontiers of technological development and research It represents a mar riage between basic science and its utilization in such varied fields as computer science, biology, social and environmental sciences, applied mathematics, bio-medical engineering, ocean engineering and energetics The common denominator to this wide range of subjects is a strong foundation in rigorous scientific and engineering principles and practices This training provides a most desirable background for graduate Stl!dY in the areas of concentration mentioned and in other professional areas such as law, medicine, and business. Preparation for Engineering Science Students anticipating pursuit of studies in Engineering Sci ence should follow the guidelines given for Engineering in this catalog when planning their high school and/or community col lege studies. Admission to Engineering Science Admissions requirements and procedures are the same as for Engineering. Engineering Science Advising Students pursuing a course of study in Engineering Science are assigned to an adviser who is familiar with the requirements of this program and whose special interests match the student's specialization objectives. Comments and requirements spelled out in the section on Engineering Advising in this catalog are applicable to this program. FOUR-YEAR PROGRAMBACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING SCIENCE DEGREE (EGC) The College of Engineering offers a curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Science in Engineering Science degree which stresses the scientific aspects of engineering. The curriculum is a four year program with a minimum requirement of 180 quarter hours, and it provides the student with an unusual depth of study in mathematics science, and engineering without limiting the opportunities to broaden one's education in humanities and so cial sciences. The exact composition of the curriculum followed by a given student is determined by the student with the adv!ce and consent of the academic adviser and based on the option c hosen An option in Computer Science provides a continuum of training and knowledge in the foundations of information pro cessing Courses range from studies in software and program ming, data structures, data base systems, operating systems, and systems analysis to the analysis of computer architecture and organization logic design, automata theory hardware simula tion, microprocessors and reliability considerations. Finally a number of specialized electives allows concentration on applica tions of computers to a variety of activities such as scientific computation computer-aided design busines s syste ms, biomedical research, and pattern recognition Graduates from this program follow fruitful careers in either scientific or business applications of computers. They are often involved in the systems level definition of information processing complexes for both manufacturers of computers and for users A wide and expanding variety of design and applications op portunities characterize this field This is the reason for requiring a broad foundation in applied mathematics and the physical sci ences, and also to develop communications abilities and clear perceptions in the social sciences and the humanitie s. Research and development opportunities as a computer scientist often following graduate training are present in the areas of artificial intelligence, software engineering, digital data communications, data base management, fault-tolerant computing and testing, microprogramming and simulation. This program is administered through the Coordinator for Computer Science Program, Department of Electrical En gineering. An option in Applied Mathematics covers applied analytical techniques to establish a more fundamental understanding of basic physical phenomena leading to engineering applications Areas of mathematics considered from an applied viewpoint in clude modern algebra, theory of algorithms, classical advanced calculus, complex variables, probability and statistics nuinerical procedures, approximation theory operations research, and applied mathematical programming. The use of computers is emphasized. This program provides the student with an oppor' tunity that is not available in either a pure mathemat ics cur riculum or in a design-oriented engineering program. An option in Environmental Science is designed for students who desire to develop the bFOad interdisciplinary background necessary for careers in environmental protection with industry and government. Training is provided in the sociological sci ences of politics, government, and social science ; the communi cation arts (speaking and writing) ; and the scientific and tech nological aspects of air, water and noise pollution. This option is administered through the Department of Civil Engineering and Mechanics. Other options are designed for such areas as Ocean and Ener getics. Baccalaureate Requirements (minimum 180 credit hours) The Bachelor of Science in Engineering Science degree pro-



PAGE 1

110 COLLEGE OF ENGINEER/NG gram requires a strong foundation in math e matics and science, foundation course work in the humanit ies, social sciences and other non-technical areas, a basic knowledge of engineering fundamentals, and culminates i n approximately one year of specialized-often interdisciplinary-studies These basic re quirements are further listed below. 1. Humanities social science and other non-technical areas requirement ( 42) 2 Mathematics and science requirements (45) 3. Engineering Science core requirement (41) 4. Specialization requirements (52) (There may be minor variations from these numbers in a defined option.) Other Requirements for Engineering Science The English Mathematics Continuation and Graduation requirements for the Engineering degree program are applicable to the Engineering Science degree program Students with a Computer Science option will not be given credit towards their degree for Computer Service Courses taken without prior consent of their adviser. FIVE-YEAR PROGRAM-MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING SCIENCE DEGREE (EGF) Students who at the beginning of their senior year are clearly interested in graduate study are invited to pursue a five-year program of study leading simultaneously to the Bachelor of Sci ence in Engineering Science and Mas ter of Science in Engineer ing Science degrees The keys to this program are : I .A two-year research project exte nding through the fourth and fifth years 2. The opportunity of taking graduate courses during the fourth year and deferring the taking of senior courses to the fifth year. The requirements for the combined de grees do not differ from those for the two degrees pur sued separately. Students apply for admission to this program through their adviser, who should be consulted when additional information is needed. General requirements inclde: I. Senior standing ( 135 credits) with at least 24 credits com pleted at the University of South Florida in the engineering science curriculum 2. A minimum score of 1000 on the verbal and quantitative portions of the Graduate Record Examination is ex pected. 3 Above-average performance i n the engineering science program is expected. Stude nts following the Computer Scien ce option can obtain through this program the deeper specialization required of those engaged in advanced research and development. POST-BACCALAUREATE MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING SCIENCE DEGREE (EGC) The admission and program requirements (minimum 45 credit hours) for this degree are essentially the same as those itemized for the Engineering Master's Degree Programs page 108 To meet the student's specific Engineering Science objec tives, each department or the college, may elect to award this degree dependent on prior arrangement with the s tudent. Students entering the Computer Sci e n ce concentration of this. program without a baccalaureate degree in Computer Sci ence may have to take supplemental remedial coursework Students with interests in Bio-medical engineering should have a well above average undergraduate preparation in one of the traditional fields of engineering DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE IN ENGINEERING SCIENCE (EGC) The Doctor of Philosophy degree in Engineering Science is awarded in recognition of demons trated proficiency and high achievement. It is altogether a different type of educational en deavor than that of the Baccalaureate or even Master s pro grams. The Ph .O. cannot be gained merely by diligent appli cation to a prescribed course of st11dy over a period of years nor can it be awarded for miscellaneous study. After adequate fundamental preparation the student must complete a searching and authoritative investigation of a specia l area of the field of his/her choice, culminating in a written dissertation covering that investigation. The dissertation must demonstrate that the student possesses considerable power of original thought, talent research and ability to organize and present his findings. Entrance Requirements I. An undergraduate degree in engineering or the sciences with a minimum GPA of 3.0 in junior-senior work in the major area of concentration. 2. A minimum GRE score of 1000 (verbal and quantitative) 3. Applicants who do not hold a bachelor's degree from an ECPD accredited program may be required to show profi ciency in areas of the undergraduate Engineering Sciences designated by the department or departments associated with the applicant's research area. An area of concentration is defined as a coherent group of engineering studies but not necessarily located within a single department Program Requirements I. An adviser or an advisory committee will be appointed by the chairman of the appropriate department or program for each student during the first quarter of registration at the Universty of South Florida This adviser or committee will assist in determining the student's area of research interest and to initially delineate preliminary course assignments. At the earliest possible date a supervisory committee is ap pointed which will serve as the dissertation committee. It prepares the student's program and has full responsibility for preparing (or having prepared under its supervision) the in dividual's qualifying examination. The supervisory commit tee consists of a minimum of five members one external to the College of Engineering A majority of the committee will be from the College of Engineering with at least two or more departments represented from the college. 2 A total of 135 quarter hours minimum beyond the baccalaureate degree (including dissertation research) is re quired with a minimum of 40 hours in an engineering area of concentration. The 40 hours may not necessarily be course work of the same department but must focus directly upon the area of concentration and at least 30 hours must be at the 6000 level. A minimum of 12 hours of mathematics or mathematics and statistics is required. Engineering mathematics may be approved by the committee if approp riate In addition, a mini1pum of 12 hours of course work as defined by the committee outside the major area of concen tration is also required . This may include natural sciences, earth sciences, social s ciences additional statistics, or ap proved support in other areas of engineering Further re quirement s may be imposed by the candidate's committee. At least 12 hours of course work must be taken outside the major department, if there is a major department 3. A reading knowledge of two foreign languages Competence in a computer language may be substituted for one of these wl)en approved by the supervisory committee 4. All prospective candidates must pass both parts of a Ph .D. qualifying examination : a general area of mathematics and a prescribed area of Engineering Science concentration. This examination must be taken after the student has completed

PAGE 2

appropriate studies usually equivalent to one year's course work. Students entering with Master's degrees must take this examination before the end of the first year after admis sion to the program. 5 A written and oral examination devised and administered by the dissertation committee will be taken by each Ph.D. stu dent toward the end of his or her course work Completion of this requirement admits the student to candidacy. 6. The defense of dissertation will be in accordance with the University's general rules and regulations. 7 The minimum residency requirement may be satisfied by completing at the University of South Florida beyond the Master's degree or equivalent the following: (1) 36 quarter hours in one calendar year or (2) 45 quarter hours in no more than 6 quarters within a period of 3 calendar years. Any graduate work counted toward the fulfillment of the requirement of the Ph D degree after admission to candidacy must be accomplished within a 7-year calendar period. 8 Throughout the student's program of study, independent learning will be emphasized. For the first time in the par ticipant's career, in most cases, the student will be respon sible for mastering a new domain of knowledge without the aid of organized lectures and textbooks. The principal information source will be the current literature. Such ex perience is ne.cessary preparation for a meaningful career in COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 111 engineering and other fields where the participant s face the requirement of keeping pace with a l arge, ever-changing body of knowledge 9 The student mus t carry out an inves tig a tion of such qualit y that he / she can either make an independent, or original con tribution to the knowledge in hi s/ her field or a new and better interpretation of facts already known. The require ment of uniqueness means that the dissertation research will provide an important creative experience for the student. Successful completion of this experience makes the Ph.D. program a valuable career preparation for every aspec t of the engineering profession As the final stage of the student's program he /s he must prepare a written dissertation covering the research Students in the Ph .D. program must take an appropriate number of Doctoral Dissertat i on credits but not less than 30 quarter hours; the exact number is determined by department and/or individual requirements 10. An all college advanced graduate advisory committee re pon:s to the Dean of the College of Engineering. This com mittee receives copies of all programs arranged for the stu dents by their advisory committees as well as copies of qual ifying examinations and examinations for a dmi ssi on to can didacy This committee provides recommendations to the Dean, department heads and advisory committees relative to programs, procedures and exam i nations ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY The College of Engineering offers a program leading to the de gree of Bachelor of Engineering Technology to serve educational needs in engineering-related areas The program normally pro vides for two years (90 min credit hours) of study at the Univer sity of South Florida following two years (90 credit hours) of successful study in an engineering technology program which has led to an Associate of Science degree. Many programs of the State System of Community Colleges uniquely mate with this program BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY (ETK) Upon completion of their full four years of study leading to the award of the Bachelor of Engineering Technology degree, students will have gained a well rounded background concen trated in the following areas: Engineering Technology, Mathematics and Science Liberal Arts and Social Science arid Management and related areas (including Computers) A student who has completed this program should be adequately prepared to assume career responsibilities in technical, technical super visory, or technical executive positions Prospective students should note, however, that this program is not intended to be an engineering program. Rather its function is to bridge the gap between design or research professional engineers, technicians, and management. It is for this reason that the program consists of a balance of course work in technical management, and Lib eral Arts and Social Science areas. A typical student pursues the bulk of the Engineering Tech nology course work, together with much of the mathematics and science course work within the framework of a junior college Associate of Science degree engineering technology program. Most of the Liberal Arts and Social Science course work, Man agement and Computer-oriented studies, and some additional engineering technology course work is taken by the student at USF during the junior and senior year The typical four years of study thus exhibit approximately the following course work dis tribution (in credit hours) : Engineering Technology ......... :: .. .. ... ......................... 80 Management & related studies .. ............... .................. 30 Liberal Arts, Social Science and Electives ... .... ......... .48 Mathematics and Science ...................... . .. .... ......... ... 22 Total 180 Specific students' may deviate from thi s balance to some extent due to the differences in the students' first two years' program contents At USF a portion of each student's program may be u s ed for one of the areas of concentration listed below. Computer Systems Technology Electronics Technology Management Engineering Technology These areas are designed to complement the technical work received at the community college s and need not necessarily be in the same field in which the A .S. degree is awarded. Students entering this program will have their transcript an notated as to the ins titution from which their technical training was received as well as their technical specialization as desig nated by that institution Admission In general students are expected to have successfully com pleted an Associate of Science degree in Engineering Technol ogy at a comnmnity college or to have accomplished equivalent work Normally, the student should have completed a minimum of mathematics through applied integral calculus and a noni calculus physics sequence. If the student's performance in his community college program indicates a reasonable probability of success in the Bachelor of Engineering Technology program, the student will be admitted to USF. Students are required to com plete a minimum of 90 additional quarter hours to receive the Bachelor of Engineering Technology degree. Because this evalu ation procedure is unique to the Bachelor of Engineering Technology program, the application for admission should clearly indicate the desired major field as Engineering Technology. This application should be filed through the Of fice of Admissions. Students who are currently following a program other than that of an Associate of Science degree in Engineering Technol ogy at a community college and who are interested i n pursuit of studies in this field should contact the College of Engineering for further guidance Further information is available from : Director of Engineering Te chno logy USF St. Petersburg Campu s 830 First Street South

PAGE 3

112 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING St. Petersburg, Florida 33701 o r Director of Engineering Technology College of Engineering University of South Florida Tampa, Florida 33620 Other Requirements The following supplemental requirements listed on page 104 are applicable to this program English Requirement Mathematics Requirement Continuation Requirement In addition to' the completion of the course work of the college, students must be recommended for their degrees by the faculty of the college The awarding of a baccalaureate degree also requires a minimum average of 2 0 or "C'.' for all engineer ing course work of 3000 level or above attempted while regis tered in the college. Location The course work for this program is offered on both the Tampa campus and the St. Petersburg campus. On occasion it may be necessary for a student at the St Petersburg campus to go to the Tampa campus for a specific course, or vice versa It should be noted that the St. Petersburg campus does not have dormitory facilities and students must arrange to live off campus The Center Administrator of the St. Petersburg campus will as-Computer Service Courses These courses marked SC are specifically designed for the non engineering student. Recognizing that the general purpose digital computer has made significant contributions to the advancement of all ele ments of the academic community and that it will have an even greater impact in the future, the College of Engineering offers several levels of credit course work undergraduate and graduate, to serve students of all colleges in order that they may be prepared to meet the computer challenge. These courses do not require a mathematics preparation beyond high school level. Computer-oriented courses are offered in two broad catego ries : (1) those courses which are concerned with the operation organization and programming of computers and computer sys tems from the viewpoint of examining the fundamental principles involved in computer usage; and (2) those courses which are concerned with computer applications to a vareity of different disciplines, by means of user-oriented-languages such as FOR TRAN, PU! and COBOL. Students in engineering, the physical sciences, and mathematics should consult the college's departmental course offerings for suitable computer courses. I

PAGE 4

COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS The College of Fine Arts se r ves the. three-fold purpo se of providing programs of study, theatres of practice, and programs of events for the Univer s ity family, the surrounding community, and the citizens of the State of Florida In recognition of its academic and artistic achievement s the College of Fine Arts has been given Program of Emphasis status by the Board of Regents of the State University System. Its prime objectives are : (I) to provide a broad but thorough education dedicated to the development of professional excel lence in those who are highly talented in the fine arts, (2) to foster this feeling and commitment to aesthetic excellence in those pre paring for teaching and (3) to provide curricular studies and extracurricular activities designed to enrich the life of the general University student and contribute to the overall human environ ment of the University and Tampa Bay communities The College offers degree programs in the departments of Art, Dance Mus ic and Theatre and conducts a program of cultural events. Programs in art education and music education are offered jointly by the College of Fine Arts and the College of Education Studio and history courses in art; literature, music theory and s tudio courses in music for these programs are offered by the College of Fine Arts (see programs under the College of Education) Fine Arts Events Program The College of Fine Arts, recognizing the importance of main taining an arts-tilled environment an integral part of the total' learning experience it offers to the students within the college and to the community at large, is critically aware that a truly comprehensive university performaing arts program musi in clude performances and related activities by internationally rec ognized artists and ensembles. Through the Artist Series, the summer Chamber Music Series the Performing Arts Residency program, and the Film Art Series, the college continually strives to enrich its academic program and the cultural environment by bringing to the campus and into the community artists of the highest stature in dance, mus ic and theatre from around the world. The list of prestigious artists which have been over the year s by the College of Fine Arts is impressive and a sampling includes John Cage the Guarneri String Quartet, Lazar Berman the New York Pro Musica, Alvin Ailey Martha Graham, Marcel Marceau, and the Polish Mime Ballet Theatre (More extensive lists of visiting artists and performing organizations appear in.this catalog under the sections of the specific academic units in the college in which re searc h, demonstration, teaching and other educational ac tivities have directly benefited students.) Fine Art s Event s is the designation given to the art s man agement unit of the college. With a faculty whose professional and academic credentials are of the highest quality, Fine Arts Events provides the expertise needed to develop and administer these programs. The unit also functions as the technical service wing of the college's departmental performing arts programs and serves as a teaching resource for the academic program s in the college Through the Theatre Department curriculum the courses in arts management and various courses in the de s ign/ technology track are taught by members of the Fine Arts Events faculty. The impact of the Fine Arts Events program on the cultural life of the University and the community is immeasurable affording the tine arts student numerou s opportunities to become aware of the unlimited options he or she might wis h to pursue and providing for the whole community cultural enrichment op portunities that otherwise would not be available. SY COM The SY stems CO Mp lex for the Studio and Performing Arts exists to provide essential instructional services and state-of-the-art re producing mixing editing and electronic sound generating and processing equipment (digital and analog) for development and implementation of explorative research and creative activity by artists, scientists, and students (generally enrolled in related classes) at USF. The facilities in SYCOM include a 16-channel quad-mixing unit and an array of 8-track 4-track, a nd recorders with peripheral real-time recording equipment. Digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital converters interface a PDP 11/10 computer with various voltage controlled devices, including two Moog-10 syn thesizers, one E mu modular synthesizer system, a nd a custom designed polyphonic digital sequencer constructed around a Z-80 microproce ss or An IBM Systems 370 /165 computer the central processing unit of the campus, offers the most extensive and advanced potential in digital sound s ynthesis research and com puter assisted music composition ; it s four megabytes of monolithic memory and 3200 megabytes of disc storage are a c cessed via a Music 360 sound synthesis program. The Systems Research Lab maintains the f\icilitie s in SYCOM and provides a vital communications link between recent innovations in elec tronic technology and the potential for the s e advancements as arti s tic applications. Written proposals for individual or group projects to be sponsored or subsidized by SY COM and / or extramural granting agencies should be submitted for consideration to the director of SYCOM. The subsequent result s of project activitie s will be exhibited in the form of public lectures performances, report s, publications, or large theatrical events and special workshops, such as Sound Gallery the Even t/Co mplex Series Art Tech Workshop, and the new music / media festival INTERMUSE. BACCALAUREATE LEVEL DEGREE PROGRAMS Programs Leading to the Baccalaureate Degree The College of Fine Arts has programs leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree in the fields of Art, Dance Music and Theatre, and a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Theatre 113 Admission to the College A freshman student may elect to enter the College of Fine Arts as a major in one of the four dep a rtment s as early as his initial entry into the University. At that time the new freshman s hould file a Declaration of Major or Change of Curriculum Code form

PAGE 5

114 COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS indicating the choice of degree program within the College of Fine Arts. However, any continuing s tudent in the University in good standing, upon acceptance by the department can apply to c hange from another major to a major in the College of Fine Arts. The student desiring to make thi s change mus t initiate a Change of Major form in the college of the present major and transfer his / her current academic records to the College of Fine Arts advising office Tran s fer s tudent s and s tudent s from other units within USF with previous college or univer s ity fine arts course credits (art, dance music, theatre) mus t have such credits evaluated by meeting the appropriate portfolio or a udition requirements when s eeking admission to the College of Fine Arts These students a re urged to make early arrangements for any necessary portfolio review s or auditions as well as appointments for advising, since the se must take place prior to course scheduling a nd regis tra tion Furthe r, students are required to provide copies of their trans cripts showing all p re viou s college or univer s ity course work for advising, portfolio review and / or audition appointments. Addi tional informati on m ay be obtained and : appointments may be made by telephoning or writing the College s a d vising office or th e offic e of the department of particular intere st. Advising in the College The College of Fine Arts operates a central advising office lo ca ted in the Fine Arts Building. It maintain s the records of all major s tud e nt s in the College (art dance, music theatre) and provides on-going acade mic a d v ising referral s er v ice s and assis tan ce t o all present a nd potential s tudents. Academic a dvi sers are provided for each of the depa rtme nt s i n the College. For information and app ointment s call or write to the Coordinator of Advising, College of Fine Arts. Degree-seeking graduate s tudent s accepted into the F .A. prog ra m in art or into the M.M. program in music will be coun se led on program requirements and in their selec tion of courses by th e a ppropri ate Graduate Adviser. student in the University regardless of major may enroll m courses offered by the College of Fine Arts when pre requi sites are met and space is available. Where applicable, these cour ses m ay be use d to sa tisfy elective or General Distribution Requirements. In all cases the responsibility for meeting all graduation requir emen t s rests ent irely upon the student. Graduation Requirements The College of Fine Art s c urrently offers two undergraduate degree s the Bachelor of Art s (B. A ), attainable in the Depart ments of Art, Dance, Music and Theatre, and the Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) in Theatre The University requirements are pre sente d o n page 36 of this Catalo g, but are briefly s ummarized here along with college and department a l requirements : I. 180 credit s for the B .A. and 225 credits for the B.F.A. wit h at least a "C" average (2.0) i n work done at the U niversit y of South Florida and in the major At least (i() credits mus t be in courses numbered 3000 or above. Since 15 hour s is considered a normal, full-time load stu dents are reminded that programs requiring more than 180 cre dit hours may require additional quarters for com pletion of the program 2. General Dist ribution Requirements may be satisfied by (I) co mpleting the University's General Distribution Re qui reme n t as explained on page 35 o f thi s catalog, (2) completing the A A degree from a Florida Junior or Com munit y College, or (3) completing the general education requirements from a nother state university General educ a tion courses transferred from other accre dited i n s titutions will be evaluated based on USF Gen eral Distrib ution equivalencies. The A .A. degree is in no way a requirement for acceptance into the College of Fine Arts (or into any one of its upper level degree programs), or a requirement for graduation from the University. 3 Special Fine Arts College Requirement: All majors in the College of Fine Arts JP.US! take at least 9 hours in one or more of the other departments of the College. 4. A maximum of 12 hours of ROTC credit (MIS prefix) taken at USF may be counted as general elective credit toward the B.A or B.F. A degree with a major in the College of Fine Arts 5 With departmental approval, a maximum of 4 hours of elective Physical Education credits taken at USF may be counted as general elective credit toward the B.A. or B.F.A. degree in the College of Fine Arts. 6. Department Requirements: Art Requirement$: Completion of a minimum of 63 hours in the major, 35 hours of Free Electives (of which 28 hours in art may apply) and 13 hours of non-major credits dis tributed at the discretion of the Art Department. Dance Requirements: Completion of a minimum of 63 hours in the major 3 5 hours of Free Electives (of which 28 hours in dance may apply), and 13 hours of non-major credits distribu ted at the discretion of the Dance Department Music Requirements: Completion of a minimum of 96 hours itt the major and 15 hours of non-major electives of which 8 hours may be distributed at the discretion of the Music Department. Theatre Requirements: For the B A ., the completion ofa min f mum of 75 credit hours in the major with 36 credit hours of Free Electives of which a maximum of 16 credit hours may be in theatre. For the B.F. A., the cempletion of a minimum of 112 credit hours in the major with 45 c redit hours of Free Electives of which a maximum of 16 credit hours may be in theatre 7 Re s idency Requirements: A minimum of 30 credit hours in the m ajor department must be earned in Thi s requirement, however may be waived by the de partment based on examination (e.g. portfolio review, audition etc".). Also, a student.must earn 45 of the last 90 hours of credits in residence at the Universi t y of South Florida. However any course work to be taken and any credits to be earned outside of the University to be applied toward graduation from the University must have prior approval from the appropriate department and the College Waiver for credit of up to 18 credit hours in the major or Fine Arts College requirements is possible by demonstration of competence : Review is by faculty committee. Specific questions concerning program requirements(or the B A and B .F.A. de grees in the College or other related problems should be directed to the Coordinator of Advising College of Fine Arts, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620. T-Oe responsibility for seeing that all graduation require ments are met rests with the student. Courses for General Distribl:ftion Requirements: Courses in the College of Fine Arts In the departments of Art, Dance Music and Theatre fall with .in Area II of the Uni versity's Gen e ral Dis tribution Requirements (See page 35 of the University Catalog for a complete description of General Distribution Requirements and special policies for AA degree holders and other transfer students with General Education Requirements met.) However, a majOr in any one of the four departments in the College of Fine Arts may utilize only those in the other three departments of the College for Area II General Distribution Requirements. College Policy for Academic Progress The following criteria will serve as the basis for disen rollment from a major in the College of Fine Arts :

PAGE 6

. l. Grade point average below 2.0 in the major 2 Recommendation by major applied (studio) art, dance, music or theatre faculty with approval of respective de partment chairperson, or art or music education coor dinator. 3. The department may recommend probationary status (rather than disenrollment) for one quarter when academic progress is not maintained. Contracts and Permission Procedures Contracts: All Directed Studies and other variable credit courses in the College of Fine Arts require contracts between students and instructors describing the work to be undertaken by the student and specifying the credit hours. These contracts are to be com pleted in quadruplicate and signed by the student, the instructor, and department chairperson. It is the student's responsibility to obtain the necessary signatures and make the required distribu tion of all copies Important : the student must have his/her signed copy of a contract at the time of registration. Additional Contracts: The College of Fine Arts requires that any SIU grading agree ment entered into between student and instructor be formalized by a contract in quadruplicate signed by the student and the instructor. "I" Grade Contracts: Incompletes must be contracted for by mutual agreement be tween student and instructor, with the contract describing speci fically the amount and nature of the work to be completed for the removal of the incomplete grade. This contract additionally clearly specifies the date that the work will be due (within legal limits) for grading. Both the student and the instructor must sign this contact and the distribution of the four copies will be the same as with SIU contracts A student must not register for a course again to remove an "I" grade Please see page 32 for more details concerning the University s I grade policy. Permission Procedures: Admission into some courses is possible only by consent of in structor (CO, consent of chairperson (CC), or by audition or portfolio review. When such special permission is required, it will be the student's responsibility to obtain any required j>ermis s ion prior to registration. S/U Grading in the College l Non-majors enrolled in courses in the College of Fine Arts may undertake such courses on an SIU basis with instructor approval. COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS 115 2 Credits earned by a non major student with an S grade will not count toward the student's minimum major course grad uation requirement s hould that student ultimately de c ide to become a major student in one of the four departments in the Coll e ge Instead s uch credits earned with an "S" grade will be assigned to the student s Free Elective c a tegory (wi th the exception of music). 3. Although Fine Arts major student s may t a ke course work in their major as Free Electives, they are not entitled to the S I U grading option for these courses taken in their major subject area even when specifically used or intended to be used as Free Electives 4 In the College of Fine Art s the only SIU graded courses available to a major student in his major subject area are those curriculum allowable courses d e signat e d S I U (that is S I U only) 5. With the exception of such courses as may be specifically required under the College's Special Requirements" regu lation, a maximum of 9 credit hours of SIU credits in non major courses may apply towards a degree in the College of Fine Arts Ple. ase see page 32 for more details concerning the University s SIU Gradfog policy. Dean's List Honors See Academic Policies and Procedures, Programs and Ser vices page 35. Interdisciplinary Study In spite of the fact that an undergraduate interdisciplinary degree program is not formally offered in the College of Fine Arts, it is possible for a student to pursue such a program of study in the College by utilizing free electives allowed in the major program A student may also choose a double undergrad uate major in two departments within the College of Fine Arts as a means of interdisciplinary study See the major adviser in the programs of particular interest. Minors Program The College of Fine Arts offers minor programs in Art, Dance, Music, and Theatre. Majors in the College of Fine Arts may pursue a minor in any certified minors program at USF except within the same department as the major. The require ments for these programs are located under the departmental academic program descriptions. For University Minor Policy consult page 37 of this Catalog. MASTER'S LEVEL DEGREE PROGRAMS The College of Fine Arts offers two master's level degree programs, the Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) in the art depart ment and the Master of Music (M M ) in the music department The requirements for these programs are located under the de partmental academic program descriptions The general Univer sity admissions requirements for graduate degree-seeking status and the regulations of the University governing graduate study are described beginning on page 46 of this Catalog. The general University application procedures are explained page 12. When all of the information required for general acceptability into the University is received in the Graduate Admissions Of, fice the information gathered by the office will be forwarded to the appropriate department in the College of Fine Arts where final processing occurs However it is important that the appli cant simultaneously seeks to satisfy the departmental admission requirements along with the requirements of the Office of Graduate Admissions in order to meet all deadlines PROGRAMS AND CURRICULA -ART (ART) Departmental Requirements for the B.A. D8Qree The art curriculum is designed to develop the student's consciousness of aesthetic a nd ideological aspects of art and it s relationship to life and to assist students in the realization of personal ideas and imagery. Most B.A. recipients interested in college teaching, musem : n or gallery work fine or commercial studio work pursue the extended discipline and experience offered at the graduate level.

PAGE 7

116 COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS Although the Art program allows many possible courses of study, most art major students will select one area of emphasis chosen from the course offerings listed The major concentrations or areas of emphasis, available to undergraduate (B.A. seeking) art students are: Drawing, Paint ing, Sculpture, Ceramics, Graphics (Lithography and / or Intag lio) Photography, Cinematography, Art History and Theory. Art majors must receive a grade of" C" or better in all art courses. Transfer credit will be accepted on the basis of portfolio and transcript evaluation for additional r e quirements see page 114 for Graduation Re-quirements, College of Fine Arts. The requirements for the bachelor s degree in Art Education are listed under the College of Education. Art Studio Concentration (63 quarter hour minimum) I. Visual Concepts I, II, and III and Introduction to Art, 16 credit hours 2. Minimum of 12 credit hours of 3000 level studio courses (exclusive of Technique Seminars) 3 Minimum of 12 credit hours of 4000 and /or 5000 level studio courses exclusive of Technique Seminars With rare exceptions, these should be in one area and repeated only once 4 Minimum of 12 credit hours in Idea Seminars and /or art history courses 5. Art Senior Seminar, 3 credit hours. 6. Eight credit hours of additional art courses (which may include Technique Seminars). Art History Concentration (63 quarter hours minimum) I. Visual Concepts I, II III and Introduction to Art, 16 credit hours. 2 Minimum of 20 credit hours of 4000 level art history courses including Twentieth Century art history 3 Seminar in the History of Art History 4 credit hours. 4. A minimum of 14 credit hours in Idea Seminar (2 quarter hours each) and / or Directed Readings (I to 6 quarter hours each) and /or Critical Studies in Art History (4 quarter hours each). 5. Art Senior Seminar, 3 credit hours 6. Six additional credit houts of art courses, to total a minimum of 63 quarter hours. 7. A proficiency in at least one foreign language, with either French or German strongly recommended. In lieu of some considerable direct living experience with another language, it is suggested that a minimum of two years or equivalent of college-level study of a language be undertaken. For more specific information concerning this requirement, the student should consult with the art adviser or the faculty of the art history area of the art department. Requirements for a minor in Art (32 quarter hour minimum) I. Studio Concentration : ART 2202C (4) ART 2203C (4) ART 2205C (4) ARH 3000 (4) ARH 4450 (4) Plus: Two 4 quarter hour classes from 3000 level studio and repe a t one of these areas on the 4000 level. (12) H. Art History Concentration: ART 2202C (4) AllUOOC W ARH 3000 (4) Plus: Four 4 quarter hour classes from any of the following: ARH 4100 (4) ARH 4170 (4) ARH 4200 (4) ARH 4301 (4) ARH 4350 (4) ARH 4430 (4) ARH 4450 (Required) (4) ARH 4530 (4) Plus: Four quarter hours selected from ART 4930 or ARH 4796; or. one 4 quarter hour class on the 3000 art studio level. ( 4) Visiting Artists and Artists-in-Residence The Art department is widely known for the consistent level of excellence of its programs. Aside from the contributions of its permanent staff, and to insure the continuing expansion of learning opportunities available to students, the art department has brought to the campus internationally known artists and lec turers such as: Scott Bartlett, Larry Bell, Friedl Dzubas, Allen Jones, Nicholas Krushenick, Daniel Lang, Paul Sarkisian, Lucas Samaras, Robert Irwin, James Rosenquist, Robert Raus chenberg Phillip Pearlstein. Master of Fine Arts Degree (Art) The major concentrations, or areas of emphasis available to graduate (M.F.A.) art students are: Drawing, Painting, Sculpture, Ceramics, Graphics (lithography and/or intaglio), Photography, Cinematography. Procedure for Applying The application for admission to graduate study should be sent to University Admissions prior to deadlines published in the academic calendar on pages 4-5 However, the application and all support materials (portfolio, etc.) should be submitted early enough so that they will reach the art department by the follow ing dates: for Quarter I admissions by April l; for Quarter II admiss ions by October 15, and for Quarter III admissions by January 1. At least one week should be allowed for internal processing of the application providing all transcripts have been received and the applicant's grade point average (GPA) for the final 60 semester or 90 quarter credit hours of undergraduate work is 3.0 or above. If the GPA is below 3.0 the GRE score must be available which may take up to six weeks from the date the exam is taken. The applicant should submit a portfolio of art work directly to the Graduate Art Adviser in the College of Fine Arts for faculty review. The portfolio should consist of 35 mm slides, for convenience in shipping, handling and presentation. Applicants in drawing and printmaking, however, should send original works and applicants in photography should send original prints. Cinematography applicants should send duplicate prints. The portfolio should provide evidence of rrucimum strength in the area of the applicant's primary interest, although work submitted may represent more than one discipline. Return post age in stamps in the amount necessary for the return of all mate rials should accompany the portfolio. (Please do not send cash, checks or money orders.) Applicants to the Master of Fine Arts Degree program are also required to submit (in addition to the portfolio), three letters of recommendation and a letter of intent. For information concerning University graduate studies, admissions and graduation policies see page 46 It is the appli cant's responsibility to see that all required materials such as transcripts, GRE scores, portfolio and letters of recommenda tion are received in time to be processed by art department dead lines.

PAGE 8

Requirements for the M.F.A. Degree: A student may be accepted into the M.F.A. program eiiher provisionally or fully. Provisional enrollment is normally pro vided for one or two consecutive terms. When accepted fully as degree-seeking, the student will be given a calendar year in which to achieve "degree-candidacy." These steps are achieved by submission of work for faculty reviews held twice a year. All degree-seeking students are provided with two opportunities within the calendar year to achieve candidacy If a degree seeking student does not achieve candidacy on the second at tempt, the student will then be terminated from the program. Upon acceptance to candidacy, the student will select a committee of three faculty members, two of which must be studio faculty of the student's primary discipline. The M F. A degree requires a minimum of72 quarter hours. The bulk of a student's program is discretionary, and is planned with the advice of the graduate art adviser in its initial stages, and later with the advice of the student's graduate committee. Specific program requirements include work in theory (ART 6936 Graduate Seminar: 2 hours credit, must be taken twice); participation in instruction (ART 6937 Graduate Instruction M e thods: Variable credit to 5 hours); presentation of work (thesis exhibition for which credit is normally given); and thesis documentation (usually earned under ART 6971, Masters Thesis, but in certain circumstances under ART 6911, Directed R e search: credit for documentation is variable); and 8 hours in art history Students are also required to participate in a thesis orals session in conjunction with the thesis exhibition. This is a forum for questions from faculty representatives and is open to other graduate students Graduate students are normally assigned studio space, when available, in the department and are expected to remain in resi dency during their enrollment. Exceptions must have the ap proval of the student's graduate committee and the graduate art adviser. Approval from both of these sources is also necessary for the acceptance of any Special Student status courses (up to 8 hours) taken prior to admission and for any transfer credit from another institution (limited to 9 hours). The graduate committee must additionally approve the written thesis, the thesis exhibi tion and the conduct of the orals in satisfaction of degree re quirements. The requirements for the M A degree in Art Education are listed under the College of Education DANCE (DAN) The dance curriculum is designed for students interested in dance as a n art form. Their objectives may be to continue their education in graduate school, to teach in a college or a private school, or to pursue a career as a performer and /or choreog rapher. Major concerts are given during each quarter as well as workshop performances. Major dance companies are brought to the campus giving students the opportunity of taking classes with the visiting artist Requirements for the B.A. Degree (63 quarter hours minimum) Modern Concentration: DAA 2160 (3) DAA 2200 (3) DAA 2700 (3) DAA 3161 (8) DAA 3201 (4) DAA 3701 (3) DAN 3603 (3) DAN 3710 (3) DAN 3110 (3) DAA 4162 (15) DAA 4702 (3) DAA 4703 (3) DAN 4120 (3) DAN 4151 (3) DAN 4170 (3) Ballet Concentration : DAA 2160 (3) DAA 2200 (3) DAA 2700 (3) DAA 3161 (4) DAA 3201 (8) COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS 117 DAA 3701 (3) DAN 3603 (3) DAN 3710 (3) DAA 3220 (6) Dl'\A 4202 (15) DAN 3110 DAN 4120 DAN 4151 D AN 4170 (3) (3) (3) (3) TP A 2223 Stage Lighting and Costume is required of all dance majors and may apply toward Area II of the General Distribution Requirement s, or non-major electives, or the 9-hour Special College Requirement. Junior dance majors are required to do a dance project and senior dance majors are required to choreograph and perform in a senior dance program. Entrance to all technique courses is by jury examination. A student must audition each quarter to stay at his/her present level or to advance to a higher level. Until the student is accepted into Intermediate Modern or Intermediate Ballet he / she will be con sidered as a probatio nary dance major. Beginning courses may be repeated only three times Prospective students must contact the dance department to arrange for an audition prior to registration. A dance major is expected to keep his/her weight at a level that is aesthetically acceptable to the dance faculty for classroom training and for performances. For other non-major requirements see page 114 of Fine Arts College requirements and page 35 for the University 's General Distribution and graduation requirements Requirements for a minor in Dance (26 quarter hour minimum) I. Minimum of 12 quarter hours upper level courses (3000 and 4000 level courses) II. Admission to all studio classes is by audition only (as with major students) and the student must be ranked by level before being admitted Studio courses may be repeated for credit as stipulated in the Catalog III. Prospective students must contact the Dance department to arrange for an audition prior to registration Beginning courses may be repeated only three times. IV. The student must audition each quarter to stay at his / her present level or to advance to a higher level for all technique courses. Visiting Artists and Artists-In-Residence By supplementing its excellent on-going regular staff-in structed dance curriculum with other professional resources made available through the Visiting Artist and Artist-in Residence programs the Dance department provides for dance students an overall dynamic program for practice, study and learning An impressive list of visiting artists includes: Murray Louis Dance Co Norman Walker Dance First Chamber Dance Co Team Claude Kipnis Mime Ballet Marjo Theatre Luis Rivera Co Louis Falco Dance Co. Utah Repertory Dance Nikolais Dance Theatre Theatre Kerela Kalamandalam Cliff Keuler Dance Co. Co. Kelly

PAGE 9

118 COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS Dance Theatre of Harlem Mcree Cunningham Dance Co. Alvin Ailey American D ance Theatre Don Recllich Dance Co. Polish Mime Ballet Theatre Viola Farber Dance Co. Paul Taylor Dance Co. The Phakavali Dancers of Thailand Royes Fernandez Jacques D' Amboise Lucas Hoving Dance Co. New Caledoni a Singers and Dancers The Trocaderos Kazuko Hirabayashi MUSIC (MUS) Jose Limon Co. James Cunningham Co. Lar Lubovitch Dance Co. Dena Madole Meredith Monk Luigi Carolyn Brown Susanna Hayman Chaffey Sandra Neels Betty Jones Barton Mumaw Twyla Tharp Dance Company George Faison Dance Company Pilobolus Dance Theatre Jennifer Muller and The Works Daniel Nagrin Milwaukee Ballet Co. The Departmental B.A. Degree: The music curriculum is designed for those students gifted in the performance and/or composition of music. Candidates for a major in music are required to pass an entrance examination (audition) in their respective performance area Composition candidates are required to submit appropriate scores and/or tapes of their compositions for faculty appraisal. All ne1"J regis trants are also required to take a placement or proficiency examination in music theory and literature. Students may obtain dates and times for these examinations from the music depart ment office Completion of those examinations is required before registration in music courses can be permitted. Academic programs offered include: Bachelor of Arts degree with concentration in Performance (voice, piano and orchestral instruments) Composition. Requirements for the B.A. Degree (96 quarter hour minimum) All students seeking a degree in music are require d to (1) c;omplete success fully the secondary piano and music theory literature requirements as defined by the music faculty," (2) pre sent a partial public recital during their junior year, (3) present a complete public recital during their senior year, (4) present a record of satisfactory recital attendance during each of the quar ters of study at the University. The specific requirements for satisfactory attendance are set by the music faculty. These re quirements are in addition to the actual course requirements listed below: A total of 96 hours is required as follows: Music Theory (jO) MUT 1111 (3) MUT 1112 (3) MUT 1113 (3) MUT 1241 (2) Music Literature (6) MUT 1242 (2) MUT 1243 (2) MUT 2Jl6 (3) MUT 2117 (3) MUT 2118 (3) MUT 2246 (2) MUT 2247 (2) MUT 2248 (2) MUL 2lll (2) MUL 2Jl2 (2) MUL 2JJ3 (2) Music History (9) MUH 3211 (3) MUH 3212 (3) MUH 3213 (3) Applied Concentration: A total of 36 credit hours of applied music is required with a minimum of 9 hours to be completed at the senior level. One major ensemble per quarter is required in conjunction with app\ied music enrollment. Promotion to the next higher level in applied music i s made upon the recommendation of the facult y in the student's respec tive performance concentration based upon a jury examination conducted by that concentration faculty For other non-major requirement s s ee page 114 of the Fine Arts College requ i rement s and pag e 35 for the Univ ersity s General Distribution and graduation requirements. The requirements for the B.A. in Music Education are listed under the College of Education Composition Concentration: Undergraduates concentrating in composition must com plete a minimum of 36 credit hours from the following sequence of courses including MUC 3403 and at least one quarter of MUC 4204, satisfying all necessary prerequisites for all courses: MUC 2202 (6) MUC 2301 (3) MUC 3203 (3) MUC 3401, 3402, 3403 (3,3,3) MUC 3441, 3442, 3443 (3,3,3) MUC 3601, 3602, 3603 (3,3,3) MUC 4204 (3) MUC 4405, 4406, 4407 (3,3,3) MUC 45.01 (3) MUT 4311, 4312 (3,3) In consultation with and with the approval of the entire composition faculty, the senior requirement for compositio n concentration is to be satisfied in any of the following three ways, or in other ways so designated by the composition faculty : (1) a complete public concert of works by the student composer, (2) the public performance of several compositions in various concerts throughout the composer's senior year (3) the formal presentation to the c omposition faculty of an extensive portfolio of compositions plus the public performance of at least one of these works during the senior year. Requirements for a minor in Music (29-32 quarter hour minimum) Students seeking a minor in music may choose from three concentrations: (1) History-Theory-Literature, (2) Applied Medium and (3) Composition Each of the concentrations will include the same core curriculum consisting of 18-19 hours I. Core Curriculum: Music Theory (15) Introduction to Music (4) or Music History (3) II Optional Concentrations; III. A. History Theory Literature 11-12 hours Music History and/or Theory and/or Literature (8-9) Music Ensemble (3) B. Applied Medium 11-12 hours Performance Studio courses which may include up to 2 quarter hours of class-studio Music Ensembles Faculty jury recommendation for sophomore level studio study (minimum) (8-9) (3) C Composition Introduction to Electronic Music 13 hours (3) Composition Studio courses which may include one course oforchestration (9) Music Ensemble (1) Admission to all studio courses is by audition only (as with major students), and the student must be ranked by level. Class-studio courses may serve as preparation for auditions. Registration in all music courses is by permission of the instructor. Studio courses may be repeated for credit as stipulated in the Catalog The Faculty: US F' s superior music faculty has been carefully chosen for i t s training, performing ability and ability to teach It is in e very sense a team This achievement has been demonstrated by such fine musical ensembles as the Faculty String Quartet, the Faculty Brass Quintet the Ars Nova (faculty) Woodwind Quintet and the Faculty Chamber Players.

PAGE 10

Unique Learning Opportunities: The music department at the University of South Florida offers the student the opportunity to study with a distinguished faculty, work with the newest.in creative equipment, and to be in the company of other superior music students for an extensive, exciting and exacting period of study. SYCOM-The Systems Complex for the Studio and Per forming Arts offers the student the opportunity to work with an unusually well developed electronic facility for creative research and compositional opportunity Visiting Artists and Artists-In-Residence: The Department of Music utilizes guest composers, con ductors, and performing musicians to enhance its offerings in terms of teaching faculty, forum appearances, and the con ducting of musical programs, symposia, and clinics. Some prominent musicians who have appeared in the past are Howard Hanson Norman Dello Joio, Randall Thompson, Virgil Thom son, David Ward-Steinman, Walter Trampler, Fred Hemke, Eleazar de Carvalho, Thomas Nee ; Lukas Foss Maurice Andre, John Haynie, Jean Pierre Rampa!, Julius Baker, David Baker, and Thomas J. Anderson Student Organizations: Sigma Alpha Iota, national professional music fraternity for women, and Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, a professional music frater nity for men, are dedicated to serve the cause of music in America Student Music Educators National Conference is an affiliate of the Music Educators National Conference and is open to all interested students. Financial Aid : The University has made available to highly qualified undergraduate students a number of music service awards Usu ally these awards cover in-state tuition fees, and are distributed following open auditions held in January and February. The award is made for the following year for three of the four quar ters. Available to graduate students who show special potential for creative contribution to the profession are the University Scholar Awards and graduate assistantships and fellowships Additionally, loans, grants and work programs are available to qualified University of South Florida students. Financial aid is granted on need, academic promise and character. Master of Music Degree The major concentrations available to graduate (M M : ) music students are : performance composition Procedure for Applying theory choral conducting The applicant seeking acceptance into the Master of MQsic degree program must meet the University's general admissions requirements and make formal application for general University acceptability with the Graduate Admissions Office. Con currently, the applicant must arrange to fulfill the specific accep tance requirements in the Music department (of the College of Fine Arts). Full acceptance cannot be given until the applicant satisfies: (1) performance audition (2) placement examination in music the9ty. Dates and times for auditions and examinations may be obtained by telephoning or writing the Music department, College of Fine Arts. Persons to contact directly are the Chair person of the Music departme nt and the Graduate Music adviser, or the Coordinator of Graduate Studies (College of Fine Arts) for referral. Requirements for the M.M Degre e (45 quarter hour minimum) General requirements for graduate work are given on page 46. In addition the applicant for the Master of Music degree COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS 119 program will nee
PAGE 11

120 COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS The Actor s Studio, Dublin's Abbey Theatre, Broadway Washington's Arena Stage The American Shake s peare Festi val The Wel s h National Theatre the BBC the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art, Thcr Working Theatre Coventry s Belgrade Theatre, Paris, Hollywood East Berlin's Deut sc he s Teater Taiwan The Socialist Republic of Armenia and Poland A partial, alphabetized list would include Martin Esslin Bori s Goldovsky Henry Hewes, Mestrop Kesdekian Arthur Lithgow Marcel Marceau Paul Massie Siobhan McKenna Estelle Par s ons Ben Piazza, Sergei Alan Schneider and Doug Watson. Requirements for B.A. Degree: Total 180 quarter hours ; minimum 75 quarter hours of Theatre. Major Core Requirements ( 41 quarter credits to be completed by all majors:) THE2020 (2) TPA2200 (3) Select two : TPP 21 lQ \3), TPA 2223 (3), TPP 2500 (3), TPA 2400 (3) THE 3110 (3) THE 4562 (3) THE 3111 (3) TPA 2250 (I) THE 4180 (5) TPA 3086 (4) Plu s one a dvanced level Theatre Studies Performance Concentration (34 credit hours): TPP 4150 (4) TPP 4220 or TPP 4151 (4) TPP 4920 (4) TPP 4140 (4) TPP 3510 (3) TPP 4152 (4) (6) TPA 3601 (3) TPP 3111 (4) TPP 3790L (3) TPP 4310 (4) TPP4311 (4) Design and Technology Concentration (34 credit hours): THE 4264 (3) THE 4266 (3) Design sectio ns in major area: TPA 4020 TPA 4021 o r TPA 4040, TOA 4045 o r (4,4) (4,4) TPA 4060, TPA 4061 (4,4) Performance course as specified by department: (4) Additional section from related area : TPA 4020 (4) o r TPA 4040 or (4) TPA 4060 (4) In area of emphasis-4 hours ; TPA 4211 (4), o r TPA 4285 (4), o r 4 hours from TPA 4230 (2), TPA 4231 (2), TPA 4281 (2) (4) In related area-4 hours from : TPA 4211 (4), o r TPA 4285 (4), or 4 hours from TPA 4230 (2), TPA 4231 (2), TPA 4281 (2) (4) Four credits from s kill s courses: TPA 4081 (2), TPA 4240 (2), TPA 4052 (2), TPA 4071 (2), TPA 4281 (2) (4) Requirements for a minor in Theatre (32 quarter hours minimum) Three l a b courses including TP A 2200, Stagecraft (9) Other lab courses to c hoose from : TPP 2110 (3) TPA 2223 (3) TPP 2500 (3) TPA 2400 (3) The remaining 23 hours are to be s elected by the student based on personal interest. At lea s t 20 hours must be upper level co ur s e s. The Theatre Advi-ser will be available to assist the st udent in developing a cour s e of study that will meet the need s of the individual s tudent. Students desiring admittance into the Acting Sequence and / or the De sig n Sequence mus t audition and / or portfolio review. All Theatre courses (with the exception of the above mentioned l a b courses) require permi ssi on of the instructor. Requirements for the B.F.A. degree in Theatre: Concentrations in Performance and Design / Technology (Total 225 credit hours 112 of which will be in Theatre and related courses a nd 45 hours of which will be Free Elective s with up to 16 credits in Theatre applicable) : Admission to B. F. A program is by audition or portfolio presentation Participation in one summer quarter theatre program is required Awarding of the B.F.A. degree i s based upon completion of course work and a creative project B.F .A. requirements for the Stage Design/Technology concentra tion with emphasis in Scenic, Lighting or Costume: Major Core Requirements (41 quarter hours to be com pleted by all majors) see B .A. degree program page 120, for description Plus 35 hours in the Major Emphasis : Designffechnology Emphasis #1 Scenic (35 hour s minimum) : THE 4264 (3) m TPA 4060 Scene Design I (4) TPA 4061 Scene Design II ( 4 ) Choice of: TPA 4020 Lighting Design I o r (4) TPA 4040 Cp s tume Design I ( 4 ) TPA 4211 (4) TPP 4150 (4) TPA 4012 (Project De sign Honors : Scene) (4) THE 3925 (I) Plu s 4 hour s from : TPA 4230 (2) TPA 4231 (2) TPA 4281 (2) TPA 4285 ( 4 ) Designffechnology Emphasis #2 Lighting (35 hours minimum): THE 4264 (3) 4266 (3) TPA 4020 Lighting Design I ( 4 ) TPA 4021 Lighting Design II ( 4 ) Choice of: TPA 4040 Costume Design I or (4) TPA 4060 Scene Design I (4) TPA 4285 (4) TPP 4150 (4) TPA 4012 (Project Design Honors: Lighting) (4) 3925 (I) Plu s 4 hour s from : TPA4211 ( 4 ) TPA 4230 (2) TPA 4231 (2) TPA 4281 (2) Designffechnology Emphasis #3 Costume .(35 hours minimum) : THE 4264 THE 4266 TPA 4040 Costume De s ign I TP A 4045 Costume Desi -go II Choice of: TPA 4020 Lighting Design I o r TP A 4060 Scene Design I TPA 4230 TPA 4231 TPP 4150 TPA 4012 ( Project Design Honors: Costume) THE 3925 Plus 4 hours from : TPA 4211 TPA 4285 ( 3 ) (3) ( 4 ) (4) (4) ( 4 ) ( 2) (2) (4) ( 4 ) (I) ( 4) ( 4 )

PAGE 12

Plus 36 additional hours from the following : 12 hours in Creative Pr oject and Ex ec ution THE 4905 or 5909 ( Rese arch: Creative Project) (2} THI;: 4905 or 5909 (Design: Creative Project) (3) THE 4905 or 5909 (Execute: Creative Project) (3) TPA 4020 Lighting Design I or (4) TPA 4040 Costume Design I or (4) TPA 4060 Scene Design I (Completes Design I in all three areas) (4) 1 2 hours in Design and Te c hnical Skills (c hoice of): TPA 4281 (2) TPA 4052 (2) TPA 4240 (2) TPA 4081 (2) TPA 4021 Lighting Design II or (4) TPA 4045 Pesign II or (4) TPA 4061 Scene Design ii (Secondary emphasis for de s ign stu dent) ( 4) TPA 4071 (2) TPA4211 (4) TPA 4230 (2) TPA 4231 (2) TPA 4285 (4) THE 4903 (4) 12 h ou r s in C o urs e Producti o n work (choice of credit in workshops or ensembles in the College of Fine Arts) : TPP 4230L (4) TPP 3235; TPP 3236 (4 ,4) TPA 3810 ; TPA 3820 ; TPA 3840 (4,4,4) TPP TPP 3510; TPP 3790L (4, 3,3) DAN 3710 (l) COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS 121 MUO 3501 THE 3925 (repeatable for 6 hours) Total : (I) (I) 112 c.redit hour s B.F.A. requirements for the Performance concentration: Major Core Requirement s (41 quarter hour s, to be com pleted by all majors) See B.A. degree program page 120, for description Plus the following required hours (34 quarter hour s mini mum) : TPP 4150 ; TPP 4151; TPP 4140; TPP 4152 (16 ) TPP 4220 or TPP 4920 (4) TPP 3510 (3) TPP 3790L (3) TPP 4310 (4) TPP 4311 ( 4 ) Plus 36 hour s as follows : 18 hor s of production preparation througli Berfor mance classes (choice ot) THE 4905, THE 4927, THE 4930, TPA 3810-TPA 3820-TPA 3840 TPP 3121TPP. 3122, TPP 3235-TPP 3236 TPP 4180 TPP 4230L TPP 4250 TPP 4920, THE 3925. 18 hours of additional elective s to be decided in con ference with s tudent's advisory committee. Any theatre s tudent enrolling in lab courses (TP A 2200, TPA 2223, TPA 2400 TPP 2110 and TPP 2500) w ill be ex pected to spend 40 hours per quarter a s ass igned lab require ment. Upper division courses in studio and performance carry Advanced Course Production Involvement ( ACPI) r!!guire ment. Any student enrolling in these courses will be expected to fulfill ihis obligation up to 6 times Credit may be earned foreach ACPI by enrolling in THE 3?25 (I hour) which may be repe a ted up to 12 times.

PAGE 13

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE The major objectives of the College of Medicine are, first to create and maintain an academic environment in which medical education the production of new knowledge, and community service may be continued in a quality manner. The second ob jective is to integrate the College of Medicine into the mainstream of the community and to participate in and lead in the up-grading and improvement of the health care standards of the community in which the College is located The third objec tive is to function within the framework of the total University as an integral and valued part of the University community The philosophy of the educational program at this institution is to provide a strong academic basis for lifetime scholarship in medicine and growth in professional stature for our students ; to lay the foundation for the development of ever increasing techni cal and professional competency and proficiency in the arts and sciences of medicine for each of the students; to instill in our students compassion and a sense of devotion to duty to their profession and to their patients ; to provide relevance and con tinuity in instruction among the various disciplines related to medicine ; to maintain and increase our students motivation for community and human service in the practice of their profession; to stimulate the students to accept major responsibilities in learning ; to orient teaching activities around the student and his desire and ability to learn With these concepts in mind, a curriculum has been de veloped which we believe will achieve an effective correlation between the pre-clinical and clinical instructional areas This curriculum is designed to emphasize conceptually oriented teaching, thus affording the students a challenging and intellec. tual experience as opposed to a routine and the superficial pre sentation of a large volume of facts. Relevance to medicine will be emphasized in all areas of instruction in a way recognizable and understandable by the student of medicine Increased cor relation on an interdisciplinary basis will be instituted providing reinforcement between the various fields of study. The cur riculum will also provide a close and ongoing experience for the student in the day to day and: continuing health care delivery system within the community hospitals and the college of medicine's ambulatory care facilities It is anticipated the pro gram will produce graduating physicians who understand and desire the practice of medicine as a fruitful and meaningful choice for a lifetime career of service to their patients and the community. It is recognized that the program does place heavy demands upon the students. They will be expected to utilize all resources provided by the College to maintain a consistent level of academic achievement, and to demonstrate evidence of initiative and dedication to their chosen profession MEDICINE Students admitted to the College of Medicine, seeking an M D. degree are selected on the basis of what appears by present standards to be the best suited for the successful study and prac tice of medicine The selection is made by the Admission Com mittee composed of members of PreClinical Clinical faculty and two senior medical students. Each applicant is considered individually and is judged strictly on his or her own merits. Characteristics evaluated include motivation, integrity, charac ter and general fitness. These are judged by recommendations of the applicant's Pre-Medical Advisory Committee as well as other letters of recommendation. The academic record and new Medi cal College Admission Test furnish an estimate of academic achievement and intellectual competence. Interviews are arranged for applicants whose qualifications appear to warrant complete exploration All inquiries concerning admission should be directed to the Associate Dean for Admissions, Medical Center, College of Medicine, Department of Admissions, Box 3, 12901 North 30th Street, University of South Florida 1 Tampa, Florida 33612. ) '' Requirements for Admission A minimum of three years of college or university work is re quired with some preference given to those applicants who pre sent a bachelor's degree from a liberal arts college approved by one of the national accrediting agencies. The minimum require ment is three years of college work (90 semester hours or 135 quar.ter hours, exclusive of Physical Education and ROTC). Regardless of the number of years involved in PreMedical training, the college credits s ubmitted by the applicant must in clude the following: English Biological Science (including laboratory) Mendelian Genetics (laboratory optional) General Cpemistry (including laboratory) organic Chemistry (including laboratory) Mathematics Statistics (mathematics or social science) Physics Semest e r(s ) 2 2 2 2 2 Quarter(s) 3 3 3 3 3 (including laboratory) 2 3 All applicants arrange to the new Medical College Admission Test. Requirements for Graduation The awarding of the degree Doctor of Medicine will follow suc cessful completion of the entire required course of study Appropriate arrangements for post graduate training must be made Grading of performance in academic subjects will be on a pass, fail, honors grading system, and the student must have achieved a grade pass in all subjects in the curriculum. of Philosophy Degree in Sciences A graduate program ) eading to the Doctor of Philosophy degree in Medical Sciences is offered by the Basic Science Departments of the College of Medicine Information concerning this program may be obtained by contacting the Assoc i ate Dean for Graduate Studies, College of Medicine, Box 40, 12901 North 30th Street University of South Florida, Tampa Florida 33612 Requirements for Admission 1. Students who seek admission as first-time graduate students 122

PAGE 14

to the Ph D. Program in Medical Sciences of the College of Medicine shall be required to meet the minimal System-wide (State University System of Florida) and University-wide (University of South Florida) entrance requirements. 2 In addition, and /or over and beyond the minimal System-wide and /or University-wide entrance requirements, the applicant while working for the baccalaureate degree, shall have earned a minimum overall grade point average of 3 .0 out of a possible 4 .O with a minimum grade point average of 3 .0 in tl\e sciences. 3 The applicant shall have a total quantitative-verbal Graduate Record Examination score of 1100 or higher. However, under the circumstance that the applicant takes an advanced test on the G RE in his or her major and achieves a score of (J()() or higher, the minimum score of 1100 may be waived by the Graduate Studies Committee (College of Medicine). 4 The applicant must have completed the following courses: one year of general biology, one year of general chemistry, one year of general physics, one year of mathematics includ ing integral and differential calculus, one year of organic chemistry and a course in 9uantitative analysis. ; COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 123 5. In addition to course requirelfients summarized above (Sec tion 4) the department of the chosen discipline of major may require additional course work to be completed before admis sion into the Graduate Program Conversely, at the Graduate Studies Committee's discretion, specific deficiencies may be corrected through courses taken within a specified period of time. Each such course as well as the grade obtained in the course, is to agreed upon by the Graduate Studies Committee (College of Medicine) and the student's department of major at the time the student is accepted into the Graduate Program. This information will be communicated to the student prior to the time of regular registration for the quarter. 6. Except for the System-wide and/or University-wide minimum admission criteria, all other requirements herein summarzied (Sections 2 -5), under exceptional circumstances. in consid eration of the applicant's expected success in the program and in the best collective judgment of the Graduate Studies Com mittee (College of Medicine), with its recommendation, and with the concurrence of the Associate Dean for Graduate Studies and the approval of the Dean of the College of Medicine, may be wai\/ed. ACADEMIC CALENDAR First Academic Period-Class of 1984 September 2 Tue s da y November 11, Tuesday November 27-28 Thursday-Friday December 19, Friday January 5, 1981, Monday May 25, Monday June 5, Friday Registration-Classes Begin Veteran's Day Holiday Thanksgiving Holidays Last Day of Classes Classes Resume Memorial Day Holiday End of First Academic Session Clerkships (Second Academic Period)-Class of 1982 September I, Monday September 12, Friday September 29, Monda y November 11, Tue s day November 27-28, Thursda y -Friday December 19, Friday January 5 1981, Monday March 27, Friday April 6, Monday May 25, Monda y July 3, Friday September 7, M o nda y September 18, Friday Labor Day Holiday Last Day of Basic Sciences Clerkships Begin Veteran's Day Holiday Thanksgiving Holidays Last Day of Classes Classes Resume Last Day of Classes Classes Resume Memorjal Day Holiday Independence Day Holiday Lab .or Day Holiday End of Second Academic Period Elective Program (Third Academic Period)-Class of 1981 September I Monda y September 19, Friday September 29, M on day November 11, Tuesda y November 27-28, Thursday-Friday December 19, Friday December 29, Monday Janu a ry I, 1981, Thursday May 25, Monda y June 12, Frida y Labor Day Holiday Last Day of Clerkships Electives Begin Veteran .'s pay Holiday Thanksgiving Holid a ys Last Day of Classes Classes Resume New Year's Day Holiday Memorial Day Holiday Last Day of Electi v e Period Holidays may be waived for students serving in Cllnlcel Clerkehlps at the discretion of the individual Chiefs of Service

PAGE 15

COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES Students in the College of Natural Sciences are trained in the tools of logical analysis and the modes of experimentation in the continuing attempt to better understand the nature of man and his relationship to the universe In all its functions the College is dedicated to fostering a spirit of inquiry and intellectual growth. The College of Natural Sciences offers programs in biology including botany microbiology, and zoology; chemistry, and biochemistry ; geology ; marine s cience ; mathematics; medical technology ; and physic s These programs are designed for stu dents planning scientific careers in the science fields or for those planning professional having a considerable component of science. These students will typically major in one of the sciences or in a combination of sciences as preparation for employment, transfer to professional schools or admission to graduate school. In addition, the college administers advising for the pre medical sciences non degree program and the medical technol ogy degree program. These programs combine specialized coun seling and curriculum planning to assist the student in gaining admission to a professional sc hool or internship program BACCALAUREATE LEVEL DEGREE PROGRAMS Admission to the College To be admitted to the College of Natural Science s a student must make written application and sa tisfy the admission criteria of the college. Upon admiss ion the student will be assigned a faculty adviser for co unseling an d program planning Students preparing for a scie nce or m at hematic s career must plan their courses carefully because of the sequential nature of the science cur ricula and students seeking entrance into a professional school or medical technology internship program require specialized counseling. Because of this, immediate application for admission into the college is strongly recommended Inform a tion on admission criteria, departments, majors, programs counseling, and other services of the college may be obtained from the office of the De a n or by contacting the Direc tor of Advising College of Natural Sciences, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, 33620. General Requirements for Degrees In addition to the University graduation requirements found on page 36, the r e quirem ents for graduation in any undergraduate degree in the college are as follows: I. Completion of a major program with a grade of" C" or higher in each course. A m ajor program is defined to be courses in a department of concentration plus s upporting courses in re l ate d department s All courses in the major program must be t a ken with letter grade (A,B,C, D, F ,I) except those courses which are graded S / U only. For a more det a iled description of the m ajor program requirement s, consult the appropriate de partmental sectio n Certain courses offered in the college are designed for the non -sc ience major or the non-dep a rtment a l m ajor. These courses a re designated "For non m ajors, "No credit for (department) major," .. No credit for scie nce majors," or some simila r phrase For these courses the following rules apply. For non majors "-For major s in the college, the course will count as c redit toward s graduation only as a free elective No c r edi t for (department) major -the course will not count toward graduation for a science major in the specified department but will count towards graduation as a free elec tive for all nonspecifie d departments. No c r edi t fo r scie nc e majors -the course will not count tow ard graduation for any major in the college. 124 2. Satisfaction of the University Distribution Requirement ex cept: (a) In area III, the minimum requirement of eight hours in Mathematics may be waived by credit in at lea st eight hours of Mathematic s courses required by the m a jor. (b) In area IV the minimum of eight hour s in Natural Sci ences may be waived by credit in at least eight hours of natural sciences courses required by the major. 3. Completion of 24 hour s of courses from the Colleges of Fine Arts, Social and Behavioral Sciences, or Arts and Letters The student may elect any course from any of these colleges provided : (a) No more than 12 hour s are taken in courses in any one department. (b) The courses are taken with letter grade (A,B,C,D,F,I). Courses taken to satisfy the University Distribution Requirement may not be used to satisfy this requirement. 4 Subsequent to admission to the co llege a student must com plete at least 45 credit hour s of letter graded courses in the college of which at lea st 16 hour s mus t be applicable to a major. Up to 2 credits of elective physical education and up to 12 c redits in military s cience co ur ses MIS IOIOC, 3410C, 4421C may count as free electives toward s graduation. Credits tran sfe rred from other sc hool s will not be included in the grade point average computed for graduation. For graduation with honor s, see page 39. The college or department in the college may have specific requirement s in addition to tho se listed in this catalog. CoHege rule s or requirements are o n file in the de a n's office, and de partmental rule s or requirements a re on file in each departmental office. The s tudent is respon s ible for meeting all graduation re-qu ire ment s < Grading Systems Typically courses in the University receive letter grades (A, B ,C,D,F,I). However the co llege recognizes that educa tional competence m ay be achieved a nd demonstrated by experi ences other than classroom a tt e ndance lea ding to l e tter grades. The attention of the student i s directed to the following: I. CLEP and other a dv ance place ment examinations. 2 Waiver by either documentations or examination. 3. Off-Campus T e rm p rograms. 4 Cooperative Education Progr a m

PAGE 16

5. Independent Study 6. S / U Graded Courses A. With the exception of courses graded S / U only all courses required to satisfy the departmental major and all supporting courses required by the de partmental major are considered in the students' major program and may not be taken S/U How ever, once the requirements of the major program have been satisfied, subsequent courses taken in the major or supporting areas are considered free elec tives and may be taken SIU. All hours required to complete the 24-hour rule must be taken by letter grade. B With the exception of ENC 1102, ENC 1135, ENC 1168, all courses in Distribution Requirements and all courses in free electives may be taken S /U. There is no restriction regarding the number of hours to be taken S / U except the graduation re quirement that the student mus t earn at least 45 cre dit hours with letter grade s in the College of Natural Sciences. C Students will be permitted to enl'oll in a course by an S / U on the basis of a written contract signed by the student, and the instructor of the course. This contract should be completed no later than the third week of the quarter in which the course is offered D Each instructor for course s in the College of Natural Sciences will provide students with re quirements necessary to attain an "S" grade. Es sentially, S should be equal to a "C" or better. E. Students transferring from any other college or divi sion of the University will be s ubject to the above requirements. Programs Leading to the Baccalaureate Degree The College offers the Bachelor of Arts degree with majors in Biology (BIO), Botany (BOT), Microbiology (MIC), and Zool ogy (ZOO); Chemistry (CHM); Geology (GLY) ; Mathematics (MTH); Physics (PHY); and Interdisciplinary Natural Sciences (INS) with a concentration in one of the above. The College offers the Bachelor of Science degree with majors in Chemistry (CHS), Clinical Chemistry (CHC), Medical Technology (MET), and Physics (PHS). For specific requirements, consult appro priate departmental sections of this <;::atalog. Academic Minor Programs Academic Minors are offered in the departments of Geology and Mathematics To complete a minor, a student must satisfy the course requirement s found in the departmental sections of this catalog and must satisfy the University requirements found on page 37. In addition the student must earn a grade of C or higher in each course used to meet a minor requirement of de partments of the College of Natural Sciences PRE-MEDICAL SCIENCES The University of South Florida is a rapidly developing center for allied health education. The near by Tampa Veteran's Administration Hospital Florida Mental Health Institute and University Community Hospital are within walking distance of the campus, and offer students excellent opportunities for ob servation, research, and practicum experience A wide variety of undergraduate programs are available, ranging from the pre professional curricula to the bachelor degree programs in Clini cal Chemistry, Health Education Medical Technology Nursing and Social Work. The University of South Florida also offers graduate concentrations in Medical Anthropology (M.A.), COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES 125 Urban Anthropology (M.A.), Clinical Psychology ( Ph D.), Gerontology (M.A ) Medicine (M. D .), Medical Sciences (Ph D .), Rehabilitation Counseling (M.A ) Speech Pathology (M.A.), Speech Audiology (M A.), and Aural (Re) Habilitation (M A.). These programs are offered through five different col leges on campus : Educ ation, Medicine Natural Sciences, Nursing, and Social and Behavioral Sciences. The College of Natural Sciences offers non-degree pro grams in pre-medical sciences pre-veterinary medicine, pre pharmacy and pre-physical therapy The Pre-medical Sciences Program is designed for students seeking entrance into profes sional schools of medicine osteopathy, dentistry optometry or podiatry Students in these programs are assigned to a pre professional adviser who will provide guidance relative to course selection admission procedures and entrance examinations. The Pre : Professional Advising Office maintains a library of ap propriate books and catalogs of professional schools and pro vides pre-professional students with quarterly records of their academic progress The Pre-Medical Sciences Committee also prepares evaluations of students in the program seeking admis sion to professional schools. Students may remain in the Pre Medical Sciences Program until admitted to a professional school or until an alternative program or m ajor ha s been desig nated, even if the time required extends beyond the bac calaureate degree. Pre-Medical Sciences Program The Pre-Medical Sciences non degree Program prepares students for admission to a profe ssiona l school and therefore should be completed by the junior year, the usual time of appli cation. In addition, pre-professional students sho uld major in a discipline of personal preference whether it be in the scie nces or non-sciences, and fulfill all remaining requirement s for gradua tion in the senior year The following pre-professional core should be completed for application to almost all professional schools of medicine osteo pathy dentistry optometry and podiatry : One year of Biology : BSC 2010C (4) BSC 201 IC (4) BSC 2012 (4) Two years of Chemistry : CHM 2045 CHM 2045L CHM 2046 CHM 2046L CHM 2047 CHM 2047L CHM 3210 CHM 3210L CHM 32'11 One year of Physics: PHY 2050 PHY 2050L PHY 2051 PHY 2051L PHY 2052 PHY 2052L One year of Mathematics: MAC 2242 MAC 2243 MAC 2244 (3) (1) (3) (1) (3) (1) (3) (2) (3) (4) (1) (4) (l)' (4) (I) {CHM 2055C or CHM 2056C CHM 3211L CHM 3212 CHM 3212L PHY 3040 PHY 3040L or PHY 3041 PHY 3041L PHY 3042 PHY 3042L (5) (5) (2) (3) (2) (3) (1) (3) (1) (3) (1) l MAC 1104 (4) (4)} MAC 1114 (3) (4) or MAC 3411 (5) (4) MAC 3412 (4) MAC 3413 (4) In addition to these requirements it is generally expected that pre-professional students will complete three quarters of English. CLEP credit generally is not acceptable to profes sio nal schools. Pre-medical students must include the following courses to meet additional admission requirements of medical schools in Florida : PCB 3063 (4) STA 3023 (5) BCH 3033 (4), or CHM 3120C (5), or CHM 3400 (3)

PAGE 17

126 COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES Pre-dental students must take the following additional course to meet adnlission requirements of regional dental schools: CHM 3120 (5) Pre-optometry students should also include the following courses for eligibility at most optometry schools: MCB 3010C(5) STA 3023 (5) PSY 2012 (4) Some professional schools require or recommend additional courses. The following science courses are frequently specified: Biology: MCB 3010C(5) PCB 3063 (4) PCB 4023C (5) Chemistry: PCB 4024C (5) PCB 4253C (5) PCB 4743 (5) PCB 4184C (4) ZOO 3713C (6) BCH 3033 (4) CHM 3401 (3) CHM 3120C (5) CHM 3400 (3) Beyond s cience course requirements and recommendations, it is essentiai that students pursue courses developing a sense of understanding of cultural and humane values, and basic social problems The quality of academic performance in preparation for professional school should be of the highest level. A few well-prepared students with exceptional qualifications may be admitted to some professional schools as early as the completion of the junior year of' pre-professional work. Pre-Veterinary Medicine Program The PreVeterinary Medicine Program is designed to meet admission requirements of the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine, the only veterinary sc hool in the state Admission into veterinary school is highly selective, and to be competitive students should obtain experience working with animals, preferably through volunteer work or employment with a veterinarian. Pre-veterinary students should complete a degree in the major of their choice while including the following en trance requirements: Biology: BSC 2010C (4) BSC 2011 C (4) BSC 2012 (4) PCB 3063 (4) MCB 3010C(5) Chemistry: CHM 2045 (3) CHM 2045L (!) CHM 2046 (3) or CHM 2
PAGE 18

concentration must be in c ourses applicable to a major in that department. The 24 hours in supporting courses must also be taken in courses applicable to a major in that department and must include a minimum of three courses at the 3000 level or above At least a "C" must be earned in each course in both major concentration and supporting courses, except for courses graded S/U only 3. Credit in the following courses : Biology: BSC 2010C (4) BSC 2011 C (4) BSC 2012 (4) Chemistry : CHM 2045 CHM 2045L CHM 2046 CHM 2046L CHM 2047 CHM 2047L CHM 3210 CHM 3210L CHM 3211 Physics: (3) (I) (3) (I) (3) (I) (3) (2) (3) {CHM 2055C or CHM 2056C CHM 3211L CHM 3212 CHM 3212L ( 5) (5) (2) (3) (2) PHY 2050 (4) PHY 3040 (3) PHY 2050L (I) PHY 304,0L (I) PHY 2051 (4) PHY 3041 (3) PHY 2051L ([) or PHY 3041L (I) PHY 2052 (4) PHY 3042 (3) PHY 2052L (I) PHY 3042L (I) 4 A minimum of 30 credits from the following courses: Biology : PCB 3063 (4) PCB 4253C (5) MCB 3010C (5) PCB 4023C (5) ZOO 37!3C(6) PCB 4184C (4) PCB 4024C (5) PCB 4743C (5) Chemistry : BCH 3033 (4) CHM 3401 (3) CHM 3120C (5) CHM 3400 (3) Mathematics : STA 3023 MAC 2242 MAC 2243 MAC 2244 (5) (4) (4) (4) MAC 1104 (4) MAC 1114 (3) or MAC3411 (5) MAC 3412 (4) MAC 3413 (4) 5 Completion of the General Distribution requirements of the College of Natural Sciences as approved by the stu dent's adviser. COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES 127 6. At leas t 45 credit hours with letter grades earned in the College of Natural Sciences 7. The last 45 credit hour s prior to tr a nsfer to a medical or dental sc hool in residence at the University of South Florida. Application for the ba c calaureate degree must be received no later than two years from the d a te of entrance i nto the profes sional school. Post-baccalaureate Pre-Medical Sciences Program A s pecial two-year non-degree program is administered by the Pre-medical Sciences Committee of the College of' Natural Science s for students who hold a baccalaure a te degre e a nd a re seeking to improve their academic record for a pplic atio n to pro fession al sc hool s The program is particular ly for pr eviously re jected applica11ts who need to improve their grade point average and demonstrate their ability to perform well in the sciences Students in the program will have the advantage o'f priority re gistration in the College of Natural Sciences, and upon comple tion of the program will be evaluated by the PreMedical Sc i ences Committee in a letter sent to the professional s chools where students are applying. In order to be admitted to the program, s tudent s must have a baccalaureate degree and be interviewed by the Pre-Medical Sciences Committee Students must d e mon stra te to the Com mittee potential for success through thi s progr am by their recent improvement in academic record performance in scie n ce courses, previous test scores, and motivatio'n for the profession. Students who do not have a ba ccalaurea te d egree from the Uni versity of South Florida must provide two letter s of recomm en dation Once admitted to the program s tudent s must complete a minimum of 15 hour s per quarter (excluding s ummers) of cou r ses approved by the PreMedical Sciences Committee with a minimum grade point average of 3.3 each quarter. An ap proved schedule would typically include a t leas t three rigorous scie nce courses Courses will generally be at the undergraduate level selected from those listed in the pre-medical s ciences program1or other advanced sciences. Student s should expect to complete at lea s t one year in the program prior to re-application to profes sional schools, but additional quarters or a second year m ay be necessary for some students. Students Iack 'ng adequate famil iarity with the profe ssio n will be expected to obtain adequate exposure while enrolled in the program. GRADlJATE LEVEL DEGREE PROGRAMS Progr ams of graduate study are available in every department of the College of Natural Sciences. Students apply for graduate work through the College of Natural Sciences and are recom mended for admission by the department in which they intend to concentrate. A dep a rtmental committee is appointed which supervises and guides the program of the candidate. The general University requirement s for graduate work at the mas ter's level are given on page 46 and for the Ph.D degree on page 51. The specific requirements for each dep a rtment are listed under that de partment below. For further information regarding admission and the availability of fellowships and assistantships a candidate should write to the appropriate departmental chairperson, Uni versity of South Florida T a mpa, Florida 33620. Master's Degree Programs The College of Natural Sciences offers graduate programs lead ing to the Master of Arts degree in th e fields of Botany (BO'D, Mathematics (MTH), Microbiology (MIC), Physics (PHY), and Zoo logy (ZOO); and a Master of Science degree in Chemistry (CHM), Geology (GL Y), and Marine Science (MSC). Doctor's Degree Programs The College of Natur a l Sciences offers three program s leading to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy : Biolo gy (B/0)-Thi s program leads to the Ph.D. in Biol ogy including the fields of Marine Biology, Syst e matic s Behavior Ecology and Physiolog y . Chemistry (CHM)-This program leads to the Ph.D i n Chemistry, i ncluding the fields of Analytical Biochemi s try, Inorganic, Organic and Physical Chemistry. Mathematics (MTH)-This program le a ds to the Ph. D in Pure and Applied Mathematics Oceanography (OCE)-This cooperative program with Florida State Univer s ity leads to the Ph.D. in Oceanog raphy College Regulations Governing Graduate Study The following regul a tions are in addition to the University regu lations governing grad uate stu d y found o n pages 46 -51.

PAGE 19

128 COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES Admission. The College of Natural Sciences requires a minimum of a B" average in the last two years of under graduate work and a minimum of 1000 (1100 for marine science applicants) on the Graduate Record Examination for admission to any of its graduate programs. Applicants with a "B" average in the last two years of undergraduate work or a minimum of 1000 on the Graduate Record examination may be considered for provisional admission subject to departmental recommendation. Applicants who do not meet either of the above conditions must meet the 10% exception criteria described on page 46 and must have the recommendation of the department offering the degree to be considered for provisional admission. Enrollment Levels. A student who enrolls in eight or more credit hours leading to a graduate degree is classified as a fulltime student. Once a major professor has been assigned and /or. a student occupies or utilizes significant space or facilities for research or analogous scholarly activity directly. pertinent to the generation of his/her thesis, he /she shall enroll for not less than three hours of research and/or thesis and / or dissertation each quarter other than the summer quarter except that no student shall be required for the purposes of this rule to enroll for more than eight hours total. Additional requirements may be imposed in any depart ment in the college. A student mus t be regi ste red for an appropriate load (in no case fewer than three hours) in the college for the quarter in which all degree requirements are satisfactorily completed. Registration in Research, Th1l5is, and /or Dissertation Courses. Regi s tration in courses entitled Directed Research : Master s, or Dissertation : Doctoral must be with the approval of the major professor and the concurrence of the departmental graduate studies coordinator and must be commensurate with each s tudent's research plan A s tudent who enrolls in courses entitled Thesis : Master's but doe s not submit a thesis or who enrolls in Dissertation : Doctoral but does not submit a dis s erta tion will not be certified for graduation. Master's Pro g ram A graduate student working on a master's degree in a program in the College of Natural Sciences which requires a thesis must register in course 6971 when engaged in research data collection, or writing activities relevant to the master' s thesis. Advisers should assign the number of credits in this course appropriate to the demands made on faculty, staff, and university facilities, but in no event will the total number of earned thesis credits be less than nine Ph D Program. Following admission to candidacy, a graduate student in a Ph.D. program in the College of Natural Sciences must enroll in course 7980 when engaged in research, data collection or writing activities relevant to doctoral dissertation. Adviser s should assign the number of credits in this course appropriate to the demands made on faculty, staff, and university facilities but in no event will the total number of earned dissertation credits be less than 24. Students not admitted to candidacy are not eligible to enroll in 7980. All Graduate Students. Students in a graduate program in the College of Natural Sciences must be either active or on a leave of absence granted by the department. Students on active status must register for a minimum of one hour of graduate level course work each quarter. During any quarter that a student is utilizing research space, other university facilities, faculty/staff time, or com. pleting any requirements for the degree including thesis (dis sertation) defense or approval, the student must register for a minimum of three graduate credit hours. A maximum of 15 credit hours (nine for physics graduate students) of combined thesis research and seminar courses may apply towards a degree. Additional Regulations. Additional regulations concerning graduate study may be found in the departmental sections of thi s Catalog or are on file in the Office of the Dean The student i s responsible for meeting all requirements of his / lier degree pro gram TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS The College of Natural Sciences offers B.A and M.A degree programs for s econdary school teachers and the M .A. degree for junior college teachers. B.A. Degree Program for Secondary School Teachers: The College of Natural Sciences in cooperation with the College of Education offers degree programs in Mathematics (MAE) in Botany (BOE) in chemistry (CHE), in Physics (PHE), in Zoology (ZOE) and in Science (SCE). Because requirements exist in both colleges, a student will have an ad viser in each college. At the outset the planned courses in mathematics and science must be approved by the student's ad viser in the College of N a tural Sciences There are two options available to the student to satisfy the s cience portion of the program : I The student may complete the requirements of the de partmental major Departmental majors in Botany and Zoology may be found in thi s sec tion of the catalog under the heading Biology. The departmental requirements of Chemistry Mathematics, and Physics are found in this section of this catalog under the re s pective headings in Chemistry, Mathematics and Physics. 2. The student may complete requirements of the Interdisc iplinary Natural Sciences major with concentration in Biology Chemistry Phy sics, and Mathematics. A complete descripti o n of this major is found on page 133. This major is particularly appropriate for Science Edu cation major s (SCE) Prospective students should consult the College of Education portions of this catalog under the heading "Science Edu cation (SCE) for the required education courses and sample programs M.A. Degree Program for Secondary School Teachers: The College of Natural Sciences in cooperation with the College of Education offers the M A degree in Mathematic s (MAE) and in Science (SCE). In science, concentrations are available in Biology Chemistry and Pi1ysics. Because require ments exist in both colleges the student will have an adviser in each college At the outset the planned courses in mathematics and science must be approved by the student's adviser in the College of Natural Sciences The University requirements for the M.A. degree are found on page 46 Mathematics major s must complete a minimum of 51 quarter ho4rs; scii:nce majors must complete at least 27 quarter hours in the discipline of concentration For requirements in education the student should consult the College of Education portion of this catalog entitled "Master's Level Degree Pro grams-Science Education (SCE).'' M.A. Degree Program for Junior College Teachers: The M A degree program for junior college teacher s is available in the College of Natural Sciences with specialization s in biology, chemistry, geology, mathematics or physics. The student may complete the M.A degree in a progr a m offered jointly by the College of Natural Sciences and the Col-

PAGE 20

lege of Education. This program requires 36 hours in mathe matics or science specialization courses which must be approved by the student's adviser in the College of Natural Sciences ; 9 hours are required in Professional Education courses and 1-9 COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES 129 hours are required in internship depending on the amount of teaching experience of the student. For requirements in edu cation, the student should consult the College of Education por tion of the catalog entitled "Junior College Teaching Program." CURRICULA BIOLOGY (BIO/BOT/MIC/ZOO) In addition to a set of basic courses in biology, students must have a thorough preparation in other areas of natural sci ences in order to be competitive for jobs or for further study beyond the baccalaureate. A modern biology curriculum is built on a foundation of mathematics, chemistry and physics Four specific Bachelor of Arts degrees (Biology, Botany, Microbiology, and Zoology) are available for students interested in the biological sciences. They are all preparatory for careers in teaching, agriculture, medicine, dentistry marine biology, biotechnology, or for post-graduate study in any of the various life sciences. The Department attempts to schedule sequences of 5000 level courses which allow seniors in the Biology program to concentrate in such areas as: Ecology, Cell & Molecular Biol ogy, Physiology and Marine Biology. Students should study the requirements listed below and then make maximum use of the vigorous advising program maintained by the Department in structuring their total program A reading knowledge of a mod ern foreign language (German, French, or Russian ) is strongly recommended for those who intend to enter graduate school. Requirements for the B.A. Degree: I. Department of Biology Courses A. Biolo gy Core Courses (Required for all B.A. degrees 35 or 36 er.) BSC 2010C (4) BSC 2011C (4) BSC 2012 (4) PCB 3063 (4) PCB 4023C (5) PCB 4024C (5) PCB 4043C (4) Physiology (choice of course for all programs aG indi cated): BOT 4503 (3) MCB 4030L (3) and MCB 4404 (3) PCB 4734C (5) B Individuat'D egree Requir emen ts BIOLOGY MAJOR (BIO) (25 er. hrs.) 25 credit hours in Biology department courses in con sultation with adviser (maximum of 5 hours in BSC 4910) . BOTANY MAJOR (BOT) (20 er. hrs.) BOT 3010 (5) BOT 4503 (0) Other BOT courses (15) MICROBIOLOGY MAJOR (MIC) (26-27 er. hrs.) APB 4053C (5) or PCB 5235C (4) MCB 3010C (5) MCB 4115 (4) or MCB 5206 (4) MCB 4163L (3) MCB 4505C (4) MCB 40301:.. (0) MCB 4404 (0) MCB 4934 (1) and one of the following : APB 5575C (5) BOT 5405C (5) ZOO 5235C (5) BOT 4434C (5) NOTE: Every microbiology maj or should obtain a r ecom mended course sequence from a member of the microbiolo gy faculty in order to avoid pos sible schedule problems. ZOOLOGY MAJOR (ZOO) (15 er. hrs ) PCB 4253C (5) ZOO 3203C (5) or ZOO 3823C (5) PCB 4743C (0) and any one lab course in vertebrate .biology (5) D. Supporting Courses in the Natural Sciences (Required for all CHM 2045 (3) B A degrees 42 or 44 er.) I CHM 2045L (I) .CHM 2046 (3) {CHM 2055C (5) CHM 2046L (I) or CHM 2056C (5) CHM 2047 (3) CHM 2047L (I) CHM 3210 (3) PHY 2050 (4) .CHM 3210L (2) PHY 2050L (I) CHM 3211 (3) PHY 2051 (4) CHM 3211L (2) PHY 2051L (I) Mathematics (12) Three courses in mathematics chosen from the fol lowing to attain 12 credits: MAC 2242 (4) MAC 3412 (4) MAC 2243 (4) MAC 3413 (4) MAC (4) MAC 3414 (4) MAC3411 (5) MAS3103 (4) MGF 2202 (4) STA 3023 (5) STA 3404 (5) III. General Distributioo Requirements (Required for all B. A Degrees, 60 er.) Each student is required to satisfy the General Distribution requirements of the College of Natural Sciences (see page 124.) The selection of courses within the r e quirement is to be done in conference with Biology Department advisers. IV. Liberal Education Electives The student must satisfy 24 hours of liberal education electives as described in item 3 of the graduation requirements of the College of Natural Sciences. (See page 124. ) V. Free Electives (including General Distribution waivers) can be taken over and above m ajo r requirements and major electives to complete a 180 hour program_. Teacher Education Programs: For information concerning the degree programs for secon dary school teachers and junior college teachers, see pages 95 and 86 of this Catalog Marine Biology The field of marine biology is especially important in Florida and there is a good demand for trained personnel. Several faculty members in the department teach courses and conduct research in this area. Undergraduates interested in specializing in marine biology may do so by taking marine-oriented courses offered }\'ithin the department. Appropriate courses include : BOT 5185C (Marine Botany) BOT 5405C (Phycology) ZOO 3203C (Introductory Invertebrate Zoology) ZOO 5285C (Echinoderm Biology) ZOO 5455C (Ichthyology) ZOO 5555C (Marine Animal Ecology) ZOO 5815C (Zoogeography) The Biology department offers M.A degrees and the Ph.D. de gree which allow specialization in marine biology.

PAGE 21

130 COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES Requirements for the M.A. Degree: General requirements for graduate work are given on page 46. Major programs are offered in Botany, Microbiology and Zoology The M A degree require s completion of structured coursework a research the s i s or a review paper and passing a comprehen s ive examination. It is expected that students will have had undergraduate training comparable to that of a USF undergraduate in biology Any deficiencies completed after admission to the graduate pro gram cannot be u s ed to complete graduate requirements. The departmental graduate coordinator functions as the stu dent's adviser until the student make s a rrangements for a faculty member to serve as major ad v iser The selection of a major adviser include s acceptance of the student by the faculty member. The major a dvi s er and two additional faculty constitute the student' s supervi s ory c ommittee which must be established within three quarters after matriculation. Failure to do so will be cause for dismi s sal. The s upervisory committee must be ap proved by the departmental chairper son ajtd the college dean For s tudent s enrolled in the thesi s program, a 45 credit hour minimum is required at the 5000-6000 level ; 24 mus t be at the 6000 level or above; 30 of the 45 credit hours must be in formally structured course s of which 22 musi be biology ; 12 of the 22 credit hours must be a t the 6000 level or above. All students in the the s i s program must complete the graduate seminar (BSC 6935) A maximum of 15 hour s of combined the sis, research and s eminar m a y apply toward degree For s tudent s enrolled in the non-thesis program a 45 credit hour minimum i s required at the 5000-6000 level ; 40 credits must 1:\e in form a lly structured courses 24 credits must be at the 6000 level or above ; 22 mus t be in biology. A final comprehensive examination on basic biology is re quired for all s tud e nt s This examination is open to all depart mental faculty and i s normally taken after tl\_C completion of for mal cour s e work and at lea s t one quarter before thesis presenta tion. In some cases the ability to translate pertinent scientific literature from a foreign language mus t be demonstrated before taking the comprehen s ive ex a mination Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree: General requirement s are g i ven on page 51. A doctoral program in biology i s offered Areas of speciali zation for the Ph D are marine biology ecology (tropical ecol ogy population ecology and physiological ecology) physiology ( c ellular physiology microbi a l physiology neurophysiology), systein a tic s and behavior. It i s expected that student s will have had undergraduate training comparable to that of a USF undergraduate in biology Any deficiencies completed after admission to the graduate pro gram can not be used to complete graduation requirements The departmental graduate coordinator functions as the stu dent s a dvi ser until the student makes arrangements for a faculty member to serve a s major advi s er. The selection of a major advi s er includes acceptance of the student by the faculty member and must be done within three quarters after matriculation. Applicant s are s trongly urged to contact faculty conducting re search in the student s area s of interest. The major adviser and four addition a l faculty constitute the student s supervisory committee. The s upervisory committee must be approved by the dep a rtmental chairman and the college dean. Thirty credit hour s are required in structured graduate-level course s, as well as any additional courses necessary to the needs of the student' s program as determined by the supervisory com mittee A maximum of nine liours may be waived with the ap proval of the supervisory committee if the student has earned thi s amount of graduate credit at another recognized university Individual s who receive the M A degree from the Department of Biology at US F may waive 15 credits with the approval of the s upervi s ory committee. A total of 135 credits above the baccalaureate inust be earned ; this includes any graduate credit earned prior to admission to the doctoral program. A diagnostic examination is required of all doctoral students the first quarter after matriculation ; the examination covers molecular, cellular, organismal, and supra-organismal biology. On the basis of this examination a student may be required to take courses in areas in which he is found deficient. Doctoral students must pass a qualifying examination. The written preliminary portion covering the major areas of biology and the oral advanced portion in the student's general field must be takenwithin six quarters after matriculation. Any language or other technical skills required by the supervisory committee must be within six quarters after matriculation. If the doctoral degree is not awarded within-five years after passing the qualifying examination the examination must be retaken and passed. The student is eligible for admission to candidacy after completion of structured course requirements and passing the qualifying examination, upon rec ommendation of the super visory committee and approval of the Dean of th e College and the Director of Graduate Studies Students must complete all requirements for adm i ssion to candidacy by the end of the second year after matriculation A public seminar presenting the dissertation is required A final oral examination administered and evaluated by the super visory committee emphasizes the dissertation and the student's general field of research. Graduate Application Deadlines: Applications must be completed by Febru a ry 15 for Quarter I applicants who wish to be considered for assistantships. All other applications must be completed by the fourth week of the quarter preceding the one for which you are applying. (CHS/CHM/CHC) The Department of Chemistry offers three degrees at the baccalaureate level, Bachelor of Arts degree in Chemistry Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry, and Bachelor of Sci ence degree in Clinical Chemistry and two degrees Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy each with specialization in the areas of analytical chemistry, biochemistry inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, and physical chemistry, at the graduate level. The chemistry facuhy is comprised of27 full-time senior faculty members, all of whom hold the Ph.D. degree. A comparable number of teaching as s istants, generally graduate students enrolled in the Ph.D. program, serve as instructors in the laboratories. The combination of a large and strong faculty with a wide variety of courses and electives provides students with programs of study which can be tailored to. fit individual needs while maintaining a sound background in all general aspects of chemistry The Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry (CHS) is a rigorous program which supplies the foundation in chemistry re quired for both the student who begins a chemical vocation im mediately upon graduation as well as the one who pursues ad vanced study in chemistry or related areas. In ac c ord with this goal the curriculum for the B S. degree meets the requirements for degree certification by the Amencan Chemical Society. The Bachelor of Arts degree (CHM) provides a course of study designed for the student who does not intend to become a professional chemist but whose career goals require a thorough understanding of chemistry Inherent in this program is a hjgh degree of flexibility which permits tailoring a course of study to the student's own educational objectives As such it offers con siderable advantages to pre-professional students planning careers in medicine and the other health-related fields and an excellent preparation for primary and secondary school tea c hers of chemistry or physical science. The B.A student whose goals change in the direction of graduate work in cheffiistry should supplement this curriculum by addition and/or substitution of a selection of advanced courses from the B.S. program. .

PAGE 22

The Bachelor of Science degree in Clinical Chemistry ( C HC) offered by the Department of Chemistry one of only a few such programs in the country, is specifically designed to train person nel for this new and growing field of the medical profession ; however the strong scie n tific background and specific technical expertise provided by this program also afford t h e st u dent an excellent preparation for graduate study in clinical chemistry, biochemistry1 or medicine Interested students should see the Coordinator of the C l inical Chemi s try Program in the Depart ment of Chemistry for further information In graduate work, the excellent physical facilities and very low student-teacher ratio combine to afford unique opportunities for advanced study in chemistry. In addition to the five tradi tional fields, analytical chemistry, biochemistry inorganic, or ganic, and ph ysica l chemistry, research oppor tu nities are also avai l ab l e i n such inte rdis ciplinary and specialized areas as bio organic and bio-i n organic chemistry, cli n ical chemistry, en vironmental c h emistry, lasers and photoc h emistry marine chemistry, photoe l ectro n spectroscopy (ESCA) and phar maceutical chemistry Requirements for the Baccalaureate Degrees I. Chemist r y C ou rses B.A. CH EMIST R Y (CHM) (54 er. hrs.) CHM 2045 (3) CHM 2045L (I) CHM 2046 (3) CHM 2046L (1) CHM 2047 (3) CHM 2047L (I) CHM 3120C (5) CHM 3210 (3) CHM 3210L (2) CHM 3211 (3) CHM 3211L (2) CHM 3212 (3) { CHM 2055 or CHM 2056C CHM 3212L CHM,3400 CHM 3401 CHM 3402C CHM 361 0C (5) (5) (2) (3) (3) (2) (5) Chemistry electives (3000 level or above; may include not more than one hour of CHM 4970) (8) B.S. CHEMISTRY (CHS) (65 er. hrs.) BCH 3033 (4) CHM 2045 (3) CHM 2045L (l) CHM 2046 (3) CHM 2046L (I) CHM 2047 (3) CHM 2047L (I) CHM 3120C (5) CHH 3210 (3) CHM 3210L (2) CHM 3211 (3) CHM 321 IL (2) CHM 3212 (3) CHM 3212L (2) CHM 4130C (4) { CHM 2055C or CHM 2056C CHM 4131C CHM 4132C CHM 4410 CHM 4411 CHM 4412 CHM 4610 CHM 4931 B.S. C L INICAL CHEMISTRY (CHC) (66 er. hrs.) BCH 3 033 (4) BCH 30331,.. (3), CHM 2045 (3) CHM 2045L (1) CHM 2046 (3) rHM 2055C CHM 2046L (I) or CHM 2056C CHM 2047 (3) CHM 2047L (I) CHM 3120C (5) CHM 4410 CHM 3210 (3) CHM 4412 CHM 3210L (2) CHS 4100C CHM 3211 I (3) CHS 4300 CHM 3211 L (2) CHS 4301L (5) (5) (4) (4) (4) (4) (4) (4) (I) (5) (5) (4) (4) (4) (4) (2) CO L LEGE OF NATURAL S CIEN CES 131 CHM 3212 CHM 321 2L (3) (2) CHS 4302 CHS 4310C (5) (4) CHM 2055CHM 2056C (10) m ay be s ubstituted for C HM 2045 CHM 2046, C HM 2047 and CHM 2045L. CHM 2046L, CHM 2047L (12). This redu ces by two the credit h ours of required chemi s try courses in each degree program II. S u p p orting Co u rses in the N a tural Sci ences B.A. CHEMlSTRY (CHM) (35 er. hrs. ) MAC 2243 (4) PHY 2050L(l) PHY 2052 (4) MAC 2244 (4) PHY 2051 (4) PHY 2052L(I) PHY 2050 (4) PHY 2051L(l) Electives (must be acceptab l e for credit towards a Natural Science College discipline major) (12) B.S. CLINICAL C H EMISTRY (CHC) (54-60 er. hrs.) BSC 2010C (4) COC 3300 BSC 2011C (4) COP 3110 BSC 201 2 (4) MAC 3281 MAC 3282 MAC 3283 MCB 3010C PCB 3700 PHY 2050 PHY 2050L PHY 2051 PHY 2051L PHY 2052 PHY 2052L or (3) (5) (4) or (4) ( l) (4) or (I) (4) (I) l MAC 341 1 MAC 341 2 MAC 3413 PHY 4744C PCB 4743C PHY 3040 PHY 3040L PHY 3041 PHY 3041L PHY 3042 PHY 3042L B.S CHEMIS TR Y (CHS) (29-32 er. hrs.) (3) (3) (5) (4) ( 4 ) (4) (5) (3) (l) (3) (I) (3) (I) MAC 3281 (4) MAC 3411 (5) MAC 3282 (4) MAC 3412 (4) MAC 3283 (3) or MAC 3413 (4) MAC 3284 (3) MAC 341 4 (4) PHY 3040 PHY 3040L PHY 3041 Physic s elective 3020) (3) PHY 3041L (I) PHY 3042 (3) PHY 3042L (3000-4000 leve l except III. General D i strib u tio n Co u rses (60 er. hrs excluding waivers) (I) (3) ( l) PHY (3) The s tudent is required to complete the General Distribu tion req u irement s of the College of Natural Sciences (see page 124) IV. Libera l Educa tion E lectives T h e st u dent must satisfy 24 h ours of liberal education e l ec tive s as de s cribed in item 3 of the grad u atio n req u ireme nts of the College of Natural Sciences. (See page 124.) V. Free Electives t (including General Distribution waivers) B.A CHEMISTRY (CHM) ; 43 er. hrs B.S. CHEMISTRY (CHS) ; 34-37 er. hrs. B S CLINICAL CHEMISTRY ( CHC) ; 6-12 er. h rs. The required sequence of Chemist r y co u rses shou l d be started immediate l y in the freshman year a n d the mathema t ics and physic s requiremen t s should be completed before t h e j u nior year so that CHM 3400 (B.A. degree) or CHM 4410 ( B .S d egr ee) can be commenced at that tim e t Student s t aki n g CHM 2055C-2056C must add 2 more hour s o f free e lecti ves. Transfer Credit It i s strongly recommended that students transferring from community / junior c olleges to the University of South F l orida complete whole se quence s of chemistry courses, such as genera l and organic chemistry, before the transfer. Eve n though courses may carry the same common course number topics may vary sufficiently from sc hool to schoo l to leave the transfer s t udent ill-prepared to proceed within a sequence.

PAGE 23

\ 132 COLLEGE OF NA TUR AL SCIENCES Teacher Education Programs: For information concerning the degree programs for s econ dary school tea c her s and junior college teachers see pages 95 and 86 of thi s Catalog Requirements for the M.S. Degree: General requirements for graduate work are given on page 46. All entering graduate s tudents who have no advanced work beyond a B A or B.S. will be required to take the core courses iri each of five areas : Analytical Biochemistry Inorganic Organic and Physic a l Chemistry. This requirement can be waived by recommendation of the supervisory committee on the basis of past work, performance on a diagnostic test or substitutiop of more comprehensive and advanced courses. The required core courses are : BCH 5065 CHM 5425 CHM 5621 CHM 6150 CHM 5225 Qualifying Requirements All entering graduate s tudents will be required to pass Qual ifying Examinations in three of the five divisional areasAnalytical, Biochemistry Inorganic Organic and Physical Chemistry which are set during the week prior to enrollment. Students failing to qu a lify by examination in a particular area will be required to obtain at least a grade of B in an undergraduate course determined by the appropriate division Qualifying re quirements must be completed within one calendar year (4 quar ters) of initial enrollment. Course Requirements Each st1.1dent is required to p ass graduate (5000) level core courses (4 quarter hours each) in all five divisional areas These cour s es will constitute the Comprehen s ive Examination and contribute to the minimum course requirement of 45 quarter hour s of which 24 quarter hours must be at the 6000 level with 15 of these in formal regularly scheduled courses. However a graduate s tudent may not take a core course or any other graduate cour s e in a given area until he / she has qualified in that area or has met the above qualifying requirements. Final Thesis Defense Upon completion of the thesis research and preliminary ap proval of the thesis by the supervisory committee, the M S can didate will be orally examined by the committee on the results of his / her re s earch Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree Qualifying Requirements Each student will be required to pass Qualifying Examina tions in four of the five divisional areas-Analytical, Biochem istry, Inorganic Organic and Physical Chemistry-during the week prior to enrollment ; and two of these examinations (one of which is in the s tudent's major area) must be pas s ed with dis tinction. Students failing to qualify by examination in a particular area will be required to obtain a grade of B (pass) or A (pass with distinction) in a n undergraduate c our s e to be determined by the appropriate division Qualifying requirements must be com pleted within one caleQdar year (4 quarters) of initial enrollment Course Requirements E ac h student is required to pass graduate core courses of 4 quarter hour s each at the 5000 level in all five divisional are as. These will contribute to the m i nimum course requirement of 135 quarter hours of which 16 must be in structured 6000-level chemistry courses However a gradu a te student may not take a core course or any other gradu a te course in a given area until he/she has qualified in that area or ha s met the qualifying re quirement s for the Ph.D. degree Language Requirements A reading knowledge of the chemical literature in any two of the languages-German, Russian and French (or any other lan guage approved as appropriate by the supervisory committee) must be demonstrated. As an a lternative to one or both of the language requirements the student may demonstrate proficiency in skills or specializations outside the dis cipline of chemistry but pertinent to scholarly work in chemi s try Major Comprehensive Examination A comprehensive examination must be passed in the s tu dent's area of specialization Thi s examination must be taken one year before graduation Admission to Candidacy Completion of the foregoing requirements admits the stu dent to candidacy for the Ph .D. The supervisory committee of doctoral students must evaluate the student for admission into candidacy by the end of the three years (nine quarters after matriculation.) If the com mittee doe s not recommend admission to candidacy by that time it may dismiss the student or grant an extension for the immediately subsequent quarter. At the end of the additional quar ter (the 10th quarter enrollment excluding summers), the com mittee must recommend that the student be admitted to candi d a cy or dismissed from the program Final Dissertation Defense When the Supervisory Committee has ins pected the final draft (final unbound form; typewritten and ready for duplication with the excep_tion of possible minor corrections) of the disserta tion and finds it suitable for presentation the '1Major Professor will complete a form requesting the scheduling and announcing of the final oral examination The request form will be submitted via the department chairperson to the College Dean and the Director of Graduate Studies for approval. The final oral ex amination must be held at least three weeks before the end of the quarter in which the student is to be awarded the degree The required copies of the completed dissertation sign!!d by the Committee must be received by the Director of Graduate Studies at least two weeks before the end of the quarter. The Examination Committee shall consist of a chairperson and the members of the student s Supervisory Comm i ttee in cluding the Major Professor(s) The Chairperson of the Ex amination Committee s hall be appointed by the Dean of the College and shall not be a member of the student's Supervisory Committee or the department or program in which the degree is sought. The candidate may expect questions concerning the details and significance of the research after the oral presentation which is open to the public. Final approval of the candidate's degree will require approval by a majority of the Examining Committee which shall include the Chairperson. GEOLOGY (GLY) Geology is one of the broadest of all sciences because of its dependence qn fundamentals of biology, chemistry, mathe inatics, and physic s as applied to the study of the earth. As a result, undergraduate students are expected to obtain a broad background in the other sciences as well as a concentration in geology This bachelor's degree program is designed to provide the geology major with a broad foundation that will prepare him for employment in industry or with various governmental agen cies as well as the necessary training to continue study in graduate school The graduate program in geology allows the student to spe cialize in nearly all of the major areas of concentration. Because of the geographic and geolqgic location of the University in a rapidly expanding urban center of coastal Florida there are a number of areas of specialization which are being emphasized Tl\ese include coastal geology hydrogeology, low temperature and pollution geochemistry, applied geophysics, geology of car bonate rocks a nd phosphate deposits. All of these are closely related to local problems of the environment. Requirements for the B.A. Degree: I. Geology Courses (51 er. hrs.) GL Y 2016 (4) GL Y 3400 (4) GL Y 2017 (4) GL Y 3610 (5) GLY 4210 (4) GLY 4220 (4)

PAGE 24

GL Y 2100 (4) GL Y 4200 (4) GL Y 4550 (4) GL Y structured electives (12) A minimum of 2 er. hrs. from : GLY 4920 (I) CHM 2045 (3) CHM 2045L (I) CHM 2046 (3) {CHM 2055C CHM 2046L (I) or CHM 2056C CHM 2047 (3) CHM 2047L (I) (5) (5) II. Supporting Courses (34-41 cr. lhrs.) Three courses in mathematics chosen from the following to attain 12 credits : MAC 2243 (4) MAC 2244 (4) MAC 3411 (5) MAC 3412 (4) MAC 3413 (4) MAC 3281 MAC 3282 MAC 3283 MAS 3103 STA 3023 (4) (4) (3) (4) (5) PHY 2050 (4) PHY 3040 (3) PHY 4Q50L (!) PHY 3040L (I) PHY3041 (3) -PHYi Z051L (I) or PHY 3041L (!) PHY 2052 (4) PHY 3042 (3) PHY 2052L (I) PHY 3042L (!) UJ. General Distribution Courses (60 er. hrs. excluding waivers ) The student is required to satisfy the General Distribution requirements of the College of Natural Sciences. (See page 124. ) IV. Liberal Education Electives The student must satisfy 24 hours of liberal education elec tives as described in item 3 of the graduation requirements of the College of Natural Sciences (see page. 124. ) V. Free Electives (Including Distribution waivers) (40-47 er. hrs ) The student will choose, in consultation with his Geology adviser, such courses in the College of Natural Sciences that support his major interest in the field of Geology. Courses in computer programming and additional Mathematics are of particular value Those students who anticipate continuing for a doctorate in graduate school are encouraged to take a foreign language, preferably French, German, or Russian. All geology majors are strongly urged to take a course in technical writing and to attend a summer field camp. An entering student anticipating a major in Geology is advised to enroll in: GL Y 2016 CHM 2045 CHM 2046L GL Y 2017 CHM 2045L CHM 2047 GL Y 2100 CHM 2046 CHM 2047L in the freshman year and to seek curriculum counseling with a Geology adviser. Minor in Geology A minor in geology consists of 24 credit hours and must include GL Y 2016, 2017 and 2100. Additonal courses approved by the geology adviser, are designed to complement the student's major program. Only those courses which are acceptable toward the major in geology may be used toward the minor. Teacher Education Prospective elementary and .secondary school teachers de siring to teach science should include basic courses in Geology and related sciences as part.of their curriculum Requirements for the M.S. Degree: Requirements for admission to the Divison of Graduate Studies and general graduate curriculum guidelines are given on page46. Students are admitted for graduate work in Geology if they present the requisite background in Geology and supporting sci ences. The bachelor's degree with a major in Geology or a major COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES 133 in other sciences with strong supporting pro8ram in geosciences is required. Students who wish to enter the graduate program in Geology without the proper background will be required to take some undergraduate courses without receiving credit toward their master s program. In addition a formal summer field course or equivalent professional experience is required. The curriculum for a Geology graduate student will vary depending on the area of interest of the individual. Course work for the degree will be determined by the thesis committee after consultation with the student. A minimum of 45 credit hours (excluding GL Y 6940) is required for the master's degree of which a minimum of24 credits must be in courses numbered 6000 or above All graduate students must take Graduate Seminar ( GL Y 6931) at least three times and GL Y 6933 two times. All students must complete one course ii;i each of the following areas ; geochemistry, geophysics, geostatistics and igne ous and metamorphic petrology or their equivalents. All full-time students must register for at least one structured course per quarter during their first two years. A written thesis in the student's field of specialization is required. A comprehensive oral qualifying exam is to be taken by the end of the third quarter in the program An oral thesis defense and a public presentation of the thesis are also required. INTERDISCIPLINARY NATURAL SCIENCES (INS) The Bachelor of Arts in the Interdisciplinary Natural Sciences major is designed for majors in an interdisciplinary pro gram in the college and for majors in Science Education and Mathematics Education. For information on teacher certification in science or mathematics, prospective teachers should consulf the section entitled Teacher Education Programs on page 128, and also consult the College of Education section of the catalog The requirements for graduation for this degree are the same as those contained on page 124 except that item I of the require ment is altered as follows: la. Completion of a major program consisting of a minimum of 68 hours in College of Natural Sciences courses In these hours there must be a minimum of 36 credit hours in a discipline of major concentration and a minimum of 24 credit hours in supporting courses in the College of Natural Sciences outside the discipline of major con centration All courses in the major program must be applicable to a major in that department and must have the approval of the student's adviser. At least three of the supporting courses must be at the 3000 level or above The student must earn a grade of "C" or better in each course in the major concentration and in each supporting course MARINE SCIENCE (MSC) Marine Science has been designated by the Board of gents and the University as an academic Center of Excellence, the first such Center for USF. The Department is devoted to research, graduate training, and public service in oceanography. It is located on a peninsula at Bayboro Harbor adjacent to downtown St. Petersburg. Headquarters for the newly organized Florida Institute for Oceanography are located in the same building as the Depart ment of Marine Science. FIO serves faculty members doing re search in oceanography at all of the institutions in the State Uni versity System It provides ship time, utilizing the 65' R I V Bellows, and a variety of shipboard equipment. The Department owns a number of small boats vehicles, and other field equipment. Its specialized laboratories include those for trace metal work, water quality organic and isotppe geochemistry optical oceanography, particle dynamics, sedimentology micropaleontology bent hie ecology marine physiaJogy phycology bacteriology ichthyology and plank tonology

PAGE 25

134 COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES Student Admission Prospective students with baccalaureate degrees in biology chemistry geology or physics generally possess an adequate course work background for undertaking graduate studies in marine science Those with such degree s who have a n upper level, undergraduate grade point ave rage of 3 0 or better and a Graduate Record Examination s core of 1100 or more ( verbal+ quantitative part s ) are encouraged to apply for the Maste r of Science Program Admi s sion to the Ph D Program will be more selective than for the M.S. Program In addition to meeting the GPA and GRE standards noted above other factors such a s the research inter est of the prospective student and the availability of suitable laboratory space and equipment will be considered The Department has graduate s cholarship and assistantship funds at its disposal and most of the individual faculty members are able to hire student s to work part time on research grants. Tho s e in need of financial support beginning at the start of the academic year in September are urge.d to have their applications completed by March 1. Award s of scholarships and assistant ships will generall y be announced on April I. Admi ss ions materials for student s entering Quarter IV or I s hould reach the Department by March 1 ; for those wishing to enter Quarter II and III, material s should be in by October 15. Departmental regulations govern ing the graduate program are detailed in the Student Handbook available in the departmental office .. Requirements for the M.S. General requirements are given on page s 46-51. A minimum of 45 credits must include OCC OCG 5050, OCP 5051, and OCB 5050. The student may emphasize biological chemical, geological, or physical oceanography through his thesis research and course work A thesis i s required but a foreign language is not. Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree: The Ph.D. in Oceanography is offered in cooperation with the Department of Oceanography a t Florida State Uni v ers i ty Students may apply to USF and if a ccepted, will work under a USF professor. A studenfs committee will be comprised of fa culty members from both ins titutions Res i dency requirements three quarter s of consecutive course work in which the stu dent must register for 12 hours may be met on either campus A minimum of 135 hours after the bachelor's degree is required. Student s with exceptional qualification s may be accepted to work directly toward the Ph D. without first earning the M S Degree. However ; in most case s the master' s degree will be a prerequisite The latter may have been earned in marine science or one of the related areas, i e., biology chemi s try, geology or physics An adviser will be appointed by the chairperson of the USF Department for each student during his first quarter of resi dency By the third quarter ofresidency a major professo r shall be selected Designation of the major professor will be made by the Department chairperson upon a recommendation from the student and faculty member concerned Any member of the graduate facult y at either university (USF or FSU) may serve on a doctoral committee but the majority must have doctoral directive status Each committee will consist of at least five faculty members. One member of the doctoral committee shall be from a science department outside Marine Science or Oceanography. The committee appointment shall be by agreement between the two department chairpersons (USF and FSU) The s tudent's doctoral committee will supervise the written and oral examinations for admission to Ph.D. candidacy The qualifying examination will be open to the faculty of both institu tion s with que s tions solicited from the entire faculty. The doc toral committee will also conduct the dissertation defen s e which will be open to the general faculty. The chairperson of the final exanilnat i on shall be someone outside either department; a s emi nar will be presented by the candidate beforehand. MA THEMATICS (MTH) The Department of Mathematics offers a diversity of courses designed not only to enabl,e the student to pursue a pro fes s ion in mathematics itself, but also to enhance his compe tence in the fields of engineering,. the physical sciences, the life sci ences and the social sciences The department offers program s leading to the B.A., M A ., and Ph.D. degrees The under graduate program emphasizes the broad nature of modern mathematics and its close association with the real world The program is designed to prepare students for entry into graduate school or careers in industry or secondary education The department has a flexible Ph.D. program which is de signed to encourage students to take an active role-in the shaping of their own curricula This flexibility is coupled with a desire to promote interdisciplinary research In cooperation with the Departments of Marine Science and Physics and the Colleges of Engineering and Medicine the department offers special Ph D programs in the applications of mathematics. The department is composed of four areas of concentration These are as follows : I. Algebra and Topology Number theory, algebraic coding theory general topol ogy, topological semigroups 2 An a lysi s Real analysis, complex analysis, abstract harmonic analysis abstract measure theory, approximations and expansions functional anillysis geometric runction theory 3. Applied Mathemat i cs and Computer Science Analysis of algorithms, differential equations, integral equations, numerical analysis 4 Statistics Biomathematics, theory of probability and statistics, re liability theory information theory stochastic modeling in the life sciences and engineering stochastic sy s tems and time series There are 30 faculty members in the department and about 50 graduate students While programs in the more traditional areas of pure mathematics are offered the department is com mitted to emphasizing applied mathematics at both the graduate and undergraduate levels For both undergraduate and graduate work students and faculty have access to the University s com puter, an IBM 370 / 165-II. Requirements for the B.A. Degree Pro gram II Four (4) courses lowing : MAP 4302 MAC 3414 (4) MHF 3102 (3) MAS ,3103 (4) MAA 4211 (3) MAA 4212 (3) MAS 4156 (3) (4) (4) (4) MAA 5306-5307 MAA 5402-5403 MAS 5311-5312 MTG 5316-5317 (8) (8) (8) (8) (including one sequence) from the fol(4) MAA 5306-5307 (8)

PAGE 26

MAS 5146 MAA 5405 (4) (4) MAD 4401-4402 (8) MAP 5316-5317 (8) MAP 5205 (3) ST A 4442-4321 (8) Although the following description of Programs l and II is neither exhau s tive nor restrictive it is intended as a general guide Program I is a liberal arts program designed to prepare a student in pure mathematics which could lead to either graduate study in pure or applied mathematics, a teaching career, or a career where mathematical approaches to problems are needed such as law or business. Pro g ram I/ emphasizes various areas of applied m athematics which are frequently used in physical and engineering sciences It could lead to graduate study in applied mathematics, an engineering career, or to a career in industry as an applied mathematician Majors in mathematics for teaching should const1lt the section Mathematics (MAE) on page 90 for mathematics requirements. II. Mathematics Related er. hrs ) Majors., except for majors in mathematic s for teaching, must take two ,ofthe following sequences, one of which must be in the College of Natural Sciences: !. BSC 20ll)C, BSC 2011 C BSC 2012 2. CHM,2!M.5, CHM 2045L, CHM 2046 CHM 2046L, CHM 2047, CHM 2047L or CHM 2055C, CHM 2056C 3. GL Y 2016, GL Y 2017, GL Y 2100 4. ECO 2023, ECO 2013 and one of ECO 3101 or ECO 3203 5 EGN 3373, EGN 3374, EGN 3375 6 EGN 3343, EGN 3344 and one of EMC 3103 or EMC 3ll7 7. EGN 3313, EGN 3321, EGN 3331 8. PHY 3040, PHY 3040L PHY 3041, PHY 3041L and PHY 3042, PHY 3042L 9 PSY 2012, PSY 3013, PSY 3213 Majors will not receive credit toward graduation for the fol lowing courses : AST 3033 ECO 4402 GEB 2111 GEB 3121 PHY 3020 STA 3122 Majors wishing to take a course in statistics should take STA 4321. III. General Distribution Courses (60 er hrs excluding w aivers) Majors must satisfy the General Distribution requirements of the College of Natural Sciences, which must include (or show competence in) one of the following sequences : FRE 1100, FRE 1101, FRE 1102 GER 1100, GER 1101, GER 1102 RUS 1100, RUS 1101, RUS ll02 IV. Liberal Education Electives The student must satisfy 24 hours of liberal education elec tives as described in item 3 of the graduation requirements of the College of Natural Scierices(see page 124) The followin_g is a suggested course program for the first two academic years : Fall Quart e r ( /) Winter Quarter ( //) Spring Quart e r ( ///) MA<:; 1104 MAC 1114 MAC 3413 MAS 3103 Freshman Y ear MAC 3411 Sophomore Year MAC 3414 MAC 3412 MHF 3102 Two Mathematics electives Students with a stropg background in high school mathematics may omit either or both MAC 1104, MAC ll 14 with the consent of the chairperson. Teacher Education Programs: For information concerning the degree programs for sec ondary schoo l teachers and junior college teachers see pages 90 91, and 86 of this Catalog Mathematics Minor Although open to all students the minor in mathematic s is designed particularly for students in science and engineering who COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES 135 wish to enhance their mathematical capabilities to benefit their major. A student wishing to receive a minor in mathematics must take the following courses: Total credit hours required: 37 (minimum) MAC 3411-3414 (17) Calculus I-IV or equivalent MHF 3102 (3) Set Theory MAS 3103 (4) Linear Algebra COP 3215 (4) Introduction to Computer Program ming with Mathematics Applications (or 4 hours of approyed programming BASIC FORTRAN, or PL I ) MAA 4211 (3) Advanced Calculiis I MAA 4212 (3) Advanced Calculus II MAS 4156 (3) Vector Analysis In addition, one sequence from the following: I. BSC 2010C 20IIC, 2012 2. CHM 2045, 2045L 2046, 2046L 2047, 2047L or CHM 2055C, 2056C 3. GL Y 2016, 2017, 2100 4. ECO 2023, 2013, and one of ECO 3101 or 3203 5. EGN 3373, 3375 6. EGN 3343, 3344, and one of EMC 3103 or 3117 7. EGN 3313, 3321, 3331 8 PHY 3040, 3040L, 3041, 3041L and PHY 3042, 3042L 9 PSY 2012, 3013, 3213 Requirements for the M.A. Degree: General requirements for graduate work are given on page 46 A thesis is optional. The thesis program requires a minimum of 45 credits of course work (excluding MAT 6945), of which the thesis may carry three to nine credits The non-thesis program requires 45 credits of course work In either case 24 hours of the course work must be taken in courses numbered 6000 or above and the program must total at least 45 credits The course of study is flexible and interdisciplinary work is encouraged. :rhe areas of specialization include the following : a Algebra and Topology b. Analysis c. Applied Mathematics and Computer Science d Statistics Each candidate for the M A degree is required to pass a written examination in any three of the following nine subjects listed below in five areas: I. Algebra (MAS 5146, MAS 5311, MAS 5312) 2 Topology (MTG 5316, MTG 5317) 3 Real Analysis (MAA 5306, MAA 5307) Complex Analysis (MAA 5402, MAA 5403; or MAA 5405, MAA 5403) 4. Probability (ST A 5446, STA 5447) Mathematical Statistics (ST A 5326, ST A 6327) Applied Statistics (ST A 5166, STA 5167) 5 Differential Equations (MAP 5316, MAP 5317) Applied Mathematics (MAP 5345, M,A.P 5407) Each examination will cover the prescribed contents of the courses listed above. A reading knowledge of either French, German or Russian is required Computer Science may be substituted for the .Iang4age requirement. For specific p rogram requirements, the student should con sult the deplirtmental chairperson. Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree In addition to the general University requirements for the Ph.D degree on page 51. the Mathemaiics department requires the following: I Qualifying Examinations Each doctoral stude nt must pass four of the nine qualify ing examinations that appear under the Requirements for the M.A degree. The examinations are classified into five categories. The four examinations which the student

PAGE 27

136 COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES selects must represent at 1east three of the five categories shown, and can not include both mathJmatical statistics and applied statistics or both applied mathematics and differential equations. 2. Foreign Language Requirement Each student must pass an examination in two of the three languages : French, German or Russian Computer Science may be substituted for one of the languages. 3. Course Requirements The student's program of study must meet the course requirements for the M A. degree. In addition the stu dent must pass one quarter of course work in each of the five categories not represented by his/her four qualifying examinations. The course can be one of the courses listed or any other course in the same general area if the sub stitution is approved by a majority of the Department Graduate Committee. Other course requirements will be determined by the student s Supervisory Committee. 4 Specialization Examination This examination shall be administered by the student's Supervisory Committee after he has passed the qualify ing examinations, the language requirements and has completed all course requirements. The composition and scheduling of this examination shall be determined by the Supervisory Committee and may be written and/or oral. 5. For specific program requirements, the student should consult the chairperson of the Department of Mathema. tics. 6. The student must submit a diS'lertation to be approved by the Supervisory Committee. Special accommodations may be made for students with interest in interdisciplinary areas. MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY (MET) Medical Technology is one of the growing professions as sociated with the advances in modern medical science Working in the clirtical laboratory the medical technologist performs chemical microscopic bacteriologic, and other scientific tests to help track the cause and treatment of disease This talent requires specialized training and a baccalaureate degree is essential preparation for certification as a medical technologist. The University of South Florida offers a four-year program leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in Medical Technol ogy. A student electing to major in Medical Technology will spend the first three years of the program on the campus of the University of South Florida ; the fourth year (12 months) will be spent in one of the affiliated hospitals or clinical laboratories. Admission to the fourth year is limited by the number of open ings in the affiliated hospitals. Selection of interns is made by the ho spitals During the first three years, the medical technology student will complete the liberal arts and basic science requirements for entrance into the fourth year of the progrjlm for clinical training To remain in good standing as a Medical Technology major dur ing this period, a reasonable grade point average, determined by the College of Natural Sciences must be maintained To be eligible for entrance into the program's fourth year, the student mus t have completed not less than 135 credit hours of work (excluding physical education courses). Of hours, at least 30 credit hours must be from the College of N11tural Sciences at the University of South Florida (in courses approved by the Dire ctor of the Medical Technology Program). The following courses must be included in the three years of work which pre cedes the fourth year of clinical training. 1. Biological Sciences A minimum of 24 hours is required with at least one course in microbiology and one course in immunology. Physiology (PC B 3700 or PCB 4743C) is strongly recommended 2. Chemistry A minimumof 24 hours is required including organic chemistry. Biochemistry (BC H 3033), Elementary Analytical Chemistry (CHM 3120C) and Clinical Chemistry (CHS 4300) are strongly recommended 3 Physics A minimum of 12 hours (one full-year majors-type course) is required 4. Mathematics One course in mathematics (above the level of MGF 1203) is required. A year of math or its equivalent is strongly recommended. 5 General Distribution Requirements Courses satisfying the general distribution requirements of the College of Natural Sciences 6. Courses in non-science fields to insure a broad back ground. Upon successful completion of this curriculum, recom mendations by the College and acceptance by one of the affiliated hospitals or clinical laboratories the student will com plete 12 continuous months of training at that hospital or labora tory. This training period usually begins in early August or September of each year. During this period one will continue to be registered as a full-time student of the University and will receive a total of 45 credit hours of work in: MLS 3031 MLS 4216 MLS 4405 MLS 4605C MLS 4215 MLS 4309 MLS 4545 MLS 4625C These courses will be taught at the hospital or clinical laboratory. Students successfully completing this program will be a Bachelor of Science degree in Medical Technology. PHYSICS (PHY/PUS) "'The Department of Physics offers programs leading to a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree, and to a Mas ter of Arts degree Both thesis and non-thesis programs are available for the M.A. degree Qualified graduate students with appropriate backgrounds may obtain a Ph D in applied mathematics sci ence. An interdisciplinary arrangement with the Department of Mathematics and with the College of Engineering provides for such an opportunity. Students should consult with the Physics Graduate Adviser for details Special courses may be offered upon sufficient demand. Modern excellently equipped classrooms and laboratories pro vide an outstanding environment for students. Opportunities for undergraduate students to participate in research projects with professors and graduate students form an integral part of the undergradu ate experience Undergraduate students have en gaged in research efforts to the extent that their work lias been published in scientific journals. There is a tradition of close working relationships between professors and students. At the graduate level, thesis research areas include theoreti cal and experimental plasma physics, experimental gaseous electronics, elementary particle theory, and biophysics Sup porting facilities include an IBM 370/165-11 computi;r, a Tek tronix 4501 graphics systems terminal located in the Physics Building an excellently equipped machine shop and electronic shop, a glass blowing shop, an electron microscope and an x-ray photoelectron spectrometer. Teaching assistantships and finan cial aid through the College Work-Study Program are often avail able to qualified students. A supervised study hall is available where students may obtain help with their course work at their convenience throughout each week day Requirements for the Baccalaureate Degrees: I. Physics Courses B.A. PHYSICS (PHY) (49 er. hrs.) PHY 30401 (3) PHY 3040L1 (I) PHY 30411 (3) PHY 3041L' (I)

PAGE 28

PHY 30421 (3) PHY 3042L1 (I) PHY 3223 (3) PHY 3323C (4) PHY 3822L (2) PHY 4224 (3) PHY 42252 (3) PHY 4324 (3) PHY 43252 (3) PHY 4823L (2) Physics Electives3 (10) plus two hours of PHY 4910 and two hours of PHY 4930 B.S PHYSICS (PHS) (61 er. hrs.) PHY 30401 (3) PHY 3040L1 (I) PHY 30411 (3) PHY 3041L1 (I) PHY 30421 (3) PHY 3042L1 (I) PHY 3223 (3) PHY 3323C (4) PHY 3424C (4) PHY 3822L (2) PHY 4124 (3) PHY 4224 (3) PHY 4225 (3) PHY 4324 (3) PHY 4325 (3) PHY 4526 (4) PHY 4604 (3) PHY 4823L (2) PHS 44044 (4) PHS 48145 (4) Plus two hours .of PHY 4910 and two hours of PHY 4930 The s equ e nce PHS 3101 (3), PHY 2050 (4), PHY 2050L (I ), PHY 2051 ( 4 ), PHY 2051 L ( I ), PHY 2052 ( 4), a nd PHY 2052 L (I), may be s ub s tituted for the sequence indi ca ted 2With the con s ent o f th e Phy sics Adviser either o r both of the following substitutions may be mad e : PHY' 4604 ( 3 ) for PHY 4 225 and PHY 3424 (4 ) for PHY 4325. 'Excluding PHY 4905, PHY 4910 and PHY 4930 Either PHS 5505 ( 4 ) o r PHY 5722C (4) may be s ub s tituted 'Eith e r PHS 5113 (3 ) o r PHS 5304 ( 4) may be s ub s tituted II Supporling Courses in the Natural Sciences B.A. and B.S. PHYSICS (33 er. hrs.) CHM 20456 (3) CHM 2045L6 (I) CHM 20466 (3) CHM 2046L6 (I) CHM 20476 (3) CHM 2047L6 (I) MAC34117 (5) MAC 34127 (4) MAC 34137 (4) MAC 34147 (4) MAP 4302 (4) The s equence CHM 2055C (5) and C HM 2056C (5) may be s ub s tituted for the sequenc e indicated ' The sequ e nce MAC 3281 (4), .MAC 328 2 (4), MAC 3283 (3) a nd MAC 3284 (3) may be subs tituted for the s equence indicated. COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES 137 Ill. General Distribution Requirements (60 er. hrs excluding waivers) The student is required to complete the General Distribution requirements of the College of Natural Sciences (see page 124). Selection of a foreign language preferably French German, or Russian is also strongly recommended IV. Liberal Education Electives The student must satisfy 24 hours of liberal education elec tives as described in item 3 of the graduation requirements of the College of Natural Sciences (see page 124). V. Free Electives (including general distribution w a ivers) B.A. PHYSICS (PHY) : 43-54 er. hrs. B.S. PHYSICS (PHS) : 31-43 er hrs Teacher Education Programs: For information concerning the degree program s for secon dary s chool teachers and junior college teachers see pages 95, 96 and 86ofthis catalog. Requirements for the M.A. Degree: General requirements are given on page 46. When admitted to the graduate program in physics, a student will consult with the Graduate Physics Adviser who will be the student's course ad viser and will also keep a close check on the progress of the student's work. After. a decision has been made concerning the student's academic goals, the duties of the Graduate Adviser will be assumed by a Supervisory Committee appointed by the de partment chairperson. The Supervisory Committee will have the right and the responsibility to add special requirements to meet any deficiency in the student's background. The student desiring the M.A degree with a thesis is re quired to take a minimum of 45 credits no more than nine of which may be for PHY 6911, PHY 6935 and PHY 6971. Of these 45 credits 24 must be in courses numbered 6000 or above. Re quired courses are: PHS 5113 PHY 5722C PHY 6346 PHY 6846L PHY 5624 PHY 6246 PHY 6347 The Supervisory Committee will administer a comprehen sive examination before recommending that a degree be granted. The student desiring the M.A. degree without a thesis is required to take a minimum of 45 credits (excluding PHY 6940), no more than three of which may be for PHY 6911 and PHY 6935. Of these 45 credits, 24 must be in courses numbered 6000 or above Required courses are: PHS5113 PHS5115 PHY6347 PHY6645 PHS 5114 PHY 6247 PHY 6536 PHY 6846L and a choice of any two of the following: PHS 5405 PHS 5505 PHY 5722C or Biophysics The Supervisory Committee will administer a wntten and an oral comprehensive examination before recommending that a degree be granted All graduate students are required to register for PHY 6935 in the first quarter .of each academic year and, in connection therewith, to attend all Physics Colloquia scheduled during the year.

PAGE 29

......... .1 NEW COLLEGE OF USF New College, formerly a private liberal arts college became a part of the University of South Florida in 1975, retaining its distinctive academic program a nd the s tatu s of an honors college within the greater University It ha s, in fact, been designated a Program of Emphasis at the University of South Florida. A s m all, re s idential inno va tive liberal arts college, New College provitles an educational environment which allows st u dents to ac hieve maximum academic and personal development. The curriculum is designed to promote self-direction and to supply the knowledge an d skills appropriate to the Liberal Arts. New College is both traditional and contempor a ry in its orienta tion : dedicated to humane learning, but a lso purposely seeking the discovery, the development, and the creation of ways to equip people for s urvival in a fluid society. Students are encouraged to develop their own educational plans-using the educational contract-that will tielp them reach individual goals. Flexibility, individualism, and broad freedom of choice characterize the program, giving to each student the opportunity to plan a m ajo r role in the construction of his or her program. The Academic Calendar and Residence Requirements New College operates on a s lightly different academic year than the rest of the University. The College s academic year is di vided into three 10-week terms beginning in September a nd end ing in June with a s pecial four-week period in late fall designed specifically to permit studen t s to accomplish independent studies Becau se students a re s elected for their ability to benefit from the New College program, they are considered at en trance, to have the a bility to begin at an advanced level of prep aration Therefore, New College offers each st udent the oppor tunity to earn a bachelor's degree in three acade mic years or nine terms of residence. However, each s tudent a l so ha s the option to distribute his educational experience over a four-year period by taking some terms off from study at se lected times during those four years Educational Contracts The basic instrument of the New College educational program is the educational contract, a written document constructed at the beginning of a term by each st udent and expressing that student's plan s for the ensuing term Each contract states the individual st udent' s educational and personal goals for the term a nd possibly longer range objec tives ; a lis ting of the specific educational activities that will help accomplish these ends; and an explanation of how those specific educational activi ties will be evaluated at the end of the term. Each contract is developed by the individu a l s tudent as an expression of personal education and career goals but faculty are expected to contribute substantially to help s tudent s deter mine the best ways to s hape contracts to reach goals 138 Admissions New College welcomes applications from all qualified s tud ents without regard to nationality creed race or s ex New College seeks those s tudent s who are unu s ually well-qualified to thr ive in its a nd social a tmosphere The College u ses a varie t y of indicator s to help each s tudent mea s ure whether he or s he is right for participating in this specia l program The most reli abl e index of s tudent ability is past scholastic performance About two-third s of all New College entering stu dent s rank in the top 10 per ce nt of their graduating cla sses. Entering student Schola stic Aptitude Test (SAT) sco re s are generally 1200 and above. Experience of s tudents demonstrate s that those who s e verbal or math s cores fall anywhere wtthm the 550-800 range are capable of succeeding at New Col lege provided they also have the per so nal c haracteri stics that will allow them to cope effectively with the educational progr a m These individual tr ai t s, in addition to motiv a tion are initiative tenacity m a turity curiosity concern for others and an excite: men t about life and learning Applicants may s ubmit results of the Scholastic Aptitude Tes t from the College Entrance Exami nation Board or sco res received from the American College Testing Program (ACT) to help the Admissions Office of New College determine whether a st udent s hould be s elected . Bec a u se the program at New College ha s been deliberately designed to fulfill the need s of individual students, it follows that the College will a lso accept st udent s with varied academic preparation The College does not require that certain courses be completed to gain admittance, but doe s urge prospective s tu dents to complete the customary courses within a college pre paratory program before enrolling a t New College Particular attention is giv en to students who have participated in h onors courses advanced pla ce ment or enriched a nd accelerated courses and independent studies. Advanced placem e nt provided at some institutions i s not necessary for admission to New College of USF si mply because all students are cons idered to be entering at adva nced levels. Since there a re no required courses, a s tudent and a faculty a dvi se r work together to de s ign a program to take a d va nt age of the s tudent's ab ilities and previou s academic prep aration. Stu dents are encouraged to begin s tudie s at adva nced level s if they have adequate background s. New College welcomes transfer s tudent s from other ins titu tions. As many as one-third of each entering cla ss are st udent s with previous college experience. Transfer s tudents must de monstrate through their transcripts that they c;an s ucce ssf ull y handle college level work Application forms and literature m ay be obtained from the Director of Adm!ssions, New College of US F 5700 N T amiami Trail, S arasota, Florida 33580 Prospective st udent s s hould note that a s uppl e mental application i s needed for a dmis s ion to New College. Application Deadlines: Fall Term / Term I : Application should be completed before March I and no later than August I. Application for fina n c ial ass i sta nce s hould be received before February I for sc holar s hip s and March I for other type s of aid.

PAGE 30

Winter Term/Term II : Application should be completed by December 15. Spring Term / Term III : Application should be completed by March !. Degree Requirements All students who are graduated from New College of USF re ceive a Bachelor of Arts degree However, students may elect to concentrate in any of a number of areas within the various divi sions or to elect an interdisciplinary course of study in fields of their own shaping. Requirements for completion of a course of stu dy in fields of study at New College include satisfactory evaluations on nine educational contracts, on four indejlendent s tudy projects on the senior project, and on the baccalaureate examination. Areas of Study New College is divided into three academic divisions-Humanities Social Sciences, and Natural Sciences-and students may elect to study primarily in one area, to distribute their studies throughout the entire three divisions, or to create special interdisciplinary curricula which span offerings of any of the disciplines. To aid prospective students of New College, each division has indicated broad areas of study which are available in each division Within each area there are, of course, many subdivi sions and information about these may be obtained from the New College Records Office. Humanities Art History Fine Arts Music Literature Languages Classics Philosophy Religion Natural Sciences Mathematics Biology Chemistry Physics Experimental Psychology Social Sciences Economics History Political Science Psychology Sociology Special Programs New College has two special programs which are available to students of New College but which fall outside of the regular divisional or interdisciplinary areas The Environmental Studies Program is an interdisciplinary and interdivisional program that is also expected to integrate academic and real world" experiences in problem-solving sit uations Students who elect the Environmental Studies Pro gram may develop disciplinary knowledge and skills through courses and seminars in the College's three academic divisions and then may apply their knowledge and skills in research pro jects dealing with practical problems in environmentally related areas. Each year, for three weeks in June the New College Music Festival is held on campus. The Festival bring s to the campus a number of nationally and internationally known musicians to teach and to perform public concerts with emphasis on chamber music Festival concert performances are open to everyone in the college community Students for the Festival are drawn from all parts of the country and abroad coming to the college to study each year and also to perform in student concerts which are held frequently on campus. New College students have the oppor tunity to audit Festival master classes and rehearsals, to compete for selection as Festival students, and also to attend student and public concerts 1 NEW COLLEGE OF USF 139 Costs Costs for attending New College of USF are the same as those for attending any part of the State University System. Costs are on a per credit-hour basis (see page 20 for University credit-hour costs). Each term' s educational contract is the equivalent of 16 credit hours while each independent study project is equivalent to four credit hours. During the first three terms students are considered for fee purposes to be on a second-year college level. For the final six terms, students are considered to be t a king upper-class courses with consequent cost differentials Since New College offers students the opportunity to have a more individualized type of study than is available in other Uni versity programs, it is easily see n that such a program would be more expensive. To help meet this difference in cost, the New College Foundation has agreed to provide an annual subsidy to the University System to make up the difference of state funding and the actual cost of the educational program. These funds are raised by the New College Foundation and its Board of Trustees from individuals, corporations, and foundations. Student Life New College is essentially a residential institution with th e majority of the students living either on campus or in the s urrounding community. Student s are challenged to accept major responsibilities for the direction of their own affairs, including their social and extracurricular activities The Student Affairs Office is an essential part of New College and is concerned with almost all phases of student life from orientation of arriving students to commencement plans for those ready to depart. Student Affairs, through its profes sional staff, is re s ponsible for counseling, housing recreation an d health services Staff a lso are concerned with helping students assume respon s ibilities in relation to others on campu s and in the outside communities. All first-year s tudent s live on campus during their initial academic year. Upper -class students may choose College or non-College residency Students have the option of u sing the food service or of making independent arrangements. New College offers counseling for students in seve ral differ ent areas New College provides for students a s mall health center on campus staffe d while the college is in sess ion Ex cellent specialized medical services are readily available in the community with a c ommunity hos pit al only minute s away from campus. Qualified clinical p syc hologi s t s provide for students a broad range of psychological counseling and therap y as well as dealing with students concerned about life goals, academic a nd career decisions and study skills. Professional medical an d psychiatric counsel is available in the community at the student's expense

PAGE 31

140 NEW COLLEGE OF USF NEW COLLEGE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA ACADEMIC CALENDAR 1980-81 Fall Term (I), 1980 and Independent Study Period Labor Day Holiday Orientation and Advising Classes Begin; Last Day to Register September I Monday September 3-6, Wed.-Sat September 8 Monday September 12, Friday September 19, Friday November 3, Monday November 7, Friday November 14, Friday November 17, Monday November 27-28, Thurs.-Fri. December 12, Friday Fees Due ; Last day to withdraw without financial penalty Deadline for submission of contracts Deadline for declaring option / off-campus study for Term II ISP Sign-Up Forms due End of Fall Term Independent Study Period begins Thanksgiving Day Holiday Independent Study Period ends projects due Winter Term (II), 1981 Registration, Orientation, and Advising Classes Begin; Last Day to Register January 2, Friday January 5, Monday January 9, Friday January 16, Friday March 2, Monday March 13, Friday Fees Due ; Last day to withdraw without financial penalty Deadline for submission of contracts Deadline for declaring option / off-campus study for Term III End of Winter Term Spring Term (Ill), 1981 Classes Begin; Last Day to Register March 30, Monday April 3, Friday April 10, Friday May 4, Monday Fees Due; Last day to withdraw without financial penalty Deadline for submission of contracts Senior Theses due Baccalaureate Examinations Memorial Day Holiday May 18-22, Mon -Fri May 25, Monday June I, Monday June I, Monday Deadline for declaring option / off-campus study for Term I ISP Sign-up forms and contracts due for summer June 5, Friday June 8, Monda y June 9 Tuesday June 10, Wedn esday June 13, Saturday End of Spring Term Evaluations due for graduating students Contract certifications due for graduating students Faculty review of graduating students Commencement Students who have not submitted contracts to the Office of Rec ords and Regi s tration by the deadline will be considered as with drawn by default with no refund or cancellation of fees. Under no 1;ircumstances will students be granted option for the following term past the deadline. Off-campus contracts for the following term should be submitted as soon as possible follow ing declaration but must be submitted pri o r to the.first da y of the term of the off-campus work ISP registrations and payments must be included with Fall and Spring Term regi s trations / payments /

PAGE 32

COLLEGE OF NURSING The College of Nursing i s committed to the improvement of nursing and health care services through it s educational pro grams, community service and related re s earch activities In order to carry out its commitment in nur s ing education, the coF lege offers programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels : 1) An upper division program that leads to a baccalaureate degree with a major in nursing The program currently provides two curricula : a) Curriculum A for generic students (qualified students with no previous preparation in nursing) and b) Cur riculum B for registered nurses who are graduate s of diploma or associate degree nursing programs Curriculum A i s offered for fulltime students on the Tampa campus. Curriculum B is c ur rently offered for both fulltime and part-time students on the Tampa campus Curriculum B is offered for qualified part time registered nurse students on the University s regional campuses at Fort Myers, Sarasota, and St. Petersburg 2) A graduate program that leads to a Master of Science degree with a major in nursing'. The major objective of this pro gram is the preparation of professional nur s es who will assume leadership roles a) as clinical specialists in acute health care set tings, b) as advanced reg i stered nurse practitioners in ambulat ory or extended care settings for adults or c) as teachers of nursing The undergraduate program is accredited by the Nat i onal League for Nursing and approved by the Florida State Board of Nursing Graduates -of this program are eligible for admission to examinations leading to licensure to practice as professional nurses in the State of Florida or to apply for licensure to practice in other states Graduates also have the educational background necessary for graduate study in nursing The graduate program was initiated in January 1980 and it is anticipated that the first students will graduate in 1982. National League for Nursing accreditation will be sought as soon as the program is eligible for accreditation Application s from all qualified applicants are accepted with out regard to age, sex, cultural, racial religious or ethnic back ground . The College of Nursing has quota program s in that limita tions are set on enrollments on the basis of availability of suffi. cient qualified faculty laboratory and c lassroom facilities, and clinical resources for nursing practice experience for students Therefore, admissions are based upo11 selection processes de veloped by the faculty of the College of Nursing Fl o rida re sid e nts are gi v en priorit y. Professional Nursing The health care delivery system is rapidly changing and these changes are creating new demands on health care professionals, including nurses Since nursing is a vital component of the health care delivery system, nursing practice has become increasingly complex in terms of knowledge and skill s required for nurses to assume added responsibilities and funct i ons Professional nursing practice is based on a dynamic, helping relationship which fosters client growth whether that client be an individual a family group or a community. This relationship is based on theoretical knowledge and a body of cognitive, affec tive and psychomotor skills exemplified in the nursing process Nursing practice involves problem solving and decision making based on knowledge from the humanities, natural and social and behavioral science s Thu s nur sing builds upon a foundation of general education and basic s cience s The undergraduate program is ba s ed on the philosophy that nurses must be s elf-direct ing professionals who as s ume respon sibility for their own learning and their own practice Therefore the facuity provide opportunitie s for s tudents to identify their individual learning needs to participate in the planning of learn ing activities to meet those need s and to develop cognitive, affective and psychomotor s kills es s enti a l to profe ss ional nursing practice in a variety of primary secondary and tertiary care set tings where professional nursing service s a re provided : i e ., acute care hospitals community health agencie s, extended care facilities industry physicians' office s, military health services and so on. Opportunitie s are also provided for the development of interpersonal and leadership skills needed by nur s es in order to meet their responsibilities as citizen s and as a c countable pro fessionals in the health field. Additionally students can e s tablish investigative and independent study habits that will per s ist throughout a lifetime of profes s ional growth and development. Nationally, as well as in Florida, there is a critical need for nurses prepared at advanced levels to provide leadership in clini cal nursing practice, administration of nursing services, teaching of nursing and research The graduate program in nursing i s built upon undergraduate education in nursing and provide s oppor tunities for nursing with baccalaureate degree s in nur sing to pre-! pare for lea dership in a variety of functional roles in a variety of settings where nursing s ervices are provided for adults The program provides: 1) the theoretical foundations underlying advanced practice including opportunitie s to develop and test hypotheses related to practice ; 2) opportunities to explore role theory in relation to the development and expansion of the professional nurse's leadership role ; 3) initiation to research processes as well as exploration of researchable problems and application of re s earch to nursing practice ; 4) theory and practice in teaching of nursing in academic or inservice education programs; and 5) practicum s based on individual goals Undergraduate Education in Nursing Qualified students with no previou s preparation in nursing and registered nurses who are graduate s of associate degree or hos pital programs are eligible for admi s sion Students may complete all requirements for admis s ion to the College of Nursing through enrollment at the University of South Florida or they may com plete the University's general education distribution require ments and College of Nursing admission prerequisites and transfer to USF for the nursing major. College graduates and transfer students from other baccalaureate nursing programs are also eligible for admission to the major. Lower division students who enroll at USF are admitted to the Division of University Studies. They must meet the same requirement s as other applicant s for admi s sion to the Univer s ity and should follow the admission procedures outlined elsewhere in this Catalog. Transfer students seeking admis s ion to the College of Nursing must also apply for admission to the University Appli cations for admission to the University may be obtained by con tacting the Office of Admissions, University of South Florida Tampa Florida 33620. Transfer students may not be admitted to the College of Nur s ing unles s they are eligible for admission to 141

PAGE 33

142 COLLEGE OF NURSING the University. Official transcripts certifying completion of an requirements for admission must be available to the College of Nursing before admission will be confirmed and enrollment per mitted. At the present time, one class is admitted to Curriculum A (for generic students) in the fall quarter each year. Deadline for University application is January 4 of the year in which the stu dent enrolls Applications are available from: Office of admis sions, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620. The deadline for applications to the college is February l. Registered nurse students are admitted to Curriculum B -twice each year. The deadline for acceptance of applications for summer (Quarter IV) admission is February I; the deadline for acceptance of applications for winter (Quarter II) admission is October I. Applications and academic advising are available by contacting the Assistant Dean for Student Personnel, College of Nursing USF Medical Center Box 22, 12901 North 30th Street, Tampa, Florida 33612. General Requirements CURRICULUM A AND CURRICULUM B The minimum academic requirements used as a basis for evaluating eligibility of applicants for admission to the upper division major are outlined below A. Overall Requirements 1 Completion of 90 quarter (60 semester) hours of college level work with cumulative grade point average of 2.5. Credit re ceived on the basis of CLEP examinations or other appro priate procedures may be included to meet some of these requirements. 2. Completion of the University of South Florida general education distribution requirements as part of the above. These requirements may be satisfied by the completion of 60 quarter (40 semester) hours in the following areas with not less than 8 quarter (6 semester) hour s in each area: a) English Composition b) Humanities / Fine Arts c) Mathematics / Quantitative Methods d) Natural Sciences e) Social Sciences 3 Students with an A.A. degree (other than in nursing) will be considered to have met all of the USF General Education Distribution requirements but also must meet specific college requiremerlts in the areas marked* B. Specific Course Prerequisites The College of Nursing requires certain courses within the general education distribution for the natural, social and be havioral sciences, and mathematics. These requirements are outlined below The student must: I) earn a grade of 'C" or better in each course, 2) not repeat any course more than once, 3) repeat no more than two (2) courses Suggested cours es are also included. Courses taken at another institution will be evaluated individually on the basis of content. Students in Florida community colleges can obtain information about equi valent courses from their counselors or by contacting the College of Nursing Assistant Dean for Student Personnel. (813/974-2191) I. Mathematics/Quantitative Methods: completion of at least one course in mathematics and one course in statistics. CLEP subject exams are acceptable ST A 3122 Social Science Statistics I course in mathematics (College level algebra is highly re commended) N B For students entering beginning Sep tember, 1982, 4 quarter credits in college level algebra and one co urse in statistics will be required for admission with a grade of C or better in each c ourse 2. Natural Sciences: minimum of 22 quarter credits (excluding anatomy, microb io logy and physiology) Each course taken toward meeting this requirement must have been completed with a grade of "C" or better. At least one course must in clude a laboratory or have a corequisite laboratory course. At least 8 quarter credits must have been comp l eted by the ad mission application deadline. a) Biology-a minimum of 10 quarter credits Courses should include content in I) cell theory 2) biological transport, 3) genetics, 4) evolution 5) phylogenetic survey of plant and animal kingdoms, 6) ecology etc. BSC 2010C, 2011 C, 2012 b) Ch emistry-a minimum of 6 quarter credits Courses should include content in I) principles of chemistry, 2) structure of matter, 3) atomic and molecular structure, 4) states of matter, 5) chemical formulas and nomenclature, 6) solutions, 7) chemical kinetics and e quilibrium 8) theory and practice of quantitative analysis, 9) organic chemistry. CHM 2045, 2046 or *CHM 2030, 2031, 2032 Chemistry seque nce for non -s cience major s. c) Other-the remaining credits can be earned by completing additional courses in biology and chemistry or in genetics, physics, physical science, etc. (A course in non quantitative physics is recommended but not required.) 3. Social Sciences: completion of each of the following with a grade of "C" or better in each course. a) American government--0ne cou r se in modern American government or state and local government. POS 2041, POS 2112, PAD 3003, POT 4204, POS 4424 b) Individual and Social/Community Behavior: completion of at least three co urses with at least one course in psychology and one course in socio l ogy and one additional course in psychology, sociology, anthropology, geron tology or human sexua l behavior 4. Supporting Sciences: Anatomy, microbiology and at least two of the other courses must be completed prior to enrollment in the nursing major with a grade of "C" or better in each course. The remaining course must be completed while en rolled in the first quarter of the nursing major. a) Microbiology: one course-APB 3110 or MCB 3010C CLEP is not acceptable. b) Anatomy: one course-NUS 3210C or the course offered by the College of Natural Science Biology Department. c) Physiology: one course-NUS 3211C or PCB 3700 d) Nutrition: one course-HUN 3201 e) Human Growth and Development (Life Span)-Must inc elude birth through aging process to death-HUS 4020 or DEP 3103 and GEY 3000 or DEP 4005 and GEY 3000. N.B. Each of the above supporting science courses is not offered every quarter therefore, tire student should plan enrollment schedule with care C. CLEP Examinations College Level Examination Program (CLEP) general and subject examinations may be taken i n severa l areas. The CLEP general examinations apply toward the distribution requirements at USF and successful performance results in credit for any one or all five of the required areas. In addition, credit may be earned for a number of college of Nursing prerequisite courses, includ ing : American Government POS 2041; English Composition ENC 1102, 1135, 1168; Biology BSC 2010C 2011C 2012; Gen. eral Chemistry CHM 2045; and Statistics STA 3122. Additional information may be obtained from the Office of Evaluation and Testing, University of South Florida. D. ACT/PEP and College of Nursing Examinations R eg istered nurse applicants are eligible to take the ACT/ PEP subject examination in anatomy / physiology to fulfill the course requirement in physiology. The co llege also offers an e xamination in nutrition which RN students may take to meet

PAGE 34

this requirement. Registered nurses may receive up to 20 hours of lower division elective credit for previous nursing education and /or experience through satisfactory performance on the ACT/PEP proficiency examinations in any of the approved four areas: I) Fundamentals of Nursing (Code No. 403), 2) Maternal and Child Nursing (Code No. 457), 3) Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing (Code No. 503), 4) Adult Nursing (Code No. 5540) These credits do not apply toward meeting the University re quirement of 60 upper division credits or toward meeting the requirements of the upper division nursing major. The credits earned by passing the ACT/PEP examinations in nursing apply only to the B S. degree with a major in nursing program offered by the College of Nursing. Additional information about the CLEP and ACT/PEP examinations may be obtained from the Office of Evaluation and Testing, University of South Florida. Information about the college examination in nutrition may be obtained by contacting the Dean's Office, College of Nursing, University of South Florida. E . Other Requirements In order to be considered for admission to the college the applicant must: I) have s ubmitted application to USF by the appropriate dead line. 2) have submitted application and all supporting materials in c luding transcripts, to the College of Nursing by the appro priate deadline . 3) have a minimum grade point ratio of 2 5 with a grade of C' or better in each prerequisite course 4) be able to complete prior to enrollment in the major all those general education and specific prerequisite s required for ad mission to the major 5) must have completed all prerequisites with not more than two (2) repeated courses and not more than one (I) repeat of any given prerequisite course 6) Registered nurses must have current licensure in Florida In addition to the minimum requirements listed above, applicants will be evaluated on factors which are1 relevant to program completion and professional nursing practice : cumula tive grade point average, performance in specific courses, and ability to communicate verbally and in writing. All applicants who appear to be eligible for admission may be interviewed Those applicants with the highest total rankings are ac cepted in order until the quota is filled. As vacancies occur prior to the enrollment date, those next on the list are accepted to fill them Enrollment of all students is contingent upon verification through official transcripts of satisfactory completion of all requirements for admission. Degree Requirements Students already in the program will be certified for the Bachelor of Science degree with a majpr in nur sing upon the completion of a minimum of 180 quarter hours of credit distri buted among the general education supporting sciences, minimum requirements for the major and electives For generic s tudents admitted to the College of Nursing beginning Quarter I, 1980, a minimum of 190 quarter hours of credit will be required for degree certification For registered nurse st udents admitted to the College Qf Nursing beginning Quarter II, 1981, a minimum of 190 quarter hours of credit will be required for degree certification. A minimum grade of "C" must be attained in each course in the major and a cumulative grade point ratio of2.0 or better must be maintained throughout the program. At least 60 quarter hours must be upper division level work (courses numbered 3000 or above). Ovei;all requirements, which differ for Curriculum A and Curriculum B are outlined below Some of these requirements will change with the implementation ofa new curriculum in 1980. Nursing courses include substantial theory and nursing practice in care of the physically and mentally ill, the young and COLLEGE OF NURSING 143 the old the acutely and chronically ill. They also provide opportunities for learning in health m a inten a nce preventive a nd rehabilitative services a nd for functioning as member s of nur s ing and health care team s in highly res pon s ible and complex pri mary secondary and tertiary patient care settings. Learning ex periences are. provided in a variety of institutions and age ncies involved in the delivery of nursing se rvices Curriculum A (For students admitted prior to September, 1980) Curriculum A for students prep aring for initial entry to the profession is an upper division m ajor built upon general edu cation and supporting sc iences previou sly discussed as require ments for admission to the college The Nursing major is com posed of required nursing courses and electives. Students ad mitted to the College of Nurs ing prior to September, 1980 are currently enrolled in s enior level courses. *The Junior level courses NUU 3210C, NUU 3320 NUU 3121L, NUU 3321, N UU 3211, NUU 321 IL and NUU 3214 are described in the 1979-80 University of South Florida Catalog. S e nior Year (3 quarters) NUU 4220 Nurs ing Core II (5) NUU 4220L Nursing Intervention II (6) NUU 4222 Nursing Seminat III (2) NUU 4630 Nursing Inquiry I (3) NUU 4221 Nursing Core III (5) NUU 4221L Nursing Intervention III (6) NUU 4223 Nursing Seminar IV (2) NUR 4910C Independent Study (1-5) NUU 4432 Nursing Core IV (3) NUR 4943L Nursing Intervention IV (7) NUR 4935 Nursing Seminar V (2) NUR 4930 Selected Topics (2-4) (May be repeated up to 12) Curriculum A (For students admitted beginning in September 1980) The upper divi s ion nursing major is built upon the general education and science courses previou sly discussed as prerequi site for admission The nursing major is composed of supporting science courses required nursing courses a nd upper division general education and nursing electives The undergraduate curriculum is developed around a con ceptual framework which include s three major focci: M a n Health, and Nur s ing The content and learning experiences are organized around the biopsychosocial developmental and health care needs of individuals and families throughout the life s pan and include health needs of the community The health needs and related professional nursing responsibilities and functions in meeting these needs are developed on a wellness-i llne ss con tinuum and include primary secondary, a nd tertiary levels of care Nursing Courses Junior Year (3 quarters) NUU 3280 Nursing Core I (3) NUR 3612C Nursing Process I (2) NUR 3722C Client Assessment I (3) NUU 3223 Introduction to Profe ss ion a l Roles (2) NUU 3281 Nursing Core II (2) NUR 3421 Nursing Process II (2) NUR 3136 Nursing Process III (2) NUR 3136L Nursing Intervention I (4) NUR 3723C Client Assessment II (3) NUU 3282 Nursing Core III (2) NUR 3422 Nursing Process IV (2) NUR 3422L Nursing Intervention II (I) NUR 3321 Nursing Process V (2) NUR 3321L Nursing Intervention III (3) Senior Year (4 quart e rs) NUU 4283 Nursing Core IV (2)

PAGE 35

144 COLLEGE OF NURSING NUR 4431 Nu rsing Process VI (2) NUR 4431L Nursing Intervention IV (I) NUR 4635 Nursing Process VII (3) NUR 4635L Nursing Intervention V (4) NUU 4284 Nursing Core V (2) NUR 4652 Nursing Process VIII (3) NUR 4652L Nursing Intervention VI (3) NUR 4653 Nursing Process IX (2) NUR 4653L Nursing Intervention VII (3) NUU 4285 Nursing Core VI (2) NUR 4654 Nursing Process X (2) NUR 4654L Nursing Intervention VIII (2) NUR 4655 Nursing Process XI (2) NUR 4655L Nursing Intervention IX (3) NUU 4286 Nursing Core VII (2) NUR 4946L Nursing Intervention X (8) NUR 4936 Senior Seminar (2) In addition to the requirements listed above a minimum of 15 credits in upper division electives will be required for grad uation : at least nine (9) credits in upper division courses in gen eral education (courses in arts humanities, natural or behavioriil sciences, economics, business or management, education etc., are acceptable) and at least four (4) credits in nursing electives (NUR 4930, Selected Topics in Nursing, and /or NUR 4910C, Independent Study in Nursing, are currenily used for this pur pose). Curriculum B Curriculum B is an upper division major for registered nu. rse students and is built upon the general education and supporting science courses previously discussed as requirements for ad mission fo the college The nursing major is composed of re quired nursing courses and electives At least 60 quarter hours of credit at the upper division leve l with at least 45 quarter hours in nursing courses (not to include human physiology and nutrition) are required for graduation. There will he changes in this curri c ulum for sfl/dents admitted after Quart e r II, 1981. Nursing Courses NUR 49IOC Independent Study (J-5) NUR 4930 Selected Topics (2-4) (May be repeated up to 12) NUR 4943C Nursing Practicum III (5-7) NUS 3220 Biopsychosocial Pathology (4) NU U 3229L Nursing Practicum I (5) NOV 3240 Conceptual Framework for Professional Nursing Practice (4) NUU 3241C Planning, Implementing & Evaluating Nursing Intervention ( 4) NUU 3340C Client Assessment (5) NUU 4422 Nursing Process Synthesis (5) NUU 4422L Nursing Practicum II (3-5) NUU 4630 Nursing Inquiry I (3) General Elective Credit The number and kinds of electives taken will depend upon the number of credits needed to fulfill the hour requirement for the degree and upon individual interest and goals They may be chosen from language literature, fine arts. natural science, etc. or from areas relating to nursing roles and relationships-e. g., management, health education, mental retardation, gerontology, urban problems, race relations women's studies, or physical sciences, social or behavioral sciences, or from NUR 4930, Selected Topics in Nursing. Electives in nursing These courses are offered on the basis of student interest to and opportunity to investigate some area of interest in depth. All students are expected to undertake at least two credits of NUR 4910C (Independent Study) under the guidance of a faculty member. Graduate Education in Nursing The College of Nursing offers a program leading to the Master of Science degree with a major in nursing. The major objective of this program is the preparation of professional prac titioners who are able to assume leadership roles in nursing as I) clinical specialists in seco ndary or tertiary health care settings for adults (i.e., acute care), 2) as advanced registered nurse practitioners in ambulatory or extended care settings for adu lt s, or 3) as teachers of nursing in the area of medical-surgical nursing of adults. The program is comprised of the following components: I) theoretical foundations of advanced nursing practice (includes nursing theory, physiology, social and behavioral sciences, etc.), 2) role theory and development, 3) research (including thesis or scholatly study), 4) c linical experience which includes manage ment of patient care, theory testing and practice related to the functional minor (teaching, clinical specialist, or adult primary care nursing ), and 5) electives in nursing or related disciplines. As part of the clinical experience, students may opt to focus on a particular area of specialization (e.g., cardiovascular, on cology, geriatrics) depending upon availability of qualified fac ulty with expertise in the area and availability of appropriate clinical resources for theory testing and related practice. Stu dents electing the functional minor in teaching will be required to take courses in measurement and evaluation, curricu lum. and in. struction, higher education, etc. and a te aching practicum in addition to core courses and clinical practicums. Experiences in the second and third practicums will be adapted to the student's teaching goals e.g., practicums may be in inservice education or in clinical and classroom teaching in associate degree or baccalaureate programs Additional requirements for clinical specialists and adult primary care practitioners include courses ln management. To meet this requirement, students may select from a number of courses offered by the Department of Management in the Col lege of Bu siness Administration The program has a n extensive core requirements for all stu dents, but it has been designed with considerable flexibility for student options rc:lated to previous education and experience, clinical focus, and functional minor. It has also been designed with the needs of part-time students in mind. Entrance Requirements The maximum number of graduate credits which may be tr.ansferred into the graduate program in nursing is nine quarter hours Requests to transfer additional hours must be recom mended by the Admissions Committee for the Graduate Pro gram and approved by the Graduate Council. However, grad uate credits which are transferred into the major cannot be used in determining the student's grade point average for admission purposes. Admission to the graduate program is dependent upon favorable evaluation of the college faculty in relation to ad mission criteria Applicants must meet the minimum require ments of the University and those outlined below. Those who do not meet all of the admission requirements may enroll in selected courses as Special (non-degree see king) Students if space is avai l able after regularly enrolled students needs are met. Up to 18 hours of work attempted on this basis may be accepted at the discretion of the faculty when the student does meet admission requfrements and is accepted into the program. Applications for admission into the program in September are considered only one time a year. The deadline for completed applications is Man;:h 1. A completed application includes com pletion of all application forms transcripts of all college work, scores on the MAT and G RE Aptitude Tests and letters of reference. Admission to the program is on a competitive basis Criteria for Admission I. A baccalaurea te degree in nursing from an NLN accredited program with an overall grade point average of 3.2 in upper division work.

PAGE 36

2. Current licensure as a registered nurse in the State of Florida . 3. A minimum of one year's experience in clinical nursing practice 4 Three letters of reference indicating potential for graduate study from profe ss ional nurses who can attest to the appli cant's academic ability and profe ss ional competence 5 A minimum total score of 1 ,900 on the verbal and quantita tive portions of the Graduate Record Examination with minimum s core of 450 in each of the s e categories i e verbal comprehensi"on and mathematical skills. 6 A s core of 46 or above on The Miller Analogy Test. 7. A course in elementary statistics including introduction to probability and testing hypothesi s 8. Ability to demonstrate competencies in phy s ical assessment skills comparable to those required in NUU 3340C (A chal lenge exam is available, and/or course may be compfoted after the applicant has been admitted but no later than Quarter 1 of the graduate program.) 9. Physical examination not older than four months at time of enrollment. JO. Profes s ional liability insurance. I I. Florida resident at the time of enrollment. 12. Admission to program will be dependent on availability of adequate facilities and faculty in addition to the above stated criteria. Application Process I Complete and submit application form s to the Office of Ad mission s a t USF. 2 Provide nece ssa ry transcripts of all pr.evious college work. 3. Provide results of s cores on the Graduate Record Examina tion and The Miller Analogy Test. 4. Complete a per s onal interview with designated Coliege of Nursing faculty 5. Meet deadlines as designated by the Office of Admissions at USF and USF College of Nursing 6 Submit letters of reference as indicated under criteria for a dmi ss ion. Course Requirements NUU 6350 Foundations of Nursing Theory (4) NUR 6751 Advanced Physiologic Assessment (5) NUU 6293 Factors Influencing Health Care (3) NUU 6351 Role Development I (3) NUU 6352 Role Development II (3) NUU 6370 Nursing Research (4) NUR 6971 Directed Research Studies (2-6) NUR 6750C Adult A ss essment (4) NUR 6270C Common Health Problem s I NUR 6271C Common Health Problems II NUR 6945L Nursing Practicum I (4) NUR 6946L Nursing Practicum II (4) N UR 6947L Nur s ing Practicum III (7) Elective s (17-21) Propo s ed Cour s e s Graduation Requirements I. A minimum of 72 hours required for graduation 2. A the sis or major s cholarly work is required by all candidates. A. The thesis or masterly scholarly work may be an indi vidual or an interdependent project with two or more stu dents. B For the thesis a minimum of two readers, one of whom is a faculty member in the student's area of specialization within the graduate program is required C For the major scholarly work two readers are required D. The student ha s the option of requesting additional read ers or consultants for either the thesi s or masterly scho larly work. COLLEGE OF NURSING 145 3 A cumul a tive grade point average with a minimum of B (3.0) is required for graduation. 4 A minimum grade of C (2.0) is. required in each co urse ac cepted tow ard the graduate degree. 5 A minimum grade of B (3.0) is required in all undergr a duate course s (1000-4000 level) t a ken after m a triculation either as electives or to make up deficits, even though the s e cour ses are not computed in the overall academic average 6. All incomplete grades must be removed from the student's record before gr a duation 7 Degree requirements must be completed within s even (7) years of marticulation the date on which a s tudent formally enrolls for s tudy after having been accepted. Candida te s who are unable to meet this requirement may petition to h ave the i r credenti a l s and program reevaluated Such candidates mus t expect to meet any requirements which have been a dded since their original matriculation 8 Application for the degree must be filed with the Uni versi ty Registrar on the appropriate form s igned by the aca demic adviser of the College of Nursing Each degree candidate is held responsible for obtaining and s ubmitting the degree application form on the date specified by the Univ e r s ity The College of Nu(sing reserve s the right to alter as pects of the Master of Science Program on the basi s of on-going curri culum evaluation by faculty and students. Special Requirements Tuition and fees for s tudents enrolled in nursing are the same as for other students at the University of South Florida However there a re s ubstantial expen ses not covered by the basic tuition and fees. Textbook s, labor a tory manuals and s tand a rdized te s t s are essential tools for s tudents enrolled in the nur sing m a jor. Texts in nur sing are s omewhat more expen s ive than those in general education and it is e s timated these cost s run from $50-75 per quarter Since texts are used over the two year major the Se costs are somewhat higher at the junior level. Uniforms including watch with s weep s econd hand, scis sors, shoes, stethoscope, etc ., are required after the fir s t quar ter of the junior year Uniform specifications and policie s h ave been developed by students enrolled in the fir s t class and co s t s vary depending upon personal choice In a ddition l a b coats or aprons are nece ssa ry during the first quarter. Medical care insurance is required. Profes s ional liability insurance i s highly de s irable for all and required for regis tered nurse and graduate .students An annual physic a l examination is required. The fir s t one must be done prior to enrollment in the nursing m ajor. Transportation to and from community health agencies for clinical nursing experience is also the re s pon s ibility of the s tu dent. Since public tran s portation in the Tampa area i s not usually convenient to the hour s of clinical s chedule s, s tudent s mus t h av e access to some other means of tran s portation or form ca r pools. Als o, from time to time field trips to an institution or a gency at s ome distance from the campus will be required for a n entire class or section of a class. In these instance s, s tudent s making the trip share the costs. Financial Aid Policies and procedures pertaining to financial aid are the same for s tudents in nursing as for other s tudents Specific in formation can be obtained from the Office of Financial Aid, Student Affairs, University of South Florida Tampa Florid a 33620

PAGE 37

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES The social and behavioral sciences are concerned with human beings and their development problems, behavior, and insti tution s The study of man helps the student to understand the world of which he / she is a part to become a more informed c itiz e n and to prepare for a role in contemporary society The soci a l and behavioral s ciences provide the student with knowl edge experience and background for future application in busines s and industry government human service professions, and graduate education. The s etting of the University in the rapidly expanding Tampa Bay metropolitan area provides exceptional oppor tunities for the development of urban related academic pro gram s, research and community service The Board of Regents recently authorized the establishment ofa Program for Emphasis in Human Service s at USF for the enhancement of selected pro grams in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences and the College of Nursing Three programs in the college-Urban Community Psychology, Gerontology, and Urban Anthropology-were ap proved several years ago by the Board of Regents as Programs of Distinction. Although the programs are housed respectively in the Departments of Psychology", Gerontology, and Anthro pology, they utilize faculty expertise from many disciplines. Stu dents majoring in these areas receive distinctive educational ex periences in both university and community settings. The Human Resources Institute of the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences was established to address critical issues in the broad human resources sector through a comprehensive pro gram of research and service The following Centers are related to the Human Resources Institute: Center for Applied Anthro pology, Center for Applied Gerontology, Center for Community Development and Analysis, Center for Community Psychology, and Center for Evaluation Research. BACCALAUREATE LEVEL DEGREE PROGRAMS Admission to the College Admis s ion to the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences is open to students who have been accepted to the University of South Florida and who declare a major in a particular field within the college. The Bachelor. of Soc.ial Work, however, is a limited acce s s degree program and does require satisfaction of additional criteri a prior to admission. Undergradu a te students must submit a formal application for admission to the college. This application is available in the College Office of Advising and Student Records Students will then be counseled by an academic adviser in his / her major field Information about m a jors, departments, programs, advising, and other s ervices of the college may be obtained from the Assistant De a n College of Social and Behavioral Sciences University of South Florida Tampa Florida, 33620. Any student in the University may take courses in the Col lege of Social and Behavioral Sciences Students in other col leges or adults in the community may s elect social and behavioral s cience courses of particular interest. Honors Programs Faculty and selected students in the college participate in the University Honors Program. In addition, the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences offers undergraduate honors programs in two fields: Political Science and Psychology. Students in terested in one of these honors programs should consult the appropriate department for further information General Requirements for Degrees The College of Social and Behavioral Sciences currently offers two undergraduate degrees: Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Social Work Requirements for graduation (referred to on page 36) are summarized as follows : I. 180 credits with at least a c" average (2.0) in courses taken at the University of South Florida. At least 60 of these 180 credits must be in courses numbered 3000 or above (A maximum of four credits of physical education courses may be counted toward graduation requirements ; no credits in physical education are required ) 2. 60 credits of general distribution courses as required by the University in the areas of English Composition, Fine Arts and Humanities, Mathematics and Quantitative Methods, Natural Sciences, and Social and Behavioral Sciences (See General Distribution Requirements, page 35) Transfer students with standard AA degrees will be considered to have met the University's General Edu cation Requirements; however, such students who have not gained exposure each of the five areas are strongly encouraged to make up deficiencies early in their USF careers 3 Completion ofa major in a subject or an integrated major, with at least a "C" average (2. 0), or 2 .75 in the case of Social Work majors. (See following pages for require ments in specific majors offered in the college ) 4 120 credits outside the major, including 62 credits outside the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences. These requirements are designed to insure breadth of academic experience 5 Credits transferred from othe institutions will not be in cluded in the computation of the grade point average for graduation To be eligible for graduation with honors re quires at least a 3 5 average in all USF work and all previous college work 6. A student must complete at least 45 of the last 90 credits in academic residence at USF. The approval of the Dean of the college granting the degree must be secured for any transfer credits offered for any part of these last 90 hours A maximum of 90 quarter hours (60 semester hours) of transfer credit will be accepted for community college work except with the recommendation of the Dean and the approval of the Academic Regulations Committee. Students are encouraged to consult with an academic adviser in 146

PAGE 38

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 147 his i her major.It must be noted, however, that the student as. sumes full responsibility for satisfying all Uni versity, College, and departmental requirements for graduation. Programs Leading to the Baccalaureate Degree The College of Social and Behavioral Sciences offers a major in 13 fields as described in the following pages In addition to the departmental majors, interdisciplinary major s are offered. (See Interdisciplinary Social Sciences, International Studies, and So cial Science Education listed below). Economics offers two majors, one in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences and the other in the College of Business Administration. A Bachelor of Arts Degree is offered in the following: Afro-American Studies (AFA) Anthropology (ANn Criminal Justice (CCJ) Economics (ECN) Geography (GPY) Histor,}' (HTY) Interdisciplinary Social Sciences (SS I) International Studies (INT) Political Science (POL) Psychology (PSY) Sociology (SOC) Social Science Education (SSE) A Bachelor of Social Work Degree (B.S.W ) is also offered. Social Work (SOK) Offered jointl y with the College of Educ a tion. GRADUATE LEVEL DEGREE PROGRAMS Master's Degree Programs Graduate level courses are now offered in most social and behavioral science areas. The Master of Arts Degree is offered in the following: Anthropology (ANn Criminal Justice (CCJ) Geography (G PY) Gerontology (AGE) History (HTY) Political Science (POL) Psychology (PSY) Rehabilitation Counseling ( REH) Post-Baccalaureate Rehabilitation Counseling (REF) 5-year program Sociology (SOC) A Master of Public Administration Degree (M.P.A.) is also offered. Public Administration (PAD) In addition to the Master of Arts degree offered from the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, joint degrees are of-fered with the College of Education in Social Science Education, School P sycho logy and the Junior College Teachers' Program. The Department of Communicology in the college offers a Master of Science Degree in the following: Audiology (AUD) PostBaccalaureate Audiology (AUF) 5-year program Aural (Re) Habilitation (ARH) Post-Baccalaureate Aural (Re) Habilitation (ARF) 5-year program Speech Pathotogy (S PP) Post-Baccalaureate Speech Pathology (SPF) 5-year program Doctor of Philosophy The Department of Psychology offers a program leading to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. SPECIAL NON-DEGREE PROGRAMS The Gerontology undergraduate program consists of a core of courses designed for interested st udent s These courses are GEY 3000, GEY 3100, GEY 4'!30. Additional information will be found in the Geronotology s6ction of the catalog. The OFF-CAMPUS TERM PROGRAM offers a wide variety of opportunities for self-de signed, supervised educational ex periences for credit. This program is presently hou sed adminis tratively in the Department of Interdisciplinary Social Sciences and the courses are listed under Off-Campus Term and Social Sciences Interdisciplinary The WOMEN'S STUDIES PROGRAM consists of courses designed to deal with historical, anthropological, sociological and psychological aspects of the woman's role and of the feniale experience. This program is pre sently housed in the Department of Interdi scip linary Social Sciences, and the courses are listed under Women s Studies. The HUMAN SERVICES COURSES are designed for stu dents interested in careers in the human sciences and services, and may be taken in conjunction with any major or by special students. These courses are coordinated by the Department of Gerontology, and the courses are listed as : HUS 3010 HUS 3300 HUS 4020 HUS 4500 HUS 5224 MHT 4302 sow 4332 Certificate in Latin American Studies The College of Social and Behavioral Sciences also offers a Cer tificate in Latin American Studies for students who wish to gain a n intensive multidisciplinary understanding of this importan t area. A minimum of 32 quarter hours is required of all s tudents seeking such a certificate Of these, at least 16 must be planned around the following core courses : GEA 3400 Geography of Latin America LAH 3022 Modern Latin America CPO 4930 Comparative Government and Politics (Latin America) SPT 3131 Spanish American Literature in Transla tion; or equivalent ih original language The remaining 16 hours must be selected from othe r specified courses with Latin American content, a list of which is available from the Latin American Studies Coordinator. In addition students seeking a Certificate in Latin Ameri can Studies must have ability in Spanish ; Portuguese, or another major Indo-American language or must have completed no less than three quarters of study in that language, or its equivalent. It is hoped that the student will develop an even higher level of competency in one language and at least minimum proficiency in a second language.

PAGE 39

148 COLLEGE OF SOCIAL ANO BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES When the student has completed the above requirements, the Latin American Studies Coordinator will recommend the s tudent for the Certificate which will be awarded upon the suc ce ssful completion of all degree requirements for the major. Information and advice about the certificate program may be obtained from the Latin American Studies Coordinator or the Assistant Dean Only degree-seeking undergraduate students may earn a Certificate in Latin American Studies. The program is open to all majors in all colleges. Academic Minor Programs In order to help students develop some concentration in elective work taken in conjunction with their chosen major, the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences offers minors in the following fields: African Studies Afro-American Studies, Anthropology Economics Geography, History, International Studies, Manual Communications, Political Science, Sociology and Women's Studies. (See following pages for requirements in specific minors offered in the college.) There are certain restrictions that apply to students earning a minor in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences : (I) students who major and minor in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences may not use courses in the major or the minor for general distribution requirements; (2) only degree-seeking students may earn a minor in the social and be havioral sciences; and (3) SSI majors may not earn a minor in any of the social and behavioral sciences. Minors will be certified at the time of graduation PROGRAMS AND CURRICULA AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES (AFA) Afro-American Studies Program provides a quality under graduate education leading to a B a chelor of Arts degree in Afro-American Studies. Essentially it is a service program which provides opportunities for all s tudents to broaden the bases of their knowledge of the entire human experience and intercultural understanding so essential to living in a multi-racial society and a world that has become a global village. It provides a new horizon in liberal education that s eeks reunification of the knowledge of human experience and strikes at the narrowness and ethnocen trism of the traditional disciplines which have contributed much to race prejudice and misunderstanding. Part of its mission is to assist its black student clientele to achieve a more dignifying identity and fuller participation in the mainstream of American life. It attempts to help them to develop a greater awareness of themselves and their talents and to provide them educational and research opportunities necessary for the acquisition of under standing of political and economic realities and tools that must enable black people and other minorities to become effective determinants of their own political and economic life. Admission to Afro-American Studies major is open to all s tudents who have been duly admitted to the University of South Florida by the Office of Admissions and who file necessary pap ers in the Office of the Coordinator of Advising, College of So cial and Behavioral Sciences, to declare a major in the field All of the program's courses are open to all other students-regular and special-of the University Requirements for the B.A. Degree: The major in Afro-American Studies consists of a minimum of 56 hours in the field specified as follows: R equired Core Courses (20 e r hrs.) AFA2001 (4) AFH3200 (4) AMH3572 (4) AFH 3100 (4) AMH 3571 (4) R eq uired Supporting Courses (12 e r hr s.) I AFA 4150 (4) AFS 3311 (4) ECP 4143 (4) AFA 4936 (4) AFS 4910 (1-4) PHM 4120 (4) Suggested Electi1e Courses (24 er. hr s.) AFA 4 J31 (4) AFS 4321 (4) AFA 4419 (4) CPO 4204 (4) AFA 4900(2-4) CPO 4244 (4) AFA 4931(1-4) CPO 4254 (4) HUM 3420 (4) INR 4254 (4) PUP 3313 (4) Majors must maintain a minimum of2. 0 average and are also responsible for fulfilling College and University general educa tion requirements Requirements for the Minor: Afro-American Studies Program offers minors in African and Afro-American Studies to meet the interests of students. Each minor comprises twenty eight (28) quarter hours, exactly one-half of the upper division credits required for a major. Re quirements for the minors are as follows : Afro-American Studies Option I (Minimum of 28 hours): Required Core Courses ( 12 hours) AFA 2001 (4) One of: AFH 3100 (4) or AFH 3200 (4) One of: AMH 3571 (4) or AMH 3572 (4) Ele c ti ves (16 hours) selected from : AFA4150 (4) AFA4931 (4) AFS3311 (4) CPO 4204 (4) CPO 4254 (4) HUM 3420 (4) INR 4254 (4) PUP 3313 (4) Afro-American Studies Option II (Minimum of 28 hours) : Required Core Courses ( 16 hours) AFA 2001 (4) AHM 3571 (4) AMH 3572 (4) PUP 3313 (4) El ec tives ( 12 hours) selected from: AFA 4150 (4) AFA 4331 (4) AFA 4931 (4) AFS 3311 (4) ECP 4143 (4) HUM 3420 (4) PHM 4120 (4) African Studies (Minimum of 28 hours) Required Core Courses ( 16 hours) AFH 3100 (4) AFH 3200 (4) CPO 4204 (4) INR 4254 (4) Electives (12 hours) selected from: AFA 4150 (4) AFA 4931 (4) AFS 3311 (4) AFS 4321 (4) CPO 4244 (4) CPO 4254 (4) HUM 3420 (4) ANTHROPOLOGY(ANT) Anthropology aims at comprehending people as biological and social beings. It is concerned with all forms of people through time and space. One consequence of this broad-ranging view is the presence within anthropology of four branches ; physical anthropology, archaeology, cultural anthropology, and linguistics. Exposure to anthropological information and the cross-cultural perspective produces heightened sensitivity in the student to the world about him / her. This helps the student to adopt an intellectual posture of disciplined skepticism with re spect to any scheme which purports to define and account for regularities in human life In response to an increasing interest on the part of students an undergraduate focus in applied anthro pology has been created to offer the Department's majors the option of including career training as a part of their anthropology curriculuin. The focus includes emphasis in applied anthro pology coursework and a practicum course in which the student applies anthropological method and theory in off-campus set tings Students majoring in other fields may find anthropology coursework an exciting and valuable supple ment to their primary academic interest. A minor in anthropology has been developed with this purpose in. mind. The minor program is structured to allow the student maximum flexibility in course selection within a broadly defined progression of anthropological concerns. Thus the student is able lo tailor a minor in anthropology to best suit special wants and needs in the context of an overall cur riculum.

PAGE 40

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 149 The primary objective of the graduate program is to provide both b asic education and s pecialized training in several specific field s of a pplied a nthropology (medical and urban anthropology, publi c archaelogy) which will enable the graduate to render val u a ble and substantive s ervice at local, state, national and international levels in a context of non-academic, non-teaching employment. Graduates wili be capable of a s suming vital posi tions in the various agencies and institutions charged with under s t a nding and acting on the complex problems which beset our society Bec a use of the s equential nature of the graduate courses, entering s tudent s are ordinarily admitted only in the Fall Quarter (September) each year. .At that time a new cycle of courses be gin s. The Center for Applied Anthropology is one of five centers in the Hum a n Re sources Institute, College of Social and Be h a vioral Science s The Center is concerned with applying an thropologi c al kno w ledge theory method and perspectives to problem s of contemporary society. Illustrative areas of activity include human s ervices needs assessment program planning and evaluation social and environmental impact assessment, and public policy analysis. Requirements for the B.A. Degree in Anthropology (ANT): The major in Anthropology consists of a minimum of 48 credit hours including 44 credit hours in the field and the course Social Science Stati s tics (ST A 3122) or its equivalent. ANT 2000 i s prerequisite to all subsequent courses. ANT 3100 ANT 3410, A NT 3511 a nd A NT 3610 are required as intermediate level training in the main subdivisions of the field, and A NT 4034 and ANT 4935 complete the specific requirements Majors are re quired to complete a minimum of 16 hours of elective course work 12 hours of which must come from three of the follpwing four subdivision clusters : Cluster I (Archaeology) ANT 4133 (4) ANT 4153 (4) ANT 4162 (4) ANT 4163 (4) ANT 4172 (4) ANT 4181 (5) ANT 4182 (4) Cluster II (Physical Anthropology) ANT 4124 (5) ANT 4158 (5) ANT 4180 (5) ANT 4542 (4) ANT 4552 (4) ANT 4583 (4) ANT 4586 (4) Cluster III (Anthropological Linguistics) ANT 4620 (4) ANT 4750 (4) Cluster IV {Cultural Anthropology) ANT 4226 (4) ANT 4316 (4) ANT 4231 (4) ANT 4326 (4) ANT 4241 (4) ANT 4340 (4) ANT 4302 (4) ANT 4367 (4) ANT 4305 (4) ANT 4432 (4) ANT 4312 (4) ANT 444Z (4) ANT 4462 (4) ANT 4495 (4) MUH 4521 (4) ANT 4705 (4) ANT 4723 (4) The remaining 4 minimum elective hours may come from any of the department's elective offering s including ANT 4901 (1-6) ANT 4907 (3-6 ), ANT 4930 (4) and those in the clusters de s cribed above. Anthropology majors are urged to become com petent in the u s e of a foreign language Exceptions to course prerequi s ite s require the consent of the instructor R e quir e d Co r e C o ur s e s ( 2 8 e r hrs : ) ANT2000 (4) ANT-3511 (4) ANT4034 (4) ANT 3100 (4) ANT 3610 (4) ANT 4935 (4) ANT 3410 (4) Requirements for the Minor in Anthropology The minor in Anthropology consists of a minimum of 24 credit hours with a C average (2.0) di s tributed among three a reas. Students will normally progress through these area s in the order lis ted below s electing cours e s prerequi s ite or otherwise a ppropri a te to cours e s desired in subsequent areas. Exceptions to thi s pattern mu s t be a pproved by the department's under gr a du a te a d v i ser. Students are urged to consult with the major a nd minor s tudent advisers to create the most beneficial specific set of cours es. A 2000-level required core course (4 er. hrs ) ANT 2000 (4) B. 3000-level subfield courses (4-8 er. hrs ) ANT 3100 (4) ANT 3511 (4) ANT 3410 (4) ANT 3610 (4) C. 4000-level elective courses (12-16 er. hrs ) (as described in Clusters I, II, III, and IV above) Requirements for the Undergraduate Focus in Applied Anthropology This s equence is designed for Anthropology majors who wish to include career training as part of their Anthropology curriculum The student is required to complete the major in Anthropology, making certain to take the following Focus courses : ANT 4495 (4) ANT 4705 (4) ANT 4442 (4) or ANT 4462 (4) In addition, the student must take ANT 4907 (4), the setting in which the off-campus practicum is pursued A departmental Letter of Achievement is awarded upon graduation and suc cessful completion of Focus requirements with a "B" average (3.0). Information regarding admission into the Focus program may be obtained from the department undergraduate adviser. Requirements for the M.A. Degree General requirements for graduate work are listed on page 46 and should be s tudied carefully The student must complete 49 quarter hours of graduate course work. All students must complet!< the fo\ir core seminar courses then proceed to take minimally, one methods course one selected topics course, and one regional problems course in one of the three tracks (medical anthropology, urban anthropol ; ogy, public archaeology) In addition, each student must : com plete a graduate level statistics course for a minimum of four quarte r hours, and two graduate-level courses, normally taken outside the department, for a minimum of six quarter hours, chosen in mutual agreement by the student and his / her adviser; successfully pass the comprehensive examination ; under take directed research (internship); and write a thesis. The student must maintain a "B" average in all course work. In addition the program requires a "B" average for the four core seminars be fore the student can proceed to take the comprehensive exami nation. I. Courses Required of All Students A. Core courses ANT 6186 (4) ANT 6588 (4) ANT 6490 (4) ANT 6676 (4) B. Additional Requirements Two graduate-level courses normally taken outside the department; one graduate-level statistics course ; C ANT 6915' (1-15) ANT 6971 (1-9) II. Courses in One of Three Tracks A. Medical Anthropology Track ANT 6463 (4) A NT 6737 (4) ANT 6469 (4) B Urban Anthropology Track ANT 6446 (4) A NT 6448 (4) ANT 6447 (4) C Public Archaeology Track ANT 6196 (4) ANT 6198 (4) ANT 6197 (4) COMMUNICOLOGY (AUD/ AUF/ ARH/ ARF/SPP/SPF) A Master of Science degree is offered through the Depart ment of Communicology that is structured to meet the prepara tion requirements of the American Speech and Hearing Associ-

PAGE 41

150 COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES ation for the Certificate of Clinical Competence In addition to the core subject material each student may elect to pursue a program of sj)ecialization in the areas of Speech Pathology, Au diology or Aural (Re)Habilitation. Undergraduate s tudents enroll in a five-yea r program termi nating in the Master of Science degree in Speech Pathology, Audiology or Aural (Re)Habilitation Students may apply for acceptance in the M S degree program upon attainingjunior class standing, completion of the basic departmental core curriculum with a 3.0 grade point average, submitting cumulative Graduate Record Examination scores of 850 or greater (Verbal/Quantita tive) and demonstrating competency in communication skills as determined by the chairperson or his /her delegate Students may not apply for the baccalaureate degree Programs are planned through the master's degree at the time of acceptance. Applicants holding a baccalaureate degree from an accre dited college or univer sity with appro priate prerequisite course work will be eligible for admission if the following minimal re quirement s are met : I. Submis s ion of a cumulative score of 1000 or greater for the GRE aptitude test s (Verbal / Quantitative) plu s a grade point average of 3.0 (A=4.0) for the la st half of their undergraduate course work. 2. Submi ss ion of three satisfactory l e tter s of recommenda tion for gr a du ate s tudy, and 3. Demonstration of competency in communication s kill s as determined by the Ch airpel's on or his / her delegate. Requirements for the M.S. Degree in Speech Pathlogy-Post-Baccalaureate (SPP) General requirements for graduate work are already de lineated by the University's Division of Graduate Studies. A minimum of 45 credits is required as well as completion of suffi cient coursework and practicum to meet the American Speech and Hearing Association's requirement for clinical certification in speech pathology. The attainment of clinical competency as determined by a minimum GPA of 3 0 in Graduate Practicum and the approval of a m aj ority of the academic staff of the De partment of Communicology is also required for graduation. The student with an existing bachelor's degree and appropriate pre requisites may plan his / her degree program from among the following cour s e s with a pproval of the department chairperson or his/her delegate: SPA 4250 SPA 4255 SPA 4333 SPA 5002 SPA 5131 SPA 5201 SPA 5210 SPA 5222 SPA 5303 SPA 5402 SPA 5550 SPA 5552 SPA 5557 SPA 5600 (4) (4) (3) (6) (6) (4) (4) (4) (6) (4) (6) {6) (1-12) (4) SPA 6231 SPA 6245 SPA 6322 SPA 6332 SPA 6335 SPA 6410 SPA 6423 SPA 6505 SPA 6825 SPA 6906 SPA '6930 SPA 6910 or SPA 6971 Requirements for the Combined Undergraduate/Graduate M.S. Degree in Speech Pathology (SPF) (4) (4) (6) (6) (3) (4) (6) (1-121) (4) (var ) (4) (var.) (6) A minimum tot a l of 225 cred its is required for the combined undergradu ate / graduate M.S. program. In ad dition to the Gen eral Dist ribution requirements the following courses will be re qu i red for all progr ams : LIN 3010 LIN 4040 LIN 4710 SPA 2001 SPA 3080 or STA 3122 (4) (4) (4) (3) (6) (4) SPA 3101 SPA 3110 SPA 3117 SPA 4050 SPA 4250 SPA 4255 SPA 4333 (6) (6) (6) (1-12) (4) (4) (3) SPA 4363 (6) SPA 6231 (4) SPA 5002 (6) SPA 6245 (4) SPA 5131 (6) SPA 6322 (6) SPA 5201 (4) SPA 6410 (4) SPA 5210 (4) SPA 6423 (6) SPA 5222 (4) SPA 6505 (1-12) SPA 5303 (6) SPA 6825 (4) SPA 5402 (4) SPA 6906 (var.) SPA 5550 (6) SPA 6930 (4) SPA 5552 (6) SPA 6910 (var ) SPA 5557 (1-12) or SPA 5600 (4) SPA 6971 (6) In addition, s ufficient and appropriate coursework (ap proved by the Chairperson or his /her delegate) will be included to meet the preparation requirements of the American Speech a nd Hearing A ss oci a tion for the Certificate of Clinical Compe tence. The attainment of clinical competence as determined by a minimum GPA of3. 0 in Graduate Practicum and the approval of a majority of the academic staff of the Department of Communi cology is also required for graduation Requirements for the M.S. Degree in Audiology Post Baccalaureate (AUD) General requirements for graduate work are a lre a dy de. lineaied by the University's Divi s ion of Graduate Studies. A minimum of 45 credits is required as well as sufficient course work and practicum to meet the American Speech a nd Hearing Association's requirement for clinical certification in Audiology. The attainment of clinical competence as determined by a minimum GP A of 3 0 in Graduate Practicum and the a pproval of a majority of. the academic staff of the Department of Communi cology is also required for graduation .' The s tudent with an ex isting bachelor's degree and appropriate prerequisites may pla n a program from among the following courses with approval of the department c hairper so n or his / her delegate. SPA 4250 (4) SPA 4255 (4) SPA 4333 (3) SPA 5002 (6) SPA 5132 (6) SPA 5303 (6) SPA5312 (6) SPA 5402 (4) SPA 5550 (6) SPA 5552 (6) SPA 5557 (1-12) SPA 5600 ( 4 ) SPA 6305 (4) SPA 6307 (4) SPA 6322 SPA 6332 SPA 6335 SPA 6345 SPA 6354 SPA 6423 SPA 6505 SPA 6825 SPA 6906 SPA 6930 SPA 6910 or SPA 6971 (6) (6) (3) (4) (4) (6) (1-12) (4) (var.) (4) (var.) (6) Requirements for the Combined Undergraduate/ Graduate M.S. Degree in Audiology (AUF) A m ini mum of 225 credits is required for the combined pro gram In addition to the General Distribution re quirements the following courses will be required for all programs : LIN 3010 LIN 4040 LIN 4710 SPA 2001 SPA 3080 or STA 3122 SPA 3101 SPA 3110 SPA 3117 SPA 4050 S PA 4250 SPA 4255. SPA 4333 SPA 4363 SPA 5002 (4) (4) (4) (3) (6) (4) (6) (6) (6) (1-12) (4) (4) (3) (6) (6) SPA 5132 SPA 5303 SPA 5312 SPA 5402 SPA 5557 SPA 5600 S P A 6305 SPA 6307 SPA 6322 SPA 6332 SPA 6345 SPA 6354 SPA 6423. SPA 6505. SPA 6825 SPA 6906 (6) (6) (6) (4) (1-12) (4) (4) (4) (6) (6) (4) (4) (6) (1-12) (4) (var.)

PAGE 42

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 151 SPA 6930 (4) SPA 6910 (var.) or SPA 6971 (6) In addition suffic ient and coursework (ap proved by the department chairperson or his/ )ler delegate) must be included to meet the preparation requirements of the Ameri can Speech and Hearing Association for the Certificate of Clini cal Competence in Audiology The attainment of clinical competence as d etermi ned by a minimum GPA of 3 0 in Graduate Practicum and the approva l of a majority of the aca demic staff of the Department of Communicology is also required for graduation Requirements for the M.S. Degree in Aural (Re)H .abilitationPost Baccalaureate (ARH) General requirements for graduate work are already line ated by the University s Division of Graduate Studies. A minimum of 45 credits is required as well as sufficient course work practicum and internship to meet the Florida State De partment of Education certification requirements for speciali zation with the hearing impaired. The attainment of clinical com petence as determined by a minimum GP A of 3 .0 in Graduate Practicum and the approval of a majority of the academic staff of the Department of Communicology is also required for gradua tion. Students may plan programs with emphasis in the areas of preschool, schoo l age, m"1ltiply handicapped, and adult hearing impaired All teachers of the deaf programs will be planned from among courses offered by the appropriate teacher preparation areas within the College of Education as well as from the follow ing : SPA 4333 (3) SPA 6345 SPA 4363 (6) SPA 6354 SPA 5002 (6) SPA 6423 SPA 5201 (4) SPA 6505 SPA 5303 (6) SPA 6825 SPA 5402 (4) SPA 6906 SPA 5557 (1-12) SPA 6930 SPA 6305 (4) SPA 6910 SPA 6322 (6) or SPA 6332 (6) SPA 6971 SPA 6335 (3) Requirements for the Combined Undergraduate/Graduate M.S. Degree in Aural (Re)Habilitation (ARF) (4) (4) (6) (1-12) (4) (var.) (4) (var.) (6) A minimum of 225 credits is required for the combined pro grams as well as sufficient coursework, practicum and internship to meet the Florida State Department of Education certification requirements for specializa tion with the hearing impaired. The attainment of clinical competence as determined by a minimum GP A of 3 0 in Graduate Practicum a nd the approval of a major ity of the academic staff of the Department of Communicology is also required for graduation Students may plan programs with emphasis in the a reas of preschool schoo l age, multiply handi capped and adult hearing impaired In addition to the General Distribution requirements all teachers of the deaf programs will be planned to include coursework from the appropriate teacher preparation areas wit hin the College of Education as well as from the following: LIN 3010 LIN 4040 LIN 4710 SPA 2001 SPA 3080 or STA 3112 SPA 3101 SPA3110 SPA3117 SPA 4050 SPA 4333 SPA 4363 (4) (4) (4) (3) (6) (4) (6) (6) (6) (1-12) (3) (6) SPA 5002 SPA 5201 SPA 5303 SPA 5402 SPA 5557 SPA 6305 SPA 6322 SPA 6332 SPA 6335 SPA 6345 SPA 6354 SPA 6423 SPA 6505 (6) (4) (6) (4) (1-12) (4) (6) (6) (3) (4) (4) (6) (1-12) SPA 6825 SPA 6906 SPA 6930 (4) (var.) (4) SPA 6910 (var.) or SPA 6971 (6) Requirements for the Minor in Manual Communica tions A Minor in Manual Communications is available to under graduate students interested in attaining an understanding of the i:;ommunication problem s associated with deafness and de veloping competency in receptive and expressive manual lan guage skills. The minor consists of the following courses which must be taken in the seq uence indicated: SPA 2001 (3) SPA 4363 (3) SPA 4333 (6) SPA 4050 SPA 4930 (4) (4) Departmental approval for the minor must be obtained prior to enrolling in any of the required 4000-level courses. CRIMINAL JUSTICE (CCJ) The major in criminal justice provides students with an indepth exposure to the total criminal justice syste m including law enforcement, detention the judiciary, corrections, and probation and parole. The program concentrates on achieving balance in the above aspects of the system from the perspective of the criminal justice professional the offender and society. The objective of the graduate program in criminal justice is to develop a sound educational basis for professional training in one or more of the specialized areas comprising the modem urban Criminal Justice System. Requirements for the B.A. Degree: A minimum of 53 quarter hours is required of all under graduate majors in Criminal Jus tice including the following courses or their equivalents : CCJ 3020 (5) CCJ 3610 (8) CCJ 4934 (3) CCJ 3280 (4) CCJ 3620 (4) CCJ 4940 (12) In addition to the above, a minimum of 17 hours in Criminal Justice selected by the student complete the requirements. Transfer students should be awa re that by University regu lation they are obligated to establish academic residency by completing the equivalent of one academic year (45 quarter hours) in "on-cam pus courses. All undergraduate transfer stu dents electing Criminal Justice as their major will be required moreover to take a minimum of 35 credits in major coursework at the University of South Florida. These residence requirements are de signed to insure that transfer students who subsequently receive their baccalaureate degree from the University of South Florida with a major in Criminal Ju s tice will have been exposed to the same body of knowledge in their major as those s tudent s who complete all or a major portion of their coursework at the University of South Florida. Any st udent who receives a grade of D or lower in more than one USF CCJ course will be automatically barred from continuing as a Criminal Justice major. Thi s applies only to stu dents whose first USF CCJ course was taken during Fall Quar ter (I) 1975 or thereafter. Students electing to major in Criminal Justice as of Quarter I (Fall) 1978 will be required to obtain a score acceptable to the Department of Criminal Justice on an English proficiency test. This performance requirement must be met before the student completes 13 CCJ hours t Inservice s tud en t s are required to take only 4 hours of CCJ 4940, thu s reducing th eir major cou r se credits to 45 quarter hours. t Approval Pending.

PAGE 43

152 COLLEGE OF SOCIAL ANO BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES Requirements for the M.A. Degree: University requirement s for graduate study are given on page 46. Additionally eac h gra duate applicant s hould s ubmit three letter s of recommendation a letter of intent to the Dep art ment of Criminal Ju s tice and s ho w successful co mpletion of an acceptable undergraduate social sc i e nce introductory statistics course or equivalept. Admi ss ion into graduate courses and /or the graduate pro gram is contingent upon demon s trated proficiency in the English langu age, as determined by the department. Special provi sio n s for meeting thi s requirem e nt may be arranged for out-of -s tate applicants. NOTE: Individual s who wish to take courses in the graduate progr a m as "Special Students s hould contact the Director of Gradu a te Studies for the dep a rtment prio r to their fir s t class appearance Such s tudent s will in general be prohibited from enrolling in CCJ 6910 Further information m ay be obtained by contacting the Di rector of Gr ad uate Studies of the Department of Criminal Jus tice. Requirements for graduation for all M .A. candidates will consist of: I. 45 c redit s of CCJ course work (or a pproved equivalents) which include : CCJ 6285 (4) CCJ 6705 ( 4 ) CCJ 6946 (4) CCJ 6605 ( 4 ) CCJ 6920 (I) 2. Completion of a the s is; CCJ 6971 3 Co mpletion of an oral defen se of the the sis (occurs after the fina l draft of the the sis has been acceptd b y the s tudent' s committee). All co ur s e work counted toward the degree must have the prior a pprov a l of the s tudent' s major profe ssor and the Director of Gra duate Studie s of the Criminal Ju stice Should be take n fir s t qua rter i n the program ECONOMICS (ECN) Requirements for B.A. Degree Eco nomic s i s one of the vital disc ipline s investigating the complex problem s and relationships in modem s ociety. Indeed the very breadth of economic s h as led to major areas within th e discipline, including l abor economics, intern a tional economi cs, urb a n and regional economics, monetary eco nomic s, public fi n a n ce, industrial organization, comparative economic sys t e ms, and the like Students a re given a s ound grounding i n economic the o ry and economic s t at i s tic s to facilitate the inve stiga tion o f the probl e m s of hum a n beh av ior deci sio n making and organi zational effectiveness in these problem areas. A s tudent m ay earn a Bac,helor of Arts d egree with a m ajor in Eco nomic s b y completing sa ti sfac toril y 48 credits in Eco nomic s in a ddition to co llege r e quirem e nts. These 48 credits in clude: ECO 2013 ( 4 ) ECO 3203 (5) GEB 2111 (3) ECO 2023 (4) ECO 4303 ( 5 ) GEB 3121 (5) ECO 3101 (5) Economics m ajors working a t the r egio nal campuses cannot expect to fulfill all economics course requirements a t tho se re gional campuses. In addition to thi s core, s tudent s are encouraged to select 3000-level courses in seve ral o f the a pplied a rea s during their junior year., The remaining economics electives mus t be selec ted from those upper lev e l co ur ses th at pro v ide the type of program th a t best su it s the s tudent s intere s ts and objectives Additional flexibility in pur s uing the se intere s t s i s provided by the ECO 4905 and ECO 4914 courses 1 However not more than 10 hour s of credit m ay be earned in ECO 4905 and ECO 4914. Students m ajori n g in economics are encouraged to s upple ment their program s with a ppropri a te cour ses in other socia l sc i e n ces. Political sc ience p syc hology, soc iology and others contribute greatly to a n enriched pla n of s tudy. Similarly a vari ety of courses in economics are desi g ned to permit students majoring in other disc ipline s to acq uire the s kill s and insight s provided in economics. Requirements for a Minor in Economics A s tudent may minor in economics by completing 26 or more credit hour s 'in economic s as follows: (a) A minor mu s t include these four courses in basic economics: ECO 2023 Economic Principle s I : Microeconomic s ( 4 ) ECO 2013 Economic Principles II: Macroeconomic s (4) ECO 3101 Intermedi ate Price Theory (5) ECO 3203 Intermedi ate Income & Monetary Analysis (5) ( b ) In a ddition a minor mus t include two or more upper level courses taught in the Economic s Department ( ex cluding the variable credit courses ECO 4905, 4914, and 4935), bringing the total credit hours in economics to a minimum of 26. GEB .3121, Business and Economic St atis tic s II, or it s equivalent, i s acceptable for credit in a minor (c) Before being recognized as a minor in economics, a s tu dent must obtain a pproval by the adviser in the Eco nomic s Dep a rtment of the cour ses involved in the s tu dent' s minor program (d) A grade point average of 2 0 or better mu s t be a chieved in the minor coursewo rk for a s tudent to be certified for graduation with a minor in econom ics : (e) At lea st 18 of the required 26 credits mu s t be taken in residence a t USF. Student s intere s ted in majoring or minoring in economics a re encouraged to contact the departm enta l adviser for more inform a tion about these programs. GEOGRAPHY (GPY) Requirements for the B.A. Degree: Geograph y explain s the variable character of the earth s s urfa ce. The two m ajor divi s ion s of geography a r e phy s ical and cultural ( human ). Phy s ical geography includes the s tud y of earth-sun rel a tion s hip s, weather, clim a te, a nd natural feature s of the l a nd sc ape s uch as landforms, s oil s, vegetation and hydrol ogy. Cultural geogr a phy s tudies people their va r ious cultures level s of technology a nd economic activities that operate differ entially to alter the natural land sca pe. Geography's overriding purpose is to under s tand the earth as the h o me of man. A major concern of geography i s the wise use of n a tural, human, and economic re so urces Therefore ecological and environment a l considerations are central to the s tud y of geography Student s a re encou rage d to ta ke elective credits in wide variety of disci pline s because of the cross-disciplinary a pproach to geography. Both soc i a l and n a tural sci ence s are recom mended Geographer s typic ally work as urban and regional planner s, environmental s peci alis t s, map a nd aerial photographic analy s t s, and resource m a nagers. A m ajo r in geography consi sts of 50 credit hour s as follo ws: R equired cor e courses ( 15 cr e dit h o urs) GEO 3013 (5) GEO 3370 (5) One of the foll owi n g (5 c redit h ours) GEO 4280C (5) MET 4002 (5) Two of the foll owi n g ( 10 credi t hours) GEO 3402 ( 5 ) GEO 4440 (5) GEO 4372 (5) GEO 4460 (5) GEO 4100C (5) MET 4010C (5) GEO 4470 ( 5 ) G EO 4500 (5)

PAGE 44

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 153 Two courses with a GEA pr e fix (JO cr e dit hours) Any additional JO c redit hours in geograph y ; excluding GEO 3901 GEO 4900 GEO 4910 GEO 3931C Requirements for the Minor: A minor in Geography is basically a name given to a set of geography courses taken by a student that totals one-half of the upper division credits required for a major. Twenty-five credit hours consisting of the following courses must be completed with a minimum grade point average of 2.0 : GEA 3000 (5) GEO 3370 (5) GEO 3402 (5) GEO 3013 (5) One upper level elective (GEA, GEO, MET, or URP 3000-5000 level) (5) Requirements for the M.A. Degree General requirements for graduate work are given on page 46. All students must complete 45 credit hours in graduate geog raphy courses, following one of the two plans outlined below A written and oral comprehensive examination covering the gen eral field of geography is required before graduation, and the student must demonstrate his ability to translate into English the pertinent scientific literature from one modern foreign language. Foreign students, whose mothe,r tongue is not English may use English as their foreign language A computer language (such as Fortran) may be used to meet the language requirement Thesis Program: The 45 credit hours in geography must in clude: GEA 6195 GEO 5065 GEO 6119 GEO 6209C GEO 6428 GEO 6971 Up to eight credits outside the department may be elected with the approval of the student's committee and major pro fessor. An oral defense of the thesis is required. Non Thesis Program: The 45 creqit hours in geography must include : GEA 6195 GEO 6209C GEO 6947 GEO 5065 GEO 6428 GEO 6119 GEO 6945 The remaining credit hours must be approved by the student's committee and major professor, and may include up to eight credits outside the department. GERONTOLOGY (AGE) Undergraduate Program Although no baccalaureate degree in gerontology is offered, the Department of Gerontology does provide a core of four courses at the undergraduate level. These courses range from Introduction to Gerontology to Seminar in Selected Topics in Social Gerontology, aftd are designed as electives for students from a variety of areas, particularly the human service areas More generally, the objective of the sequence of undergraduate courses is to provide with a broad educational experi ence in gerontology The Human Services Courses The Human Services Courses are designed for students in terested in careers in the human sciences and services, and may be taken in conjunction with any major or by si)ecial students They are closely related to our Urban Community Psychol9gy and Gerontology Program of Distinction and will be taught by qualified faculty from the various disciplines within the colJege. The Human Services sequence is coordinated by the Depart ment of Gerontology. Center for Applied Gerontology The Center for Applied Gerontology is one of five special ized centers in the new Human Resources Institute within the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences The activitie s of the Center include research on aging program evaluation, short term training of agency personnel the collection and dissemination of resource materials on death, dying and grief and other activities intended to complement the educational program in gerontology. Graduate Program The primary objective of the graduate program in aging is to train personnel for leadership positions in the planning de velopment delivery, and evaluation of community service s for older persons. in keeping with this objective the program offers a broad range of cross-disciplinary courses. As an important part of the training process each graduate student spends a super vised internship for one academic quarter in a community agency or facility which provides services for older persons A Masier of Arts degree in Gerontology is awarded upon satisfactory com pletion of the requirements Requirements for the M.A. Degree in Gerontology The M A degree requires five quarters of full-time study-or the part-time equivalent thereof-including one quarter of supervised field experience The courses in the degree program were developed specifically to meet the objectives of the program and are offered under the Department of Geron tology The M.A. degree ii;t Gerontology requires a minimum of 54 credit hours in approved Gerontology courses. Prior to be ginning the program, each student will confer with a depart mental adviser who will thoroughly review the student' s aca demic background experience, and career interests and develop an approved, individual curriculum from the available Geron tology courses Requir e s courses for the M.A d eg r ee includ e: GEY 6930 (2) GEY 6932 (2) GEY 6940 (12) GEY693!.(2) GEY6933 (2) Majors are also required to take a minimum of 34 hours from the following: GEY 5250 (4) GEY 5642 (4) GEY 6450 (4). GEY 5350 (4). GEY 5645 (4) GEY 6460 (4) GEY 5600 (4) GEY 5901(1-3) GEY 6500 (4) GEY 5610 (4) GEY 6325 (4) GEY 6643 (4) GEY 5620 (4) GEY 6390 (4) GEY 6911(1-6) GEY 5630 (4) GEY 6391 (4) GEY 6912(1-6) There are no language requirements. However, following completion of the necessary coursework, there will be a compre hensive examination designed to test the student s knowledge of and ability to integrate key concepts and information in the field of gerontology. This examination must be taken and passed be fore the student begins the required field placement. Admission Requirements: To be eligible for admission to the M.A. program, the a pplicant must: I. hold a baccalaureate degree or its equivalent from an accredited college or university 2 have a minimum score of 1000 on the Graduate Record Examination (total o'f quantitative and verbal aptitude scores) plus a minimum grade point average of 2.5 (A = 4.0) on the last half of courses taken for the b a chelor s degree or have a minimum score of 900 on the Graduate Record Examination (total of quantitative and verbal aptitude score s ) plus a minimum grade point average of 3 0 (A = 4 .0) on the last half of the courses taken for the bachelor's degree 3 An M A in a refated field from an accredited university may be accepted in lieu of undergraduate grade point requirements and Graduate Record Ei:i:amination score requirements.

PAGE 45

154 COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 4 Applicants with significant experience and demon s trated commitment to the field of aging may be approved for admission in lieu of one or more of the above listed requirements. Special consideration may be given to mature students (25 years of age or older) w ho demonstrate commitment to or ex perience in the field of aging. In addition to the University Graduate Studies application, a program application is required and should be ob t ained from the Department of Gerontology. Entering full-time students are ordinarily admitted only in the Fall Quarter (September) each year. At that time, a new cycle of courses begins and runs for five academic quarters HISTORY (HTY) Requirements for the B.A. Degree: A minimum of 48 quarter hour s is required for a major in history 16 hours of 2000 l evel courses, or their equivalent, constitute the lower level requirements. HIS 4070, 4152, and 4936 constitute the upper level requirements for the degree. At lea s t 20 hours of course work must be drawn from the 3000-4000 level. W i th the prior written consent of the student's adviser, major s may take up to eight (8) hours of course work offered by other departments and apply these hours toward meeting the course requirements in history. The course work undertaken outside the Department of History must complement the stu dent's program in history. It is recommended that history majors take ENC 3466 "Advanced Expository Writing, SPC 2023, Fundamentals of Speech Communication," LIS 2001, .. Use of the Library," and 27 quarter hours drawn from the following disciplines: Afro American Studies Anthropology Economics, Geography, Political Science, Interdisciplinary Social Sciences, P sychology, Philosophy Sociology, Literature the Humanities, and the Fine Arts. Major s intending to pursue graduate work s hould take a minimum of two years of classical or m
PAGE 46

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 155 The College Major (SSI) Requirements for the B.A. Degree The coliege major offers students whose educational and vocational interests and objectives cross disciplinary lines an opportunity to undertake a program of study individually de sig ned to serve those interests and objectives. That program of study must inch1de 64 credits in courses offered in the college including STA 3122 Social Science Statistics and a minimum of eight credits in Interdisciplinary Social Science courses At least 40 of the 64 hours required must be upper level. Within these parameters each student's program of study is to be evolved in consultation with and must be formally ap proved by the major adviser, who is the Assistant Dean. The program of study must include an area of concentration of at least 20 credits fo one discipline ; it will normally be expected to include a second area of concentration with either a disciplinary or multidisciplinary focus. The of areas of concentration and of courses within them is to be directly related to the edu cational goals of the student such as to provide an educational experience of excellent quality International Studies (INT) Requirements for the B.A Degree: The major in International Studies is designed to enable students to undertake programs of study based upon the course offerings of not less than three departments of the college which will emphasize (a) preparation for careers in international activi ties, or (b) the study of particular international themes or topics, or (c) the study of particular regions or culture The program of study is developed by each student in con sultation with the major adviser so as best l o serve the individual's educational goals The program is to include not less than 48 credit hours. Of these 24 (a minimum of 6 courses) must be in the Inter national Studies Program offerings of the Department of Inter disciplinary Social Sciences The courses required are: SSI 3221 (4) SSI 4250 (4) SS! 4936 (4) SSI 3260 (4) One of the following : AFS 3930 (4) ASN 3000 (4) ASN 3012 (4) ASN 3014 (4) ASN 3030 (4) EUS 3000 (4) EUS 3022 (4) LAS 3001 (4) One of the following : INR 2085 (3) INR 4083 (4) SSI 3242 '(4) INR 3336 (4) SSI 2261 (4) SSI 3930 (4) INR 3503 (4) SSI 3128 (4) WST 3275 (4) With the approval of the major adviser, credits earned in: SSI 4900 (1-5) SSI 4910 ( l-5) SSI 3955 (1-9) may be used to augment or substitute for the foregoing requirements. The additional 24 credits (6 cour s es) required niust be selected from course offerings of at least two other departments which have international, regional or cultural content. R eq uired Supporting Courses 17 er. hrs (or equivalent proficiency) of appropriate foreign lan guage. Students will be provided with advice as to choices of other courses offered throughout the University which will best reen force and complement their major program Each student's pro gram must be planned with the international studies adviser who is empowered to make appropriate substitutions when edu cationally justified Up to nine credits may be substituted for these requirements by successfully passing SSI 3955 (1-9). Minor in International Studies The minor in Internati onal Studies is basically a name given to a set of International Studies courses taken by a student that totals one-half of the upper division level credits required for a major. The 24 credit hours constituting the minor shall consist of six courses as follows: SSI 3221 America's Role in the World (4) SSI 3260 Communism in the Modern World (4) SSI 4250 The Emerging Nations (4) and three upper level courses chosen from the International Studies Program's offerings of the Department of Interdisci plinary Social Sciences Each student's program must be planned with the International Studies Program major advise r who is empowered to make appropriate substitutions when edu cationally justified. Core Courses These courses, taught from an interdisciplinary social sci ence perspective focus on contemporary social problems and issues. Included is Social Science Statistics which is required for majors in Interdisciplinary Social Sciences, Anthropology, Nursing, Sociology and Social Work. Off-Campus Term The Off-Campus Term Program described more in detail elsewhere in this Catalog is a University-wide, interdisciplinary program which urges students to spend part of their time in col lege in pursuits that are self-designed and implemented in an environment entirely off-campus and out of the classroom. OCT provides for an "education i n life" for full academic credit as an alternative to the traditional methods of learning Women's Studies Program The Women's Studies Program offers a variety of courses, from a n interdisciplinary perspective, focusing on current re search about both the evolution of attitudes towards women and on the stat u s and condition of women today. The content of the program is designed to apply to study in many disciplines, and several of its courses are cross-listed with those of other depart ments, e.g. Psychology, Political Science, English. Minor in Women's Studies Program An undergraduate minor in Women's Studies is available for those who wish to combine their selected majors with study of current research focusing on woinen The courses are offered from a multi-discipline perspective and many may be taken for credit in other departments as well. Requirements for the minor are a total of 28 hours, 24 of them in upper-level courses, and include: 4 credit hours, either WST 2010 (4) or WST 2011 (4); 24 credit hours chosen from among the following: ANT 4302 (4) WST 3220 (4) .EDF 4801 (4) WST 3240 (4) LIT 3414 (5) WST 3270 (4) LIT 3415 (5) WST 3275 (4) POS 4693 (4) WST 3310 (4) REL 3145 (4) WST 3320 (4) SOP 4742 (4) WST 3360 (4) SOP 4772 (4) WST 4930 (1-5) up to 4 er. hrs. WST 3210 (4) WST 4935 (4) Either WST 4910 or WST 4900 (1-4) POLITICAL SCIENCE (POL) Requirements for the B.A. Degree The undergraduate program leading to the B.A. degree in political science offer s a general purpose degree, and a number of more specialized a ltern atives These include the pre-professional plan in political science, the pre-law plan in political science and honors in political science The program is designed for students in and seeking to understand political problems and issue s, the nature of the political process as well as the philo sophical and legal bases of political s tructures and processes at local state, and n ational levels within the United States and elsewhere. Satisfying the degree requirements prepares st udents for po si tions in the public and private sectors for law sc hool for

PAGE 47

156 COLLEGE OF SOCIAL ANO BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES graduate work in political science and related disciplines, for positions in education, and for applied political activity. A minimum of 48 credit hours is required to satisfy the requirements of the major Students must take the eight credit hours which make up the core curriculum, and, in addition, a total of 40 credit hours in political science, of which at least 16 credit hours must be in courses at or above the 4000 level. For instructional purposes, the political science is divided into seven fields However, there are no field requirements. Stu dents are free to select courses from any and all fields within the curriculum Students transferring credit hours towards a major in politi cal science must complete a minimum of 24 credit hours within the Department, regardless of the number of credits transferred, in order to satisfy the requirements of the major. The undergraduate curriculum in political scie nce is composed of the following: Required Core Courses (8 er. hrs ) POS 2041 (4) POS 3173 (4) Electives from the seven fields (40 er. hrs.) Field I Political Theory POS 4204 (4) POT 3003 (4) POT 4064 (4) POS 5734 (4) POT 3013 (4) POT 4204 (4) POS 5764 (4) POT 4054 (4) POT 5626 (4) Field II Comparative Government and Politics CPO 3002 (4) CPO 4930 (4) CPO 5934 (4) CPO 4034 (4) Field III International Relations lNR 3002 (4) INR 4334 (4) INT 5086 (4) INR 3102 (4) INR 4502 (4) Field IV American National and State Governments POS 2041 (4) POS 3273 (4) POS 4413 POS 2112 (4) POS 3453 (4) POS 4424 POS 3173 (4) POS 4233 (4) POS 5094 (4) (4) (4) Field V POS 3182 (4) Urban Government and Politics PAD 5807 (4) POS 4165 (4) PUP 4534 (4) POS 3142 (4) POS 5155 (4) URP 4050 (4) POS 3145 (4) Field VI Public Administration PAD 3003 (4) PAD 5333 (4) PAD 5612 (4) PAD 4204 (4) PAD 5417 (4) PAD 5836 (4) PAD 5035 (4) Field VII Law and Politics / INR 3403 (4) POS 3493 (4) POS 4624 (4) PAD 5605 (4) POS 3691 (4) POS 4693 (4) POS 3284 (4) POS 4614 (4) POS 5699 (4) The following courses are not included within any of the seven fields, but may still be used as elective hours : POS 4905 (1-5) POS 4941 (4) POS 4911} (1-8) POS 4970 (4) POS 4936 (4) I Requirements for a Minor in Political Science A minor in political science consists of24 credit hours, made up of POS 2041 (4 credit hours) and an additional 20 credit hour s of courses from the seven subfields in political science: Political Theory, Comparative Government and Politics International Relations American National and State Governments Urban Government and Politics Public Administration, and Law and Politics. At least 8 credit hours must be in courses at the 4000 / 5000 level. No more than 4 credit hours can be taken from POS 4910, POS 4941, POS 4970, and POS 4905. A GPA of 2.0 is required Subject to these limitations, students may take any undergraduate course offered in political science. There are no field or sequence requirements. Field Work The Department of Political Science has a field work pro gram which provides students with part-time internships with local government in the Tampa Bay area and with political parties at tlie state and local level. Academic credit is a:vailable for such internships For further information, contact the Depart ment of Political Science Honors in Political Science Honors in political science is designed for the outstanding undergraduate who seeks an intensive program plu s academic recognition during the senior year. Admission to the honors se quence, which is available to all undergraduate majors, will be controlled by gracie point average, personal interviews and close scrutiny of the student's program and record Students admitted will participate in an honors seminar, POS 4936 (4) and will write an honors thesis, POS 4970 (4). Pre-professional Plan in Political Science This plan is designed for students seeking an intensive undergraduate concentration in political science Typically, stu dents electing this plan will be qriented towards graduate work in political science or other soci<:1l sciences A minimum of 52 credit hours is required Students must take eight credit hours of required course : POS 2041 (4) POS '3713 (4) Eleven additional courses in political science (44 er. hrs .) must be taken of at least seven must be above the 3000 level. Concentration within fields will be encouraged. Requirements for the Pre-Law Plan in Political Science The Department of Political Science offers a pre-law plan designed for the undergraduate considering a career related to law: Field VII of the undergraduate curriculum (Law and Poli tics) The courses making up the Field are of particular intere s t to law-oriented students but may be taken by others as well. The department seeks to guide majors to those courses which de velop skills and provide information needed for good perform ance in the study of law The department also seeks to give students the skills and information needed for entry into a number of law-related positions in busines s and government. An integral part of this plan is a high degree of student access to the department's pre law adviser. Prior to admission to law school a student must take the Law School Admission Test (LSA n. This test is given by the Educational Testing Service of Princeton New Jersey The Law School Admission Test is given simultaneously severa l times each year at the University of South Florida and numerous other testing centers throughout the state Students should plan to take the test no later than February of the year in which they make application to a law school. Information pamphlets and application forms for the test are obtainable from the Department of Political Science, University of South Florida. (Pre-law is not a prescribed program of study No specific college major is required for admission to law school. Those s tudents intending to pursue the study of law must obtain a Bachelor of Arts degree in an area of personal choice. It is gen erally agreed that a good h1wyer must have knowledge and understanding o(. tqe 1 political, econpmic and context within which legal P,ff>qlems. arise.) Requiremen'ts M.A. Degree The graduate program leading to the M A in political sci ence is designed to offer advanced general instruction in political science and public administration on national, state, and local level s of government. It prepares its graduates for positions of responsibility in the public .and private sectors as well as in re search, teaching, and study at the doctoral level. 46 General requirements for graduate study are given on page The student must complete a minimum of 45 credit hours of graduate level courses ; of which at lea st 24 hours must be at the 6000 level. A minimum of 30 credit hours must be taken in formal

PAGE 48

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 157 regularly scheduled classes. Courses at the 5000 level are ac cepted for credit towards the degree when taken as part of a planned program with the approval of the student's adviser and the Department of Political Science. A minimum of 28 credit hours must be taken in political science; eight credit hours of approved electives may be taken outside the department. All graduate students must write a thesis ( nine credit hours) or petition for substitution with 12 credit hours of regular courses. AH students must pass a comprehensive examination in order to satisfy the degree requirements. This examination normally will be given following the completion of thesis Stu dents whose petitions for the non-thesis option have been ap proved will be permitted to take the examination upon successful completion of at least 40 credit hours. Students who do not have an undergraduate major in poli tical science or its equivalent, may be admitted to the program upon the consent of the department. Such students may be asked to take additional courses beyond the minimum requirements Students must be registered as full-time graduate students for at least one quarter of study. Graduate students in the M'.A program are required to take the graduate core cuniculum: POS 5734 (4) or POS 5764 (4) and POS 6706 (4) For instructional purposes the graduate curriculum in political science has been divid e d into seven fields : Field I Political Theory POS 5734 (4) POS 6246 (4) POT 5626 (4) POS 5764 (4) POS 6706 (4) POT 6007 (4) POS 6207 (4) Field II Comparative Government and Politics CPO 5934 (4) CPO 6008 (4) CPO 6036 (4) CPO 6007 (4) Field I I I International Relations INR 5086 (4) INR 6007 (4) INR 6107 (4) Field IV American National and State Governments POS 5094 (4) POS 6127 (4) POS 6427 (4) POS 6045 (4) POS 6415 (4) POS 6455 (4) Field V Urban Government and Politics PAD 5807 (4) POS 5155 (4) PUP 6538 (4) PAD 6306 (4) POS 6157 (4) URP 6056 (4) Field VI Public Administration PAD5035 (4) PAD5836 (4) PAD 5333 (4) PAD 6037 (4) PAD 5417 (4) PAD 6060 (4) PAD 5612 (4) Field Vil Law and Politics PAD 6207 (4) PAD6228 (4) PUP 6007 (4) PAD 5605 (4) POS 6607 (4) POS 6698 (4) POS 5699 (4) The following non-field courses may be used as elective hours: POS 6909 (1-5) POS 6942 (1-8) POS 6919(var.) POS 6971 (9) POS 6934 (4) More detailed on specific programmatic require ments may be obtained from the Department of Political Science. Requirements for the M.P.A. Degree The Master of Public Administration (M P A.) is primarily designed to meet the education and training needs of those stu dents who are interested in professional car!ier s in the public s ector at all levels of government. General requiretiients for mission to the graduate program are given on page 46 In addi tion, the Department of Political Science may require letters of recommendation, provisional admission and/or additional undergraduate courses to provide the student with the back ground necessary for graduate study in the M P A. program. Students must c9mplete a minimum of 52 credit hours of graduate level courses, of which at least 30 credit hours must be at the 6000 level. A minimum of 36 credit hours must be taken in formal regularly-scheduled classes Courses at the 5000 level may be accepted for credit towards the degree when taken with the consent of a student's adviser. The plan of study for an M P A s tudent consists of the following course distribution: I. Twe l v e credit h o ur s o f co r e c o ur ses: PAD 6060 POS 5734 POS 5764 2 Twenty cr e dit h o ur s in on e o f the thr ee s ubstanti ve a r e a s : Area I-National and State Administrative Sy s tems : PAD 5035 PA D 5807 POS 6095 PAD 5333 PAD 5836 POS 6909 PAD 5417 PAD 6037 POS 6919 PAD 5605 PAD 6207 POS 6934 PAD 5612 Area II-Urban Administration: PAD 5333 PAD 6306 PAD 5417 POS 5155 PAD 5807 POS 6095 PAD 6207 POS 6157 PAD 6228 POS 6909 Area Ill-Public Policy: PAD 5035 PAD 6207 PAD 5333 PAD 6306 PAD 5417 POS 6909 PAD 6037 POS 6919 POS 6934 PUP 6538 URP 6056 POS 6919 POS 6934 PUP 6007 3. Twe l v e c r e dit hour s o f el ec ti ves w ith a minimum o f 6 hours from the Coll ege of Bu s in ess Admini s tr a ti o n and other courses to be designated by the Department. 4. Ei ght c redit hours of Field W ork : POS 6942 Students must pass a comprehensive examination in the chosen substantive area This examination may be oral or writ ten, upon the recommendation of the student's adviser and the consent of the department. Students may also petition the de partment for permission to substitute a the s is in place of the fieldwork requirement, according to procedures establi s hed by the Department. PSYCHOLOGY (PSY) The undergraduate program in Psychology offer s the stu dent a well-rounded Liberal Arts education, together with the opportunity to gain a special acquaintance with issues such as those concerning man s role in modern society tactics of social change, personal adjustment, and educational goals and strat egies In addition, the program provide s excellent background training for qualified students who wis h to pursue graduate work in disciplines such as clinical, experimental or indu s trial psy chology education aging studies coun s eling, women's s tudies black studies, or community relations. The faculty of the Psychology department is divided into three broad program areas : Clinical-Community, Experi mental-Physiological, and Industrial-Organizational. Each of these program areas offers M A and Ph D level training as well as instruction at the undergraduate level. Member s of the Clinical-Community faculty offer coursework and training in the areas of abnormal psychology developmental psychology, behavior modification psychotherapy, personality, and psychological assessment. Individual res earch experience i s also available .to qualified students Members of the Experimental Physiological faculty provide coursework and, for qualified stu dents, direct and extensive research experience in the areas of comparative psychology, electrophysiology, learning and con ditioning, human memory, perception, and information processing. Members of the Industrial-Organizational faculty offer coursework and special training in areas including selec tion training and evaluation of employees job motivation and satisfaction, small group analysis, organizational theory and human factors Requirements for the B.A. Degree: Majors must complete at least 46 credit hours in the field. All majors must complete : PSY 2012 (4) PSY 3013 (4) PSY 3213 (5) PSY 3214 (5)

PAGE 49

158 COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES and select four courses as follows : CLP 4143 or PPE 4004 DEP 4005 (4) EXP 4204C or PSB 4013C EXP4404 or or (4) SOP 4004 (4) EXP 4523C (4) In addition 12 elective credits in psychology co urse s must be completed. PSY 4205 (4) is strongly recommended for all majors and required of students planning graduate training. Functional mathematics and biological science are recommended other wise, students majoring in psychology are encouraged to com plete a varied undergraduate program Admission to Graduate Study: Applications for admission to the Ph.D. degree program are considered only once per year, for admission into the program in September of that year The deadline for completed applications is February I. A completed application includes a complete tran script of college work, a copy of scores on the ORE Aptitude Test, and three letters of recommendation (preferably from col lege instructors). Admission to the program is on a competitive basis. Details concerning the program, including a description of the credentials needed to be competitive with other applicants, and the Graduate Program in Psychology Handbook, are avail able from the Chairperson Graduate Admissions Committee Department of Psychology, USF, Tampa, Florida 33620. All graduate applicants are accepted to work toward the Ph.D. Work on the M.A is considered as the initial portion of the Ph.D. Program The M .A. is not intended to be the tenninal degree Requirements for the M.A. Degree: General requirements for graduate work are given on pages 46-51. The student must complete 50 credit hours of graduate psy chology courses All students must take at least two of the three methods courses, each of which must have a different topic, listed under PSY 6217. In addition, the student must complete a minimum of five of the following ten courses : CLP 6166 (5) EXP 6406 (5). PPE 6058 (5) DEP 6058 (5) EXP 6526 (5). PSB fi056 (5) EXP 6208 (5) INP fi056 (5) SOP (i()59 (5) EXP 6307 (5) The selection of these courses will be made by mutual agreement of the student and his advisory committee .. St dent s with prior work in these areas may waive any of these courses by successfully passing a special examination given by the Psy chology department. Successful waiver may be used to reduce the overall credit hours requirement, if approved by the Psy chology department. A research thesis, PSY 6971, is required and the stude nt must successfully pass an oral examination of the thesis and research courses. In addition to the M.A degree in psychology the Psy chology department and the Departme nt of Educational Psy chology in the College of Education jointly grant the M.A. de gree in School Psycholog y (PSE). (See College of Education, page 73. ) Requirements for the Ph.D Degree: The Ph.D. in Psychology is offered in the fields of Clinical, General Experimental, and Industrial-Organizational Psy chology Specific requirements are determined by the student and his supervisory committee Assuming that the student has completed an M.A. degree in P sychology or its equivalent, the Psychology department re quire s the following in addition to the general University re quirements forthe Ph. D degree. on page 51. I. Reading knowledge of two foreign lan guages, or substi tution for either or both languages by demonstrated com petency in an area or areas approved by the Psychology department. Two substitutive areas currently approved are computer usage skills and electronics skills 2. Supervised undergraduate psychology teaching experi ence 3 A one-year internship in an approved clinical facility for Ph.D. students in the Clinical Psychology program. 4 Six months of internship in approved industries or com munity agencies as available for Ph.D. students in the Industrial-Organizational Psychology program. REHABILITATION COUNSELING (REH/REF) The mission of Rehabilitation Counseling is to help the dis abled live normal and productive lives. Rehabilitation counselors work in a wide variety of human service settings, most frequently those serving the physically m entally, or emotionally disabled. The Department of Rehabilitation Counseling emphasize s training in vocational, psychological, sociological, and medical aspects of disability Graduates are prepared to work as both counselors and rehabilitation specialists The Department of Rehabilitation Counseling at the Uni versity of South Florida offers the M.A. degree. Most students are admitted after completing an undergraduate program in one of the behavioral social, health related or educational disci plines. There is some flexibility in that students may opt to enter the program while still University seniors The graduate program in Rehabilitation Counseling is fully accredited by the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE), the national accrediting body for rehabilitation counselor trainin g programs. Upon completing the program graduates are eligible to sit for the national certification examination of the Com mission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification After passing this examination, the graduate is registered with the commission as a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC). Requirements for the M.A. Degree: General requirements for graduate work are given on pages 46-51 The Department of Rehabilitation Counseling offers the student the flexibility of entering the M A program while a Uni versity senior (REF) or after earning a baccalaureate degree (REH). Minimum admission requirements for stude nts electing the five-year approach include completion of 135 quarter hour s a total Quantitative-Verbal score of at least 1000 on the ORE or a B average on all work beyond 90 credit hours, three letters of recommendation, and a personal interview All General Distri bution requirements must be completed before admission to the program. Students enrolled in a Five-year Master s Program may also earn a baccalaureate degree in another major under the conditions specified in the Academic Policies section of this catalog. Minimum admission requirements for students entering the program as regulat graduate stude nt s after they have earned a baccalaureate degree include a total Quantitative-Verbal score of at least 1000 on the ORE or a B average during the last two years of college undergraduate work or a graduate degree from an accredited institution three letters of recommendation, and a personal interview The ORE must be taken by all students before applying to the program and scores received by the department before the admission deadline. In addition, all students entering the graduate program (REH/ REF) must show s uc cessful completion of an acceptable undergraduate social science introductory statistics course or equivalent or they must complete such a course during, the first quarter after acceptance.

PAGE 50

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 159 The Department of Rehabilitation Counseling offers both a thesis and a non-thesis program There is no language require ment; however, a comprehensive examination involving both written and practical work is required of all students The following 65-hour core courses are consistent with na tional certification standards of rehabilitation counselors and must be taken by all students (post-baccalaureate, five-year, thesis, and non-thesis). EGC 5065 EGC 5376 EGC 5493 EGC 5725 EGC 5850 (5) EGC (5) EGC 6374 (4) EGC 6375 (5) EGC 6468 (2) EGC 6494 (5) EGC 6727 (3) EGC 6767 (5) EGC 6851 (5) 'EGC 6885 (4) Additional requirements for graduation include: (5) (5) (2) (10) Non-thesis program: Students in the non-thesis program must complete a minimum of 75 credit hours in the post-bacca laureate program and a total of no less than 225 hours in the five-year program (including the 65-hour core courses). Addi tional hours to complete either the minimum of 75 credit hours or the minimum of 225 credit hours may be elected from other Re habilitation Counseling offerings or from related programs with the consent of the student's adviser. Thesis program: Students in the thesis program mu t com plete a minimum of 68 credit hours in the post-baccalaureate program (65-hour core courses plus 3 credit hours of E GC 6971), and a total of no less than 225 hours in the five-year program (65-hour core courses plus 3 credit hours of EGC 6971). Addi tional hours to complete the minimum of 225 credit hours for students in the five-year program may be elected from other Rehabilitation Counseling offerings or from related programs with the consent of the student's adviser. An oral defense of the thesis is required. SOCIAL WORK (SOK) The University of South Florida offers a program leading to a Bachelor of Social Work (B. S W.) degree in the Departmei:it of Social Work, College of Social and Behavioral Sciences. This program has been developed in accordance with the guidelines set forth by the Council on Social Work Education, the national accrediting body for social work education programs and in accordance with the recommendations of the National Associa tion of Social Workers. The B S.W. program is fully accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. The primary objective of the B.S W. program is the prep aration of the graduate for beginning level professional pr actice as a social work generalist. The secondary objectives of the B.S. W program are : I to provide for the social work human reso urce s needs of the service district (the central Florida west coast area), the State of Florida and the Southeast Re gion; 2. to prepare graduates for additional professional training at the graduate level in social work or in related human service professions ; 3. to provide an exposure to social work as a profession and to contemporary issues in the social welfare field to non social work majors and others in the community. In preparing the B S.W. graduate for beginning professional practice the curriculum provides the student with an oppor tunity to develop a knowledge base and skillbase as a "gen eralist practitioner. The student will develop an understanding of various interventive methods, and skill in their application to a variety of client sys tem s. For example inter ventive methods may take the form of individual and group coun s eling resource development consultation, teaching, advocacy, etc Client sys tems ma y be individu a l s, families groups, co mmunit y groups, organizations social welfare organizations, etc. The s tudent will develop an under s tanding of the dynamics of hum a n beh a vior in individual, group and organizational contexts and the influences of the socio-c ultural environment upon those beh av iors. The student will learn about the development of socia l we lfare sys tems and institutions and the social, economic and political pro cesses affecting policy development and program implementa tion. The st udent will develop a n understanding of the utilization of basic social research skills particul arly related to the proce sses of problem-solving planning, and evaluation. The s tudent will a l so become aware of the value b as e of the profes sio n and engage in a self-exa mination process as it rel a te s to the development and reflection of ethical and effective pro-fessional practice. The B S.W progr am, as any professional program place s great emphasis on the de velop ment of a p rofessionally resp o nsible g raduat e in terms of one's obligations to the client system served the profe ss ion itself, the organizatio n in which one works and to the general public which ultimately provides any profes s ion with legitimacy Enrollment in the B S.W. program is limited Unlik e many academic programs where the student m ay declare a m ajo r the B S.W program is a limited access program. Students m ay apply for admission to the progr a m after having satisfied the admission criteria de scr ibed below. However the completion of the pre requisites doe s not g uarantee the s tudent' s admission to th e pro gram. Limited s tate funding places constraints on the s ize of the social work faculty and in order to maintain a high quality of instruction it is nece ssa ry to achieve a n appropriate faculty s tudent ratio This means that it may be nece ssary to deny ad mission to the B .S.W. program solely on the ba s i s of no available space Any student filing intent to seek a dmi ss ion or actually applying for a dmi ssio n to the program s hould be aware of this possibility Additionally any student who does not maintain a GP A of at least 2.75 in social work cour ses while enrolled in the B S.W. program or who clearly does not exhibit responsible profe ssio nal behavior may be s ubject to dismissa l from tl:te program A socia l work major receiving a grade of les s than .. C" in a core co ur se will be required to repeat the course. Admission to the Social Work Program To be considered for admission to the B .S. W program as a major, a student must satisfy certain criteria Specific admission criteria may be waived for a s tudent who is a regular employee of a social se rvice agency In s uch instances s upporting docu mentation of skill and experience from the agency m ay be used in waiving a requirement. Generally, a stu dent mu s t meet the fol lowing requisite s. I. A student mus t be admitted to the University of South Florida. 2. A st udent must have filed a formal declaration of intent to major in So cial Work with the College of Social and Behavioral Scierices, followed by a statement to the De partment of Social Work of intent to apply for a dmi ss ion into the program at least one quarter in advance of appli cation for admission. 3. A student must have completed all the General Distri bution Requirements for the bachelor's degree and hold a minimum of Junior Class standing 4. A student mus t have a minimal grade point average of 2. 75 on transfer to US For have achieved a minimal grade point average of 2.75 in work at USF. 5 A student must have completed a t least one ba sic course in each of the following areas-economics, politic a l sci ence psychology, and sociology. 6 A student must have completed the prerequi s ite course

PAGE 51

160 COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES SOW 3302, Theory and Practice of Social Work I, with a : minimum grade of B. 7 A student must file a formal application for admission to the Department of Social Work and provide the names and addresses of three persons who can serve as ences to the student's character and abilities students will ilot be allowed to register for advanced coursework (SOW 3403, 4232, 4102, 4343, 4510 4361, 4341, 4930) unless a completed admission application is on file with the Social Work Admissions Committee. Admission to advanced courses in subsequent quarters is contingent upon favorable action by the Admissions Committee. 8. A student must participate in a personal admissions interview with an Admissions Committee. Waiver of the foregoing specific criteria may be considered by the Department of Social Work upon presentation of docu mentation of extreme unusual circumstances. An example of such a circumstance might be a person who though not currently employed in a social service agency possesses a number of years of experience in the fidd. Requirements for the B.S.W. Degree I. Required Prerequisite for Admission to the B.S.W. Pro gram sow 3302 (4) 2. Social W.ork Practice Courses sow 4341 (5) sow 4343 (5) 3 Social Welfare Policy & Service Courses sow 3203 (4) sow 4232 (4) 4 Human Behavior and Social Environment Courses HUS 4020 (5) SOW 4102 (4) 5 Social Research Courses ST A 3122 (4) SOW 3403 (4) 6 Directed Field Experience sow 4510 (15) 7 Additional Requirements SOW4361 (4) PAD3003 (4) Approved Electives (8) Summary: Core Courses 47 credits Field Experience 15 Approved 70 credits SOCIOLOGY (SOC) Sociology offers both a major and a minor. As an undergraduate major sociology provides students with three different kinds of program concentrations. One attractive to the majority of possible students may be described as "us eful sociology." Man y of the courses taken involve skills valuable in employment. For example in a research methods cour s e interviewing skills can be used in sales personnel work s ocial action careers management as well as in research Simi larly careers which involve inter-personal relations can benefit enormously from courses in s ocial p s ychology or small group analysi s. Also pre-professional training as in law school, busi ness administration, social work and the like, can rest on courses that have "useful aspects in them Another concentra tion can be styled that of "liberal education. In this concentra tion the central point is the question of the nature of man, the social being. Experience has shown that the truly liberally edu cated person is prepared for a variety of life experiences because that person understands how to ask important questions and how to go about getting answers More importantly, the liberally edu cated person is equipped to take seriously the matter of being a human being Sociology courses are aimed largely at problems on the nature of one s social world the nature of man collec tively a nd on the individual per son-the student as a unique being Finally sociology can be a major in the sense that it represents an intellectual discipline Some students will find that it is interesting in its own right and that they would like to con tinue educational pursuits beyond the bachelor's degree. These different concentrations differ as much in the attitude of the student taking the courses as in the selection of courses making up the individual program of study They are not logic ally distinct concentrations: any one course may have elements of all three. For example, a student majoring in sociology as an academic discipline may at the same time involve himself in questions of a liberal education and at the s ame time pick up skills which will lead to satisfying employment. Students s hould understand that sociology majors are not restricted to social work or even social action types of careers Careers for which a major in sociology seems appropriate judging from those who have so majored and succeeded in their fields, cover a wide range of lines utilizing interpersonal rela tions. Law, for example, is well predicated on sociology. So are personnel related careers, as in counseling Similarly, knowledge of social relations, social structure, and class differences appear valuable to the entire spectrum of sales opportunities. Generally speaking any career dealing with the public in a direct or indirect way will benefit from training in sociology. The benefits derive either from the knowledge gained or the skills (as in inter.viewing, a fundamental aspect of any formal system of people interacting with each other) ; or both. Specific elective courses should reflect individual differences ; and the student's departmental major ad viser will assist each one in making particular choices. As an undergraduate minor, Sociology serves as a con venient body of knowledge and experience for a variety of disci plines For the major in Mass Communications .for example a Sociology minor would give some substance to stories and in sights to backgrounds of stories thus enabling a reporter better to do an assigned job. Those majoring in Sales would similarly have an understanding of the process of whatever organization they work in or for as well as a knowledge of the public Similarly, students in advertising, politics, religion , counseling, aging studies, criminal justice and related areas will find a sociological minor of particular value. Finally those seeking to teach social studies at the high school level will find a minor in Sociology compatible with their intere s ts Requirements for the Major (B.A. Degree): The major consists of a minimum of 40 credit hours. The following courses may not be counted in the 40-hour minimum for the major but may be elected as additional courses : SOC 1020, MAF 2001, SOC 3696. No more than 4 credit hours of Individual Research (SOC may be counted as major elec tive credit. A model program of recommended sequences may be obtained from the [)epartment'of Sociology. Transfer students should be aware that by University regulations the equivalent of one academic year must be taken in "on-campus courses In Sociology we require that of the 40 credits needed to make up the major no more than 10 credits earned elsewhere can count towards the major and in addition the 10 credits offered for the major must reflect courses offered here. The purpose of this rule is to insure that our certification that an individual who has majored in sociology genuinely re flects our understanding of sociology as a major and that there i s no fundamental difference between the transfer student and those whose work was entirely or mostly completed at the Uni versity of South Florida Requ;red courses (24 er. SOC 2000 (4) SOC 3612 (4) STA 3122 (4) soc 3500 (4) soc 3800 (4) and either SOC 3410 (4) or SOC 3422 (4) For students electing a major after having successfully taken 16 upper division credits without having had a formal .Intro ductory course, SOC 3422 Social Organization, may be substi tuted for SOC 2000 as a requirement. Students making thi s choice must take SOC 3410 to meet the additional requirement stated above.

PAGE 52

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 161 Requirements for a Minor: A minor consists of a total of 20 credits : SOC 2000, Intro duction to Sociology (or equivalent) plus 16 quarter hour credits a t 3000 level or higher. Though we do not require an adviser, feeling student s to be capable of making reasonable choices, we recommend the use of an adviser to find the best se t of courses fitting one s personal interests. Requirements for the M.A. Degree: A minimum of 45 credit hours and a thesis. Required Courses (23 er. hrs ) soc 6502 (4) soc 6606 (4) soc 6971 (8) soc 6526 (5) soc 6699 (2) University requirements for graduate study are given on pages46-51 Admission to the M.A. Program: Satisfactory score o n the Graduate Record Examination (Ap titude) ; two letter s of refer ence from previous instructors; four courses in socio l ogy, in cluding statistics, theory, and methods of research (ST A 3122, SOC 3612, SOC 3500, or equivalent). Documents are sent to the Office of Admissions Instructions for applicants are available from the Dep artment of Sociology

PAGE 54

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Courses offered for credit by the University of South Florida are listed on the following pages in alphabetical order by college and subject area. The first line of each description includes the State Common Course prefix and number (see below), title of the course, and number of credits. Credits separated by a colon indicate concurrent 'lecture and laboratory courses taught as a unit: PHY 3040, 3040L GENERAL PHYSICS AND LABORATORY (3:1) Credits separated by commas indicate unified courses offered in different quarters : AMH 2010, 2020 AMERICAN HISTORY I, II (4,4) Credits separated by a hyphen indicates variable credit: HUM 490S DIRECTED RESEARCH (1-S) The abreviation "var." also indicates variable credit: MAT 7912 DIRECTED RESEARCH (var.) The following abbreviations are utilized in various course descriptions: GR See Grades in the Graduate Program heading in the PR CI cc CR Lee. Lab Division of Graduate Studies, p. . Prerequisite 1 With the consent of the instructor With the consent of the chairperson of the department or program Corequisite Lecture Laboratory Dem Demonstration Pro. Problem Dis. Discussion The University reserves the right to substitute, not offer, or add to courses that are listed in this Catalog. Alphabetical Listing of Departments and Programs Course descriptiom are listed by college under the following de partment and program headings: Department/Program Accounting Administration/Supervision Adult Education Afro-American Studies American Studies Anci .ent Studies (Religious Studie$) Anthropology Arabic (Foreign Languages) Art Art Education Astronomy l:lasic and Interdisciplinary Engineering Biology Botany (Biology) Business and Office Education Chemistry Chemical and Mechanical Engineering Civil Engineering and Mechanics Classics (Foreign Languages) Communication Communicology Computer Service Courses Cooperative Education Criminal Justice Curriculum College Busines s Administration Education Education Social and Behavioral Sciences Arts and Letters Arts and Letters Social and Behavioral Sciences Arts and Letters Fine Arts Education Natural Sciences Engineering Natural Sciences Natural Sciences Ed ucation Natural Sciences Engineering Engineering Arts and Letters Arts and Letters Social and Behavioral Sciences Engineering University-wide Courses Social and Behavioral Sciences Education Department / Program Dance Distributive and Marketing Education Economics Electrical Engineering Elementary Education Emotional Disturbance Education Engineering Technology English English Education Environment Exceptional Child Education Finance Foreign Language Education Foundation Courses in Business (Graduate) Foundations French (Foreign Languages) General Business Administration Geography Geology Gerontology German (Foreign Languages) Gifted Child Education Greek (Foreign Languages) Guidance and Counseling Education College Fine Arts Education Business Administration Engineering Education Education Engineering Arts and Letters Education Social and Behavioral Sciences Education Business Administration Education Business Administration Education Arts and Letters Business Administration Social and Behavioral Sciences Natural Sciences Social and Behavioral Sciences Arts and Letters Education Arts and Letters Education Health Educati on Education Hebrew (Foreign Languages) Arts and Letters 163

PAGE 55

164 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Department / Program Higher Education History Honors Program Humanities Humanities Education Human Services Industrial and Management Systems Engineering Industrial/Technical Education International Studies Program Italian (Foreign Languages) Latin (Foreign Languages) Liberal Studies Library, Media and Information Studies Management Marine Science Marketing Mass Communications Mathematics Mathematics Education Measurement-Research Medical Sciences Medical Technology Mental Retardation Education Microbiology (Biology) Military Science Music Music Education Nursing College Education Social and Behavioral Sciences University-wide Courses Arts and Letters Education Social and Behavioral Sciences Engineering Education Social and Behavioral Sciences Arts and Letters Arts and Letters Arts and Letters Education Business Administration Natural Sciences Business Administration Arts and Letters Natural Sciences Education Education Medicine Natural Sciences Education Natural Sciences University-wide Courses Fine Arts Education Nursing Department I / Program Off-Campus Term Philosophy Physical Education (Elective) Physical Education for Teachers Physics Political Science Portuguese (Foreign Languages) Psychology College Social & Behavioral Sciences Arts and Letters University-wide Coutses Education Natural Sciences Social ahd Behavioral Sciences Arts and Letters Social and Behavioral Sciences Reading Education Education Rehabilitation Counseling Social and Behavioral Sciences Religious Studies Arts and Letters Romance (Foreign Languages) Arts and Letters Russian (Foreign Languages) Arts and Letters Science Education Social Science Education Social Sciences, Interdisciplinary Social Work Sociology Spanish (Foreign Languages) Specific Leaming Disabilities Education Speech Communication English Education Theatre Women's Studies Education Education Social and Behavioral Sciences Social and Behavioral Sciences Social and Behavioral Sciences Arts and Letters Education Education Fine Arts Social and Behavioral Sciences Explanation of Florida's Statewide Course Numbering System The course numbers appearing in this Catalog are part of a statewide system of prefixes and numbers developed for use by all public postsecondary and participating private institutions in Florida One of the major purposes of this system is to make transferring easier by identifying courses which are equivalent no matter where they are taught in the state All courses desig nated as equivalent will carry the same prefix and last three digits The classifying and numbering of courses was done by community college and university faculty members in each academic discipline Their work was reviewed by faculty mem bers in all of Florida s postsecondary institutions who made suggestions and criticisms to be incorporated into the system. The course numbering system is, by law, descriptive and not prescriptive. It in no way limits or controls what courses may be offered or how they are taught. It does not affect course titles or descriptions at individual schools. It seeks only to describe what is being offered in postsecondary education in Florida in a man ner that is intelligible and useful to students faculty and other interested users of the system. The course numbering system was developed so that equiv alent courses could be accepted for transfer without misunder standing. Each public institution is to accept for transfer credit any course which carries the same prefix and last three digits as a course at the receiving institution For example if a student has taken SOC _000 at a community college, he cannot be required to repeat SOC _000 at the school to which he transfers. Further, credit for any course or its equivalent, as judged by the appro priate faculty task force and published in the course numbering system, which can be used by a native student to satisfy degree requirements at a state university can also be used for that pur pose by a transfer student regardless of where the credit was earned. It should be noted that a receiving institution is not pre cluded from using non-equivalent courses for satisfying certain requirements General Rule for Course Equlvalencles All undergraduate courses bearing the same alpha prefix and last three numbers (and alpha suffix, if present) have been agreed upon to be equivalent. For example, an introductory course in sociology is offered in over 40 post secondary institutions in Florida. Since these courses are considered to be equivalent, each one will carry the designator SOC _ooo. First Digit The first digit of the course number is assigned by the in stitution generally to indicate the year it is offered e.g., I indicates freshman year, 2 indicates sophomore year. In the sociology example mentioned above, one school which offers the course in the freshman year will number it SOC 1000; a school offering the same course in the sophomore year will number it SOC 2000 The variance in first numbers does not affect the equivalency If the prefix and last three digits are the same, the courses are substantively equivalent. Titles Each institution will retain its own title for each of its courses The sociology courses mentioned above are titled at

PAGE 56

different sc hools "Introductory Sociology," General Sociol ogy," and Principles of Sociology." The title does not affect the equivalency. The courses all carry the same prefix ;md last three digits; that is what identifies them as equivalent. Lab Indicators Some courses will carry an alpha suffix indicating a lab The alpha suffixes "L" and "C" are used as follows to indicate laboratories: "L" mean s either (a) a course, the content of which is en tirely laboratory or (b) the laboratory component of a lecture-lab se quence in which the lab is offered at a different time /place from the lecture. C:' mean s a combined lecture-lab course in which the lab is offered in conjunction with the lecture at the same time / same place. Examples : Marine Biology OCB _013 (lecture on.ly) OCB 013L (lab only) Marine Biology OCB 013C (lec ture and lab com bined) with Lab Therefore OCB 013C is equivalent to OCB _013 plus OCB 013L. Equivalency of Sequences In certain cases, the sequences of courses in a given disci pline are equivalent rather than the individual courses which make up these sequences (For example, MAC !32, 133, 134). In these cases the subject matter topics may not be taught in the same sequence, course by course, in several institutions; however upon completion of the full sequence at any of the seve ral in s titutions st udents have completed substantively equivalent content. These seque nce s are clearly identified in the Course Equivalency Profile s. Explanation of Prefixes and Numbers Prefixes and numbers in the course numbering sys tem are not chosen at random ; they are designed to describe course con tent in a n organized fashion within a classification syste m de veloped for each subject matter area Generally each of the major classifications in a discipline is represented by a three-alpha prefix In some cases, one three al pha prefix has been sufficient for the entire discipline A dis cipline may use as many prefixes as necessary to accommodate its m ajor alassificatio ns The logic of the system allows it to be infinitely expandable with minimal disruption to existing num bers. History, for example, has seven prefixes: AFH, African History ; AMH, American History; ASH, Asian History; E UH, Europea n History ; HIS, History-General; LAH, Latin Ameri can History ; and WOH, World History. All history courses in the state will carry one of these prefixes. A more specific example is AMH 3421, Early Florida History: AMH 3 4 2 1 Broad area of American part of discipline of History Junior level offering (at particular institution) In Taxonomy for AMH 400 serie s indicates Areas in America n History In Taxonomy for AMH this digif indicates courses in "His,tory ----------' of Florida" L as t digit in this case refers to group of equated courses dealing-----------' with Early History of Florida" GENERAL INFORMATION 165 (Local titles are used for each particular course The last three numbers are used to indicate equivalency.) The number of prefixes is a function of the extent of the sub classifications of the given subject matter area When thi s work began there were 920 alpha prefixes in ex istence; with the new system there are now 370. As in most states there existed no uniformity in Florida s prefixe s as indi cated by the example below: Discipline Before Aft e r History 20 7 Socfology 24 3 Philo sop hy 23 4 Religion 17 I Mathematics 50 10 English 39 6 Nutrition 38 4 Although it is true that a stu dent majoring at one of the 38 par ticipating institutions may have only one a lpha prefix for his major (e. g., HY-History) and now he will have seven, all pre fixes in the same s ubje ct matter areas will be the same through out these institutions. A complete inventory of taxonomic li s ting s, equivalent and unique courses, has been made avai lable to eacli academic department of every institution in the state. Students, through their loc a l advisers, should use this information in designing program s which will transfer smoothly Exceptions to the Rule for Equivalencies The following are exceptions to the general rule for course equivalencies: A. All. graduate level courses (except those which the fac ulty and their reviewing colleagues have determined to be sub stantively equivalent with undergraduate courses) a re not automatically tran sferab le. B All number s which have a secon d digit of9 (e.g., ART 2905) are place keeper numbers for s uch courses as directed independent study, thesis hours etc. Courses with _900 num bers must be evaluated individually and are not a utomatic ally transferable C All internships, practicums clinical experiences and study abroad cou rses whatever number s they carry are not automatically transferable. D Perform a nce or st udio courses in Art, Dance Theatre, a nd Music are not auto maticall y tra nsferable but must be evaluated individually Authority for Acceptance of Equivalent Courses The following amendment to Section 6A I0 .24(7) of the Ar ticulation Agreement was approved b y the Community CoUeges Council on Instructional Affairs, the Pre sident's Council the Division of Community Colleges, the State University System Council of Vice Presidents for Academic Affairs the Council of Pre s idents and the Board of Regents. It was adopted by the State Board of Education on March 7 1978: ... Students who earn credit in a course determined by the appropriate faculty task force to be equivalent and which is published in the s tate-wide course numbering system, and who later tran sfer to another institution within the syste m can transfer a nd use the credit in that course at the receiving institution for the same purpose as that course can be used by n ative stude nt s who complete the course at the re ceiving institution."

PAGE 57

166 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Cross-Listing of_ Departments and Programs Alphabetically by College, Department/Program College / Department / Program University-wide Courses Cooperative Education Honors Program Military Science Physical Education Elect Carunon Course Prefixes COE IDS MIS DAA PEL, PEM, PEN PEQ, PET College of Arts and Letters American Studies AMS Communication COM, ESL, LIN, ORI, PHI, Foreign Languages General Foreign Languages Arabic Classics French German Greek Hebrew Italian Latin Portuguese Romance Russian Spanish English Humanities Liberal Studies Mass Communications Philosophy Religious Studies Ancient Studies SED, SPC, TSL FOL ARA CLT FLE, FRE, FRT, FRW GER,GET,GEW GRE, GRW HEB ITA, ITT, ITW LAT, LNW POR, POW FOL,FOW RUS, RUT, RUW SPN, SPT, SPW AML ,CRW,ENC,ENG,ENL ESL,LAE,LIN,LIT, REA HUM IDS ADV ENG, FIL, JOU, MMC, PUR, RTV, VIC PHH, PHI, PHM, PHP GRE,REL CLA HEB College of Business Administration Accounting ACC Economics ECO, ECP, ECS, GEB Finance FIN, REE, RMI Foundation Courses in Business (Graduate) General Business Administration Management Marketing College of Education Administration / Supervisiol) Adult Education Art Education Business and Office Education Curriculum Distributive and Marketing Education Elementary Education Emotional Disturbance Education English Education Exceptional Child Education GEB MAN BUL,COC,GEB,MAN,QMB MAN, QMB MAR EDA, EDS ADE ARE BTE EDE, EDG, EDM, ESE, LAE DEC ARE, EDE, EDG, EDS, EEC, HLP, LAE, MAE MUE, RED, SCE, SSE EED EDG, LAE EEX I Foreign Language Education Foundations Gifted Child Education Guidance and Counseling Education Health Education Higher Education Humanities Education Industrial / Technical Education :Library, Media and Information Studies Mathematics Education Measurement Research Mental Retardation Education Music Education Physical Education for Teachers Reading Education Science Education Social Science Education Specific Learning Dis abilities Education Speech Communication English Education College of Engineering Basic and Interdisciplin ary Engineering Electrical Engineering Chemical and Mechanical Engineering FLE EDF,. SPS EGI EGC HES EDH HUM EIV, EVT COP, LIS CAP, MAE EDF EMR MUE '., HES LEI PEL, PEP, PEQ, PET RED SCE SSE EOG, ELD, EPH, EVI EOG, SED EGN, EMC CDA, CIS CNM, COP, COT EEL, ELR, ESI, MAP Industrial and Management Systems Engineering Civil Engineering and Mechanics ECH, EMC, EML, ENU EIN, ESI CES, EAS, ECI EES EG M EMA, ENV, SUR, TTE CAP, CDA, COC, COP, CRM BCN, ETC, ETE, ETG, ETI ETM, EVS Computer Service Courses Engineering Technology College of Fine Arts Art Dance Music Theatre College of Medicine Medicine Medical Sciences ARH,ART DAA DAN MUC, MUG, MUH, MUL MUN, MUO, MUS MUT MVB, MVK, MVP, MVS MVV MVW THE, TPA, TPP BCC, BMS, GMS, MEL BMS, GMS College of Natural Sciences Astronomy AST

PAGE 58

Biology Biology Courses Botany Courses Microbiology Courses Zoology Courses Chemistry Geology Marine Science Mathematics Medical Technology Physics College of Nursing Nursing APB BOT, BSC PCB APB BOT APB MAC, MCB PCB ENY, PCB ZOO BCH, CHM, CHS, OCC GLY,OCE EOC, OCB, OCC, OCE, OCG OCP, PCB ZOO COP, MAA MAC, MAD, MAE MAP, MAS, MAT, MGF, MHF, MTG, ST A MLS PHS, PHY HUN, NUR, NUS, NUU College of Social and Behavioral Sciences Afro-American Studies AFA, AFH, AFS, AMH, COP, ECP, HUM, INR, PHM, PUP GENERAL INFORMATION 167 Anthropology Communicology Criminal Justice Environment Geography Gerontology History Human Services International Studies Pr9gram Off-Campus Term Political Science Psychology Rehabilitation Coun s eling Social Sciences Inter disciplinary Social Work Sociology Women s Studies ANT, MUH SPA CCJ IDS GEA GEO MET URP GEY AFH, AMH, ASH, EUH, HIS LAH, WOH HUS, MHT1 SOW AFS ASN EUS INR, LAS, SSI WST IDS CPO INR, PAD, POS POT, PUP, URP CBH, CLP, DEP, EAB EXP, INP,PPE,PSB, PSY ,SOP EGC LEI, SSI STA SOW DHE, MAF, SOC ANT, EDF, LIT, POS REL SOP, WST Cross-Listing of Departments I Programs Alphabetically by Prefix C ommon C o urse Pr efix ACC ADE ADV AFA AFH AFS AMH AML AMS ANT APB ARA ARE ARH ART ASH ASN AST BCC BCH BCN BMS BOT BSC BTE BUL CAP CBH CCJ CDA CES CHM CHS CIS CLA CLP Department Program s Accounting Adult Education Mass Communications Afro-American Studies Afro-American Studies History Afro-American Studies, International Studies Program Afro-American Studies History English American Studies Anthropology, Women's Studies Biology, Botany, Microbiology (Biology) Arabic (Foreign Languages) Art Education Elementary Education Art Art History International Stud ies Program Astronomy Medicine Chemistry Engineering Technology Medicine, Medical Sciences Biology, Botany (Biology) B iology Business and Office Education General Business Administration Computer Service Courses Mathematics Education Psychology Criminal Justice Computer Service Courses Electrical Engineering Civil Engineering and Mechanics Chemistry Chemistry Electrical Engineering Ancient Studies (Religious Studies) Psychology CLT CNM coc COE COM COP COT CPO CRM CRW DAA DAN DEC DEP DHE EAB EAS ECH ECI ECO ECP ECS EDA EDE EDF EDG EDH EDM EDS EE EED EEL EES EEX EGC Classics (Foreign Languages) Electrical Engineering Computer Service Cour s e s, General Business Administration Cooperative Education Communication Computer Service Courses, Electrical En gineering, Library Media and Information Studies Mathematics Electrical Engineering Afro-American Studies, Political Science Computer Service Courses English Dance Physical Education (Elective) Dance Distributive and Marketing Education Psychology Sociology Psychology Civil Engineering and Mechanics Chemical and Mechanical Engineering Civil Engineering and Mechanics Economic s Afro-American Studie s, Economics Economics Administration / Supervision Curriculum Elementary Education Foundations Measurement-Research Women s Studie s Curriculum Elementary Education Engli s h Education Specific Learning Disabilities Speech Communication-English Education Higher Education Curriculum Elementary Education Administration / Supervision Elementary Education Emotional Disturbance Education Electrical Engineering Civil Engi neerin g and Mechanics Exceptional Child Education Guidance and Counseling Education Rehabili tation Counseling

PAGE 59

168 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS EGI EGM EGN EIN EIV ELD ELR EMA EMC EML EMR ENC ENG ENL ENU ENV ENY EOC EPH ESE ESI ESL ETC ETE ETG ETI ETM EUH EUS EVI EVS EVT EXP FIL FIN FLE FOL FOW FRE FRT FRW GEA GEB GEO GER GET GEW GEY GLY GMS GRE GRW HEB HES HIS HLP HUM HUN HUS IDS INP INR ITA Gifted Child Education Civil Engineering and Mechanics Basic and Interdisciplinary Engineering Industrial and Management Systems Engineering Industrial / Technical Education Specific Learning Disabilities Education Electrical Engineering Civil Engineering and Mechanics Basic and Interdisciplinary Engineering Chemical and Mechanical Engineering Chemical and Mechanical Engineering Mental Retardation Education English English, Mass Communications English Chemical and Mechanical Engineering Civil Engineering and Mechanics Zoology (Biology) Marine Science Specific Learning Disabilities Cuhicuh.1m Electrical Engineering Industrial and Management Systems Engineering Communication, English Engineering Technology Engineering Technology Engineering Technology Engineering Technology Engineeting Technology History International Studies Program Specific Leaming Disabilities Education Engineering Technology Industrial/Technical Education Psychology Mass Communications Finance Foreign Language Education French (Foreign Languages) General Foreign Languages Romance (Foreign Languages) Romance (Foreign Languages) French (Foreign Languages) French ( Foreign Languages) French (Foreign Languages) Geography Economics, Foundation Courses in Business (Graduate), General Business Administration Geography German (Foreign Languages) German (Foreign Languages) German (Foreign Languages) Gerontology Geology Medical Sciences Medicine Greek (Foreign Languages) Religious Studies Greek (Foreign Languages) Ancient Studies (Religious Studies), Hebrew (Foreign Languages) Health Education Physical Education for Teachers History Elementary Education Afro-American Studies Humanities, Humanities Education Nursing Human Services Environment Honor s Program, Liberal Studies Off-Campus Term Psychology Afro-American Studies International Studies Program Political Science Italian ( Foreign Languages) ITT ITW JOU LAE LAH LAS LAT LEI LIN LIS .LIT LNW MAA MAC MAD MAE MAF MAN MAP MAR MAS MAT MCB MEL MET MGF MHF MHT MIS MLS MMC MTG MUC MUE MUG MUH MUL MUN MUO MUS MUT MVB MVK MVP MYS MVV MVW NUR NUS NUU OCB occ OCE OCG OCP ORI PAD PCB PEL PEM PEN PEP PEQ PET Italian (Foreign Languages) Italian (Foreign Languages) Mass Communications Curriculum, Elementary Education, p:nglish, English Education History International Studies Program Latin (Foreign Lapguages) Physical Education for Teachers Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Communication English Library Media and Information Studies English Women s Studies Latin (Foreign Languages ) Mathematics Mathematics Microbiology (Biology) Mathematics Elementary Education Mathematics Mathematics Education Sociology Foundation Courses in Business (Graduate) General Business Administration, Manage ment Electrical Engineering ; Math e matics Marketing Mathematics Mathematics Microbiology (Biology) Medicine Geography !\:la thematics Mathematics Human Services Military Science Medical Technology Mass Communications Mathematics Music Elementary Education, Music Education Music Anthropology Music Music Music Music Music Music Music Music Music Music Music Music Nursing Nursing Nursing Marine Science Chemistry, Marine Science Geology Marine Science Marine Science Marine Science Communication Political Science Biology Marine Science Microbiology (Biol ogy), Zoology (Biology) Physical Education (Elective), Physical Education for Teachers Physical Education (Elective) Physical Education (Elective) Physical Education for Teachers Physical Education ( Elective) Physical Educa tion for Teachers Physical Education ( Elective), Physical Educa tion for Teachers

PAGE 60

PHH PHI PHM PHP PHS PHY POR POS POT POW PPE PSB PSY PUP PUR QMB REA RED REE REL RMI RTV RUS RUT RUW SCE Philosophy Communication, Philosophy Afro-American Studies, Philosophy Philosophy Physics Physics Portuguese (Foreign Languages) Political Science Women's Studies Political Science Portuguese (Foreign Languages) Psychology Psychology Psychology Afro-American Studies, Political Science Mass Communications General Business Admini s tration Management English Elementary Education Reading Education Finance Religious Studies Women' s Studies Finance Mass Communications Russian (Foreign Languages) Russian (Foreign Languages) Russian (Foreign Languages) Elementary Education Science Education SED soc SOP sow SPA SPC SPN SPS SPT SPW SSE SSI STA SUR THE TPA TPP TSL TTE URP VIC WOH WST zoo GENERAL INFORMATION 169 Communication, Speech CommunicationEnglish Education Sociology P syc hology Women's Studies Human Services, Social Work Communicology Communication Spanish (Foreign Languages) Foundations Spanish (Foreign Languages) Spanish (Foreign Languages) Elementary Education Social Science Education International Studies Program, Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Mathematic s, Social Sciences Interdi sci plinary Civil Engineering and Mechanics Theatre Theatre Theatre Communication Civil Engineering and Mechanics Geography Political Sciences Mass Communications History International Studies Program Women's Studies Marine Science Zoology (Biology)

PAGE 61

170 UNIVERSITY-WIDE COURSES UNIVERSITY-WIDE COURSES COOPERATIVE EDUCATION Director: G. F. Lentz ; Coordinators : L. J Berman, C..W. Jar man UNDERGRADUATE COURSES COE 1940 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, IST TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR : 45 hours of academic credit, acceptance in Cooperative Education Program. (S/ U only.) COE 1941 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 2ND TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR : COE 1940. (S/ U only ) COE 2942 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 3RD TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR : COE 1941. (S/ U only.) COE 2943 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 4TH TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR : COE 2942. (SIU only.) COE 3944 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 5TH TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR: COE 2943. (S/ U only.) COE 3945 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 6TH TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR : COE 3944. (SI U only ) COE 4946 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 7TH TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR : COE 3945. (S/ U only.) COE 4947 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 8TH TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR : COE 4946 (S/ U only.) COE 4948 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 9TH TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR : COE 4947. (S/ U only .) COE 4949 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, IOTH TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR: COE 4948. (S/ U only.) HONORS PROGRAM Dir ec tor: M. V. Angro s ino UNDERGRADUATE COURSES IDS 3901 HONORS PROGRAM READING SEMINAR (4) PR : Admi ss i on to University Honors Program Rea ding seminar in which st udent s read one m ajor work a week and p articipate in discu ss ion s led b y a specialis t in a chqsen field (topics vary). First of a two-part se quence IDS 3902 HONORS PROGRAM READING SEMINAR (4) PR : Admission to University Honors Program Reading seminar in which student s read one major work a week and p articipate in discus s ions led by a specialis t in a chosen field (topics vary) Second of a two-part se quence. IDS 3931 HONORS PROGRAM SELECTED TOPICS (4) PR : Admission to University Honor s Program. Seminar focuses on one major problem central to a se lected disc ipline outside a student's major The purpo se of the se minar is to demon s trate in some depth how a nother discipli ne defines, attacks, a nd resolves its major problem. IDS 4938 HONORS PROGRAM SENIOR SEMINAR (4) PR: Admi ssi on to University Honor s Progr am. This seminar serves to i nt egrate the many strands of a st udent' s college experie nce through a nal ysis of a problem of contemporary concern as approac hed by the vario u s disci pline s represented by st udent s in the se minar. MILITARY SCIENCE UNDERGRADUATE COURSES MIS lOIOC INTRODUCTION TO MILITARY SCIENCE (4) History a nd organization of R O .T. C ., U S Army and their role in s upport of U S national defense policies. Emphasis on relation between U.S. Defen se Establishment and federal government with discussion of contemporary military / political issues Discussion of motivation human behavior a nd concept of military leadership MIS 3410C FUNDAMENTALS OF LEADERSHIP (4) PR: MIS IOJOC, or Cl. The dual role of the military officer as leader and manager ; problems of military leadership in the volunteer army; examination of classical leadership traits and principles, and the role of officers in the various branches of the Army MIS 4412C SEMINAR IN LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT (4) PR : MIS 34JOC, Cl. Obligations a nd re s pon s ibilities of a commissioned officer, with emphasis on application of sound leader s hip to all situations Uniform Code of Military Ju s tice and its relation to Civilian law ; Fundamentals of both offen sive and defensive tactic s and role of various branches of the Army in ta'.cticahiperations. Role of the U S. in world affairs in the 1980's. OFF-CAMPUS TERM Direct o r : D. K Lupton. UNDERGRADUATE COURSES The following courses are provided for s tudent s admitted in the Off-Campus Term Program IDS 4905 OFF CAMPUS TERM INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-2) (SIU only.) IDS 4910 COMMUNITY INTERACTION A field course for students in the OCT Program utilizing the community as a learning l a boratory to develop sensitivity to the problem s of our society. IDS 4942 OFFICE CAMPUS TERM SOCIAL ACTION PROJECT (l-2) (S/U only ) IDS 4943 OFF CAMPUS TERM SPECIAL PROJECT (l-2) (S / U only.) IDS 4955 OFF CAMPUS TERM INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM (l-2) (SI U only ) PHYSICAL EDUCATION-ELECTIVE Director : R T Bowers ; Profes sors: R T. Bower s, R E. Hee schen, G W. Hertz ; Asso c iate Pr ofessors: D L. Holcomb, H. A. Honker A J Jonaitis S W Prather Jr., S. C. Taylor J. E Young ; Assis tant Pr ofesso r : I. Trice Visiting Profes so r : R J. Grindley UNDERGRADUATE COURSES DAA 1374 FOLK & SQUARE DANCE (2) An op portunity for the development of fundamental skills and knowledge nece ssary for enjoyment of Folk and Square Dancing. (S/ U only.)

PAGE 62

PEL 1121L GOLF I (2) Introductory experience in the sport of golf Fundamental s kills information strategy and participation ( S / U only.) PEL ll4IL ARCHERY (2) Development and refinement of the essential skills and infor mation necessary for enjoying the sport of Archery (S/ U only ) PEL 134IL TENNIS I (2) Introductory experiences in the sport of tenni s Basic skill s, playing strategies lecture demonstration and participation ( S / U only ) PEL 1346L BADMINTON (2) Progressive experiences in badminton, fundamental skills s trategy, information, and participation. (S/ U only ) PEL 2122L II (2) Continuation of PEL l l21L. Emphasis on course play and refinement of (S/ U only ) PEL 2321L VOLLEYBALL (2) Review and refinement of fundamental skills, presentation and practice of the various offensive and defensive strategies (S/U only.) PEL 2342L TENNIS II (2) Continuation of PEL 13 l4L. Refinement of basic skills, sup plementary s trokes greater emphasis on tactics and playing strategies (S/ U only ) PEL 2421L HANDBALL (2) Development and refinement of the skills and strategies of Handball with opportunity for competition and tournament play (S/ U only.) PEL 2441L RACKETBALL (2) Development and refinement of the skills and strategies of Racketball with opportunity for competition and tournament play. (S/ U only.) PEL 2SIIL SOCCER (2) A course designed to present essential knowledge of the game of soccer. Instruction and practice of basic skills, rules, team play and conditioning. (S/tJ only.) PEL 2621L BASKETBALL (2) Review and refinement of fundamental skills presentation and practice of the various offensive ;id defensive strategies. (S/ U only ) PEM 1201L GYMNASTICS I (2) Introductory experiences in the various gymnastics events Opportunities to specialize in areas of personal interests (S/ U only. ) PEM 1461C FOIL FENCING (2) Progressive experiences in the sport of Foil Fencing, fundamental skills strategy, information, and participation. ( S / U only .) PEM 2120L SPECIAL CONDITIONING (2) Varied designed to increase the functional ability of the different aspects of physical fitness (S/ U only.) PEM 2104L INDIVIDUAL PROGRAMMING (2) Individually prescribed and performed conditioning activities. (S/ U only.) PEM 2107L FIGURE DEVELOPMENT (2) Varied activities designed to effect changes in body configura tion and functional ability. (S/U only.) PEM 2131L WEIGHT TRAINING (2) Knowledge and techniques necessary for increasing muscle function Assessment of status and development of a perso nal program. (S/ U only.) PEM 214IC AEROBICS (2) Introduction to the knowledge and techniques necessary for increasing cardiorespiratory efficiency. Assessment of status and development of a personal program. (S/ U only.) UNIVERSITY-WIDE COURSES 171 PEM 2160C WEIGHT CONTROL (2) Introduction to the knowledge and techniques necessary for fffecting a change in a body composition. Assessment of status and development of a personal program (S/ U only.) PEM 2202L GYMNASTICS II (2) of PEM 1201L. Extended opportunities to mas ter the various gymnastics events. Competition and individual routines. (S/U only ) PEM 2321L ROCK CLIMBING (2) Introductory experiences in basic rock climbing techniques and related skills (S/ U only ) PEM 2376 BACKPACKING (2) Introductory experiences designed to develop the physical skills and the mental attitude necessary to travel safely, effi ciently and considerately in the wilderness setting (S/ U only ) PEM 2421C WRESTLING (2) experiences in the sport of Wrestling. Funda mental skills, strategy, information, and participation (S/ U only ) PEM 2441L KARATE (2) Introductory experiences in the sport of Karate. Fundamental skills strategy information, and participation (S/ U only.) PEN i 121L SWIMMING I (2) Development and refinement of the essential skills and information necessary for enjoying swimming Emphasis on personal safety. (S/ U only ) PEM 2II3C LIFESAVING (2) PR: PEN 2122L or equivalent Knowledge and skills ne ces sary for saving one's self or others in the event of aquatic emergency (S/ U only.) PEN 2122L SWIMMING II (2) PR: PEN 1121L or equivalent. Continuation of PEN 1121L. Special empha s i s on development of endurance and efficient stroking (S/ U only.) PEN 2136C SKIN & SCUBA DIVING (2) PR: PEN 2I22L or equivalent. Development of the sessential skills and knowledge nece s sary for enjoying the s port of Skin & Scuba Diving. Correct utilization and care of equipment ; emphasis on personal safety (S/ U only. ) PEN 2141L SYNCHRONIZED SWIMMING (2) Introductory experiences in synchronized swinmming. Em pha s i s on essential skills ; music interpretation ; and choreog raphy. (S/ U only ) PEN 22SlL CANOEING (2) PR: PEN 1121L or equivalent. De v elopment and refinement of the skill s neces s ary for enjoying canoeing Skills safety techniques and trips. (S/ U only ) PEQ 3IISC WATER SAFETY INSTRUCTION (2) PR: PEN 2113C Examination of the various s wimming strokes leading to identification of appropriate methods and techniques for instructing others ARC certification offered (SI U only.) PET 2330C HUMAN KINESIOLOGY I (2) An introduction to the structure and function of the s keletal and neuromuscular systems in reference to their support of vigorous human movement. (S/'(J only ) PET 2340C HUMAN KINESIOLOGY II (2) PR: PET 2330C An introduction to the mechanical principles which govern human movement. (S/ U only .) PET 4622 ATHLETIC TRAINING (3) PR: Cl. Principle s and techniques of conditioning athletes for competition ; prevention and care of injuries in physical educa tion and athletic activities

PAGE 63

172 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND LETTERS COLLEGE OF ARTS & LETTERS AMERICAN STUDIES Chairperson : J B Moore ; Professors: D. R. Harkness J B. Moore H. M Robertson; Visiting Assistant Pr ofessors : R A Banes, M. K. Kosinski ; Other Faculty : J J Iorio, R. C O'Hara, J. A. Parrish, S A. Zyl s tra. UNDERGRADUATE COURSES AMS 2363 ISSUES IN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION (2) !hrough lecture demonstration an examination of such top ics as natu ral environment and the quality of life architecture and American society, leisure and technology, jazz music, the role of higher education in America, the American success myth and the status of the arts in America AMS 3001 INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN . (5) Integration of major aspects of American life between 1898 and 1914 Should be taken the first term a student becomes an American Studies major Elective for non-majors AMS 1:HE COWNIAL PERIOD (5) Puritan heritage : The pattern of American culture as revealed th rough an examination of selected writings and pertinent slide_s and recordings dealing with the art, architecture and music of the period Elective for non-majors AMS AGRARIAN MYTH (5) Frontier heritage: The pattern of American culture as revealed through a n examination of s elected writings and other perti nent materials dealing with American faith and the American frontier environment (the land city machine) E lective for non-majors. AMS 3230 AMERICA DURING THE TWENTIES THIRTIES (5) Heritage of the nineteen twenties and thirties: selected inter disciplinary materials are used to examine the relation s hips among and internationalism during the twenties and th1rt1es. Emphasis is placed on the measure of cult.ural natio_nalism attained by the United States during this penod Elecltve for non-majors 3302 ARCHITECTURE AND THE AMERICAN ENVIRONMENT (4) By means of slides, lectures and discussion the course ex amines 350 years of American architectural history. chitectural styles, aesthetics and the relation between a build ing and its social environment are stressed. AMS 3303 THE AMERICANIZATION OF ENGLISH (4) An overview of American attitudes toward the English lan guage from colonization to the present. Among the topics dis cussed are : the American mania for correctness the influence of the school marm, place and proper names and language prudery. AMS 3930 SELECTED TOPICS IN AMERICAN (1-5) Offerings include The American Success Myth, Cultural Darwinism in America Through Foreign Eyes Contemporary Topic s in American Studies, Nineteenth and Twentieth Century American Communes. AMS 4910 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (l-5) The content of the course will be governed by student demand and in. struc.tor's interest. In s tructor s approval required prior to reg1strat1on. AMS 4930 SELECTED TOPICS IN AMERICAN (l-5) Offerings include American Painting: its social implications, in the Twentieth Century America, American Environmental Problem s, Popular Culture in America AMS 4935 SENIOR SEMINAR IN AMERICAN STUDIES (4) PR : Senior in American Studie s or CI. AMS 4936 SENIOR SEMINAR IN AMERICAN STUDIES PR: AMS 4935. AMS 4937 SENIOR SEMINAR IN AMERICAN STUDIES PR: AMS 4935, AMS 4936 GRADUATE COURSES AMS 6155 OUTSTANDING AMERICAN (4) (4) ACHIEVEMENTS ( 4) PR: Graduate stan ding Open to non-majors Representative works (from the arts sciences, social sciences) reflecting the development of civilization in the U.S. from colonial times t o the pr!!sent. May be repeated up to eight' (8) credit hours with departmental permission. AMS 6254 U.S.A.: A DECADE IN DEPTH (4) PR: Graduate standing. Open to non-major s. An example would be The Thirties: Inter-related Aspects of American Life from the Stock Market Crash to Pearl Harbor. Other decade s would serve in subsequent offe(ings to weave the inter disciplinary pattern of American life within a discrete period May be repeated up to eight (8) credit hours AMS 6805 MAJOR IDEAS INFLUENCING AMERICAN CMLIZATION (4) PR: Graduate standing Open to non-majors. Exami n ation of such concepts as individualism freedom and liberalism as em bodied in literature politics religion, architecture, economic s. science and technology AMS 6901 DIRECTED READINGS IN AMERICAN STUDIES (1-5) PR: Graduate standing. Open to non majors. Guided reading designed to expand a student's knowledge in a particular area of intere st. May be repeated up to six credit hours. AMS 6915 DIRECTED RESEARCH (var ) PR: GR. Master's level. Repeatable. (S/ U only.) AMS 6934 SPECIAL TOPICS IN AMERICAN STUDIES (2-5) Graduate sta nding. Open to non-majors. Variable title s offered periodically on topics of special interest to American Studies students. May be repeated up to eight credit hour s. AMS 6971 THESIS: MASJ'ER'S (va r. ) Repeatable. (S/U only.) ANCIENT STUDIESsee Religious Studies COMMUNICATION Chairperson: J I. Sisco;Professors : R. D. Brooks, R. W. Cole P. J Newcombe, R C. O Hara, R. J Schneider, J I. Sisco, D. H Smith ; Professor Emeritus: A J. Sarett; Associate Professors: J C Caflisch Ill, J. B Camp J K Jensen ; Assistant Professors : C Cargill-Power D. A. Carter K Cissna B. F Downs ; Courtesy Professor: G. F. Lehner UNDERGRADUATE COURSES COM 3003 DIMENSIONS OF COMMUNICATION (4) An introductory survey of the various perspectives for the study of human communication An exploration of the a s sumptions, constructs and explanatory paradigms associated with the st udy of communication in its symbolic, aesthetic historical, critical, and pragmatic dimensions. COM 3122 INTERVIEW COMMUNICATION (4) A study of communication theory relative to interview situa with emphasis on the employment interview, appraisal interview and persua s ive interview.

PAGE 64

COM 3131 TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION (4) Investigation and application of methodology and effective technical' communication of effective oral presentation of technical reports. COM 4110 SPEECH COMMUNICATION FOR BUSINESS AND THE PROFESSIONS (4) Identification of Speech Communication situations specific to business and the professions Analysis of variables related to communication objectives and preparation of oral presenta tions in the form of informational reports, conference man agement, 'persuasive communications, interviews and public hearings COM 4120 INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION THEORY IN ORGANIZATIONS (4) A study of communication variables and systems affecting or ganizational effectiveness. COM 4942 COMMUNICATION INTERN SEMINAR (4) PR: Communication major and minimum of 40 hours in major The Communication Intern Seminar provides students with an opportunity to put into practice concepts and skills acquired in their study of c ommunication Weekly seminar sessions aug ment intern experience. Application for seminar must be sub mitted one quarter prior to seminar offering ESL 1383 SPEECH COMMUNICATION FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS I (4) A special course for students learning English as a second language Intensive study and drill in American English pro nunciation and listening comprehension May be taken in conjunction with ESL 1422-English for Foreign Students ESL 1384 SPEECH COMMUNICATION FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS U (4) PR: ESL 1383 or Cl. Intensive study and drill in American English pronunciation and listening comprehension. Emphasis on diction and speaking skills. LIN 2200 SPEECH IMPROVEMENT AND PHONETICS (4) Designed to improve vocal quality and expressiveness, articulation and pronunciation, and to give instruction and practice in using the International Phonetic Alphabet for speech improvement. LIN 2201 SPEECH IMPROVEMENT AND PHONETICS II ( 4) PR: LIN 2200 or Cl. A continuation of LIN 2200. Emphasis will be upon applying listening and transcription skills to the improvement of vocal quality and effective expressions. LIN 3010 INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS (4) Introduction to the basic principles of linguistic science ; phonological and grammatical analysis and description ; lan guage change and genetic relationships. LIN 3801 LANGUAGE AND MEANING (4) A survey introduction for non-specialists to the basic princi ples of semantics and the way language conveys ideas. This course is also available on WUSF/ TV Channel 16 by the 0. U. Program LIN 4040 DESCRIPTIVE LINGUIS'.flCS (4) PR: LIN 3010 LIN 4370 or Cl. Introduction to the basic techniques of formalizing linguistic descriptions through elementary phonological, morphological and syntactic data solution-problems drawn from a variety of languages Both taxonomic and generative analysis and descriptions will be developed and compared. LIN 4377 LANGUAGE TYPES OF THE WORLD (4) An introduction to linguistic typology consisting in a system atic comparison of characteristic representatives of the various language types, such as Vietnamese Malay, Hungarian, Swahili, Sanskrit, Hebrew and others. No knowledge of any of these languages on the part ofihe student is LIN 4600 LANGUAGE AND SOCIETY (4) PR: LIN 3010 or LIN 4370 c An analysis of the interrelation of a language and the structure of the society using it. The linguistic behavior patterns characteristic of particular social politic al", economic educational, and racial groups. Problems in communication between strata. AMERICAN STUDIES-COMMUNICATIONS 173 LIN 4701 PSYCHOLINGUISTICS (4) PR : LIN 3010 or LIN 4370 The nature of lingui stic s tructure and it s correlates in behavior and perception Examination of the hypotheses of Whorf Chomsky, and others. LIN 4710 LANGUAGE AND COMMUNICATION : ACQUISITION AND DEVELOPMENT (4) PR: LIN 3010. A survey of current research and theory in the processes of normal acquisition and development of language and communication in children The acquisition and develop ment of phonology syntax, semantics pragmatics and non verbal communication and the role of language in general cognitive development. LIN 4903 DIRECTED READING (3-5) PR: Cl. Readings in special topics Mus t be arranged prior to registration LIN 4930 SELECTED TOPICS (3-5) PR: Cl. Course content depends upon student's needs and instructor's interest and may range over the entire field of linguistics. ORI 2008 ORAL INTERPRETATION AS COMMUNICATION ART (4) A survey of the theories in the oral interpretation of literature as it correlates with the field of communication. No credit toward the Communication major. ORI 2020 ORAL INTERPRETATION REPERTORY (4) Problems in choice of materials, audience situations, adapta tion. Aesthetic psychological, educational socio logic a l as pects of program planning Collection, adaptation, rehearsal, presentation of literature. Doe s not count as credit toward the Communication major. May be repeated up to 8 credit hours. ORI 3000 FUNDAMENTALS OF ORAL READING (4) Designed to develop proficiency in the understanding and oral communication of literary and other written materials. ORI 3920 ISSUES AND INTERPRETATION (2) The study of literature through analysis of printed textual materials and of the visual -a ural textual performance of them. May be repeated ORI 3950 ORAL INTERPRETATION PERFORMANCE (2) PR: ORI 3000 or Cl. The study, rehearsal, and performance of literature for Readers Theatre and Chamber Theatre productions May be repeated (maximum total 6 hours) ORI 4120 ORAL INTERPRETATION OF POETRY (4) PR: ORI 3000 or Cl. Critical appreciation of lyric and narra tive poetry and communication of that appreciation to audi ence Study of poetic theory and prosodic techniques ORI 4140 ORAL INTERPRETATION OF DRAMATIC LITERATURE (4) PR : ORI 3000 or Cl. Critical appreciation and Oral Inter pretation of s pecial textual materials which are inherently dramatic in nature and poetry, narrative prose drama biog raphy and history ORI 4230 ORAL INTERPRETATION OF BIBLICAL LITERATURE (4) PR: ORI 3000 or Cl. A critical interpretation and or presenta tion of selected Books of the Old Testament. ORI 4310 INTRODUCTION TO READERS' THEATRE ( 4) PR: ORI 3000 or Cl. Designed to introduce the student to and give him experience in various forms of group approaches to oral interpretation. SPC 2023 FUNDAMENTALS OF SPEECH COMMUNICATION (5) The nature and basic principles of speech; emphasis on improving speaking and listening skills common to all forms of oral communication through a variety ot experiences in public discourse SPC 3140 INTRODUCTION TO SPEECH SCIENCE (4) PR : LIN 2200 or CI. Communication models are analyzed Emphasis on quantifiable parameters of effective speaking SPC 3210 COMMUNICATION THEORY (4) PR: Junior standing or CI. The study of so urce, messag e and receiver variables in human communication ; co mmunication settings ; descriptive and predictive model s of communication ; speech communication as a process

PAGE 65

174 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND LETTERS SPC 3301 INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION (4) PR: Junior standing or Cl. A study of interper s onal communi cation in informally structured settings with empha s is on the understanding de s cription and analys i s of human communication SPC 3410 PARLIAMENTARY PROCEDURES (3) Principles of parliamentary procedure and practice in con ducting and participating in meetings governed by parl i amen tary rules. SPC 3441 GROUP COMMUNICATION (4) PR: Junior standing or Cl. A survey of theory and experi mental research in group communication. Group discu s sions and communication exercises to increase awareness of the dynamics of human communica ti on in s mall group s ettings SPC 3513 ARGUMENTATION AND DEBATE (4) PR: Junior standing or Cl. Study of principles of argumenta tion as applied in oral discourse, analysis of evidence and modes of reasoning Practice in debate preparation and deliv ery SPC 3594 FORENSICS (2) Study, library re s earch practice in forensics. Application of the principles of rhetoric to ihe current debate and discussion topics May be repeated (maximum of 6 hours). SPC 3601 PUBLIC SPEAKING (4) Study of selected public addre s ses as aids in speaking extem poraneously and from manuscript. The relation s hip between speaking and public policy formulation. SPC 3633 RHETORIC OF CONFRONTATION (4) PR: Junior standing or Cl. The study of rhetorical strategies and tactics of agitation and control in confrontation s itu a tions SPC 3641 NAZI PROPAGANDA (4) Study of communication behavior in the Nazi movement in Germany and America : Emphasis on communication con cepts, principal communicators (Hitler Goebbels, Streicher and Rockwell) and use of media SPC 3651 CURRENT ISSUES AND RHETORIC (2) Analysis of significant current speakers and issues. May be repeated SPC 3653 POPULAR FORMS OF PUBLIC COMMUNICATION (4) PR: Junior standing or Cl. Analysi s of public communication with emphasis on various presentational forms SPC 3900 DIRECTED READINGS (l-5) PR: Junior standing and Cl. SPC 3905 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (l-5) PR: Junior standing and Cl. Individual investigations and faculty superv i sion SPC 3930 SELECTED TOPICS (l-5) PR: Junior standing and Cl. SPC 4640 THE RHETORIC OF AMERICAN DEMAGOGUES (4) An analysis of the communication of such 20th Century American political leaders as : Bilbo Agnew, McCarthy Wallace Nixon and Malcolm X SPC 4680 HISTORY ttND CRITICISM OF PUBLIC ADDRESS (4) PR: SPC 3601 or Cl. The principles of rhetorical criticism applied to selected great speeches of Western Civilization SPC 4900 DIRECTED READINGS (l-5) PR: Senior standing and Cl. SPC 4905 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (l-5) PR: Senior standing and Cl. Individual investigations with faculty supervision SPC 4906 INDEPENDENT STUDY (l-5) PR: Cl. Specialized independent study determined by the s tu dents' needs and interests. M a y be repeated for credit. ( S / U only.) SPC 4930 SELECTED TOPICS (l-5) PR: Senior standing and Cl. SPC 4932 SENIOR SEMINAR IN SPEECH COMMUNICATION (4) PR: Senior standing. Speech Communication major. Explora tion of selected topics of current significance to the s everal area s of speech communication through group discussion and research GRADUATE COURSES COM 6001 INTRODUCTION TO GRADUATE STUDY IN COMMUNICATION (4) Required of all M A candidates An introduction to the aims and methodologies of the graduate discipline of communica tion: its relationship to the adjacent arts and sciences; bibliog raphical resources; methods of research ; and a brief survey of the historical development of the field with emphasis upon current issues in theory, research, and practice COM .6121 COMMUNICATION THEORY IN ORGANIZATIONS (4) A study of communication theory and behavior within organi zational settings : role of communication, communication cli mates, communication networks, leadership. COM 6312 EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH IN ORAL COMMUNICATION (4) Critical examination of research design, procedures and reporting of experimental studies in small group communication and persuasive discourse COM 6400 COMMUNICATION THEORY (4) PR: COM 6001. An examination of communication theory through selected reading in the works of major theorists past and present. LIN 5231 COMMUNICATION SCIENCE: THEORY AND PRACTICUM (4) PR: LIN 2200 or Cl. Intensified instruction in neuroanatomy of oral-nasal cavities ear, pharyngeal, laryngeal and thoracic areas Includes topics in phonological theory such as feature composition and markedness. Practice in IPA and identifica tion of segments through Sona-Graph work LIN 5245 EXPERIMENTAL PHONETICS (4) PR: LIN 2200 or Cl. Intensified training in auditory discrimi nation of the of American Engli s h Detailed use of research finding s instruments and methodologies in the laboratory study of normal speech. Development of phonetic skills of discrimination and reproduction of speech sounds. LIN 6UO DIRECTED RESEARCH (var.) PR: GR. Master's level. Repeatable (S / U only.) LIN 6117 HISTORY OF LINGUISTIC THOUGHT (4) Survey of the development of language study in the West from Antiquity to the present: Classical and medieval theories of language; origins of traditional grammar ; rationalist linguistic theory and philosophical grammar and an examination of the origin of contemporary linguistic controversies. LIN 6128 HISTORICAL LINGUISTICS (4) An advanced survey of the principles and methodology of historical linguistics. LIN 6139 TOPICS IN THEORETICAL LINGUISTICS (4) Offerings will include current issues in any area of linguistic theory LIN 6146 COMPARATIVF; LINGUISTIGS (4) The principles and methodology of comparative linguistics, focusing upon a major Indo-European subfamily, such as Ro mance, Germanic or aalto-Slavic LIN 6233 ADVANCED PHONETICS (4) PR: LIN 5231 or equivalent. Intensified training in close phonetic transcription. Work on dialects, intonation distinc tive feature theory and acoustic phonetics. LIN 6240 PHONOLOGICAL DEsCRIPTION (4) Analysis of the phonological component of a grammar, its role and formal structures The generative model is compared to taxomic descriptions. Theory and data-solution problems LIN 6377 THE STRUCTURE OF A SPECIFIC LANGUAGE (4) A linguistic examination of the phonological, morphological, and syntactic structures of both common and uncommon lan guages, such as Arabic German, Mikasuki Seneca Swahili, and Russian, etc .No prior knowledge of uncommonly-taught or unwritten language s is presumed on the part of the student

PAGE 66

(e .g., Mikasuki, Seneca, Swahili) However, when the course focuses upon a regularly-taught major world language (e.g., French, German, Russian, Spanish, etc.), an elementary knowledge of that language will be presumed on the part of the student. May be repeated up to ten credit hours with change in content/title. LIN 6380 SYNTACTIC DESCRIPTION (4) Analysis of syntactic descriptions of various languages through data-solution problems in co-occurence relations, agreement, permutation, conjoining, and embedding. Feature grammars and other models are discussed. LIN 6405 CONTRASTIVE ANALYSIS (4) PR: LIN 4377. A systematic comparison and contrast of the phonological morphological, and syntactic characteristics of contemporary American English with corresponding structures in a selected number of foreign languages which the ESL teacher is likely to encounter both in the U .S. and abroad. Typical languages or language groups include Spanish (Ro mance), Semitic (Arabic & Hebrew), Chinese, Japanese, and others. No knowledge of these languages on the part of the student is presumed. Emphasis upon practical pedagogical strategies fpr overcoming potential sources of interference for the ESL learner without regard to theoretical considerations. LIN 6407 APPLIED LINGUISTICS (4) Analysis of the phonological morphological and syntactic features of English as a basis for linguistic application to prob lems of English language acquisition by non-native speakers. LIN 6425 FORMAL STYLISTICS (4) Studies in the relationship between the development of language study and literary criticism; developments in modern linguistic theory and their application to problems of aesthetics, literary structure, and style. LIN 6435 FIELD METHODS (4) PR: LIN 4040 and LIN 5231. An introduction to the techniques of gathering language data in the field and to make an analysis of such data. Native informants are brought on campus to replicate the field experience; students will become familiar with equipment and tools used by linguists in the field LIN 6601 SOCIOLINGUISTICS (4) Detailed analysis of the phenomenon of language variation with emphasis upon the research methodology of socio linguistics and the implications of its finding for current lin guistic theory. LIN 6715 LANGUAGE ACQUISITION (4) PR: LIN 3010 LIN 4370 or Cl. A survey of current research and theory in the processes of normal language acquisition and development. LIN 6810 SEMIOTICS (4) PR: Cl. Introduction to kinesics and paralinguistics; the linguist structure of gesture, proxemics, and other significant areas of nonverbal communication and signaling behavior. LIN 6820 STUDIES IN SEMANTICS (4) Selected problems in the area meaning and the relationship between linguistic structure and cognition. Mappings of presupposition, kinship fields, emotive concepts, and other problems are surveyed. Theories such as Fodor-KatzChomsky, Ross-Lakoff-McCawley, and others are contrasted. LIN 6908 STUDY (var.) Independent study in which student must have a contract with an instructor. Repeatabte. (S/ U only. ) LIN 6932 SELECTED TOPICS (3-S) Content will depend upon instructor' s interests and student's needs. Such topics as computational and mathematical lin guistics biolinguistics dialectology and linguistic geography, and pidgins and creoles may be treated, as well as the study of the structures of languages not ordinarily taught. LIN 6940 GRADUATE INSTRUCTION METHODS (1-5) Special course to be used primarily for the training of graduate teaching assistants. Variable credit, repeatable. Limited to a cumulative total of 5 credits per student. (S/ U only.) LIN 6971 THESIS: MASTER' S (var.) Repeatable. (S/U only.) COMMUNICATIONS 175 ORI 5145 ORAL INTERPRETATION OF DRAMATIC LITERATURE II (4) PR: ORI 4140 A study of selected pre -modern dramas with s pecial emphasis on problems of interpretation for oral performance. ORI 5210 ORAL INTERPRETATION OF CHILDREN'S LITERATURE ( 4) PR: ORI 3000 or Cl. A study of the theories and practice in the oral interpretation of poetry and narrative fiction for children with special emphasis on class ical and modern literature ORI 6146 ORAL INTERPRETATION OF THE PLAYS OF SHAKESPEARE ( 4) PR: ORI 3000 or CI. A study of s ele cted plays of Shakespeare from the point of view of the oral interpreter. ORI 6350 LITERARY ADAPTATION FOR ORAL INTERPRETATION ( 4) Composition and adaptation of literary m a terials for oral presentation. An investigation of approaches to v a riou s genres: poetry, fiction, and non-fiction ORI 6410 HISTORY AND THEORIES OF ORAL INTERPRETATION (4) A study of the history, critical writings uses, and develop ments of the art of oral interpretation, with a n a lysi s of the principles and practices. PHI 6226 LANGUAGE AND NATURE (4) A study of the development o f language as a n instrument for ordering human consciousness in terms of European idea s of Nature, with special emphas i s upon the dialectic relation a l and popular modalities of conceptual r e pre se ntation PHI 6228 LANGUAGE AND LIMIT (4) Introduction to the principle s of the l ogic of natural l a nguage s including semantic analysis of logical' relations between selected syntactic structures (active / passive rai si ng case relations, etc. ) ; logic a l dominance in sem a ntic structure; ap plication of logic to questions of linguisti c meta-theory. SEO 6943 GRADUATE INSTRUCTION METHODS (1-S) Special course to be used primarily for the training of graduate teaching assistants. Vari a ble credit repeatable Limited to a cumulative total of 5 credits per student. (S / U only ) SPC 5151 SPEECH BEHAVIOR AND PROCESS (4) PR: Upperclass s tanding Study of the theorie s of the si mple and complex acoustical phenomenon of speech ; inten sive analys is of the stimulus -feedback variable of speech. SPC 5903 DIRECTED READINGS (1-5) PR: Senior or gradu ate standing and Cl. SPC 5912 RESEARCH (1-5) PR: Senior o r graduate standing and Cl. SPC 5933 SELECTED TOPICS (1-5) PR: Senior or graduate standing and Cl. SPC 6149 COMMUNICATION: ANALYSIS AND MEASUREMENT (4) A study of selected modes of communication Includes analysis of communication symbology, and presents the theory and application of selected instruments for mea suri ng and producing speech. SPC 6190 SEMINAR IN SPEECH SCIENCE (4) PR: LIN 5245. To provide graduate students with an opportunity to interact with faculty and other students for the purpose of developing an in-depth unders tanding of a selected sub-area of Speech Science. SPC 6231 RHETORICAL THEORY (4) Historical development of rhetorical theory from Pl ato to contemporary theorists with emphasis upon the evolution of trends and concepts in rhetorical theory. SPC 6442 THEORY AND RESEARCH IN SMALL GROUP COMMUNICATION (4) PR: SPC 3441 Study of contemporary theories and research relating to communication in small group st;tt ing s SPC 6515 THEORIES OF ARGUMENT (4) An examination of argumentative theory through the medium of selected re a ding in the works of major theorists pas t and present. In addition, selected examples from the argumenta-

PAGE 67

176 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND LETTERS tive persuasion of each historical period will be examined and analyzed for the purpose of correlating theory with practice SPC 6545 PERSUASION (4) PR: SPC 3513. Study of contemporary theories and research in per s uasion SPC 6610 HISTORY AND CRITICISM OF AMERICAN PUBLIC ADDRESS ( 4) Criticism of selected speeches and speakers of American pub lic address,' studied against a background of political, social, and intellectual issues. SPC 6682 THEORIES OF RHETORICAL CRITICISM (4) The study of theoretical perspectives in rhetorical criticism The application of criticism to selected rhetorical situations. SPC 6903 DIRECTED READINGS (1-5) SPC 6913 DIRECTED RESEARCH (var.) PR: GR. Master's level. Repeatable (S/ U only ) SPC 6934 SELECTED TOPICS IN SPEECH SPC 6971 THESIS: MASTER'S Repeatable (S/ U only ) (1-5) (var.) TSL 6371 METHODS OF TEACHING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE I (4) PR: Graduate standing. Required of all candidates for the M.A degree in TESL. Analysis of the methods of teaching English pronunciation and structure to speakers of other lan guages. Content will include theorie s of second language ac quisition, phonological contrastive analysis and a s urvey of various type s of programs in ESL, EFL, ESP, and Bilingual Education in terms of teaching_ materials and cur.ricula. TSL 6372 METHODS OF TEACHING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE II (4) PR: TSL 6371. Required ofall candidates for the M.A. degree in TESL. Content includes discussion of the problems and method s employed in teaching reading comprehension, con ve r sa tion compo sitio n and listening comprehension ; the sec ond part of the course deals with te s ting English as a Second Language TSL 6945 INTERNSHIP (1-9) PR: TSL 6371 and TSL 6372 Required of all candidates for the M .A. degree in TESL. Supervised teaching of English as a seco nd language to non-native speakers at ap propriate level s and settings May be repeated up to 9 credit hours (S / U only.) ENGLISH Chairperson: W J Heim ; Pr ofesso r s: J G Bentley L. R. Broer, J R Clark W F Davis, I. Deer, R. F. Dietrich F. J Fabry S. R Fiore W Garrett E F Henley J Hinz E. W. Hirshberg J. J Iorio D. L. Kaufmann H : C Kiefer, J B Moore W E. Morris J W Parker Jr ., J A. Parrish, Jr., W D. Reader W H Scheuerle E. E Smith ; Associa te Professors: R E Chisnell S. M Deats H. A Deer R M Figg HI, R. E Hall S J. Hall J S. Hatcher W. J. Heim M. G Ochshorn, W T Ros s, S J Rubin T. E Sanders, D A Wells, R. D. Wyly Jr .; Assistant Pr ofesso r s: A G. Bryant P J Collins F T Mason J D Walther F J. Zbar; Instru c tor : J. J. Dietz ; Lecturers : I. F Ceconi M C. Harmon J. N Palmer V W Valentine UNDERGRADUATE COURSES AML 3010 HIGHLIGHTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE TO 1945 (S) An introductory course consisting of s elected highlights of American literature from the beginnings to 1945. AML 3102 ROMANTIC AMERICAN LITERATURE TO 1860 (5) A study of the thought and art in poetry and prose of representative writers of the American Romantic period with empha s i s upon Emerson Thoreau Poe Hawthorne, and Melville. AML 3103 AMERICAN LITERATURE OF THE COLONIAL-FEDERAL PERIOD (5) The social, philosophic, political, and aesthetic foundations of American literature, from the period of early settlement through the writings of Cooper Irving and Bryant. AML 3107 AMERICAN LITERATURE FROM 1860 TO m2 A study of representative works of selected American Realist s and early Naturalists, among them Whitman Dickinson Twain, James Howells Crane Dreiser Wharton, Robinson. AML 3111 MODERN AMERICAN LITERATURE FROM 1912 TO 1945 (S) A study of poetry, drama, and fiction by such writers as Pound, Fitzgerald, Hemingway Faulkner Cummings Wil liams Anderson Lewis Steinbeck, Wright Wolfe West Stevens, Henry Miller, and others. AML 4214 MAJOR AMERICAN AUTHORS (S) The study of twq or three related major authors in American Literature focusing on several major figures ; the course may include such writers as Melville and Hawthorne, Hemingway and F. aulkner, James and Twain Pound and Eliot, Stevens and Lowell etc Specific topics will vary each quarter May be repeated with different topics two times. AML 4320 LITERATURE OF THE SOUTH (5) PR: One course in American literature. A study of the major writers of the Southern Renaissance," including writers such as Faulkner Wolfe, Caldwell, Hellman, McCullers O Con nor, Warren, Styron Allen Tate and Donald Davidson. CRW 3230 IMAGINATIVE WRITING: FICTION (5) PR: ENC 3486 Introduction to the writing of fiction. This course will introduce students to the variety of forms and techniques in the writing of imaginative prose CRW 3310 POETIC FORMS (S) Study of the basic elements of poetry for reader and writer Beginning with poetic language and devices used to create forms (haiku, tanka, ballad, song), progres sing to basic pros ody rhyme, and stanza pattern, the student is trained in and learns to write fixed forms from couplet to sonnet. Consider ation of the triolet, villanelle, sestina, blank verse, free verse, and naked poetry Lyric narrative and dramatic poems from world literature serve as models. CRW 3321 THE WRITING OF POETRY (5) Introduction to the writing of poetry . This course introduces the student to a variety of forms and techniques in the writing of poetry CRW 4240 WORKSHOP IN FICTION (S) Study and writing of the short story and sections of the novel. Evaluation of student work in conferences, selected readings May be taken twice for credit. CRW 4340 WORKSHOP IN POETRY (5) Self-expression in traditional and contemporary forms 'student-teacher conferences and classroom discussion Selected readings May be taken twice fur credit. ENC 0013 DEVELOPMENTAL ENGLISH (3) Instruction and practice in the review of the fundamentals of Engli s h Includes developmental work in English as applied in writing with emphasis on grammar punctuation mechanic s of expression and sentence structure. Students completing thi s course will by-pass ENC 1102. ENC 1102, 1135, 1168 FRESHMAN ENGLISH (3,3,3) Instruction and practice in the skills of writing and reading. Courses must be takc;:n in numerical sequence. Credit for Freshman English may be earned by examination ENC 3016 PRACTICAL GRAMMAR AND USAGE (4) Coverage of the traditional forms and practices of English grammar. A study of sentence patterns sentence structure agreement, punctuation, pronoun case and related matter s. ENC 3466 ADVANCED EXPOSITORY WRITING (5) A course teaching the techniques for writing effective prose excluding fict i on in which student essays are extensively criticized edited, and discussed in individual sessions with the instructor.

PAGE 68

ENC 3486 NARRATION AND DESCRIPTION (5) Writing short papers in narration and description, and the personal essay ; analyzing selected essays to heighten sensitiv ity to language. ENG 2201 INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE: FICTION (S) An examination of the short story and the novel as literary forms ; not limited to any historical period. Will not be counted toward the English major ENG 2231 CURRENT SHORT FICTION (S) Traditional and experimental short stories of this generation ; such writers as Updike, Malamud, O Connor Roth, Barth, Ionesco and Barthelme. Will not be counted toward the English major ENG 2300 CURRENT NOVELS (5) A study of major British and American novels since WW II; attention will be given to the cultural influences and recent literary trends. WiJI not be counted toward the English major ENG 2401 INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE: DRAMA (5) A study of the major forins of drama-tragedy, comedy, melodrama, farce; including the works of such playwrights as Sophocles Shakespeare, Moliere, Ibsen Chekhov and Shaw. Will not be counted toward the English major. ENG 2460 CURRENT DRAMA (S) A study of recent forms and themes in drama from Theatre of the Absurd to the present including works of such playwrights as Beckett, Ionesco Genet Pinter and Albee Will not be counted toward the English major. ENG 2711 INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE: POETRY (5) How poems work. Stress on the understanding and enjoyment of poems with attention to new forms and techniques ; not restricted to any specific period. Will not be counted toward the English major except for those students following the Creative Writing: Poetry option. ENG 3133 SHAKESPEARE: TEXTS AND FILMS (S) An introduction to the art of William Shakespeare through a comparative analysis of four of his most famous dramas and modem film adaptations of them ; Hamle t King Lear, R omeo and Juli e t and H enry V. ENG 3138 MODERN DRAMA AND FILM (S) A study of such major modem dramatists as Ibsen Strindberg, Chekhov Shaw, Brecht, Beckett, Ionesco, Weiss a nd Pinter. Films will demonstrate the possibilities of visualization. ENG 3150 AMERICAN POPULAR LITERATURE: THE ROARING TWENTIES (5) An exploration of the interaction of film literature and the popular arts in the Roaring Twenties of the U.S. Trace s the movement of Amencan culture from Main Street and Spoon River to the Modern Urban Metropolis. Studie s of such figures as Fitzgerald, Cummings Hemingway Stein E. A. Robinson, Sandburg Chaplin, and Bessie Smith. ENG 3152 TWENTIETH CENTURY BEST SELLERS (5) A study of representative best-selling novels in 20th century America; including s uch critically acclaimed works as P ey t on /'lace. Lady Chatterley's Lover. Exodus, and Catcher in the Rye, which have sold in excess of 5,000 ,000 copies and have served to portray our changing society and to reveal our changing literary taste ENG 3156 MODERN LITE. RATURE, FILM AND THE POPULAR Arns (5) Exploration into the nature and function of modem literature film and some of the popular arts like fantasy, westerns, science fiction war stories, and detective s tories. The works of such writers as Vonnegut Tolkien, Thurber, Heller Bar thelme Berger and Kesey are ENG 3294 MODERN SHORT NOVEL (5) A study of the novella from the 19th century to the present. Writers included are: Flaubert Conrad Lawrence, Mann Kafka Bellow Roth and others. ENGLISH 177 ENG 3371 MODERN EUROPEAN NOVEL (S) A st udy of the Modem European novel in translation as it developed from the 19th century to the pre se nt including such writers as Dostoevsky, Flaubert Kafka He sse, Camus a nd Solzhenit sy n ENG 4113 RESTORATION AND EIGHTEENTH CENTURY SA TIRE (5) A study of selected Neoclas s ical sa tire s, the technique s of their ex pre ss ion, and the historical conflicts out of which they arose ENG 4204 THEORY OF FICTION (S) Intensive study of the genres and varietie s of fiction to ascertain the theoretical and technic a l problem s involved in the work of fiction ENG 4223 l\:IODERN AMERICAN FICTION (5) A study of major trends and influences in American prose fiction from 1920 to the present. Im;ludes works by s uch writers as Hemingway Faulkner, Wolfe Fitzgerald Stein beck Anderson Welty Malamud Roth Barthelme and others ENG 4227 MODERN BRITISH FICTION (5) A critical study of British fiction from 1900 to the present with emphasis on such writers as Conrad Lawrence Joyce Woolf Forester, Huxley Waugh Durrell, Burgess, Powell and others ENG 4321 EIGHTEENTH CENTURY BRITISH NOVEL (5) A study of the emergence of modem reali stic prose fiction in the eighteenth century, with emphasis on Fielding Richardson Smollett and Sterne ENG 4325 NINETEENTH CENTURY BRITISH NOVEL (S) A study of such major British noveli sts as Austen Scott Thackeray Dickens, the Bronte s, Eliot, Meredith and Hardy ENG 4345 THE AMERICAN NOVEL (5) A study of major American novelist s through representative novels Authors studied may include Cooper, Hawthorne Melville James Twain Dreiser, Hemingway Faulkner, Bellow and others. ENG 4421 ENGLISH DRAMA FROM THE BEGINNINGS TO 1642 (5) The emergence of drama in England from its liturgical origins through the mystery and morality play s to its significant achievement in Renais sa nce Excludes Shakespeare ; em phasi s upon Marlowe Jon so n Webster, and Middleton ENG 4424 DRAMA F THE RESTORATION AND EIGHTEENTH CENTURY (5) A study of the bawdy theatre of Charles II's co urt as it reflects and project s English social life in the 17th ce ntury a nd an analysis of the development of 18th century dra m a. Inve-sti gate s relation s hips among dram a, novel an d English opera. Included are repre se ntative works by Wycherley, Dr yde n Congreve, Lillo Gay, Goldsmith and Sheridan ENG 4453 AMERICAN DRAMA (5) A histo rical-analytical study of American drama from the 19th century to the present. Included are s uch playwright s as Boker Boucicault Heme, O'Neill Howard Rice, Hellm an, Williams Miller Albee, and Han sbe rry ENG 4464 MODERN DRAMA (S) A study of major dramati s t s from the ris e of Re alis m up to the Theatre of the Absurd including works by Ibs en Strindberg Shaw, Chekhov Pirandello, Brecht, Beckett, Ionesco, Pinter, and other s. ENG 4512 HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE (5) The evolution of language from Anglo-Saxon through Middle English to Modern English. Changes in the pronunciation syntactic, and semantic systems; di sc ussion of the forces which influenced them : a consideration of how the s e changes may influence the interpretation of liter a ture. ENG 4742 MODERN BRITISH AND AMERICAN POETRY FROM 1900 TO 1945 (5) Stud y of selected Modern British and American Poets from Hopkins to Auden, with attention to poetic theory.

PAGE 69

178 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND LETTERS ENG 4744 C ONTEMPORARY BRITISH AND A MERICAN POETRY FROM 1945 TO THE PRESENT (5) Inten s i v e s tud y of s i x o r sev en cont e mpo rar y p o et s: Theodore Roethke Robert Lowell A llen Ginsberg Levertov Sy l v i a Pla th Edward F i e l d, B o b D y l a n o r oth e r s. ENG 4814 LIT E RARY C RITICISM ( 5) A study o f th e wor k s o f m a j o r l i t e r ary criti cs fro m Ari s totle to t h e pre se nt with e mphasi s o n their mea ning tlieir impl ie d w orld v i e w a nd th e i r s i gnifica n ce for our own time a nd lit era tur e . E N G 4900 DIR E CT E D READING ( 5) Re a din g s in s p ec i a l t opics ENG 4906 I NDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (l-5) Dir ec ted s tud y i n s p ec i a l pro j ects. S pe c i a l permi ss i o n of c h a irp e r so n r e quir e d ENL 3010 EARLY E NGLISH LITERAT U RE (5) A s urv ey of r eprese n ta tive work s of p oe tr y pro s e a nd dram a o f the Old E n glis h Middl e E n g l and a nd early R e n a i ssa nce to 1557 includin g B eow ulf, C h a u cer, M a lor y M o r e Hooker S k eito n W ya tt a m o n g o ther s ENL 3030 HIGHLIGHT S OF BRITISH LITERATURE w A n introductor y c o u r s e con s i s ting of s elected h i ghlight s of En glis h l itera ture fr o m the Middle Ages to 1750. ENL 3041 HIGHLIGHTS OF BRITISH LITERATURE 1750 TO 1945 (5) A n int roduc t ory co ur s e co n sis ting of se l ec t e d highli g ht s o f E n glis h litera tur e fro m 1 750 t o 1 9 4 5 ENL 3133 S H A KESP E ARE I ( 5 ) R eadi n g of e i g ht to t e n r eprese nt ative plays, with s p ecia l a tte n t i o n t o d eve l op ing t h e s tud e nt s a bilit y t o read a nd i n te rpr e t th e t ext. ENC3320 LITER A T URE OF THE E N GLI S H RENAI SSANCE ( 5 ) A s ur vey of r eprese nt ative w or k s of p oetry pro s e and d ra m a of th e E n glis h R e n a i ssa nc e fr o m a pp rox im a t e l y 1 5 5 8 t o 1649, i ncludin g Sidn ey an d S pen ser t o D o nne and M a r v ell wit h s p ec i a l a tt entio n t o th e e m e r ge n c e o f th e New P oe try. ENL 3351 TH E RISE AND D EC LINE OF NEO C LASSIC A L LI T ER A T U RE ( 5 ) A survey o f Neoc.lass i ca l Englis h liter a tur e beginning with Ma r vell a nd t h e l a t e w or k o f Milt o n and ending with the l a t e N eoclass i c i s m of John so n B oswell, a nd G olds mith E N L 3401 ROMA N TIC L ITERAT U RE (5) T h e poe try a nd poeti cs o f Bla k e, Word swo rth Coler i d g e B yro n S h elley a nd K ea t s ; w ith atte n t i o n t o t h e less er fig ur es, the eig h tee nth ce ntu ry b ac k grou nd a n d the co ntinuing im po rt a n ce o f roma n tic thinkin g in co nt e mpo rary a ff a i rs a nd le tte r s ENL 3430 V ICTORIAN AND EDWARDIAN LI TERATURE ( 5 ) A survey of re p resen t ative figu res of th e V ic tori a n a nd Edw a rdian periods, e ndin g in 1 9 1 4, in c ludin g p oetry pro s e a n d drama of s u c h a ut ho r s as Carlyle, T e nn yso n Browning Sw in b urne. R os s etti Dicke n s, Wild e. ENL 3441 MODER N BRITI S H LIT E RAT U RE FROM 1914 TO 1945 (5) S u rvey o f poe tr y d ra m a, a n d fic t io n of such writ e r s as Eliot, Y eats, Th o m as Co nr a d S h a w, Joyce, L aw r e n c e Hu xley W oo lf, For s ter, Wa u g h Owe n A ud en O'Case y a mong othe r s ENL 4062 MAJ OR BRITI S H AUTHOR S ( 5) T h e s t u d y o f t wo o r thre e related major a uthor s in English l iteratu r e, focusing o n seve r a l m ajor figures; the co urse m ay inc l ude s u ch write r s as F i e ldin g a n d A u s t e n Th a cke ray and D ic k e n s Keat s a nd Ye a t s, D o nn e a nd Marvell Woolf and J oyce e t c Specific t o p ics will va r y eac h qu a rter. M a y be repe a t ed wit h d iffe r e n t t opi cs t wo t i m es. ENL 4112 C H AUCE R ( 5) An int e n s ive s tud y of The Ca11t erh11ry Tal es and m a j o r critic a l co n ce rn s ENL 4121 MILTON (5) Stud y of the poetry and major pros e of John Milton with s peci a l empha s i s on P a radise L os t ENL 4134 SHAKESPEARE II (5) Three or four of Shake speare's greatest dramas seen in depth : the clo s e re a ding of the text the controversies of interpreta tion and the Elizabethan and Jacobean setting . ENL 4300 ANGLO SAXON LITERATURE (5) A s tudy of English heroic culture as presented in the literature occurring before 1066, such as B e owulf, the Battle o f Ma/d on, the S eafa r e r and Selected Charms and Spell s ENL 4311 MIDDLE ENGLISH LITERATURE (5) An inten s i v e study on one or more formal types occuring be tween 1066 and 1500, such a s the Romance The Dream Vis ion the Arthurian tradition the drama and lyrics and bal lad s ENL 4331 SIXTEENTII CENTURY PROSE AND POETRY (5) A s tudy of representative prose including fiction, and the lyric and narrative poetry of Sidney Spenser Marlowe, and Shakespeare, together with s elected poems of Donne ENL 4344 SEVENTEENTII CENTURY LITERATllRE: FORM, GENRE AND MODE (5) Study of one or more types genres, modes and theme s of English literature ; 1600-1660, such as metaphysical Poetry, C a valier Mode Devotional Literature New Philosophy Anal y tical Prose Verse Satire. Specific topics will vary ENL 4406 ROMANTIC LITERATURE: FORM, GENRE, AND ARCHETYPE (5) An inten s ive study of one or more formal types of Briti s h literature occurring between 1785 and 1832, such as Romantic Nature Poetry Romantic Historical Novels and Poem s, etc Specific topic s will vary ENL 4415 VICTORIAN LITERATURE: FORM, GENRE AND ARCHETYPE (5) An intensive s tudy of one or more formal types of Victori a n literature s uch a s the e s say the lyric, the longer poem, prose fiction, etc Specific topics will vary. ESL 1385 ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE-COMPOSITION (3) PR: Some previou s study of Engli s h Practice and drill in ba sic Engli s h s entence pattern s with emphasi s on writing punctu a ti o n v ocabulary and idiom. The course i s designed as a ser v i c e cour s e for foreign student s enrolled in the University LIN 4370 STRUCTURE OF AMERICAN ENGLISH (5) An introductory survey of trad i tional structural and generative-transformational grammars a nd their techniques for the analy s i s and de s cript i on of linguistic structure in general, a nd contemporary American English in part i cular LIN 4420 LINGUISTICS AND LITERATURE (5) The a pplication of relevant materials !Tom the fields of com parati v e and de s criptive linguistic s to analysis and interpreta t i on of literature-poetry, prose and drama, with a view to complementing the traditional modes LIT 2000 INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE: GENERAL (5) T!Je nature and signi ficance of literature in its various forms: fiction drama poetry ; emphasis on the techniques of reading literature for intelligent enjoyment Will not be counted toward the Engli s h major. LIT 3150 CONTEMPORARY BRITISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE FROM 1945 TO TIIE PRESENT (5) An introduction to the fiction poetry and drama of such writ ers a s Beckett Gin s berg Nabokov Roethke Plath Vonn egut Welty, Malamud Durrell Mailer MacLeish, and others LIT 3252 LITERATURE OF THE WESTERN WORLD: ANCIENT (5) The Bible, the best modem English translations of Homer, Ae s ch y lu s, Sophocles Euripides Ari s tophane s Plato, or others among th e Greeks ; of Virgil Ovid Juv enal Sappho Petroniu s or other s among the Roman s

PAGE 70

LIT 3254 LITERA11.JRE OF THE WESTERN WORLD: MEDIEVAL, RENAISSANCE, AND NEOCLASSICAL (5), A s tudy in English of such writers as Dante Boccaccio, Machiavelli Rabelais Montaigne, Moliere, among others and of their cultural and i ntellectual settings LIT 3257 LITERA 11.JRE OF THE WESTERN WORLD: MODERN (5) A study in English of Voltaire, Rousseau Goethe, Baudelaire Tolstoy, Mann, Lorca, Brecht, or others ; the great literary traditions of Romanticism Naturalism, and Symbolism LIT 3281 FOLKLORE AND POPULAR LITERA11.JRE (5) Literature of fairytales, folksongs, ballads and blues. Per rault, Grimm, Andersen, and others ; traditional British and American ballads and folksongs; modem ballads and blue s from folk country, delta, and big city sources; the songs of Bob Dylan and friends. LIT 3311 THE BIBLE AS LITERA11.JRE (5) Major emphasis on literary types, literary personalities of the Old and New Testaments, and Biblical archetypes of British and American literary classics LIT 3314 THE TALMUD AS LITERA11.JRE (5) An introduction to the artistic elements of one of the great books of the Jewish religion Emphasis on s tories fables legends (Aggadah), but some general background in Talmudic structure and history is also provided No previous knowledge of Judaism or religious texts is required. LIT 3323 AMERICAN INDIAN LITERA 11.JRE (5) A survey of native American Literature from pre-Columbian religious and folk literature to the current voices in the pan Indian movement. LIT 3332 BLACK LITERATURE (5) A study of Black American literature from the nineteenth century to the present, i ncluding the works of such writers as W. E . B Dubois Jean Langston Hughes, Richard Wright Ralph Ellison, LeRoi Jones and Nikke Giovanni, LIT3414 THEIMAGEOFWOMENIN LITERA11.JREI (5) A study of feminism antifeminism, sexual identity the feminine my sti que stereotyped and liberated female images from Sappho through Shakespeare, with special emphasis on how this early literature has perpetuated cultural myths, ritu als, superstitutions, and misconceptions about women. (Also offered under Women's Studies ) LIT 3415 THE IMAGE OF WOMEN IN LITERA 11.JRE II (5) A study of feminism, antifeminism, sexual identity the feminine mystique stereotyped and liberateg female images from the 17th century to the present with special emphasis on women writers on the emergence of the women's move ment (Also offered under Women's Studies.) LIT 3431 RELIGIOUS AND EXISTENTIAL THEMES / (5) Theological and philosophical ideas, allusions and symbols in the writings of Dostoevsky, Nietzsche, Mann Joyce, Eliot, Camus, Sartre and others. LIT 3442 FANTASY AND SCIENCE FICTION (5) A survey of fantasy and science fiction in England and America from Macy Shelley to the present ; includes s uch writers as Poe, Melville, Ray Bradbury, Arthur C. Clarke among others LIT 3446 LITERA11.JRE AND THE OCCULT (5) An introduction to the occult tradition as a major ingredient in English Continental, and American literature; analysis of the origins, classifications and areas of the various magic arts from classical times through the present LIT 3930 SELECTED TOPICS IN ENGLISH STUDIES (1-5) Varying from quarter to quarter the course examines in depth a predominant literary theme or the work of a select group of writers LIT 4930 SELECTED TOPICS IN ENGLISH1STUDIES (1-5) The content of the course will be governed by student demand and instructor interest. It will examine in depth a recurring literary theme or the work of a small group of writers. Special courses in writing may also be offered under this title. May be repeated for different topics. ENGLISH 179 REA 0105 DEVELOPMENTAL READING (3) Designed to help students develop maximum reading effi ciency, the course includes extensive instruction and labora tory practice in the improvement of adequate rates of reading, vocabulary, and comprehensive skills. An independent study ap proach is also available for students who prefer to assume responsibility for their own progress, REA 2405 SPEED READING DEVELOPMENT (3) A course de s igned to develop speed reading techniques on various levels of difficulty, Emphasis is placed on compre hension via nun;ierous practice drills Will not be counted to-ward the English major. (S/ U only ) REA 3505 VOCABULARY (4) A practical course in rapid vocabulary improvement for stu dent s in all areas, Stress is on words in context, Will not be counted toward the English major. GRADUATE COURSES AML 6132 S11.JDIES IN AMERICAN LITERA 11.JRE TO 1860 (5) PR : Graduate standing, Selected focused studies in American literature before 1860: the Puritans, Franklin, Cooper, Irving, Poe Emerson, Hawthorne Melville, and others. May be retaken with different subject matter three times. AML 6137 STUDIES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE 1860-1920 (5) PR : Graduate s tanding. Selected focused studies in American literature : Whitman Twain, Howells Jame s, Crane, Dreiser and others May be retaken with different subject matter three times AML 6138 STUDIES IN MODERN AMERICAN LITERA 11.JRE (5) PR : Graduate standing. Modern American drama poetry, fiction, and literary criticism; authors include Faulkner, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, O'Neill, Ander so n Wolfe, Cum mings, Frost and Eliot. May be retaken with different subject matter three times. ENG 6062 BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR ENGLISH S11.JDIES (2) PR : Gradu a te standing Detailed s tudy of bibliographies of culturai milieu s, genres, periods, and authors. ENG 6516 STUDIES IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS (5) PR : ENG 4512 and LIN 4370, or Cl. An advanced study of the origin, his toric a l development, and contemporary struc ture of British and American English in its social and cultural milieu, with emphasis upon modern te c hniques for linguistic analysis an d description. ENG 6832 SCHOLARSHIP AND CRITICISM (5) PR : Graduate standing. Selected focused s tudy of research approaches to English May be retaken with different subject matter once ENG 6837 S11.JDIES IN STYLE (5) (A dvanced Composition for Teachers) PR : Graduate standing Poetics rhetoric, dramatic style, prose s tyle, short fiction, the novel and the e s say, May be retaken with different s ubject matter three times, ENG 6917 DIRECT-ED RESEARCH (var.) PR: GR. Maste r's level. Repeatable (S/ U only,) ENG 6937 GRADUATE SEMINAR IN ENGLISH (5) PR: Consent of graduate adviset. May be retaken with diffe rent subject matter to a maximum often hours, ENG 6971 THESIS: MASTER'S (var.) Repeatable. (S/ U only,) ENG 7917 DIRECTED RESEARCH (var.) PR: GR. Ph. D level. Repeatable (S/U onl y.) ENG 7938 DOCTORAL SEMINAR (5) PR : Admission to Ph. D Program, This seminar provides inten s ive small-group discu ssio n as well as shared and individual guided re searc h in a s tudent' s area of doctoral specialty. Repeatable up to ro credit hours. ENG 7980 DISSERTATION: DOCTORAL (var.) PR : Must be admi tted to Doctoral Candidacy. Repeatable (S/ U only.)

PAGE 71

180 COLLEGE OF ARTS ANO LETTERS ENL 6304 STUDIES IN OLD ENGLISH (5) PR : Graduate standing A study of Old English language, pro s e style, poetry May be retaken with different subject matter three times ENL 6315 STUDIES IN MIDDLE ENGLISH (5) PR: Graduate standing Selected focused studies in language and in vari-ous authors and writings, 1100-1500 : Chaucer the P e arl poet, E v eryman, ballads, dr,ama. May be retaken with different subject matter three times ENL 6333 STUDIES IN SIXTEENTH-CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE (5) PR : Graduate standing Selected focused studies in 16th century British literature: Shakespeare, Sidney, Spenser, Marlowe, and others. May be retaken with different subject matter three times ENL 6349 STUDIES IN SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE (5) PR: Graduate standing Selected focused studies in British Literature 1600-1660 : Bacon, Donne, Jonson, Herbert, Milton, and others. May be retaken with different subject matter three times. ENL 6392 STUDIES IN RESTORATION AND EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE (5) PR : Graduate standing. Selected focused studies in Restoration-Eighteenth-Century British literature : Dryden, Defoe Pope, Swift Fielding Sheridan Johnson Boswell, and other s. May be retaken with different subject matter three times ENL 6407 STUDIES OF THE ENGLISH ROMANTIC PERIOD (5) PR: Graduate standing A study of pre Romantic and Roman tic prose, fiction nonfiction, and poetry May be retaken with different subject matter three times ENL 6418 STUDIES IN VICTORIAN LITERATURE (5) PR: Graduate standing A study of Victorian poetry, Victo rian fiction, Victorian non-fictional prose and Victorian drama. May be retaken with different sub