Citation
Accent on Learning

Material Information

Title:
Accent on Learning
Added title page title:
USF undergraduate catalog
Added title page title:
Undergraduate catalog
Abbreviated Title:
University of South Florida catalog
General catalog
Creator:
University of South Florida
Place of Publication:
Tampa, FL
Publisher:
University of South Florida
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 online resources ( 287 pages)

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Subjects / Keywords:
University and colleges -- Curricula -- Catalogs ( lcsh )

Notes

General Note:
None published in 1960. Volume for 1975-76 issued in 2 parts: part 1. General information -- part 2. Curricula and courses. Supplement for 1961 entitled: Summer sessions, 1961. Continued in part by University of South Florida. Graduate School programs, [1985/86]- Continued by the CD-ROM publication: USF academic information.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of South Florida
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
024905859 ( ALEPH )
29205298 ( OCLC )
A52-00037 ( USF DOI )
a52.37 ( USFLDC Handle )

USFLDC Membership

Aggregations:
USF Catalogs (Accent on Learning)

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Book

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ACCENT ON LEARNING UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG ,OF THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998-99 -)f Sarasota Campus Tampa Campus 4202 Fowler Avenue Tampa, Florida 33620 Telephone: (813)974-2011 http://www .usf. edu/ Lakeland Campus 3433 Winter Lake Road Lakeland Florida 33803 Telephone : (941)667-7000 http://www lklnd usf edu/ St. Petersburg Campus 140 Seventh Avenue South St. Petersburg Florida 33701 Telephone : (813)553-1142 http://www1 stpt.usf edu/ 5700 N. Tamiami Trail Sarasota Florida 34243-2197 Telephone : (941) 359-4200 http : //www.sar .usf. edu/ The announcements, Information, policies, rules, regulations, and procedures set forth in this Catalog are for information only and are subject to continual review and c'liange without notice. Undergraduate students enrolled In the University are entitled to one copy of each issue of the USF Undergraduate Catalog. Students wanting additional copies may purchase them at the University Bookstore. Prospective students may obtain general University Information concerning admissions, fees and degree programs by requesting eitherthe Undergraduate Viewbook or Graduate Catalog from the Admissions Office, SVC 1036, University of South Florida 33620-6900; telephone: 813-974-3350. The University of South Florida Is committed to the principles of equal education, equal access, and equal employment opportunities wltl]out regard to race, co(or, marital status, sex, religion, national origin, disability, age, or Vietnam or disabled veteran status as provided by law and in accordance with the University's respect fo; personal dignity. These principles are applied In the conduct of University programs and activities and the provision of faclllties and services.

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Visiting The University Prospective students and other interested persons are invited to visit the University campuses. Most University offices receive visitors from 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p m Monday through Friday Prospective freshmen are encouraged to attend USF PREVIEW. This program, held on the Tampa Campus is designed to acquaint parti cipants with USF admission, financial aid, housing annual costs academics and student life. USF PREVIEW information is available from the Office of Admissions i n Tampa. The Tampa Campus of the University is located on Fowler Avenue (State Road 582) approximately two miles east of Interstate 275 and Nebraska Avenue (U. S Route 41) and seven miles north of Interstate 4 off 1-75. The other campuses of the University are located in the places noted below Communicating With The University Communications regarding the services and programs listed below should be directed by letter or by phone to the appropriate office on the Tampa. St. Petersburg, Lakeland, or Sarasota campuses. Maiing addresses and general telephone numbers forthe campuses are given on the previous page. Theofficeslistedbelow(onlheTampaCampusunlessotheiwiseindicated)maybedialeddirectatthe telephonenumbersshown. Academic Advising (for Undeclared and Undecided Students) AcademicAdvising SVC2011 htfpJM9basa.admin. usl.edr.Vadvisingla .htm Academ i c Advising (for upperclassmen) Arts& Sciences, SOC 102 http://www.cas. usfedu/ BusinessAdmin., BSN 1406 http://v(Ww.coba.usf.edu/ Education, EDU309 http://www.coedu.usl.edu/ Engineering, ENG 104 http://www.eng. usl.edu/ Fine Arts, FAH 120 hllp i/www.arts. usf.edu/ Nursing, MON 1004 httpJ/www.med.usl.edu/PUBAFF!hsc/nuf$ing1. hlrrt Pre-Medical, SCA 306 Academ ic Services for Students with Disabilities Coordinator, SVC 1133 htfpJM9basa.admin.usf.edu/sdsldss.ltm Adult and Transfer Student Services Office of the Director SVC 1001 http://www.rmH. usf. edu/enroH!atss/ Applications and Admissions Office of Admissions, SVC 1036 http://www.rmit.usf.edu/enrollladfTiss/admiss.htm bu/Jseye@aanin.usf.edu New College http: //www.newcollege.usf.edu/ Office of Admissions (Sarasota) Athletlcs(lntercollegiate) Director of Athletics PED 214 httpi/www. rml .usf.edu/athletics)Jo_blils.hlm Bachelor oflndependent Studies Program External Degree Program, HMS 443 http://www.cas.usf.edu!bislindex.htrrt Career Development Counseling Centerior Human Development, SVC 2124 httpJ/www.rmit.usf.edu/counseV Career Center Cooperative Education Program, SVC 2088 Senior Placement Services, SVC 2088 http://www.career.usf.edu/ College Level Examination Program (CLEPtests) Office of Evaluation and Tes ting Services, SVC 2054 http:!Mww.ugs.usf.edu/el/dep.hlm Community College and Transfer Students AdultandTrasnferS tudentServices ,SVC1001 http://www rmd. usf edulenrolllatssl Continuing Education Courses and Conferences Continuing Education, MGZ 144 Division of Conferences and Institutes, MHH 116 English Language Institute, CPR 107 http://www.conted.usf.edu/ Counseling Counseling Center for.Human Development, SVC2124 httpJ/www.rmit.usf.edu/counseV Educational Outreach Office of the Dean, MHH 116 httpJ/www.outreach. edu/ FinancialAssistance(schoiarships,loans ,ernploy ment) Office of Financial Aid, SVC 1102 httpJ/usfweb.usf.edulenro/IAinaidAinaid. htm Graduate Studies OfliceoftheDean FAQ 126 http://www.grad.usf.edu/ ; 974-2645 974-2503 974-4290 974-2458 974-2684 g14-3660 974-9305 974-2674 (voice)974-4309 (TDD)974-5651 974-6444 359-4269 974-2125 974-4058 974-2831 974-2171 974-2171 974-2741 974-6444 -974-2403 -974-5731 974-3433 974-2831 9743)57 974-4700 974-2846 2 Health Services (Student) Health Center, SHS 101 http://www.shs.usf.edu/ Honors Program-University-wide Office of the Director, CPR 273 hllp :/!www.Ust.edu/--hororsl Housing : Campus Residence Halls Office of Residence Life, RAR 229 Office of Housing, RAR229 httpJ/www.housing.usf.edu/ Housing: Off-Campus Student Government Office, CTR 203 http:l/131 .247.44.225/sg/ International Student and Scholar Services Office of the Advisor, CTR 259 http://ctr.usf.edufisss/ Library Resources Tampa Campus: Office of the Director of Libraries, LIB 207 http://www.lib. usf.edu/ St. Petersburg Campus: Office of theUniversity Librarian httpJMww.nelson.usf.edu/ Sarasota Campus: Office of the Librarian hllp i/www.sarasota. usf.ed/Jllibraiy l Lakeland Campus: PCC/USF Library Minority Student Advising Center for Academic Advising, SVC 2011 httpJM9basa.admin.usf.eduladvisHVa
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CONTENTS List of Degree Programs and Common Prerequisites Academic Calendar Accreditation and Degrees Offered General Information Admissions and Related Matters Financial Information Student Affairs and Student Services Academic Policies and Procedures Academic Programs and Services College of Arts and Sciences College of Business Administration College of Education College of Engineering College of Fine Arts New College of USF College of Nursing College of Public Health Undergraduate Studies General Course Information Organization & Personnel Faculty Index 4 6 8 9 13 20 24 35 55. 63 158 170 188 212 236 237 242 243 247 252 258 284 For the latest and most up-to-date information regarding the Schedule of Classes, the Search a-Bull (database ofallof US F's courses) and academic policies, please visit Rocky's Information Transmission Zone (the RITZ) athttp://www.ugs.usf.edu/ritz.htm Cover: The USF Bookstore Cover Design by: Ray Cooper 3 l18F

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List of Degree Programs and Common Prerequisite$ Accounting [BAJ B A./B.S. Limited Access 160 Economics [BAJ-B.A./B.S. Limited Access 160 Common Prerequisites 158 Common Prerequisites 158 Africans Studies [AS] B.A. 71 Electrical Engineering [EN] B.S. Limited Access 197 No Common P_rerequisites 72 Common Prerequisites 198 American Studies [AS] B.A. 90 Elementary Educatio n [ED) B.A./B.S. 173 No Common Prerequisites 90 Common Prerequisites 173 Anthropology/Applied Anthropology [AS] B.A. 72 English [AS] B.A. 82 Common Prerequisites 73 (Option 1: English and American Literatur-e, Option 2: Creative Writing: Fiction, Poetry, Art [FA] B.A. 214 Option 3: Professional and Technical Writing) History and Art Studio) Common Prerequisites 83 ommon Prerequisites 215 English Education [ED] B A./B S. 174 Art Education B.A./B.S 215 Common Prerequisites 174 Common rerequisites 215 Environmental Scief"\ce and Policy [AS] B.S 83 Behavior Disorders [ED) B A./B S 177 No Common Prerequisites 83 Common Prerequisites 178 Finance [BAJ B A./B S Limited Access 161 [AS] B S. 74 Common Prerequisites 158 mmon Prerequisites 75 Language Education [ED] B A./B.S 174 Business and Office Education [ED] B.A./B.S 172 g rench, German, Italian, Spanish, Russian) Common Prerequisi tes 173 or'nmon Prerequisites 175 Chemical Engineering [EN] B S. Limited Access 192 French [AS] B.A. 93 Common Prerequisites 192 Common Prerequisites 94 Chemistry [AS] B.A./B.S. 76 General Business Administration [BAJ Common Prerequisites 77 B A./B S Limited Access 159 Common Prerequisites 159 Civil Engineering [EN) B.S. Limited Access 193 Common Prerequisites 194 Geowaphy [AS] B.A. 84 Option 1: Environmental Studies, Civil Eng i neering [EN] B S. Limited Access 193 Option 2 : Urban Studies Engineering) Option 3: General Geography) mmon Prerequisites 194 Common Prerequisites 84 Classics [AS) B.A. 92 Geology [AS] B.A./B S. 84 (Clasics, Classics Latin/Greek, Common Prerequisites 85 Interdisciplinary Classics) German [AS] B.A. 93 Common Prerequisites 93 Common Prerequisites 94 Communication [AS] B.A. 78 Common Prerequisites 78 Gerontology [AS] B.A./B S 85 Common Prerequisites 86 JEN) B.S Limited Access 195 mmon rerequ1s1tes 196 History [AS) B.A. 89 Common Prerequisites 89 Science [EN) B S Limited Access 195 mmon Prerequisites 195 Humanities [AS] B.A. 89 No Common Prerequisites 90 Criminology [AS] B.A. 80 No Common Prerequisites 81 Industrial Engineering [EN] B S. Limited Access 198 Common Prerequisites 199 Dance Performance [FA) B.F.A. 216 and Modem) Industrial-Technical Education [ED] B A./B.S. 172 mmon Prerequisites 218 (Technology Education) Common Prerequisites 173 Dance Studies [FA] B.A. 217 Common Prerequisites 218 Information Systems [EN] B.S -Lir(lited Access 197 Common Prerequisites 197 Dance Education [FA] B S. 217 Common Prerequisites 218 Interdisciplinary Natural Science [AS] B.A. 90 No Common Prerequisites 91 Early Childhood Education [ED] B.A./B S 173 Common Prerequisites 174 Interdisciplinary Social Sciences [AS] B.A. 78 (Speech, Language, Hearini Science, [ISH]; Economics [AS] B.A. 81 American Sign Language, [I A); Educational Common Prerequisites 82 Interpreter Training [ISi]) No Common Prerequisites 79 4 lJ8F

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Interdisciplinary Social Sciences [AS) B.A. 91 Political Science [AS] B.A. 87 No Common Prerequisites 92 Common Prerequisites 88 Interdisciplinary Studies [AS] B l.S 73 Pre-Law Emphasis [AS] B.A. 88 No Common Prerequisites 74 Common Prerequisites 88 International Studies [AS) B.A. 86 Pre-Medical Emphasis [AS] B.A. 70 Common Prerequisites 87 No Common Prerequisites 71 Italian [AS) B.A. 93 Psychology [AS] B.A. 100 Common Prerequisites 94 Common Prerequisites 101 Liberal Arts and Sciences [NC] B.A. Limited Access 236 Religious Studies [AS] B.A. 101 No Common Prerequisites No Common Prerequisites 102 Liberal Studies [AS] B.A. Limited Access 92 Russian [AS] B.A. 93 Common Prerequisites 92 Common Prerequisites 94 Management [BAJ B.A./B.S. Limited Access 162 Science Education [ED] -B A./B S 175 Common Prerequisites 158 (Biology Chemistry, Physics) Common Prerequisites 175 Management Information Systems [BAJ B.A./B.S Limited Access 161 Social Science Education [ED) -B A./B .S. 176 Common Prerequisites 158 Common Prerequis i tes 176 Marketing [BA] -B A./B.S. 162 Social Work [AS] B.S.W. Limited Access 102 Common Prerequisites 158 Common Prerequisites 103 Mass Communications [AS) B.A. Limited Access 94 Sociology [AS] B.A. 104 (Advertising, Journalism, Public Relations, Common Prerequisites 105 Telecommunications) Common Prerequisites 96 Spanish [AS] B.A. 93 Common Prerequisites 94 Mathematics [AS] B.A. 96 Common Prerequisites 98 Specific Leaming Disabilities [ED] -B A./B.S. 177 Common Prerequisites 178 Mathematics [AS) B.A. Limited Access 97 g'ccelerated BA/MA Program) Technology Education [ED] B.A /B.S. 172 ommon Prerequisites 98 Common Prerequisites 172 Mathematics Education [ED] -B A./B S 175 Theatre [FA] -B A./B F A.: 222 Common Prerequisites 175 Acting/Directing Design/Performance, Education Mechanical Engineering [EN] B.S. Limited Access 199 Common Prerequisites 224 Common Prerequisites 200 Women's Studies [AS] B.A. 105 Medical Technology [AS] B .S. 98 No Common Prerequisites 105 Common Prerequisites 98 Mental Retardation [ED] -B A./B S 177 Common Prerequisites 178 Microbiology [AS] -B .S. 74 Common Prerequis i tes 75 Music [FA] B.M. (Performance, Composition Jazz Studies) 218 Common Prerequisites 220 Music Education [FA] -B A./B.S. 220 (General (K-12), Instrumental (K-12), Vocal (K-12)) Common Prerequisites 221 Nursing, Basic [NU] B.S Limited Access 239 Common Prerequisites 239 Nursing, Registered [NU) -B S Limited Access 239 Common Prerequisites 239 Philosophy [AS] B.A. 99 No Common Prerequisites 99 Physical Education [ED] -B A./B .S. 176 [AS] = College of Arts and Sciences (Elementary (K-8), Secondary (6-12), (BAJ = College of Business Administration Wellness Leadership) [ED] =College of Education Common Prerequisites 176 (EN] =College of Eng i neering (FA] = College of Fine Arts Physics [AS] B.A./B S 99 (NC] = New College Common Prerequisites 100 [NU] = College of Nursing

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1998 MAY s M T W T F s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 0 1 1 12 13 14 1 5 1 6 17 18 19 2l 21 22 23 'Zl :fl 29 3l 31 JUNE s M T w 'r F s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 1 2 13 1 4 15 1 6 1 7 1 8 1 9 2l 21 22 23 25 a; 'Zl :fl 29 3l JULY s M T w T F s 1 2 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 1 1 2 13 1 4 15 16 1 7 1 8 1 9 2l 21 22 23 25 a; 'Zl :fl 29 3l 31 AUGUST s M T W T F s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 1 12 1 3 1 4 15 16 17 18 19 2l 21 22 23 25 a; 'Zl :fl 29 3l 31 SEPTEMBER s M T w T F s 1 2 3 4 5 6 0 8 9 10 11 12 1 3 1 4 1 5 16 1 7 1 8 1 9 2l 21 22 23 25 a; 'Zl :is 29 3l OCTOBER s M T W T F s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 0 11 1 2 1 3 14 15 16 1 7 18 1 9 2l 21 22 23 25 a; 'Zl :fl 29 3l 3 1 NOVEMBER s M T W T F s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 0 12 13 1 4 15 1 6 17 1 8 1 9 2l 21 22 23 25@):s 29 3l DECEMBER s M T W T F s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 1 12 1 3 14 15 16 1 7 18 1 9 2l 21 22 23 25 a; 'Zl :fl 29 3l 31 March 2 June 1 August 24 28 August 28 August 28 August 28 September 4 September 7 September 18 September 21 September 30 October 3 October 23 ACADEMIC CALENDAR FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS Monday Monday Monday Friday Friday Friday Friday Friday Monday Friday Monday Wednesday Saturday Friday FALL SEMESTER, 1998 Application Deadline Date for international applicants to apply for admission and submit all required credentials and supporting documents Priority processing date for undergraduate and former students returning to apply for admission (except interna tional applicants) Classes begin Last day to withdraw/drop and receive full refund of registration fees Last day to add courses Last day for late registration Last day to pay fees CLAST Registration Deadline Labor Day Holiday Graduation Application Deadline Rosh Hashanah Yorn Kippur CLAST Administration Day Last day to drop or withdraw from courses without academic penalty October 30 Friday Honors Convocation (Classes cancelled 2:00-5:00 p m.) November 11 Wednesday Veteran's Day Holiday November 26-27 Thursday-Friday Thanksgiving Holidays December 4 Friday Classes End December 5-11 Saturday-December 12 December 14 December 15 Friday Saturday Monday Tuesday Final Examin ations Commencement (Tampa) Commencement (St. Petersburg) Commencement (Sarasota) SPRING SEMESTER, 1999 August 3 October 19 January 5 January 11 January 11 January 11 January 11 January 18 January 22 February 1 February 1 March 5 March 8-12 April 23 April 24-30 May1 May9 May14 Monday Monday Tuesday Monday Monday Monday Monday Monday Friday Monday Monday Friday Monday-Friday Friday SaturdayFriday Saturday Sunday Friday Application Deadline Date for international applicants to apply for adm i ssion and submit all required credentials and support ing documents Priority processing date for undergraduate and former students returning to apply for admission (except interna tional applicants) Classes begin Last day to withdraw/drop and receive full refund of registration fees Last day to add courses Last day for late registration Last day to pay fees Martin Luther King Holiday CLAST Registration Deadline Graduation Application Deadline CLAST Administration Day Last day to drop or withdraw from courses without academic penalty Spring Semester Break Classes End Final Examinations Commencement (Tampa) Commencement (St. Petersburg) Commencement (Sarasota) 6 USF'

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January 4 April 5 May? May10 May14 May14 May14 May14 May28 May31 June 4 June 5 June 18 June 21-25 August 7 I January 4 April 5 June 4 June 28 July2 July2 July2 July2 July5 July 16 August 6 August 7 January 4 April 5 May? May10 May14 May14 May14 May14 May31 June 4 June 5 June 18 July5 July 16 August 7 Monday Monday Friday Monday Friday Friday Friday Friday Friday Monday Friday Saturday Friday SUMMER TERM, 1999 SESSION A (First Six-week Session) Application Deadline Date for international applicants to apply for admission and submit all required credentials and supporting documents Priority processing date for undergraduate and former students returning to apply for admission (except for international applicants) CLAST Registration Deadline Classes begin Last day to withdraw/drop and receive full refund of registration fees Last day to add courses Last day for late registration Last day to pay fees Last day to drop or withdraw from courses without academic penalty Memorial Day Holiday Graduation Application Deadline CLAST Administration Day Last day of classes Monday-Friday Summer Break between Session A and Session B Summer Commencement (Tampa) Saturday Monday Monday Friday Monday Friday Friday Friday Friday Monday Friday Friday Saturday Monday Monday Friday Monday Friday Friday Friday Friday Monday Friday Saturday Friday Monday Friday Saturday SESSIONB (Second Six-week Session) Application Deadline Date for international applicants to apply for admission and submit all required credentials and supporting documents Priority processing date for undergraduate and former students returning to apply for admission (except for international applicants) Graduation Application Deadline Classes begin Last day to withdraw/drop and receive full refund of registration fees Last day to add courses Last day for late registration Last day to pay fees Independence Day Holiday Last day to drop or withdraw from courses without academic penalty Last day of classes Summer Commencement {Tampa) SESSIONC (Ten-week Session) Application Deadline Date for international applicants to apply for admission and submit all required credentials and supporting documents Priority processing date for undergraduate and former students returning to apply for admission (except for international applicants) CLAST Registration Deadline Classes begin Last day to withdraw/drop and receive full refund of registration fees Last day to add courses Last day for late registration Last day to pay fees Memorial Day Holiday Graduation Application Deadline CLAST Administration Day Last day to drop or withdraw from courses without academic penalty Independence Day Holiday Last day of classes Summer Commencement (Tampa) 7 USF 1999 JANUARY s M T W T F s 1 2 3 4 m 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 19 al 21 Z2 Z3 24 2i al 2728293'.J 31 FEBRUARY s M T W T F s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 1 2 1 3 14 15 16 17 1 8 19 al 21 Z2 Z3 24 2i al 27 28 MARCH s M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 1@@13 14 15 16 17 18 19 al 21 Z2 Z3242ial27 28 29 3'.J 3 1 APRIL s M T W T F s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 al 21 Z2@] 24 2i al 27 28 29 3'.J MAY s M T W T F s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 12j 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 al 21 Z2 Z3 24 2i al 27 28 29 3'.J JUNE s M T W T F s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 1 12 13 14 15 16 al 21 Z2 Z3 24 2i al JULY s M T W T F s 1 2 3 4 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 al 21 Z2 Z3 24 2i al 2728293'.)31 AUGUST s M T W T F s 1 2 3 4 5 m 7 8 9 10 11 12 1 3 14 15 16 17 18 19 al 21 Z2 Z3 24 2i al 27 28 29 3'.J 3 1

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ACCREDITATION USF was originally fully accredited in 1965 by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, the official accrediting agency for educational institutions in the South. The University of South Florida is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award degrees in the Baccalaureate, Master, Specialist and Doctoral levels, including the Dbctor of Medicine. DEGREES* OFFERED AT THE UNIVERSITY Undergraduate Degrees Bachelor of Arts B.A. Bachelor of Engineering Technology B.E.T. Bachelor ofFine Arts B F.A. Bachelor of Independent Studies B. l.S. Bachelor of Music B.M. Bachelor of Science B .S. Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering B S.C .H. BachelorofScienceinCivil Engineering B.S.C.E. Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering B S C P Bachelor of Science in Computer Science B S C S Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering B.S E.E Bachelor of Science in Engineering B S.E. Bachelor of Science in Engineering Science B S.E .S. Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering B.S.l.E. Bachelor of Science in Information Systems B.S.l.S Bachelor of Science in Mechanical EngineeringB.S.M .E. Bachelor of Social Work B.S W Graduate Degrees Master of Accountancy Master of Architecture Master of Arts Master of Business Administration Master of Chemical Engineering Master of Civil Engineering Master of Education Master of Electrical Engineering Master of Engineering Master of Environmental Engineering Master of Fine Arts M.Acc. M.Arch M.A. M B.A. M.C.H.E. M.C E M .Ed. M.E.E. M E M.E.V.E M.F.A. Master of Health Administration M. H .A. Masterof Industrial Engineering M l.E. Master of Liberal Arts M. L.A. Master of Mechanical Engineering M M.E. Master of Music M. M. Master of Public Administration M. P.A. Master of Public Health M.P.H. Master of Science M S Master of Science in Chemical Engineering M S.C.H. Master of Science in Civil Engineering M.S.C.E. Master of Science in Computer Engineering M.S.C.P. Master of Science in Computer Science M S.C S Master of Science in Electrical Engineering M.S.E.E. MasterofScience in Engineering M.S .E. Master of Science in Engineering ManagementM.S.E.M. Master of Science in Engineering Science M.S.E.S Master of Science in Environmental EngineeringM.S.E.V Master of Science in Industrial Engineering M.S.l.E. Masterof Science in Information Systems M S.l.S. Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering M.S.M.E. Master of Science in Medical Sciences M.S.M.S. Master of Science in Public Health M S P H Master of Social Work M.S W Advanced Graduate Degrees Education Specialist Doctor of Education Doctor of Philosophy Professional Degree Doctor of Medicine *See index for individual degree programs Ed.S. Ed.D Ph.D. M.D. The University of South Florida and all colleges departments and programs therein establish certain academic requirements which must be met before a degree is granted These requirements concern such things as curricula and courses, majors and minors and academic residence Advisors directors department chairs and deans are available to help the student understand and arrange to meet these requirements, but the student is responsible for fulfilling them At the end of a student's course of study, if requirements for graduation have not been satisfied, the degree will not be granted For this reason it is important for all students to acquaint themselves with all regulations and to remain currently informed throughout their college careers and to be responsible for completing requirements Courses programs, and requirements described in the catalog may be suspended deleted, restricted supplemented, or changed in any other manner at any time at the sole discretion of the University and the Florida Board of Regents

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USF -A COMPREHENSIVE RESEARCH UNIVERSITY UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA Statement of Institutional Purpose The University of South Florida is a multi-campus, compre hensive, research university strongly committed to the bal anced pursuit of excellent teaching, significant research, and useful public service. The University generates and dissemi nates new insights, knowledge, and forms of expression; it prepares students fortheirpersonal lives, professional careers, and contributions to society; and it serves its external commu nities through the citizenship and expertise of its faculty, staff, students, and graduates. The University of South Florida is committed to supporting and nurturing the free expression of ideas. It embraces the role of the university as a social critic and conscience and respects and defends the rights of faculty, staff, and students to speak out and act responsibly upon the social implications of their knowl edge. The University values an intellectually excellent, cultur ally diverse academic community of faculty, staff, and students. The University strives to provide an educationally challenging environment, within and beyond the classroom, that engages students and faculty in a common inquiry into the values of society and gives them a rational understanding of the need to accept and appreciate differences among people and cultures as a foundation for national and global welfare. The three traditional activities of teaching, research, and public service are the foundation of the University's mission. In the conduct and delivery of its programs, the University recog nizes the special characteristics of its students and the oppor tunities provided by the location of its campuses in thriving metropolitan areas on Florida's gulf coast. The University gives particular consideration to programs and activities that can build on these advantages to achieve national and international distinction. As an inst.itution dedicated to excellent teaching, the Univer sity's fundamental objective is to evoke in its students a lifelong commitment to teaming that enables them to become thought ful, active, productive, and compassionate citizens. The Univer sity provides to all undergraduates a strong common curriculum in liberal education that balances the acquisition of general knowledge with the development of intellectual honesty, curios ity, creativity, critical inquiry, and values and ethics that include a commitment to advancing the society in which they live Specialization in the major areas builds upon this strong liberal education and prepares graduates to enter grad uate school or to emt?ark directly upon their life's work. Ad vanced studies at the graduate and professional level enable students to work with faculty at the forefront of their disciplines, to increase their depth of knowledge and personal achieve ment, and to contribute to the advancement of their professions and the larger society. The University has high expectations of its faculty as inspirational teachers and of its faculty and students as exemplary scholars. As a comprehensive research university, the University is dedicated to the discovery of new knowledge, insights, and forms of expression through significant innovative research and other creative activity and to the preservation, organization, analysis, and synthesis of existing knowledge. As a leading publicly supported university, the University accomplishes its research mission by building on existing program strengths, by fostering effective, cross-disciplinary approaches, and by con tributing to the resolution of social, cultural, economic, medical, and technological challenges facing the largely metropolitan populations of our state and country within the international community of the 21st century. As an institution serving the region, state, and nation, the University actively encourages the use of the expertise of its faculty, staff, and students for the advantage of the larger community-to provide intellectual, cultural, health-related, and social services; to contril;>ute tb life-long learning opportunities; and to function as a catalyst for improvements within its imme diate cultural, economic, and social context. USF has the assigned responsibility to provide continuing education for a 15-county area. Within the mission of the total university, the Tampa campus plays the central role. It incorporates a comprehensive range of teaching, research, and service functions and provides essential academic leadership and administrative services for the University's multiple campuses. The missions of the region al campuses at St. Petersburg, Sarasota and Lakeland empha size programs that respond to demonstrated regional need for undergraduate upper level and master's level education. On a selective basis, regional campuses also undertake program initiatives involving special community interests and resources. The mission of New College at Sarasota is to provide a high quality, undergraduate, liberal arts education. The special strengths of all five campuses contribute to an integrated, diversified, and comprehensive university dedicated to educa tional quality and leadership. OVERVIEW Since its beginnings in the late 1950s as a single-campus undergraduate institution, the University of South Florida has become a comprehensive, multi-campus research university serving more than 36,000 headcount students in 1 O colleges on four campuses. USF is home to medical clinics and hospitals, a major mental health research institute, and four public broad casting stations. The University employs more than 1,860 full time faculty and generates more than $100 million annually in sponsored research. Its endowment exceeds $52 million and includes 39 endowed chairs. USF faculty are making national contributions in their fields, and their commitment to quality education is central to the University's teaching, scholarship, and service mission. Now the second largest of Florida's state universities, USF serves not only traditional-age, residential students but also adult students already in the workforce and seeking a first degree, professionals seeking to remain or become competitive by continuing their education through graduate study, commu nity college transfer students, and senior citizens A large number of students attend part-time This diverse student body requires a broad array of services and programs, delivered at times and in formats that accommodate the needs of all. USF offers a wide variety of degree programs with both basic and applied orientations, including 77 baccalaureate, 87 mas ter's, and 22 doctoral degrees, as well as the M.D. These degree programs are in the University's Division of Academic Affairs and are administered in one of 10 schools and colleges: Architecture, Arts and Sciences, Business Administration, Edu cation, Engineering, Fine Arts, Medicine, Nursing, Public Health, and an honors college, New College ofUSF on the Sarasota campus. Specialized credit and non-credit programs are ad ministered by the School of Continuing Education. As an institution dedicated to excellent teaching, the Univer. sity's fundamental goal is to evoke in its students a lifelong commitment to learning that enables them to become thought ful, active, productive, and compassionate citizens. The Univer sity is committed to the concept of total student development intellectual, social, physical, emotional and moral. A major institutional focus is on providing programs and services that reflect standards of quality that foster the development of individual student's talents to the fullest. This publication discusses the major undergraduate aca demic programs in the University that serve the people of Florida through the instruction of students, the advancement of knowledge, and community service

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10 GENERAL INFORMATION UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG USF AT TAMPA, SARASOTA, ST. PETERSBURG, LAKELAND The University of South Florida's four campuses are within reach of more than 3 million people, roughly one quarter of the state's population in a 10 ,<;:ounty area. The USF academic programs offered in St. Petersburg, Sarasota, and Lakeland are designed primarily to serve stu dents of junior, senior and graduate standing Programs are offered at times that meet the special needs otstudents, many of whom are residents in the campus area and are employed in fulland part-time jobs Selected courses and programs are offered on the campuses by the colleges of Arts and Sciences Business Administration, Education Engineering and Nursing. Students may enroll on a part time or full-time basis on any one of the campuses or elect to enroll on more than one USF campus simultaneously. Dual enrollment may provide students with a schedule both academically flexible and personally convenient. Resident faculty and Student Affairs staff provide students at all campuses with social, vocational, and academic counseling. TAMPA: The central campus in Tampa located on a 1 748acre tract of land 10 miles northeast of downtown Tampa, serves a three-county area of over 2 million people This is the largest campus, designed to serve students from throughout the state, nation, and many foreign countries from their fresh man year through graduate school. Nine schools and colleges are located on this campus, including, on the undergraduate level, the colleges of Arts and Sciences, Business Administration, Education Engineering Fine Arts and Nursing. The campus is home to three hospitals or institutions that work closely with the colleges of Medicine, Nursing, and Public Health : the Shriner's Hospital for 9rippled Children, the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute and the Tampa General Hospital Psychiatry Center. The University is also home to the Flor i da Mental Health Institute. The Sun Dome, a multi-purpose facility with seating for 10,000 hosts an array of athletic contests concerts, lectures, and programs The Phyllis P Marshall Center, more so than any other campus facility serves as a focal point for daily activity for students faculty, alumni guests, and visitors. The Phyllis P Marshall Center houses a diversity of programs and services and a Special Events Center auditorium SARASOTA: The Sarasota campus which includes New College and is adjacent to the state-owned Ringling Museum is located on the north edge of Sarasota about 10 miles south of Bradenton on U S. Highway 41. The campus serves a population of more than 530,000 persons in a four-county area The University of South Florida at Sarasota is an educational and cultural center of local state and national significance. Its mission embraces two distinct academic opportunities: New College of USF and the University Program. New College is a residential, highly selective and innovative liberal arts college The college encourages independent study and features small classes and tutorials. All students are four-year full-time resi dential students The University Program emphasizes junior, senior, and graduate courses and degrees in Arts and Sci ences, Business, Education, Engineering and Nursing They serve fulland part-time commuting students and the educa tional needs of professionals in Manatee, Sarasota Hardee and De Soto counties The campus also has a significant re sponsibility for historic and environmental preservation and enhancement of the beautiful Ringlings' and Caples estates USF at Sarasota/New College has more than 40 buildings including a fitness center, student center, classrooms, science laboratories and student residences A $6 1-million campus library opened in 1986 The Sudakoff Lecture and Conference Center, a gift from Sarasota philanthropist Harry Sudakoff, opened in 1985 ST. PETERSBURG: The St. Petersburg campus is located on Bayboro Harbor in downtown St. Petersburg Thjs waterfront campus hosts colleges of Business, Education, Nursing and Arts and Sciences, and is nationally recognized for its graduate program in Marine Science USF St. Petersburg also houses a Center for Ethics the Knight Oceanographic Research Center, a 160,000-volume library, a fitness center and other student recreational facilities Noteworthy programs include a respected graduate pro gram in journalism studies that public journalism and ethics, and related writing components such as the Florida Suncoast Writers' Conference The campus holds several en dowed chairs whose scholars are in the fields of media ethics, ethics and marine science USF St. Petersburg serves junior senior and grad1:1ate students and is the only public in Pinellas County, an area of 1 mil ion people. ,.,. .., -._. The 33-year-old campus is USF's largest' regional branch and was the State University System's prototype for such campuses The U.S. Geological Survey's Center for Coastal Geology, the Florida Institute of Oceanography and a branch of the Department of Environmental Protection are located here. A medical research and cultural complex also surrounds the campus LAKELAND: The University of South Florida at Lakeland extends access to higher education into central portions of the state in the counties of Polk, Highlands and Hardee with population of 550,000. The Lakeland campus opened in January 1988 on a 135acre site in a new and innovative facility built for the combined use of Polk Community College (PCC) and the University The facility is located on State Road 540 on the southeast side of the which allows ease of access to residents of the surrounding counties PCC offers freshman and sophomore courses while USF provides junior, senior and graduate courses in selected academic disciplines. USF at Lakeland is designed to provide not only traditional classroom instruction but also to take advantage of advanced educational technologies Lakeland has television receiving and transmitting classrooms and labs for individualized com puter instruction. The television capabilities provide students access to outstanding faculty at USF through two-way video and audio communication The computer labs allow students to work with personal computers and still have access to the main computing facility in Tampa, as well as from their homes. Lakeland offers undergraduate degree programs in Busi ness, Criminology, Interdisciplinary Social Sciences, Education and Engineering. Graduate programs are offered in Education Engineering, Criminology and Public Administration. The pres ence of the campus plays an important role in the attraction of new industries to the area and the retention of existing compa nies by providing highly skilled professionals as a result of completing a bachelors degree in the same location FACILITIES AND ATMOSPHERE The facilities of the University now including more than 200 major buildings, are currently valued at more than $300 million The buildings are of similar modem architectural design and all are completely air conditioned. USF's Tampa campus has a variety of recreational facilities, including: a gymnasium that features a weight room natatorium; a 400-meter track; two outdoor swimming pools; 22 tennis courts; six handball/rac quetball courts; an 18-hole golf course ; two parcourses, one for running and one for walking; one baseball and four softball fields; four outdoor basketball and volleyball courts; and a new multi-million dollar recreation center In St. Petersburg, students can enjoy an outdoor pool or take part in the waterfront program that features sailboats and canoes available for use. In Sarasota, there is a 400-metertrack and a new library.

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GENERALINFORMATON 11 UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CA TA LOG The campus atmosphere is informal. Students and faculty dress casually and enjoy an unusually close relationship. Some classes are even held outside to take advantage of the area's extraordinary climate (average annual temperature 72 F) Most buildings have open hallways, which blend interiors with spacious exteriors, symbolically and architecturally sug gesting the casual accessibility that has become a USF trade mark UNIVERSITY POLICE The University of South Florida Police Department provides a full range of public safety services to the community 24 hours a day, 7 days a week on the Tampa Sarasota, and St. Peters burg Campuses. All University Police officers are certified by the State of Florida after completing minimum standards train ing atthe local Police Training Academy. The Univer sity of South Flonda Police Department is in the process of seeking accredited status through the Commission for Florida Law Enforcement Accreditation, Inc. Accreditation is the certi fication by an independent reviewing authority that an entity has met specific requirements and prescribed standards, and has long been recognized as a means of maintaining the highest standards of professionalism. General services provided by the University Police include car patrol, foot patrol, criminal investigation of all misdemean ors and felonies, traffic law enforcement, traffic crash investiga tion, special events management, and crime prevention pro grams. The University Police Department has an excellent working relationship with all local law enforcement agencies which assures the delivery of professional police services. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement and other state and federal agencies are available to assist upon request. Communication and coordination with all area law enforcement agencies are maintained on a 24 hour basis via computer networks, such as the Florida Crime Information Center and the National Crime Information Center On the Tampa Campus the University Police Department is located at the comer of Fletcher Avenue and Maple Drive. The emergency number is "9-1-1" and the non emergency number is (813) 974-2628. On the Sarasota Campus the University Police Depart ment is located near the intersection of Tamiami Trail (U.S. Highway 41) and General Spaatz Boulevard. The emergency number is "5-9-1-1" and the non-emergency number is (941) 359-4212 On the St. Petersburg Campus the University Police Department is located near the intersection of Fifth Av enue South and Second Street South. The emergency number is "1-9-1-1" and the non-emergency number is (813) 553-1140 The Lakeland Campus of the University of South Florida is located at Polk Community College. Basic public safety ser vices are provided by the security department of the community college. Law enforcement services, including the investigation of criminal acts, are provided on a routine basis by the Polk County Sheriffs Office in Lakeland. The University Police Department provides law enforcement or crime prevention services at this location on an as needed basis. VICTIMS' ADVOCACY PROGRAM The Victims' Advocacy is available to assist all USF students, staff, faculty and visitors who are victims of actual or threatened abuse/violence Offenses may include but are not limited to battery, assault, stalking, relationship/domestic vio lence, childhood victimization, sexual battery (date/acquain tance/stranger rape), hate crimes and prior abuse Advocates are available 24 hours a day to provide crisis intervention, options, assistance and referrals. Police reports are not necessary to receive services from an advocate, and services are free and confidential. Office hours are 8:00 5:00 Monday through Friday. ...... IMPORTANT NUMBERS Services are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. USF POLICE EMERGENCY USF VICTIM ADVOCATE 24-hr. CRISIS LINE REGULAR OFFICE NUMBER LOCATION HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY CRISIS LINE 911OR974-2628 974-5757 974-5756 ADM 273 234-1234 EQUAL OPPORTUNITY POLICY It is the goal of the University to create and maintain a work and study environment free of discrimination. Discrimination on the basis of race, color, sex, marital status, religion, national origin, Vietnam or disabled veteran status, handicap, or age is prohibited by University policies, federal and state laws. Any person who believes that he or she has been subjected to discrimination may file a complaint with the Office of Equal Opportunity Affairs ADM 274 The telephone number is 9744373 It shall be prohibited for any employee of USF to dis criminate or take retaliatory action against any individual who, in good faith, has opposed an alleged unlawful practice or has made a charge, testified, assisted, or participated in any man ner in an investigation, proceeding, or hearing under the provi sions of applicable law GUIDE TO RESOURCES FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES All University programs, events and services are open and available to persons with disabilities The University of South Florida is committed to the principles of Equal Educational and Employment Opportunities without regard to disability. Academic Assistance for student with disabilities: Student Disability Services exists to ensure that students with disabilities have the technical, academic, and emotional sup port necessary to achieve academic and personal success at the University of South Florida. Course related assistance and academic accomodations are provided to eligible students with documented disabilities. Services may include advocacy, reader services, interpreters, alternate exam administration, note tak ers, and adaptive equipment such as FM systems, large print computer access, and Visualteks. Students are encouraged to contact our office as early as possible prior to enrollment to make arrangments for appropriate services Admissions: Students with disabilities apply under the same guidelines as other students. If students believe that their disability has had an impact on grades, course choice or standardized test scores for admission, they may request consideration of this in the admissions process Course Substitution: Students with disabilities requesting substitution of course work for General Education, foreign language requirements, or CLAST should contact the Director of Student Disability Services. Students with declared majors requesting substitution of departmental graduation require ments will need to contactthe chair of their department. In either case, students will be requested to submit documentation to support their request for an exception. Disabled Parking: Students with state parking privileges need only supply their state card as documentation for eligibility for a USF disabled parking hangtag/sticker. Students without state privileges need medical documentation to be considered for on-campus disabled parking.

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12 GENERAL INFORMATION uNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Housing: Accessible on-campus residence hall housing is available for students with special needs. Specific information is available through the Residence Hall Director's Office. Students with disabilities are encouraged to participate fully in all University events, programs, and other campus activities. Information on whom to contact to request accommodation or assistance should be listed on program information and adver tisements. If you are unable to secure the requested assistance or need additional help with accessibility contact the Equal Opportunity Office. The following offices arrange academic accommodations and assistance for students with disabilities : Tampa Campus Director of Student Disability Services SVC 1133 (voice) 813-974-4309 (TDD) 813-974-5651 Sarasota Campus Coordinator for Advising for Special Needs Students PMD 223 813-359-4330 Lakeland Campus Office of the Director for Academic Services Building C, USF Offices 941-677-7000 St. Petersburg Campus Office of the Director, Student Affairs DAV 118 813-893-9162

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ADMISSIONS AND RELATED MATTERS UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Admission to the University of South Florida requires evianother level of study or readmission (see Readmission) dence of ability to handle academic work, capacity to think Anyone who has previously been admitted and enrolled as a creatively, and strong motivation The minimum admission degree-seeking student and has paid an application fee will not requirements are designed to help identify applicants whose be required to pay another fee. academic background indicates potential for success at USF ; The Director of Admissions may waive payment of the however, satisfaction of minimum admission requirements does application fee for disadvantaged applicants ifthe fee seNes as not guarantee acceptance. The admission of new students at all a deterrent to application In case of confirmed financial hardlevels is on a selective basis within curricular, space, and fiscal ship, the Director of Admissions will authorize Finance and limitations The selection process may include such factors as Accounting to pay the fee for the applicant. grades test scores pattern of courses completed class rank, educational objectives past conduct, school recommenda tions, personal recommendations, and portfolios Preference for admission in any term will be given to those applicants whose credentials indicate the greatest promise of academic success. The University encourages applications from qualified appli cants of both sexes and from all cultural, racial, religious, ethnic, and age groups. In the admission process there is no discrimi nation on the basis of these factors or on the basis of handicap. Applicants who do not meet minimum admission requirements will be considered for admission when there is sufficient evi dence to suggest ability to do satisfactory work at USF These policies are further described under "Applying for Admission" and "Requirements for Admission." The University supports equal educational opportunity for disadvantaged students. Requests for waiver of the $20 .00 application fee are considered by the Director of Admissions if payment of this fee creates severe financial hardship and serves as a deterrent to application. Students are admitted to USF in accordance with the mis sion and goals of the University and within enrollment limita tions established by the Board of Regents and the Florida Legislature Applying for Admissi9n Obtaining an Application As part of the State University System (SUS) ofFlorida, USF uses the common SUS Application Form for undergraduates. Applicants who are attending Florida high schools or Florida community/junior colleges may obtain the SUS Application Form in school guidance offices The USF International Student Application for Admission, as well as the SUS Application, may be requested from the Office of Admissions, SVC 1036, USF, Tampa, FL 33620-6900. All of the application forms are also available on USF campuses in St. Petersburg, Sarasota, and Lakeland. (When requesting an application, please indicate applicant categoryfreshman, undergraduate transfer, or inter national student.) Applications can be requested by e-mail at bullseye@admin.usf edu When to Apply Applications for admission are accepted as early as 12 months before the requested entry term. Applications for admis sion and the $20 00 non-refundable application fee should be submitted by the priority date (see academic calendar) for the requested entry term or by the application deadline for the requested degree program (see specific program in this cata log), whichever is earlier The priority date is normally about ten weeks prior to the first day of classes in each term. Applications for admission and application fees from international citizens (non-resident aliens) must be received at least five months prior to the requested entry term. Applications submitted after the priority date will be accepted but processing for the requested term of entry cannot be guaranteed Who Should Apply An application for admission must be submitted by all stu dents who have not been admitted to and enrolled in a USF degree program within the last three terms. Former or continu ing USF degree-seeking students must file another application for admission when applying for a second degree program, Changing Requested Term of Entry Applicants may request consideration of admission for other terms that begin within 12 months of the originally requested term of entry without submitting a new application and fee. All reqoests for changes of entry term must specify any academic work attempted that was not reflected on the original application and must be received by the appropriate published application deadline for the new term of entry or degree program specified, whichever is earlier Additionally, any issues related to criminal or academic misconduct that were not reflected on the initial application must be reported in writing to the Office of Admis sions. A new application and fee must be submitted when applicants wish to be considered for admission for a term that begins more than 12 months after the originally requested entry term. An applicant who requests a new entry term must meet the admissions requirements in effect for the new term requested. Entry for some programs are limited to specified terms. General Admission Policies All official transcripts, test scores, and any other required credentials must be received directly from the issuing agen cies. It is the applicant's responsibility to initiate the request for credentials to the issuing agencies and to assure their receipt by the USF Office of Admissions in Tampa. All credentials and documents submitted become the prop erty of USF. The originals or copies of the originals will not be returned to the applicant or forwarded to another institution, agency, or person -An applicant admitted on a provisional basis must submit the requested missing credentials, such as official final tran scripts or test scores, which must substantiate eligibility for admission before a second registration will be permitted. Receipt of final official credentials which fail to substantiate eligibility will result in rescission of admission, reclassifica tion to non-degree status, and denial of continued enroll ment in subsequent terms. Applicants who do not meet standard Board of Regents minimum admission requirements may be admitted to the University on academic probation. Students admitted on probationary status must accumulate 30 semester credits and maintain a minimum cumulative 2.0 grade point average (GPA) each term enrolled with no single term GPA below a 1 0 GPA before the probationary status is removed (A term GPA below 2 0 in the first term of enrollment results in permanent academic dismissal.) Advising is mandatory prior to registration. Failure to meet these conditions results in permanent academic dismissal from the University. -An undergraduate applicant who is denied admission may be eligible to appeal and will be advised of applicable appeal procedures by the Office of Admissions. -An application for admission or a residency affidavit submit ted by or on behalf of a student which contains false, fraudulent, or incomplete statements may result in denial of admission, further registration and/or degrees awarded. The University may refuse admission to a student whose record shows previous misconduct not in the best interest of citizens of the University community. All students entering the University with fewer than 60 semester hours of college level academic work are required to earn at least 9 semester hours during one or more Summer terms prior to graduation (see Summer enrollment requirements).

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14 ADMISSIONS AND RELATED MATTERS UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG All undergraduate transfer students admitted to USF must earn passing scores on all four sections of the College Leve l Academic Skills Test (CLAST) prior to receiving an A.A. certificate or baccalaureate degree from the University. Transfer students entering USF with fei,ver than 45 transfer able semester hours must take CLAST during the term in which 45 semester hours will be completed Transfer students entering USF w i th 45 or more transferable semes ter hours must take CLAST the first term it i s offered after initial enrollment. Prior to beginning classes all new undergraduate students and former students returning are required to participate in an Orientation/Academic Advising/Registration program on the USF campus where they will take all or the majority of courses in their first semester at USF These programs are designed to help new students become acquainted with the University, choose courses, register for classes, and com plete all other necessary procedures New students receive Orientation/Academic Advising/Registration information af ter admission NOTE: Prior to registration for classes which meet on cam pus all students less than 40 years of age must submit acceptable proof of immunity to rubella to the Student Health Service Students born after December 31, 1956 must also submit proof of immunity to measles (See Immun i zation Policy.) Performance in courses taken as a non-degree-seeking (special) student will not qualify an applicant for admission as a degree-seeking student. Similarly, courses taken as a non-degree-seeking student will not be utilized in determin ing an applicant's grade point average for purposes of admission. -A non-degree-seeking (special) student who has been dis missed from USF is not eligible for admiss ion to USF as a degree-seeking student at the undergraduate level. If exten uating circumstances contributed to the academic dismissal and the student meets other admissions requirements a requestforwa i verofthis rule may be submitted to the Faculty Committee on Student Admissions. This rule does not apply to a student who has earned a degree from a regionally accredited i nstitution subsequent to academic dismissal. Freshman and undergraduate transfer applicants denied admission to USF as degree-seeking students will not be permitted to enroll as non-degree seeking (spec i al) stu dents. Quota/Limited Access Programs Undergraduates seeking entrance to quota/limited access degree p r ograms must meet special program requirements in addition to requirements for admission to the Uni versity While many quota/limited access programs admit students only at the junior level, some programs admit students for the freshman or sophomore years. The admission criteria and procedures for quota/limited access programs at USF furn i sh equal access to A.A. degree holders from Florida public community/junior col leges transfers from other SUS institutions and USF students of equivalent status Transfer applicants with 90 or more trans ferable semester hours who are seeking admission to quota/ limited access programs must meet the grade point average requirement specified by the program to be eligible for admission to USF USF, with appr-0val of the Board of Regents and the Articu lation Coordinating Committee, has established the following undergraduate programs as quota/limited access: Liberal Stud ies Mass Communications Social Work, and the B A./M.A. Program in Mathematics in the College of Arts and Sciences; all degree programs in the College of Business Administration ; a// degree programs in the College of Engineering ; a// degree programs in the College of Nursing and New College The admissions requirements for these degree programs may be found with other program information in appropriate sections of this catalog. Minimum Requirements for Admission Freshman Applicants To be considered for admission freshman applicants must submit an SUS Application for Admission a non-refundable application fee of $20 .00, an offic ial high school transcript official GED scores if applicable SAT or ACT scores, and a TOEFL score if applicable . Although USF has minimum freshman admission require ments meeting these minimum standards does not guarantee admission Applicants selected for admission usually exceed the elig i bility requirements ; however USF also considers appli cants who do not fully meet minimum requirements but who have important attributes specia l talents or unique circum stances that may contribute to a representative and diverse student body These freshman applicants are considered for admiss ion by a faculty committee on the basis of other appro priate evidence of ability to do successful academic work at USF For purposes of admission USF recoi:nputes a high school grade point average (GPA) based on grades earned in all college preparatory academic courses In recomputing a GPA, USF assigns additional we i ghts to grades earned in honors advanced placement courses and International Baccalaureate courses The University normally requires a diploma from a Florida public or a regionally accredited high school or the state app r oved General Education Development (GED) diploma. Students admitted under the Early Admission Programs are exempted from this requirement. Students who are participat ing in an approved home schooling program are expected to provide acceptable cop i es of annual evaluations for the equiva lent of grades 9 through 12 A portfolio or additional documen tation may be requested if deemed necessary to complete an appropriate evaluation for admission Other m i nimum require ments are outlined below 1. Freshman appl i cants must submit an offic ial test score from the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the American College Test(ACT) 2. For freshman applicants earning a high school diploma, the following college preparatory academ i c units (year-long courses or equivalents) normally offered in grades nine through twelve are required : four units of English (three of the four must i ncorporate substantial writing requirements) ; three units of mathematics (algebra I and above); three units of natural sc i ences (two of the three must incorporate substan tial laboratory requirements) ; three units of social sciences (h i story, civ i cs political science economics sociology, psy chology and geography) ; two units of the same foreign language ; and four additional units of academic electives Substitution for any h i gh school unit requirement may be provided for applicants who are hearing impaired, visually impaired, dyslexic or who have a specific learning disability. Documentation of the disability and its relationship to the substitution of a unit requirement should be submitted with the application for admission. 3 Freshman applicants must minimally meet one of the follow ing to be considered for admission in good standing; how ever satisfying these minimum requirements does not guar antee admission : a At least a B average (3.0 on a 4 0 scale), as computed by USF (an SAT or ACT score must be submitted but no minimum is required) ; b A combination of high school GPA (as computed by USF) and admission test scores equivalent to a 2.5 (on a 4 0 scale) and an SAT I verbal and quantitative combined score of 1010 or a comparable composite score on the ACT as indicated in the Admissions Scale below:

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ADMISSIONS AND RELATED MATTERS 15 UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG REQUIRED TEST SCORE 4. Must meet regular USF admission criteria for degree-seek-H.S. GPA SAT SAT I* ACT jng undergraduate students; . 2.9 860 970 2o 5. Submit a personal letter outlining reasons for seeking early 2 8 870 980 20 admission; 2 7 880 990 21 6. Submit a signed statement of approval from high school 1 principal or guidance counselor; 2.6 890 1000 2 7 Submit completed Information for Early Ad-2 5 900 101o 21 mission Form; 2.4 930 1030 22 8. Submit a list of credits needed to graduate from high school; 2.3 960 1060 22 9. Meet with USF Honors Program Director or Advi-2.2 990 1090 23 sor; 2 1 1020 1110 24 10.Homeschooledstudentsmustsubmitanpfficialcopyoftheir 2 0 1050 1140 25 Letter of Intent with the student's home school district; *SAT taken after 3/31 /95 11. Private school students must submit proof that their school c. A GED diploma with an overall score of at least 300 for all is a SACS certified school. five tests and at least 50 on each of the five tests and an SAT I verbal and quantitative combined score of 1010 or an ACT composite score of21 (also required for students in approved home schooling programs); d Appropriate alternative evidence of academic achieve ment, ability, motivation and responsibility that indicates potential for successful academic work at USF. 4. A first-time-in-college applicant whose native language is not English must present a minimum score of 550 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The TOEFL requirement may be waived on an individual basis when appropriate alternative evidence of English language profi ciency is presented in writing. If otherwise qualified, appli cants who present TOEFL scores between 500 and 550 may be considered for admission with the condition that they must take a specified sequence of English courses. tional citizens (non-resident aliens) must also comply with all requirements for admission of international applicants (next page). 1 1 t k" d t th 5. First-time-in-col ege app 1can s see mg a m1ss1on a e freshman level to a limited access degree program in Engi neering must meet additional requirements specified by the program 6. If a student has not earned the following scores on the SATI or the EACT, then college prep aratory work will be required during the first term of enrollment at USF: SATI 420 verbal, 440 mathematics or EACT English 16 Reading 16, Mathematics 18 Early Admission Applicants (Freshmen) USF provides an early admission program to meetthe needs capable, mature high school students. Unde_rthe .early admission program these students may enter the university as regularly enrolled, degree-seeking students prior to graduation from high school. Participation in the early l?rogram shall be limited to students who have completed a minimum of six semesters of full-time secondary enrollment, including ies undertaken in the ninth grade. In addition, early admission applicants should be enrolled in a strong curriculum while in high school Applications for early adm1ss1on will be reviewed by the Director of Admissions in conjunction with the Dean of Undergraduate Studies. Students enrolled in an early admission program must take courses that are credit able toward the high school diploma and the associate or baccalaureate degree Students wishing to be accepted as Early Admissions stu dents at USF must: 1. Have completed the equivalent of the junior year, of high school, thus requiring only one additional year to complete requirements for the high school diploma; 2. Submit a completed SUS Application for Admission and $20 non-refundable application fee; 3. Have proof of a 1200 on the SAT I with no less than 420 on SAT IV (Verbal) and 440 on SAT IQ (Quantitative); or a 27 on the EACT with no less than or a score of 16 on ACT English and EACT Reading and a score of 18 on ACT Mathematics and a 3 5 high school grade point average (computed by USF) and a TOEFL score, if applicable; Undergraduate Transfer Applicants Applicants with fewer than sixty transferable semester cred its are considered lower-level transfers Opper-level transfers are those with 60 or more transferable semester credits. The requirements for admission for both categories of transfer students are described below. Regardless of category, grade point averages (GPA) for purpose of admission will be computed based only on grades earned in courses that are acceptable for transfer credit and as calculated by USF. USF accepts transfer credits only from institutions that are accredited by one of the regional accrediting agencies/commis sions recognized by USF atthe time the credits are earned (See Evaluation of Transfer Credit) All credits earned during the period of time a regionally accredited institution was in a "candidacy" status for accreditation are considered for transfer credit. Credits earned at an institution that is currently in "candidacy" status will not be considered fortransfer credit until such time as the awarding institution receives full regional accreditation. For an applicant applying from a non-regionally accredited school, the admissions decis)on will be based on prior work at a regionally accredited institution If all post secondary work is from a non-regionally accredited school, the evaluation will be based on the high school record and test scores and the applicant will be regarded as a freshman for purposes of admission. USF reserves the right to evaluate specific courses and deny transfer credit. USF does not award transfer credit that is determined to be occupational or vocational in nature. Lower-Level Transfer Applicants (with fewer than 60 transferable semester credits) To be considered for admission, transfer applicants with fewer than 60 transferable semester credits must submit an SUS Application for Admission, a non-refundable application fee of $20.00, an official transcript from each previous college attended, an official high school transcript, official GED if applicable, official SAT or ACT scores, and a TOEFL score 1f applicable. . . Lower-Level transfer applicants must minimally meet the following requirements to be considered for admission in good standing; however, satisfying these minimum requirements does not guarantee admission : 1. Be in good standing and eligible to return to the last region ally accredited institution attended as a degree-seeking student; 2. Have an overall "C" average (2.0 on a 4 0 scale) as calcu lated by USF in all college-level courses acceptable for transfercreditto USF (In the calculation of the GPA, incom plete grades are computed as failures and course "repeats" are not forgiven when the courses are repeated at different institutions ) ; 3. Satisfy fully all freshman admissions standards as described in the previous section entitled "Freshman Applicants." (Meet ing freshman admission standards is a critical requirement for undergraduate applicants with fewer than 60 transferable credits Board of Regents rules and p61icies do not provide for local exceptions to these requirements.);

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16 ADMISSIONS .AND RELATED MATTERS UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 4. Complete (with passing grades) two years of the same foreign language in high school or 8 to 1 O semester hours of the same foreign language at the post-secondary level (as required by Florida Statute 240.233); 5. Present a minimum score of 550 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) if the applicant's native lan guage is not English The TOEFL requirement may be waived on an individual basis when appropriate alternative evidence of English language proficiency is presented in writing. If otherwise qualified, applicants who present TOEFL scores between 500 and 550 may be considered for admis sion on the condition that they must take a specified se quence of English courses International citizens [non-resi dent aliens] must also comply with all requirements for international applicants. USF also considers applicants who do not fully meet the minimum requirements as stated in #1. and #2. above but who have important attributes, special talents, or unique circum stances that may contribute to a representative and diverse student body : These undergraduate transfer applicants are considered for admission by a faculty committee on the basis of other appropriate evidence of promise for academic success. These applicants should also submit appropriate alternative evidence of academic achievement, ability, motivation, and responsibility that supports potential for academic success at USF Upper-Level Transfer Applicants (with 60 or more transferable semester credits) To be considered for admission, transfer applicants with 60 or more transferable semester credits must submit an SUS Application for Admission, a non-refundable application fee of $20.00 an official transcript from each previous college attend ed, and a TOEFL score if applicable. Any transfer student with 90 or more semester hours who designates a desire for admission to a limited access under graduate program must meetthe overall admission GPA criteria of that program in order to be admitted to the University. Applicants with Associate of Arts (A.A.) degrees from Florida public institutions will be admitted as juniors into the University within curricular, space and fiscal limitations A.A. degree holders seeking admission to quota/limited access degree programs must also meet all requirements specified by the desired program. The admission of Florida community/junior college A.A. transfer students is governed by the Articulation Agreement between state universities and public community colleges in Florida Undergraduate transfer students who have not earned the A.A. degree from a Florida public institution or who have attended another college after receipt of the A.A. must meet the minimum requirements listed below to be admitted in good standing: 1. Be in good standing and eligible to return to the last region ally accredited institution attended as a degree-seeking student; 2. Have an overall "C" average as calculated by USF(2.0 on a 4.0 scale) in all college-level courses acceptable for transfer credit to USF. (In calculation of the GPA, incomplete grades are computed as failures and course "repeats" are not forgiven when the courses are repeated at different institu tions.); 3. Complete (with passing grades) two years of the same foreign language in high school or 8 to 10 semester hours of the same foreign language at a previous college or university (as required by Florida Statute 240.233). Students who entered a Florida public community/junior college prior to August 1, 1989 and maintain continuous enrollment until the time of their USF entry as degree-seeking students may be admitted without the required foreign language study; 4 Meet the minimum grade point average required by the program if entering a quota/limited access program and transferring 90 or more semester hours; 5. Present a minimum score of 550 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) if the applicant's native lan guage is not English. The TOEFL requirement may be waived on an individual basis when appropriate alternative evidence of English language proficiency is presented in writing. (The colleges of Business and Engineering normally require the TOEFL score regardless of prior educational background and/or degrees earned.) If otherwise qualified, applicants who presentTOEFL scores between 500 and 550 may be considered for admission on the condition that they must take a specified sequence of English courses. Interna tional citizens [non-resident aliens] must also comply with all requirements for international applicants. USF also considers applicants who do not fully meet the minimum requirements as stated in #1. and #2. above but who have important attributes, special talents or unique circum stances that may contribute to a representative and diverse student body. These undergraduate transfer applicants are considered for admission by a faculty committee on the basis of other appropriate evidence of promise for academic sucess. These applicants should also sub mit appropriate alternative evidence of academic achievement, ability, motivation and responsibility that indicates a potential for academic success at USF Evaluation of Transfer Credit 1 The receipt and evaluation of transfer credit is the respon sibility of the Office of Admissions. The Office of Admissions will evaluate the acceptability of total credits transferable to the University. The college of the student's major will assign equivalent courses in determining which courses are appli cable toward a specific degree at the University. In some instances, exact course equivalents will also be determined by other colleges which offer the same or similar courses as part of their programs of study. Trans fer students should be prepared with personal copies of their transcripts of all past course work to discuss advisement and placement with the appropriate academic advisor and should contact the col lege of their major soon after registration so that an official evaluation may be completed 2. USF will accept credits only from those institutions accred ited by one of the regional accrediting agencies/commis sions* at the time the credits are earned. (See below for agencies recognized by USF.) All credits earned during the period of time a regionally accredited institution was in a "candidacy" status for accreditation are considered for transfer credit. Credits earned at an institution that is cur rently in "candidacy" status will not be considered for transfer credit until such time as the awarding institution receives full accreditation. 3. USF reserves the right to deny credit for specific courses. USF does not award transfer credit from institutions that is determined to be occupational or vocational in nature 4. Associate of Arts (A.A.) degree holders from Florida public accredited institutions will be considered as having met USF general distribution requirements and are automati cally awarded 60 semester hours of credit. A course-by course transfer credit evaluation will be done for all out-of state and private in-state A.A. degree holders 5. Effective Fall Quarter 1976, all courses from a Florida Community College/University bearing the same State Common Course prefix and last three numbers as a USF course are automatically transferred and transfer students m ay not be required to repeat these courses, unless a college age-of-record policy is involved Excluded are grad uate courses, studio courses in art, internships, practicums, and performing arts courses such as dance, acting, vocal, and instrumental music. 6. Virtually all USF baccalaureate degrees require that at least 60 semester hours be earned from a baccalaureate-grant ing institution regardless of credit hours transferred from a community/junior college unless the student has received

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ADMISSIONS AND RELATED MATTERS 17 UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG priorapprovalforwaiverofthispolicyfromthecollegeofhis/ the condition that they must take a specified sequence of her intended major. This policy does not affect approved English courses. articulated programs based on the A.S. degree. For infor-2. International applicants must be in good standing at the last mation regarding specific articulated A.S. degree programs, institution attended. consult the Office of Adult and Transfer Student Services. 3. International applicants must submit the USF Financial 7. Credit will not be awarded for GED tests. Statement substantiating availability of financial resources 8. Service school courses will be evaluated with reference to suff)cienMo cover all educational, maintenance, and perthe recommendation of the American Council of Education sonal expenses while attending USF, without financial assiswhen official credentials have been presented ; Such rectance from the University. ommendation, however, is not binding upon the University. 4 International applicants seeking admission to limited access 9. The maximum credit for ROTC and military science courses undergraduate degree programs must also meet all requirewill vary with each college. A student must confer with his/ ments specified by the program. her college advisor to determine the acceptability for his/her major. This was effective Fall Quarter, 1975 ROTC and military science taken prior to Fall, 1975, are not acceptable for transfer credit. 10. A maximum of 45 semester hours of College Level Exami nation Program (subject and general examinations) credits can be accepted for transfer credi t. 11. A maximum of 30 semester hours of extension, correspon dence, and military service educption credits can be applied toward a degree. 12. Grades earned in transferred cour5es are not computed in the student's USF GPA except for the purposes of admis sion to limited access programs, the awarding of honors at graduation, and class ranking of baccalaureate students. 13. International credentials must be evaluated by an inde pendent evaluation service, with associated costs to be paid by the student. 14. A continuously-enrolled USF degree-seeking student must obtain prior written aFcproval from the college of the stu dent's major In order or courses taken at other regionally accredited institutions to be applied to the USF degree program. Accrediting Agencies/Commissions : New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Commission on Institutions of Higher Leaming; Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, Commission on Higher Education ; North Central Association of Colleges and Schools; Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges ; Southern Associ ation of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges; Western Association of Schools and. Colleges. Accrediting Commission for Senior Colleges and Accrediting Commission for Junior Colleges. Graduate Applicants Graduate applicants should refer to the USF Graduate Catalog. International Applicants (non-resident aliens) To be considered for admission, international applicants (non-resident aliens) must submit a USF International Student Application for Admission, a non-refundable application fee of $20.00 payable in U.S. dollars, a TOEFL score if applicable, a Statement of Financial Responsibility, undergraduate or gradu ate admissions test scores as specified for appropriate appli cant category, transcripts showing subjects and grades from the first year of secondary work to the time of application, and a Visa Clearance Form (if currently in the U.S.). Transcripts in a language other than English must be accompanied by a certified English translation. International credentials must be evaluated by an independ ent evaluation service, with associated costs to be paid by the student. Information about recommended and approved inde pendent evaluators is available from the Office of Admissions. An international applicant (non-resident alien) must meet all admission requirements for the appropriate applicant category (freshman, undergraduate transfer, graduate). Other minimum requirements are as follows: 1. An international applicant whose native language is not English must present a minimum score of 550 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). This requirement may be waived if the applicant has an AA. degree from a Florida community/junior college or SUS institution. (The colleges of Engineering and Business normally require the TOEFL score regardless of prior educational background.) If otherwise qualified, applicants who present TOEFL scores between 500 and 550 may be considered for admission with Transient Applicants An undergraduate transient student is one who comes to the University from another regionally accredited institution and wishes to take courses at USF for one term only before returning to the parent institution. Transient students may enroll at USF as non-degree-seeking students. (See Non-Degree-Seeking Students ) Honors Program Superior students in all majors may avail themselves of Honors opportunities at USF. University Honors Program-Four Year Track is designed for first-time-in-college students Uni versity Honors Program-Two Year Track is designed for trans fer or upper-level students. These exciting programs are grounded in the liberal arts tradition and intended for students regardless of major The primary goals of University Honors are the development of critical thinking skills, an appreciation of the liberal arts tradition and the development of creative, indepen dent thought. (See complete Program description in Under graduate Studies.) Potential University Honors Program-Four Year Track stu dents are actively recruited, but any interested student who feels that he/she is qualified may request admission. Students typically have 3. 7 high school GP As and 1270 SAT I or 29 ACT scores. Many scholarships are available for Honors students. Potential University Honors Program-Two Year Track stu dents are actively recruited, but any interested student who feels that he/she is qualified may request admission. Students typically have 3.50 college GPAs and 1270 SATI or 29 ACT scores. A number of scholarships are available for Honors students. Departmental Honors Programs are available in selected departments that wish to offer Honors-level work for superior students majoring in their disciplines. Requirements vary ac cording to department, but all requir.e the completion of a Thesis. Students enrolled in both University and Departmental Honors are required to complete one Thesis. Admission to University Honors is determined by the Univer sity Honors Committee and the Director of Honors; admission to departmental Honors is determif!ed by the individual depart ment. Students who satisfactorily complete Honors and grad uate with at least an overall GPA of 3 3 and a USF GPA of 3.3 shall be identified as Honors Program Graduates at Com mencement as well as on their diplomas and transcripts. St. Petersburg Campus Honors Program The St. Petersburg Campus offers an interdisciplinary Cam pus Honors Program to superior students in all majors who have transferred to USF with or without an A.A. degree. The Campus Honors Committee and Director determine admission .to the program. Applications should be submitted to the Director on the St. Petersburg Campus. (See complete Program descrip tion in Undergraduate Studies.) Scholars Community The USF Scholars' Community is for students who have high school GPAsof3.50 and SAT I scores of 1200 orEACTscores of 27. Students in the Community who wish to participate in Honors should discuss this with the Director of Honors

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18 ADMISSIONS AND RELATED MATTERS UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG .. in the Con:imunity and in Honors have the option of level, or section placement in a program of study are notto be living in the Honors residence hall on campus Living here gives construed as examining mechanisms for the granting of credit. students the opportunity to socialize and study with academic peers, enriching the college experience. The Lounge in Cooper Hall serves as a social hub for students. Organized social activities and social projects are carefully planned for students in the Community. Scholars' Community students are among the. first to register semester. Special advisin g and coun seling are always available to students in the Community. Learning Communities .. In their year of development, US F's Leaming Commu provide groups of up to 50 first-year students the oppor tunity to work together, a team of experienced faculty, for many courses taken dunng the first two years at USF Students in the L.eaming complete most of their general education requirements in a specially designed and collaboratively taught interdisciplinary curriculum One of the components of the program, writing across the cumculum, allows the students to develop writing skills the two years of the program as they create writing portfolios rather than enrolling in the traditional .Freshman English .cours.es. Students develop computer skills through use of e-mail and internet programs that extend to other community members and people with similar interests through the world wide web. The Leaming Communities are open to all students who are interested in the objectives of the program and whose test scores qualify them for college level English courses. The .are designed to serve diverse groups of students who will contnbute to the lea ming of each other in their interac tions to each other and with the faculty. Other General Information Evening Courses The admission requirements and achievement levels in the day and evening courses are the same. Any student accepted !o the may enroll in any appropriate courses offered in the evening. Opportunities for Accelerated Progress Toward Undergraduate Degrees USF provides several options by which students may accel erate their progress toward completing the baccalaureate de gree., options knowledge which has been acquired pnor to or dunng attendance at USF and provide the opportunity to earn University credit. Options which may be used include the following: 1. Recognition of satisfactory performance on tests offered through the College Level Examination Program (see CLEP). 2. Recognition of satisfactory performance on tests offered through Advanced Placement Programs of the College Entrance Examination Board (see Advanced Placement Credit Programs) 3 D';Jal enrollmen.t as a noi:i-degree-seeking student at USF pnor to graduation from high school or a community college (see Dual Enrollment [High School]) Community college should follow eligibility criteria for non-degree seek ing students (below) as well as their home school proce dures. 4. Early admission for high school students (see Early Admis sion Freshmen). 5. Open University (O.U.) courses by television. may be earned through a combination of the above options Students should contact their college advisors for further information concerning the application of this credit toward their degree requirements Internal devices. as auditions, portfolio reviews, and placement tests) utilized in the various departments for the sole purpose of determining a student's most appropriate area, Non-Degree Seeking Student t:Jon-degrt:e seeking student ei:irollment is on a space ava1lable basis and has been established for those individuals who, while not desirous of earning a degree, would like to enroll in all levels of university courses. Teachers needing to take courses school students (with the of respective guidance counselor), individ u!'l.ls desirous of taking courses for self enrichment, and senior citizens are examples of those eligible to utilize this enrolfment method. Former USF undergraduate degree-seeking students may only enroll as non-degree seeking students if they have completed their previous degree program 'or ea med an equiva lent degree at another institution. Should the latter be the case an official transcript (reflecting the degree) from that institution must be sent to the USF Office of the Registrar (Attention: Student Records Area) prior to registration Individuals enrolling as non-degree seeking students who plan to make formal application to the University may not apply more 14 seme.ster hour:s an 1.mdergraduate degree. Applicants denied adm1ss1on to USF as degree-seeking undergraduates may not enroll as non-degree seeking stu Perforn:iance in cou.rsE'.s taken in this category will not qualify an applicant for adm1ss1on as a degree-seeking student. A non-degree-seeking student who has been dismissed from USF is not eligible for admission to USF as a degree seeking student at, the undergraduate level. If extenuating circumstances contributed to the academic dismissal and the student meets other admissions requirements, a request for waiver of this rule may be submitted to the Faculty Committee on Student Admissions. This rule does not apply to a student who has earned a degree from a regionally accredited institu tion subsequent to academic dismissal. students are subject to the same aca demic pohc1es as undergraduate degree-seeking students and must adhere to deadline dates published in the University Schedule of Classes. Non-degree seeking students are not eligible to receive University honors or participate in the USF/ Florida Public Coi:nmunity College cross-registration program. Non-degree-seeking students also are not eligible to live in housing nor to receive financial aid Non-degree seeking students are subject to the academic probation and dismissal policy listed in this catalog. Non-degree seeking students who are academically dismissed from the University may appeal to the Academic Regulations Committee (ARC) through the ARC representative for Academic Support and Achievement/Center for Academic Advising to return. Potential non-degree seeking students should also refer to the section of the catalog of th.e college( s) offering the course( s) of interest to thi:m to determine any special college requirements exist which must be met pnor to enrolling. NOTE: Prior to registration for classes which meet on campus, all students less than 40 years of age must submit accept able proof of immunity to rubella to the Student Health Service Students born after December 31, 1956 must also submit proof of immunity to measles. (See Immunization Policy.) *Senior Citizen Tuition Waiver Florida residents who are 60 years of age or older by the first day of a respective semester/term may enroll in certain under graduate or graduate courses, on a space-available basis, without paying tuition. Academic credit is not awarded exami nations are not required and gr
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ADMISSIONS AND RELATED MATTERS 19 UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Dual Enrollment (Public/Private High/Home School) Dual enrollment in USF classes is open to academically qualified students currently enrolled in publidprivate high schools who are recommended by their guidance counselor or principal and to home school The University has articulation agreements with several county school boards to allow public high school students to enroll in classes at USF. Students enrolled in postsecondary instruction that is not creditable toward the high school diploma shall not be classified as dually enrolled. Students wishing to be accepted as Dual Enrollment stu dents at the University of South Florida must 1. Be at least 16 years old at start of term, unless enrolled in a special summer program initiated by USF or a special course section involving only dual enrollment students; 2. Have proof of a minimum of 420 on SAT IV (Verbal) and 440 on SAT IQ (Quantitative); or a score of 16 on EACT English and EACT Reading and a sc0re of 18 on EACT Mathematics; or appropriate placement test scores; and a TOEFL score, if applicable; 3. Have (a) completed the equivalent of the sophomore year, (b) achieved a grade point average of 3.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale (as calculated by USF), and (c) satisfied any course prerequisites; and 4. Provide a list of courses and the numberof credits necessary to complete high school diploma from the school counselor or principal on school stationery; Please contact the Office of the Dean of Undergraduate Studies (SVC 2002, 4202 E. Fowler Avenue, Tampa, FL 336206920) for complete information and student qualifications. Prior to registration for classes which meet on campus, all students less than 40 years of age must submit accept able proof of immunity to rubella to the Student Health Service. Students born after December 31, 1956 must also submit proof of immunity to measles. (See Immunization Policy.) Readmission (Former Students Returning) A former student returning (FSR) is any degree-seeking undergraduate student who has not earned his/her degree, who has not been enrolled at USF in any of the last three terms, and who wishes to re-enroll in the University Former students returning must be readmitted to the University. In order to be considered for readmission, a former student should file a new Application for Admission with the Office of Admissions by the deadline indicated in the Academic Calendar for the term of requested re-entry. A new application fee is not required. (Former College of Education majors must contact the College of Education Advising Office for additional readmission require ments.) To be readmitted, a student must meet the following require ments: 1. Be eligible to return to the University of South Florida; 2. Be in good standing and eligible to return to the last institution attended as a degree-seeking student; and 3. Have achieved a GPA of at least 2.0 as calculated by USF on a 4.0 scale on all college-level academic courses at tempted at institution( s) attended since last enrolled at USF. Students who have attended one or more institutions since their last enrollment must request official transcripts of all work attempted at the other institution( s) be sent to the USF Office of Admissions. Acceptability of transfer credits toward completion of USF degree programs will be determined by the college of the student'.s major. Prior to registering for classes, former students returning who have been readmitted are required to participate in an orientation program on the USF campus where they will take all or the majority of their courses. Former students returning will receive orientation information after readmission. Transient students and non-degree-seeking students are not considered former students returning. These students who wish to enter as degree-seeking students must file an applica tion with the Office of Admissions prior to the deadline listed in the Academic Calendar for the requested term of entry Former USF students who have earned the baccalaureate degree at USF or at another institution and who now wish to return to USF to earn another undergraduate degree must file an Undergrad uate Application for Admission with the Office of Admissions. No application fee is required. A student may not work on a second undergraduate degree if he/she has been accepted into a graduate program. NOTE: Prior to registration for classes which meet on campus, all students less than 40 years of age must submit accept able proof of immunity to rubella to the Student Health Service. Students born after December 31, 1956 must also submit proof of immunity to measles. (See Immunization Policy.) Florida Community College System High school graduates planning to start their college educa tion at a Florida community college should confer with the community college counselor and ask that their academic program qe planned with the assistance of the USF Under graduate Catalog (USF's Community College Counseling Manual has been incorporated into this catalog) which is available in all counseling offices. This catalog, prepared by the USF Office of Undergraduate Studies, explicitly describes the undergraduate program requirements and Florida's common prerequisies that should be followed to ensure maximum ease of transfer into the students' upper-level programs on a par with their native USF counterparts. Articulation Agreement An articulation agreement, in effect since April 13, 1971 and later adopted by the Florida Legislature in statute form as Florida law, governs an effective and orderly transferofFlorida community college students into the State University System (SUS). The agreement defines and establishes the Associate of Arts degree from a Florida public community/ju1"1io,r college as the basis for all articulation rights. Among these guarantees, the following are central to the transfer process: Admission into the State University System 1. A.A. graduates will be granted admission to a university within the SUS, but not necessarily to the university or program of choice. 2. A.A. graduates will have the same opportunity to enroll in a university limited access program as the native university student. 3. Upon transferring to a state university, A.A. graduates will be awarded at least 60 credit hours towards the baccalaureate degree, exclusive of occupational courses and basic re quired physical education courses. 4. Credits that are part of the A.A. degree earned through articulated acceleration mechanisms, such as dual enroll ment, International Baccalaureate, early admission, ad vanced placement and credit by exam, will be transferable to the state university. 5. As participants in the Statewide Course Numbering System, receiving institutions must accept all courses taken at the transfer institution if the courses at each institution have the same prefix and the same last three digits of the course number. 6. The university catalog in effect the year the A.A. degree student first enrolled at the community college will remain in effect for the student's entire program, provided the student maintains continuous enrollment as defined in that catalog 7. Once a student has completed the general education core and this fact is noted on the transcript, regardless of whether or not an A.A. degree is awarded, no other state university or community college to which the student may transfer can require additional courses to the general education core. Included in these transfer guarantees is the right of appeal. Students may appeal to the university and to the Statewide Articulation Coordinating Committee. Students who have ques tions or want more information about the articulation agreement should contact the Office of Adult and Transfer Student Ser vices

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FINANCIAL INFORMATION UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA-19Nf99 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG For Tuition Purposes total tuition due (the amount will not reflect any payments made This notice summanzes the provisions of 240 .1201 Florida on the account), students can bring a photo ID to the RegistraStatutes BOR Rule 6C-7 05 and University Policy/Procedure tion HelpDesk located in the Registrar's Lobby, SVC 1034, and concerning Florida Residency for tuition purposes. request a Registration Confirmation which will reflect total In determining residency classification students fall into tuition anci fees one of two categories. They are either independent students The is for paying fees in full by the (students not claimed on parent's or legal guardian's federal appropnate due date stated in the particular term's "Schedule income tax statement orwhose parents do not provide 50% or of Classes." Failure to do so may result in cancellation of the moreoftheirsupport)ordependentstudents(students regardstudent's registration. Fees paid by mail must be postmarked less of age, who are claimed as dependents by parent or legal by the post office, not office meter stamped, on or before the fifth guardian on federal income tax statement or whose parents day of the term Checks are payable to USF . provide 50% or more of their support). To avoid a $50.00 late payment fee, all tuition fees must be The law basically requires that a U.S citizen/permanent paid or postmarked by the U .S. Post Office, not office metered, resident alien/independent student or a dependent student's by the fifth day of the term. The University cannot be responsible parent/legal guardian has established and maintained a LE-for lost or misdirected U.S. Postal mail. A student whose GAL Florida residence for at least twelve ( 12) months before the registration has been cancelled may request registration reinfirst day of classes of the term for which Florida residency status statement through the fourth week of of the term for the aca-is sought. demic term. Upon approval for reinstatement, all fees and other is required to obtain documentation of 12 months' legal debts owed to .the University must be paid in full by cash, money residence before a student is classified as a Florida resident order, or cashier's check before reinstatement will be affected. for tuition A is requ!red to request Florida a Spring 1998 Tuition Fee Structure residency in wnting and submit supporting documents no later Tuition Fees are estimated only/subject to change. than the fifth day of classes in the term for which classification Tuition Fees are assessed by course level not student is sought. classification. The following is acceptable, nonconclusive evidence of the Campus/Course Level Resident Non-Resident* establishment of a legal residence in Florida. At least one such Tampa Campus: document must be dated/issued at least 12 months before the 0001-4999 Undergraduate $69 53/hr $266 75/hr first day of classes of the term for which Florida residency is 5000-0ver Graduate $134.34/hr $439.73/hr sought. 1 Proof of purchase of permanent home in Florida. 2 Declaration of Domicile 3 Florida s driver's license 4. Florida voter's registration. 5. Florida vehicle registration 6 Florida vehicle title. 7. Professional/occupational license in Florida 8 Florida incorporation or other evidence of legal residence in Florida. 9. Full-time non-temporary employment in Florida. PLEASE NOTE: Rent receipts leases employment records, tax returns school/college records are NOT evidence of estab lishing a legal Florida residence. Students who are dependent on out-of-state parents or who come to Florida for educational purposes are generally ineligible for reclassification to Florida status rare cases, the law allows some students (e g., military, pubhc school teachers, etc.) who do not meet the basic require ments to as Florida re.sidents for tuition purposes. For information about exceptional categories contact the Adm1ss1ons Office, the Office of the Registrar, orthe Office of the General Counsel. Fees The levels ofthe Activity and Service Fee, the Health Fee and the Athletic fee are determined on each campus by a student fee committee appointed by the President of the University and the Student Government President. The committee includes faculty and students with the majority bf tne committee being students. The fees may be reviewed on a yearly basis. The following fee schedule applies to all USF students with the exception of those in the Bachelor of Independent Studies, External Degree Program. For information on the BIS Program fees see paragraph 2b below. Registration fees are assessed in accordance with Board of Regent rules All fees are subject to change without prior notice. The University will make every effort to advertise any such changes if they occur. 1 Initial Application Fee (Each application not refundable) $20.00 2 Tuition Schedulte/Fee Statements are no longer mailed Tuition is due by the fifth day of each term. To find out the amount of the Tampa OU & Off Campus Credit Courses: 0001-4999 Undergraduate $64.47/hr $261.69/hr 5000-0ver Graduate $129.28/hr $434.67/hr St. Petersburg Campus: 0001-4999 Undergraduate $60 03/hr 5000-0ver Graduate $124.84/hr $257.85/hr $430.23/hr St. Petersburg OU & Off Campus Credit Courses: 0001-4999 Undergraduate $60 63/hr $257.85/hr 5000-0ver Graduate $125.44/hr $430.83/hr New College Sarasota: 0001-4999 Undergraduate $63.53/hr Sarasota Campus: 0001-4999 Undergraduate $61.41/hr 5000-0ver Graduate $126 2/hr $260.75hr $258 63/hr $431. 61/hr Sarasota: OU & Off Campus Credit Courses: 0001-4999 Undergraduate $59.41/hr $256 63/hr 5000-0ver Graduate $124 22/hr $429.61/hr Lakeland Campus: 0001-4999 Undergraduate $56.53/hr $253.75/hr 5000-0ver Graduate $121. 34/hr $426. 73/hr Lakeland: OU & Off Campus Credit Coursess: 0001-4999 Undergraduate $56 53/hr $253 75/hr 5000-0ver Graduate $121.34/hr $426. 73/hr *See "Resident Status," above NOTE: (1) There is no ceiling (maximum) on the amount which a student may be assessed for a single term (..2) A lab fee of $8.00 to $15.00 is charged on certain courses Please consult your class schedule to locate the courses that require the fee and the amount of fee that applies to the course. .. 3 ) Students who only register for a co-op assignment must pay a minimum of one (1) hour at the level of the co-op assignment. (4) Cashier's Office Hours Regular Registration See regular registration dates and times in "Schectule of

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FINANCIAL INFORMATION 21 UNNERS/TY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 199&'99 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Classes." Regular Cashier's Office hours are Mon day, Friday from 9 : 00am 5 : 00pm and Tuesday Wednesday from 10:00am 6 : 00pm (5) Tuition fee payment should be mailed to : Tuition/Purchasing and Financial Services University of South Florida 4202 E Fowler Avenue Tampa, Florida 33620-5800 b. Estimated Bachelor of Independent Studies Fees Resident Non-Resident Application Fee 1st Study Area Independent Study Seminar $20.00 $20.00 2nd Study Area Independent Study Seminar 3rd Study Area 967.05 967.05 967 05 967.05 3 868 20 3,868 20 3,868 20 3 868 20 Independent Study 967.05 3,868 20 Seminar 967 05 3,868 20 4th or Inter-area Study 1,934 1 O 7, 736.40 Total* $7 736.40 $30,945 60 *Fees do nol indude books, on-<:ampus seminars, housing or food service. c. PACE Fees Students enrolling in courses through the School of Continuing Education PACE, normally pay registration costs directly to PACE, not to the Cashier's Office. PACE fees are usually slightly higher than Tampa Campus rates d. Off-Campus College of Education Courses Students enrolling for off-campus (Continuing Edu cation) courses will be assessed fees according to the fee structure "a" above. Continuing Education courses are designated by the "700 series" section number. The "Schedule of Classes," which is printed each semester, should be used as a reference for updated information. 3. Late Registration Fee All students who initiate (i.e., those students who have not enrolled for any courses during early or regular registra tion) their registration during the late registration period will be automatically assessed a $100.00 late registration fee. 4. Financial Aid Disbursement Upon satisfaction of eligibility criteria, financial aid awards will be credited to student accounts. Monies in excess of charges will be mailed to students' local addresses. 5. Cancellation for Non-Payment of Fees Students not on an authorized deferred payment of fees and who have not paid their tuition fees in full by a specified day (per "Schedule of Classes") will have their registration for that cancelled. This means specifically that a student will receive no credit for any courses taken during that term 6. Intern Certificate of Participation Individuals who have supervised interns may register for courses during a term by presenting their intern Certificate of Participation. Prior to July 1 1997 the Intern Participation Certificate stated that all fees were waived with the exception of the Bond and Trust Fee which was $4.76 per credit hour. Certificates were valid for five years from the date of issu ance. The new Intern Participation Certificate effective July 1, 1997 states that certificate holders are entitled to a waiver of only matriculation fees for a max i mum of six (6) credit hours instruction during a single term. Certificates are valid for three years from the date of issuance. Fees must be paid or postmarked by the U S Post Office (not office meter marked) by the fifth day of the term The University cannot be responsible for lost or misdirected U S Postal mail. 7. Staff/State E.mployee Waivers Eligible USF and other State agency employees inter ested in enrolling for free university courses should obtain a State Fee Waiver Form from the i r respective Human Resources offices and complete it prior to registering. USF employees may obtain the State Fee Waiver Form from the designated fee waiver approving authority within each col lege/division, or from Human Resources, SVC 2172 The feewaiverisofferedonaSPACEAVAILABLEBASISONLY and uptosixcredithoursperterm. Fee Waivers for eligible USF employees can be approved by each college/division fee waiver approving authority, and do not have to be brought to Human Resources for approval. State employees using a fee wa i ver must register during the designated dates for each term (see current Schedule of Classes). If an employee registers prior to the designated dates he/she will be responsible for payment of fees Courses exempt from the fee waiver include (but are not limited to): thesis, dissertation, directed individual study/ research, internship, practicum, one-to-one music/theatre performance, cooperative education, Program for Adult Credit Education (PACE) Lifelong Leaming, Continu ing Education, correspondence Distance and Technology Mediated Leaming, and any other non-credit or one-to-one instruction courses. The original completed/approved fee waiver should be brought to the Cashier's Office, ADM 131, by the fifth day of each term in order to avoid a late payment fee. All hours in excess of six must be paid for at the regular rate by the fee payment deadline Employees should contact the Regis trar/Admission's Office to ensure compliance with admis sions enrollment, and Florida residency requirements Notice to Individuals Utilizing State Employee Fee Waiv ers: Based on the Internal Revenue Code(IRC), Section 127, the utilization of the employee fee waiver is a taxable benefit to employees Employees enrolled in graduate level courses earn taxable income equal to the tuition waived on graduate level courses. The value of all graduate level courses waived by an employee fee waiver that that have not been dropped by the last day of the drop/add period will be included in an individual's taxable wages. Therefore, make sure to drop all graduate level classes that you do not anticipate completing by the last day of the drop/add period! This taxable income is subject to both Federal income tax and Social Security and Medicare taxes (FICA) Therefore it is important for employees utilizing State fee waivers to ensure that their correct residency is reflected on the Registrar's system so that fees will be properly assessed and subsequently taxed. Under IRC Section 117 (d), tuition waivers given to employees of universities in the Florida State University System for education below the graduate level are exclud able from their income without dollar limit. Graduate stu dents employed as teaching and research assistants are also entitled to the income exclusion for tuition waived. The taxable value of tuition waived will be reported to the State Comptroller's Office, Bureau of State Payrolls each semester by the Division of Finance and Accounting. Due to system limitations, the Bureau of State Payroll is only able to withhold FICA tax from individuals' pay. Individuals who anticipate a tax liability from the taxable benefit received from the graduate level fee waiver can adjust their W-4 form in Human Resources to have additional withholding deducted from their pay Most individuals wishing to claim a tax exclusion for courses reported to the Bureau of State Pay rolls by the University, should work through their agency's Human Resource/Personnel Office to file necessary paper work with the Bureau USF employees wishing to claim a tax exclusion should contact the USF Payroll Office We have been advised that agencies with individuals claiming a tax exclusion for the course waived will be given an opportunity to make this claim with the Bureau of State Payrolls before taxable values are included with the employee's earnings Any questions on this matter should be d i rected to the Payroll Manager or Associate Controller in Finance and Accounting at 974-6034 or 974-6066 respectively 8. Tuition Deferment for VA Students Students receiving VA benefits who have applied in

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22 FINANCIAL INFORMATION UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG writing no later than the date specified in the "Schedule of Classes" for the deferment in Veterans Services have until a specified date (see Schedule of Classes) to pay tuition in full. 9. Florida Prepaid College Program Students who are eligible to receive benefits under this plan are responsible for the local portion offees These fees are $18 66 per credit hour, including applicable lab fees This fee must be paid or postmarked by the fifth day of the term to avoid being cancelled or charged the $50 .00 Late Payment Fee 10. Mailed Payments To avoid cancellation of registration or a $50.00 Late Payment Fee, all fee payments must be postmarked by the post office not office metered, by the applicable fee pay ment deadline listed in the Academic Calendar 11. Returned Registration Checks A student's current registration is subject to cancellation if the check presented in payment of those fees is returned to the University unpaid. Dishonored fee payment checks must be redeemed within 10 calendar days to avoid cancel lation of a student's current registration A $50.00 Late Payment Fee and a $15.00 administrative charge will be assessed on any registration check returned unpaid to the University 12. 1998/99 Room Rent for Double and Single Occupancy* Room rent is paid in accordance with information in the Student Housing Contract Double Occupancy Fall/Spring Alpha $2,800 Andros $2,334 Beta/Gamma $2 244 Village $2,536 Occupancy Fall/Spring Alp a $3 700 Andros $3 360 Beta/Gamma $3 230 13 Meal Plans 1998-99* Meal Plan Selections for New Residents Spring Only $1,400 $1,167 $1, 122 $1, 268 Spring Only $1,850 $1,680 $1, 615 (All students who have not lived in the residence halls prior to the 1998-99 academic year are required to purchase a meal plan and must select from the following eight choices.) Carte Blanche Plan+ $100 Flex $1200.00 Carte Blanche Plan $1150.00 14 Meal Plan+ $250 Flex $1125.00 14 Meal Plan+ $150 Flex $1050 00 14 Meal Plan $950 00 150 Meal Plan+ $125 Flex $950 00 10 Meal Plan+ $80 Flex $950.00 10 Meal Plan $875.00 Meal Plan Selections for Returning Residents (Returning residents may select from the five options below or any of the above eight options ) 8 Meal Plan+ $350 Flex $1050.00 8 Meal Plan + $250 Flex $965.00 8 Meal Plan+ $100 Flex $825 00 100 Meal Plan+ $100 Flex $715.00 $875 00 All Flex $875 00 To find out about these or to sign up simply stop by the Dining Services office located in the Argos Center or call (800) 775-MEAL (6325). In Tampa, call (813) 974-4385 *Rates subject to change **P!ease add sales tax Refund of Registration Fee Payment Release of Registration Fee Liability The following refunds, less deductions for unpaid debts to the University, are authorized. A Refund Request form must be completed and presented to Cash Collections, ADM Rm 106, in the Division of Finance and Accounting to initiate the refund process. A two-week waiting period is observed for each refund to be sure checks have cleared. a 100% ofregistration fees and tuition will be refunded if notice of withdrawal from the University is approved prior to the end of drop/add period and written documentation is received from the student. b. 25% of registration fees and tuition paid less building and capital improvement fees, will be refunded if notice of withdrawal from all courses from the University is approved prior to the end of the fourth week of classes (summer term is prior to the end of the third week of classes) and written documentation is received from the student. Fee Adjustment Request After Fifth Day of the Term Effective January, 1989, USF approves a refund of 100% of the tuition and registration fees if a student withdraws or drops a course due to circumstances determined by the university to be exceptional and beyond the control of the student. Requests for fee adjustments must meet one of the conditions below to be considered a. 100% of registration fees and tuition will be refunded when a student withdraws or drops a course due to circum stances determined by the University to be exceptional and beyond the control of the student, including but not limited to: (1) Illness of a student of such severity or duration, as confirmed in writing by a physician, to preclude comple tion of the course(s), (2)Death of the student or death in the immediate family (parent spouse, child or sibling) as confirmed by docu mentation indicating the student's relationship to the deceased, (3) Involuntary call to active military duty, ( 4) A situation in which the university is in error as confirmed in writing by an appropriate University official (5)0ther documented exceptional circumstances beyond the control of the student which precluded completion of the course(s) accompanied by letter of explanation and appropriate documentation. b. Students who receive financial aid and subsequently change their enrollment status which results in a refund in accor dance with this subsection, may have all or a portion of their refund returned to the University's financial aid programs in accordance with the Financial Aid Policy on Refunds and Repayments. Payment of Accounts Due the University Charges against students for loss or breakage cit University equipment books, fines and other charges are due immedi ately. Delinquent accounts may be considered sufficient cause for cancellation of registration University regulations prohibit registration or release of transcript, diploma, or grades for any student whose account with the University is delinquent. Pay ments should be brought into the Cashier's Office in the Administration Building or mailed to Finance and Accounting, USF Tampa, FL 33620 by the appropriate deadline. Financial Aid Grants scholarships, low interest loans and federal work study are all forms offinancial aid. You apply for most financial aid by submitting the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Since many programs are funded on a limited basis, it is to your advantage to apply early (Priority application dates are provided each year in the Financial Aid Guide). Detailed descriptions of the various forms of aid, the FAFSA and application information are available from the USF Office of Financial Aid, SVC 1102. You may also call (813) 974-3730 to request information, financial aid applications, and forms. You can access FastWEB and ExPAN, nationwide scholarship searches ; and USF scholarship information ; e-mail your coun selor and more via the Office of Financial Aid Web page The address is http : //usfweb usf edu/enroll/finaid/finaid.htm You may also complete the FAFSA electronically A link from the financial aid Web site provides either a version you can down load, or a Web version. Visit the Web site fordetails. You may also complete the FAFSA electronically in the Office ofFinancial Aid lobby during regular business hours

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FINANCIAL INFORMATION 23 UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG If your aid is delayed past the tuition payment deadline, you may receive an automatic .tuition deferment which allows a later tuition payment deadline Short-term loans are also available for limited use The deadline for deferred tuition payment and details about short tenl') loans are printed in the semesterly Schedule of Classes. Financial Aid and Unofficial Withdrawal If you receive federal financial aid funds and your semester grades are all F, U, I, or M you must verify your last date of attendance in classes The Office of Financial Aid is required by Federal regulations to verify the last date of attendance in classes for students whose grades indicate they may have unofficially withdrawn Your last date of attendance may be considered the last date you submitted an assignment or took an exam, or your last date of actual attendance in classes. At the end of each semester, the Office of Financial aid mails letters to financial aid recipients who appear to have unofficially withdrawn. This letter requires a response or future financial aid disbursements will be delayed or cancelled. Academic Scholarships Academic scholarships are administered by a number of different offices within the University 1. The Office of Admissions administers a variety of different scholarships for first-time-in-college students All first time-in-college students interested in academic and minor ity scholarships should contact the Admissions Office di The scholarship application deadline is usually the end of the first week in March preceding the upcoming school year. 2 The Office of Adult and transfer Student Services adminis ters a variety of different scholarships for transfer students. All transfer students interested in academic and minority scholarships should contact the Office of Adult and Transfer Student Services directly The scholarship application dead line is usually the end of the first week in March preceding the upcoming school year. 3. All financial aid applicants are automatically considered for scholarships administered through the Financial Aid Office if applications are completed by the priority deadlines. The different priority deadlines are published each year in the Financial Aid Office Information Bulletin. 4. The individual colleges of the University (the College of Business the College of Education, etc ) administer some scholarships directly through the Dean's Office in each college. New students and transfer students are advised to contact the USF Admissions Office or the Office of Adult and Transfer Student Services first and then the individual colleges regarding scholarship opportunities. 5 For non-Florida residents a limited number of out-of-state tuition waivers are available based on academic perfor mance. New students and continuing students are eligible to apply for these awards New students will be considered for the waiver based on their performance in high school or transfer institution Continuing USF students will be consid ered for the waiver based on cumulative academic perfor mance at USF For information contact the Scholarship Coordinator in the Office of Admissions. First-time-in-college students with general inquiries regarding scholarships should contact the Scholarship Coordi nator in the Office of Admissions Transfer students with general inquiries regarding scholar ships should contact the Office of Adult and Transfer Student Services. 1 Currently enrolled students should contact the individual college in which they are registered or the Financial Aid Office Parking and Transportation Parking Permits Required Parking Permits are required to park your vehicle at the University of South Florida 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Each person may purchase only one vehicle permit and permit type is based on home campus/class location Parking permit costs vary based on parking lot location Bicycle Permits Permits for bicycles are FREE! Obtaining a bicycle permit registers the bicycle and can provide information to the police in the event of loss. How to Get a Permit Parking permits may be purchased at the Parking Services Building (comer of Maple and Fletcher Avenue) on the Tampa campus or the Police Department on the St. Petersburg and Sarasota campuses (A copy of the vehicle's registration is required.) Transportation Shuttle bus service is provided FREE to USF students from 7 : 30AM to 9:00PM Monday through Thursday and Friday 7:30AM to 5 : 30PM Routes cover the entire USF Tampa campus and also travel to University Square Mall from 11 :OOAM to 2:00PM. Motorist Assistance Flat tire? Need a gas can? Keys locked in your car? Need to jump start your car? Call Parking Services at 974-3990, option #5. This FREE service is provided round the clock by Parking Services and the University Police. Parking Tickets Parking regulations are designed to provide safe and or derly parking Violation of these regulations can result in parking tickets, immobilization of your vehicle, towing, or loss of parking privileges in addition to holds on student activity Respond to parking tickets received to avoid problems. Questions and Information Parking and transportation information is located at http:// usfweb.usf.edu/parking_services. You may also contact Tampa campus Parking Services at (813) 974-3990. Special Services Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Benefits USF is approved for the education of veterans eligible dependents, members of the selected reserve and active-duty personnel who are eligible for benefits under public laws now in effect. All degree programs currently offered at USF are approved by the State Approving Agency. Students who may be eligible for benefits are urged to contact Veterans Services for information procedures and forms as early as possible. To initiate change, or renew benefits at USF a request must be submitted through that office. To be eligible for full-time VA benefits at USF undergraduate students must enroll for 12 or more semester hours and graduate students must enroll for 9 or more semester hours each normal academic term VA regulations require that students take only courses that are applicable to their degree program or other approved program and make satisfactory progress toward their degree Students should consult the "Handbook for VA Students" (available at their local USF Veterans Services office) for information on various programs/services and VA rules and regulations. Under no circumstances will the VA pay benefits to a student taking a course by audit. It is the student s respon sibility to inquire concerning all VA rules and regulations and to report any change in status which affects his/her benefits. Additionally, VA benefits will be terminated for students who are dismissed for academic or disciplinary reasons and can only be reinstated after academic counseling Veterans with a service-connected disability requesting benefits under Chapter 31 may contact the Office of Student Financial Services no earlier than one week prior to the start of classes for a book and supplies voucher. Other VA benefits include additional amounts of compensation and pension which may be payable to eligible veterans and widows or widowers of veterans for the enrollment of dependent children. The students, parents, or guardians are responsible for noti fying the VA Regional Office directly of enrollment and termina tion of enrollment. The VA toll-free number is 1-800-827-1000 *See "Resident Status ," above

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STUDENT AFFAIRS & STUDENT SERVICES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG The University of South Florida (USF) is committed to the concept of total student development intellectual, social, physical, emotional, and moral. The curricular, co-curricular, and extracurricular programs of the University are designed to achieve this end and are presented to offer USF students a wide variety of beliefs, opinions and ideas in an atmosphere of openness where all views may be aired. The programs and activities developed and implemented by the Student Affairs staff at USF are intended to improve the quality of life at the University and to meet the University's goal of total student development. The programs of the University are presented according to the guidelines established by the Florida Board of Regents (Section 6-C, Administrative Code of Florida) Students who attend the University of South Florida are admitted to the University under guidelines as well as policies and procedures of the University. University officials, and in particular Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs is charged with interpreting the policies of the Board of Regents to students, theirfamilies, and others in the University community Division of Student Affairs The Division of Student Affairs is composed of the areas of Enrollment Planning and Management, Academic Support and Achievement, and Student Life and Wellness. The Division is committed to creating a student-focused learning community distinguished by shared purpose, collaboration, open and timely communication, mutual respect, trust and inclusiveness. Student Affairs will provide leadership for a diverse University community, inspire the pursuit of academic excellence through collaborative learning and foster a caring environment that encourages the personal and professional development of students and those who serve them. In partner ship with University faculty and staff and the community, the staff will reach beyond individual perspectives to develop life long learners who are broadly educated, ethical, open to differ ences, capable of critical thinking, and who share responsibility for enhancing the human condition. The achievement of this vision will contribute to making the University of South Florida the university of first choice. Student Affairs staff provide new students and prospective students assistance in gaining information about the University before they arrive on campus during the admissions process. The staff also offers services to the students to help them cope more effectively with the many facets of college life that can affect students' academic work : financial aid, health service, individual and/or group counseling, alcohol/drug education, career planning, placement, procedures for redressing griev ances, standards for students' conduct, due process in the event of disciplinary action and advice and/or assistance in time of trouble. A variety of programs and services are offered by the Student Affairs staff to provide students opportunities to become involved in college life outside the classroom: onenta tion for new students, residence halls, student organizations and Phyllis P. Marshall Center programs and activities, student government, student publication, intramural and recreational sports, student health education/wellness programs, and events of special interest. Division of Student Affairs Diversity Statement The Division will develop a system that will create a learning community where each individual's primary identity is as a person whose worth and value are inherent. Individuals from diverse ethnic, racial, religious and social backgrounds will willingly interact frequently displaying attitudes and behaviors of respect, shared purpose, commitment to common welfare, mutual cooperation and support In this community all persons wm be judged on the content of their character and all individu als will have a voice. ACADEMIC SUPPORT AND ACHIEVEMENT Academic Support and Achievement operates under the auspices of the Division of Student Affairs and is responsible for providing academic and personal support to students. The units within Academic Support and Achievement focus on address ing the needs of first-time-in-college students and other stu dents who are undecided about a major or who see)< admission to limited access programs Responsibilities also include the coordination of the University Experience course for freshmen as well as the development and monitoring of support programs and strategies to enhance the academic success of target populations, including students with disabilities, student ath letes students admitted under alternative admissions criteria, and other underrepresented groups. Center for Academic Advi&ing The Center for Academic Advising is dedicated to promoting the successful achievement of students' academic goals through comprehensive advising services. The Center's primary re sponsibility is to provide academic advising to undergraduate students, with a special emphasis on the needs of students entering a university .for the first time The following services are provided to these undergraduate students: advisement regarding academic policies and pro grams, assistance in the selection of a major, administration of special programs for at risk or underprepared student popula tions, and special advisement for minority students. The staff prepares students for entrance into all limited access majors (e.g. Engineering, Business, Nursing, and Mass Communica tions), and and certifies all students seeking Associ ate of Arts certificates Student Disability Services Student Disability Servicesexists to ensure that students with disabilities have the technical, academic, and emotional support necessary to achieve academic and personal success at the University of South Florida. Course related assistance and academic accomodations are provided to eligible students with documented disabilities. Services may include advocacy, reader services, interpreters alternate exam administration, note takers, and adaptive equipment such as FM systems, large print computer access, and Visualteks. Students are encour aged to contact our office as early as possible prior to enrollment to make arrangments for appropriate services McNair Scholars Program The Ronald E McNair Post-Baccalaureate Scholars Pro gram is designed to prepare economically disadvantaged and underrepresented (Hispanic, African American and Native Ameri can) juniors and seniors for doctoral progra ms at the under graduate level. Special emphasis is placed on the recruitment of students with majors in math, engineering, science, public health, communications, humanities, medical sciences and English. However, other disciplines such as education, social sciences and fine arts are considered. This program encour ages graduate studies by providing opportunities for academi cally talented junior and senior level undergraduate students to define their career goals, engage in research develop the personal and professional skills and participate in student/ faculty mentor relationships critical to their success at the doctoral level. Graduate school application assistance is also provided, as well as GRE, GMAT and MCATpreparation These students are awarded scholarship stipends when they partici pate in the Summer Research Institute and during their re search internship in their senior year. Opportunities to attend and present their research at national and regional conferences are also provided. The criteria for this very competitive scholars program are as follows: 2.8 minimum cumulative GPA, declared major, a minimum of 45 earned credit hours, current enrollment

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STUDENT AFFAIRS & STUDENT SERVICES 25 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG at USF at the junior or senior level US citizenship, a academic information plan cultural activities, meet former SSS completed McNair application with faculty recommendations participants, and conduct fund-raising activities Project Thrust Project Thrust is a university wide program de signed to assist undergraduate students, minonty students and studen t s admitted by exception (pursuant to 233(2) Fla. Statutes) at USF achieve their baccalaureate education. As signed to four of the undergraduate c:olleges, the role the Project Thrust advisors is to provide stl!dents with 1mmed1ate and long-term assistance necessary to the success ful completion of their college prowam of the year, Project Thrust also provides academic adv1s1ng and counseling, tutoring and test preparation workshops Personal Excellence Program The Personal Excellence Program (PEP) offers a fresh!1'1an retention program to selected first-year students at the Umyer sity of South Florida Throug hout the provides academic and personal counseling, mentonng tutonng, career development, peer support study groups enrichment semi nars and other specialized activities The program focuses on increasing academic improved functioning in the environment and enhanc ing the self-esteem of the part1c1pants. The Personal Excellence Program also provides a residen tial summer transition program for students who have the potential to succeed in college, but may not meet all of admissions criteria. Prior to part i cipant selection, the cons i ders high school grades courses, test scores, choice major and other achievements. The summer program fac1h tates a smooth transition into campus life by acquainting stu dents with the Un i versity s expectations and r esources. PEP supplies individualized advisi!'g, assistance with fall semester registration and offers for a suc:cessful hfe at This intensive summer expenence provides course to ward graduat i on while enhancing person(!I and academic suc cess at the University of South Florida Student Academic Support System The Student Academic Support System (SASS) is the State University System computer assisted advising system which enhances undergraduate education. The report produced by this system is available to each undergraduate student through the student's advisor advising office or SUNLINK. It matches the student's academic record against the requirements of the student's degree program The central SASS office maintains the data and trains appropriate college personnel. Stodent Support Services Program Student Support Services (SSS) is a federally funded reten tion program designed to provide academ i c and support to alternatively admitted first generation, low and students with disabilities The program serves a diverse student population and provides an opportun i ty for students who may not meet all ad111ission criteria but whose high scho?I records and test scores indicate the potential to succeed in college SSS has a positive impact on student Its participants are retained and graduate at a rate s1m1lar to students regularly admitted to the Un i vers i ty . Students who participate rece i ve reer financial and tutorial assistance Special instruction 1s p r oJided in the areas of English composition reading and study skills. . SSS provides a summer program to ease the trans1t1on from high school to college, establish a strong academic foundation during the summer semester and expose students to resources and facilities Students receive a comprehensive summer orientation inelividualized academic advising, course credit toward graduation college Program part i cipants have an opportunity to Join the SSS Club which serves as a common unit for students to exchange ENROLLMENT PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT The staff of the division of Enrollment Planning and Manage ment strives to provide convenient and effective services to assist students with admissions to the University, orientation to the campus and semesterly services regarding registration financial aid, scholarships, student employment a .nd grade reporting. Experiential learning, career planning and JOb place ment are vital services to assist students with their career development, degree progress and future employment. Admissions The Office of Admissions assists prospective students with securing information about USF The office is responsible for processing applications for admission for undergraduate and former students returning. Admissions also reviews transfer credit taken at other regionally accredited institutions for deter mination of transferab i lity The Office of Admissions is located in the Student Services Building (SVC) 1036 S13/974-3350. Admission services are also available at all regional campuses. Adult and Transfer Student Services The office of Adu If and Tr<1nsfer Student Services (ATSS) is a department created to meet the needs of adult stude.nts entering or returning to the university and from a community college or other academic ATSS recruits and serves as a central source of information and referral, advising programming, and advocacy for the non traditional student by identifying the needs of adult learners and transfers and facilitating their entry into the ment. In addition the office supports the continuation of their educational goals by developing partnerships with community colleges, area employers and community groups as well as within the USF community. ATSS also focuses on the concerns of women faculty, staff, and students through specialized pro gramming and with other uni vers i ty . The office is located in the Student Services Building (SVC), Room 1001, with hours of operation Monday through Thursday Sam to Spm; Friday, Sam to 5pm ; and Saturday, 9am to 1pm. For more information, call (S13) 974-6444. The Career Center The Career Center assists students in making the transition from academic life to professional employment. A staff of experienced career specialists is available to help students plan, refine and implement their career goals and job search plan. The Center also provides information on employment opportunities and creates venues for students to network and interview with local, state and national employers. The Career Center, located in the Student Services Building room 208S is open Monday Friday from S:OO am to 5:00 pm. The telephone number is S13-974-2171. The Center's web address is http : //www.career.usf.edu Services Include: Individual Career Advising Appointments may be scheduled with career who provide assistance in resume/cover letter preparation and critiques interview strategies, i dentification, directed job search techniques networking tips and strategies for tap ping into the hidden job market. Career Development & Job Search . Workshops on such topics as resume wnting skills 1den!1fi cation interview techniques, government employment, JOb search strategies networking and participating in on-campus interviews are conducted by the staff each semester. Part-time Student Employment Part-time employment provides students an opportunity to

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26 STUDENT AFFAIRS & STUDENT SERVICES UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 199&'99 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG earn money while developing employability skills. Vacancies, updated daily, include Federal Work Study, on-campus and off campus part-time jobs and temporary off-campus opportuni ties. Internships Internship opportunities provide valuable, career related work experience and a chance to affirm the choice of a career field. All majors are eligible for an internship position. Staff is available to talk with students about potential internship sites, preparation for an internship and referrals to internship pro grams at USF. Cooperative Education (Co-Op) Co-op is a planned and supervised program which inte grates practical work experience with a student's academic program. Students may choose an Alternating or Parallel work plan. The Alternating Plan permits students to alternate full time semesters of work with full-time semesters of study. The Parallel Plan allows students to take classes half a day and work half a day. Participation requires a minimum GPA of 2.5, completion of 60 credit hours, a minimum (or more) of 21-24 hours before graduation and participation in a mandatory orien tation. On-Campus Interviews Each semester local, state and natii:mal recruiters, from business, industry, health care, finance, entertainment, govern ment, education and non-profit organizations visit campus to interview USF students for internship, cooperative education and full-time professional employment. Students from all ma jors may participate in on-campus interviews. Participation requires attendance at an On-Campus Recruitment Orientation and submission of a completed 1st Place Electronic Resume Disk, which may be obtained from the Career Center. Candidate Resume Referral Throughout the year employers, who do not conduct on campus interviews for full-time professional employees, con tact the Career Center to request resumes of USF students. Upon an employer's request, the Career Center electronic database is queried and matching resumes are faxed to the employer. Approximately 11,000 candidate resumes are re ferred each year. Full-time Professional Employment Vacancies In addition to the On-Campus Interviews and Candidate Resume Referral, the Career Center also houses local, state and national full-time job vacancies from education, health care, government, business, communication, finance, enter tainment, industry, etc. Full-time employment opportunities, updated on a daily basis, are available in Job Vacancy Note books, and a computerized job database. Career/Networking Fairs Each semester, employers participate in various Career/ Networking Fairs. These events provide a common ground for the student and employer to network and discuss employment/ career opportunities. Career/Networking Fairs include: Fall and Spring Networking Fair, Graduate and Professional Day, Part-time Job Fair.Teacher Career Fair and a Statewide Career Fair Employer Information and Videotape Library The Career Center Library maintains current information regarding employer information, in print video and computer ized form. Videos and printed reference materials are also available on resume writing, job search strategies and interview techniques. Financial Aid USF makes every effort to ensure that no qualified student is denied access to an edu cation due to inadequate funds. Many student financial aid programs are administered or coor dinated through the USF Office of Financial Aid The Office of Financial Aid provides assistance to students by offering a variety of services including literature specific to the application process, program specific brochures, a Web site, a voice response telephone system that allows a student to access his or her own financial aid file, and assigned counselors based on the last four digits of students' social security numbers. Counselor.s and advisors are available by telephone, by appointment, and students may also e-mail counselors via the Web site (http://usfweb.usf.edu/enroll/finaid/ finaid.htm). General questions may be directed to the office wide e-mail address financialaid2@admin.usf.edu. FastWeb and ExPAN, nationwide scholarship searches, are avaiable via the Web site (in addition to scholarship information specific to USF). Students may also complete their Free Appli cation for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) electronically. A link from the Financial Aid Web site provides either a version students can download, or a Web version. Students may also complete the FAFSA in the Office of Financial Aid lobby during regular business hours. The Office of Financial Aid is located in the Student Services Building (SVC) 1102, 813/974-4700. Financial aid services are also provided on all regional campuses Orientation Orientation provides an introduction to both academic and student life aspects of USF. To facilitate the smooth transition of students into the academic environment of the University, academic advising and registration are major components of the program. in addition, Orientation provides opportunities for entering students to develop realistic academic and personal goals, to locate student support programs and resources and to meet faculty, staff and continuing students. Orientation is re quired for all new students and former students who were readmitted to the University. In an effort to aid new students in their transition to USF, the office provides information tents during the first week of classes, Welcome Week activities and daily campus tours. The Orienta tion Office is located in the Student Services Building (SVC) 1037. Call (813) 974-3060 for more information. Orientation programs are available on all regional campuses. Office of the Registrar The Registrar's Office provides a wealth of student, aca and administrative services..The Registrar's Office is responsible for maintaining the student's academic record from the time of admission to degree. Therefore, virtually every USF student is a consumer of services provided by the Registrar's Office. Registrar's staff publish and distribute the University Sched ule of Classes, coordinate registration and drop/add activities, process and distribute grade information each semester, pre. pare transcripts and diplomas, as well as certify student enroll ment status. Registrar's staff also review and act upon student requests for reclassification of residency and process changes of name and student 1.0 number. The Registrar's Office also makes available forms and is a repository of information. The Registrar's Office provides forms and makes known the policies and procedures to petition the Academic Regulations Committee (ARC), to requestfee adjust ments, late registration fee waivers, or posting of a grade forgiveness. A form is also available to request privacy. The Registrar's Office provides information and services to students via SUN, the University's Student Use Network. On line services are made available over the telephone (SUN-DIAL) and on computer desktops (SUN-LINK/WEB). Using their self-declared personal identification number (PIN), students can register and drop/add, access registration ap pointment and hold information, view their grades, as well as update their permanent and local addresses. Students can also browse the University Schedule of Classes. Information and services are continually being added for students.

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STUDENT AFFAIRS & STUDENT SERVICES 27 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Although technology is being used as an enabler to provide better service, Registrar's staff provide in-person information and services in its lobby area as well as over the telephone. The Registrar's Office is located on the Tampa Campus in the Student Services Building (SVC) 1034, (813)97 Records and Registration offices are also located on every regional campus. STUDENT LIFE AND WELLNESS Student Life and Wellness is a subdivision of the Division of Student Affairs This subdivision is committed to promoting a diverse community cha,racterized by collaboration, open com munication, and values that affirm the worth of individuals Through shared purpose, critical thinking and life-long learn ing, the staff will create a wellness-enhancing environment conduci'-'e to student development and academic achievement. The staff will strive to provide leadership that develops caring citizens who value individual differences, the pursuit of excel lence and shared responsibility for enhancing the human condition The subdivision of Student Life and Wellness consists of the following Departments : Residence Life Student Health Services Counseling Center for Human Development Phyllis P. Marshall Center Campus Recreation Student Publications International Student and Scholar Services Student Government Student Judicial Services Student Relations Counseling for Human Development The Counseling Center is a comprehensive, student-ori ented facility providing services in educatio.nal skill enhance ment, career development and mental health to the USF community The Center offers individual treatment on a time limited basis and i:nakes referrals to in-house therapy groups or to community settings for appropriate management of problems requiring longer-term care. All services preserve the confiden tiality of students For more information about any of the follow ing services, call 974-2831 or stop by SVC (Student Services) 2124 Office hours are from 8:00 a.m. to 5 : 00 p.m., Monday through Friday (except University holidays). The Career Counsellng Service is designed to assist students in choosin!;J a major and an appropriate career goal. Major emphasis is given to the development of realistic educa tional and career goals through greater self understanding, reality-based decision-making, and effective problem-solving Services include intake evaluation; assessment of abilities, interests and other relevant characteristics ; individual and group counseling; informational services; and consultation. In addition, SIGI PLUS, FOCUS, and CAREER FINDER comput erized career information and guidance support systems, are available to assist students in the process of self-assessment and career exploration A Career Information Library containing current occupational resources is available for student use. The Personal Counseling Service is designed to enhance the social-emotional adjustment of students who are experienc ing stresses that interfere with personal growth and adiustment to university life Professional counselors seek to enable the student to develop a clear sense of identity establish au tonomy, discover strengths and potential, and become a more insightful, self-directing person Services aimed at early detec tion of potential mental health problems, are as follows : Intake evaluation and disposition, crisis intervention, psychological assessment, time-limited individual psychotherapy couples therapy, personal growth groups, and both time-limited and ongoing psychotherapy groups. Adjunctive services include psychiatric consultation, anxiety management and skill-en hancement workshops. The Reading and Learning Program seeks to provide students with reading skills and learning strategies necessary for academic success in education. Diagnostic services include determining an individual's functioning in reading com prehens ion and study skills. Additionally two courses are offered for credit Advanced Reading and Leaming Strategies within Academic Disciplines Students may request individual sessions focused on the application of learning strategies to academic course work. Each semester a variety of workshops focus on reading and study skill topics, as well as CLAST reading workshops for those students preparing for the CLAST test. Testing and Assessment Services enhance the effective ness of counseling by providing objective information about students. Tests of abilities, aptitudes, career interests, person ality, reading comprehension, study skills and other complex psychological attributes are maintained i n the Center Addition ally the Leaming Disabilities Testing Program receives refer rals from the Office of Disabled Student Services and identifies students with specific learning disabilities. The Outreach Program aims at understanding the needs of the University community and developing programs to meet those needs. Structured groups and workshops are provided for students and staff as methods of primary prevention and edueation. Through a monthly newsletter columns in the stu dent newspaper, posters advertisements and presentations to student and other groups, Center staff provide information about a wide range of mental health and psychoso cial issues that concern students Specialized programs include the Center for Alcohol and Substance Abuse (CASA) and Vocational Rehabilitation Services. CASA focuses on research, prevention and treat ment with regard to alcohol and other drug use/abuse. Voca tional Rehabilitation services are available for qualifying stu dents and include vocational evaluation vocational and per sonal counseling and guidance, coord i nation of services, train ing ass i stance, provis i on of books and supplies and treatment. Veterans Services provides specialized services and pro grams to veterans eligible dependents, active duty personnel, and members of the Selected Reserve. The staff assists stu dents with their use of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Educational Benefits, and serve as information and referral resources. Veterans Services was established to act as a liaison, whenever possible, between the VA students and the VA or various USF offices in order to help resolve problems. Veterans Services is the point where students submit all paper work concerning VA Educational Benefits. Programs to help students financially include VA Work-Study Program, VA Defer ment of Fees, Advance Payment Program and VA Tutorial Assistance. Office Hours: 8:00 a.m to 5 :00 p.m. Monday through Friday (except University holidays) Under special cin ; :umstances, it is possible to call to arrange for an after-hours appointment. For further information contact the staff in SVC 2127 orcall 974-2291. Student Health Services Student Health Services (SHS) provides primary health care and health education services to all registered students The SHS staff is comprised of licensed general practice M.D .s, registered nurses an advanced registered nurse prac titioner, a board certified physician's assistant, licensed practi cal nurses and assistants, licensed laboratory technologists, certified health educators, a registered dietitian and administra tive personnel. SHS strives to provide the best possible treatments of care for the university student community Location and Hours SHS is located east of the bookstore and north of the Student Services Building. Hours are Monday through Friday 8 : 00 a m

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28 STUDENT AFFAIRS & STUDENT SERVICES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CA rALOG to 5:30 p.m (hours may vary on holidays and semester breaks). SHS is closed on weekends. Emergenty Services SHS does not provide ambulance services. If students require emergency services or immediate medical attention after hours, two nearby facilities are the University Community Hospital (971-6000) on Fletcher Avenue (north of campus) and the Doctor's Walk-In Clinic (977-2777) on Bruce B. Downs Boulevard (west of campus) After Hours Telephone Consultation An SHS physician is available by telephone after hours to provide medical advice and direction for currently enrolled USF students. The on-call physician may be contacted at the SHS telephone number, 974-2331. Eligibility and Fees SHS provides services to any registered student with a valid student ID card USF Tampa Campus students are assessed a health fee that is included in their tuition each semester. Students registered on campuses other than Tampa may pay a voluntary health fee. Students taking a semester off or who graduated the previous semester may elect to pay a health fee at SHS entitling them to the same benefits as any student who is currently registered. The Health Fee entitles students to: Unlimited visits to the clinic nurse or general M.D.s if ill or injured. The use of SHS specialty clinics at a reduced cost. Specialty clinics include: Gynecology Clinic, Dermatology Clinic, and Antigen Clinic Reduced cost for laboratory tests. Access to the Health Education Department. Students may participate in a wide variety of health education and nutrition programs and services at no cost or a reduced fee Some popular programs include: "Freedom From Smoking" Clinics, Healthy Choices Nutrition Program REACH Peer Education and the Wellness Resource Center (WRC). Printed materials and videos are also available. Call 974-4936. Prescriptions Although SHS does not operate a pharmacy, an inventory of frequently prescribed medications is maintained as well as some brands of birth control pills If the medication prescribed is not available in the inventory, a prescription will be written which can be filled at any local pharmacy. When receiving the prescription, inquire about the local pharmacies which may give discounts to USF students. Health Insurance If you do not have health insurance, it is recommended you obtain some form of coverage. USF Student Government offers a student health insurance policy for a nominal fee Applications are available in Student Health Services For more information, contact the insurance representative at 974-5407 Health Care SHS provides screening and evaluations by nurses, exami nations by general practice physicians, laboratory work and antigen, dermatology, and gynecology specialty clinics Stu dent Health Services does act as a day infirmary, but does not provide x-ray, dental or optometry services Referrals are available to private facilities which provide these services Specialty Clinics Dermatology The on-staff dermatologist provides profes sional advice, diagnoses, and treatment of skin disorders These may include irritations, allergies, cancer, acne, or infec tions such as herpes simplex, warts, and fungi. Antigen If you require allergy shots, SHS can store and administer your injections Complete written instructions must be submitted by the prescribing physician for antigen therapy to be approved by SHS's medical director Gynecology SHS full-service gynecology clinic provides comprehensive well women's care. The Gyn. team includes registered nurses, and a female board certified physician's assistant who specializes in women's health Services include: annual Pap and pelvic examinations, STD testing, diagnosing and treating special problems. Evaluation including colposcopy is available at an affordable price. Birth Control and pregnancy testing also available. Referral available for pertinent women's health issues. Health Education Programs Student Health Services Health Education Department, staffed by Certified Health Educators a Licensed Registered Dietitian anq other support personnel provides sevices to assist students in obtaining a high level of health and well being. Staff is available for student consultations on an individual or group basis. Programs can be tailored to fit the special needs of your group or organizat ion. The following describes some of the services provided by the Health Education Department. All are free and offered upon request, unless otherwise stated . "Wellness Resource Center" Outreach services includ ing computerized health risk appraisals, a self care cold center and resource library are provided by the Student Health Ser vices Wellness Resource Center, located in the Phyllis Marshall Center Room 150. Call 974 5133 for more information. "HIV Antibody Testing" Confidential HIV Antibody testing is available to USF students for a fee. Referrals are made to local community agencies for anonymous testing. "Nutrition Education Services" -A variety of nutrition education programs ranging from cooking demonstrations to healthy eating seminars are offered each semester by our Registered Dietitian "Responsible Education and Action for College Health (REACH) Peer Education Program REACH peer educators are trained to provide innovative, non-threatening educational activities regarding sexually transmitted diseases, contracep tion, alcohol and drugs to fellow students Workshops are presented in resident halls, academic classes, and to university student organizations For more information, contact the Health Education Depart ment at (813) 974-4936 Mandatory Medical History Form A Mandatory Medical History Form is required for all student$ (regardless of age). According to Florida Administrative Code Rule "Each student accepted for admission shall, prior to registra tion, submit on a form provided by the institution, a medical history signed by the student." New admits will be provided a Medical History/Immunization Form with their admissions letter. In order to register, this form must be completed signed and returned to: Student Health Services \Jniversity of South Florida 4202 East Fowler Avenue, SHS 100 Tampa FL 33620-67 50 Fax: (813) 974-5888. Telephone : (813) 974-4056 or 974-2331 SUS Immunization Policy As a prerequisite to matriculation or registration, the State University System of Florida shall require all students born after 1956 to present documented proof of immunity to measles. All students less than 40 years of age shall present documented proof of immunity to rubella. Consistent with Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services guidelines, acceptable proof of immunity is as follows : MEASLES: Students can be considered immune to measles only if they have documentation of at least one of the following : 1. Documentation of immunization with two (2) doses of live measles virus vaccine on or after the first birthday. Persons

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STUDENT AFFAIRS & STUDENT SERVICES 29 UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG vaccinated with killed, or an unknown vaccine prior to 1968 must be revaccinated. Persons born before 1957 may be considered to have haq a natural infection and, therefore, do not need measles vaccine 2. Laboratory serologic [lgG] evidence of measles immunity. 3. A written, dated statement signed by a physician on his stationery, that specifies the date seen and stating that the person has had an illness characterized by a generalized rash lasting three (3) or more days, a fever of 101 degrees Fahrenheit or greater, a cough, and conjunctivitis, and, in the physician's opinion, is diagnosed to have had the 10 day measles (rubeola). RUBELLA: Students are considered immune to Rubella only if they have documentation as follows: 1 Documentation of immunization with live rubella virus vac cine or;i or after the first birthday or, 2. Laboratory (serologic) [lgG] evidence of rubella immunity. If the student has no documentation of any doses of measles vaccine, vaccine should be given at the time of entry and the second dose no later than thirty (30) days, and no more than three (3) months later. It is recommended that both doses of measles vaccine be given as a combined measles-mumps rubella (MMR) vaccine. The documented date of immunization for both measles and rubella should indicate the day, month, and year. However, only month and year will suffice if the month and year indicate that the immunization was given at least 13 months after the month of birth. Exceptions to this policy may be granted in the event of valid medical contraindications, or for religious reasons. PLEASE NOTE: ALL FEMALES SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THEY SHOULD NOT BE VACCINATED IF THERE IS ANY POSSIBILITY OF PREGNANCY. Temporary Medical exemptions must be submitted by the attending physician and must include reason for exemption and duration of exemption. For religious exemption applications, contact Student Health Services. For off-campus term exemptions, contact Registrar974-2000. VACCINATIONS AND BLOOD TITERS ARE AVAILABLE AT STUDENT HEAL TH SERVICES. USF Student Health Services, 4202 East Fowler Avenue, SHS 100, Tampa, FL 33620-6750, (813) 974-2331, FAX (813) 9745888. International Student and Scholar Services (ISSS) The University welcomes qualified students from other coun tries to the campus community. This international exchange leads to the enrichment of life, intellectual development, re search and understanding, and exposes students, faculty and staff to cultural and national differences in outlook, experience, and ideas. ISSS at USF (located in the Phyllis Marshall Center) is the main administrative and counseling office for approximately 1200 international students at the university. The ISSS has four main functions; 1) Administrative: the ISSS has many adminis trative duties including the issuance and maintenance of visa documentation for internationals on campus, as well as moni toring health insurance for internationals; 2) Counseling: the staff of the ISSS is trained and experienced in cross-cultural counseling and is able to advise students in the areas of immigration, adjustment to l,ife in the U S as well as personal and academic issues; 3) Programming: the ISSS develops and implements programs designed to assist international students in their adjustment to life at USF, and these programs include orientation, tax seminars, immigration workshops, and cultural programs; and 4) Cor:nmunity Service: the ISSS is the focal point of community service activity related to assisting interna tional students and scholars for example the Conversational English Program and the American Mentors Program . ISSS services also include letters of enrollment and ex penses, insurance advising, and numerous social activities (parties, cultural events, International Festival). The ISSS has written information concerning Tampa area activities, transpor tation and housing, tourist attractions, and Florida driver's licenses. SUS Health Insurance Requirement for International Students The Board of Regents of the State University System in Florida requires that all international students h13ve medical insurance in order to register for classes at USF. The Florida State University System's International Student Health Insur ance Requirement is as follows: As ofFall, 1992, no foreign student in F-1, F-2, J-1, or J-2 non-immigrant status shall be permitted to register, or to con tinue enrollment without demonstrating that ( s }he has adequate medical coverage for illness or accidental injury. An appropriate health insurance policy must have the following elements present: 1. 52 weeks continuous coverage 2. Basic benefits: room, board, hospital services, physician fees, surgeon fees, ambulance, out-patient services and out-patient fees paid at 80*-. of usual, customary, and reasonable (UCR) charge after deductible is met. 3. Inpatient mental health care: 50% of UCR charges with a thirty (30) day cap. 4. Out-patient mental health care: 50% of UCR charges with a $100.00 cap 5 Maternity benefits: treated as any other medical condition 6. In-patient/Out-patient prescription medication 7. Repatriation: $7,500.00 coverage to return remains to the home country in the event of death. 8. Medical evacuation: $10,000.00 coverage to permit patient to be returned to home country for medical treatment. 9. Exclusion period for preexisting conditions: six months. 10. Deductible: $50 00 per illness/accident if treatment is given at USF Student Health Services; $100 00 per illness/acci dent if treatment is given elsewhere. 11. Aggregate cap: $200,000.00 per illness/accident. Students must show proof of appropriate health insurance coverage before registration. An insurance policy is available which is recommended by the ISSS at USF. Exchange visitors, such as visiting research scholars must follow Federal Regulations regarding their insurance. These regulations implementing the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961 as amended by Public Law 87-256 require that all exchange visitors in J-1 non-immigration status and their dependents in J-2 non-immigration status must also dempnstrate the possession of adequate medical insurance for illness or accidental injury. Residence Hall Living The Residence Hall program is an integral part of the total educational experience offered to USF students. Professional and Graduate staff members and Resident Assistants strive to serve our mission to provide students with intellectual and social experiences in a conveniently located residence hall community supported by a concerned and informed staff ... to promote a safe, secure, and healthy living-learning environ ment individual differences are appreciated and re spected! Whether considering the convenient location, the availability of resources and amenities, or the student-oriented personnel associated with the Residence Hall program at USF, campus living has a lot to offer! Every enrolled degree-seeking student is eligible to live on-campus. A student desiring to live in the Resi9ence Halls is encouraged to apply for housing immedi ately upon receiving his/her official acceptance letter from USF. Florida Prepaid College Program participants with a Prepaid Dormitory Contract should note the Prepaid Dormitory Contract number in the space allotted on the Student Housing Contract.

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30 STUDENT AFFAIRS & STUDENT SERVICES UNNERSfTY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 199&'99 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG On-Campus Housing Facilities Student housing facilities on the Tampa campus are clus tered in three centers of community activitythe Argos, Andros, and Village Complexes Each area provides a core of services for its residents including a central service desk, mail delivery, laundry facilities, snack facilities, and swimming pool. Although the complexes provide the same basic services, they represent distinctly different options in campus living. In the Argos Complex, Beta and Gamma Halls offer tradi tional student residential living. Gamma houses women and Beta houses men. The traditional living arrangement in these halls prov i des room accommodations designed for both sleep ing and studying., 40-50 of a double living unit or 20-25 residents of a single occupancy living unit share common bath facilities which are cleaned on a regular basis by the hall's housekeeping staff. Each hall also offers l!"undry facilities kitchens, community rooms, and snack machines Alpha Apartments house 3-5 students per in single or double occupancy . Juniors, se niors and graduate students are eligible to live in Alpha Apartments The Andros Complex consists of nine smaller halls with suite arrangements Delta, Iota and Epsilon Halls are co-ed and double occupancy Epsilon is the designated Honors/Interna t i onal and Exchange Program/Leaming Community hall Zeta and Eta Halls are all female and double occupancy. Theta, Lambda and Mu Halls are co-ed and single occupancy. Theta is designated as the Leadership House, a program for students interested in leadership development. Kappa Hall is all female and single occupancy. Each suite in Delta, Epsilon,, Zeta, and Eta accomodates two students per room, four students per study area and eight students per .bathroom two sinks two showers and toilets. Each suite in Iota accomodates two students' per room, four students per study area, and eight students per bathroom, which includes two sinks, one shower, and two toilets. Each suite in Theta, Kappa Lambda, and Mu accomodates one student per room, two students per study area, and four students per bathroom, which includes two sinks one shower, and two toilets Each Andros Complex living unit (20-41 students) shares a kitchen/lounge and small laundry room. The housekeeping staff cleans study a r eas and bathrooms The Village Complex consists of 30 indiv i dual one story buildings, each containing 10 double occupancy (there are limited single occupancy spaces available) efficiency apart ments. These facilities are reserved for students who have attained sohomore, junior, senior or graduate class standing or have reached 21.years of age Each fully carpeted apartment has its own private entry and is furnished with a bed desk, wardrobe, and bookcase for each resident. A refrigerator, cooking facilities bathroom facilities and individually con. trolled apartment heating and air-conditioning un i ts are also provided Within the Village Complex, the residents have ac cess to a swimming pool, snack machines recreation r?or:n. multi-purpose/study room, laundromat and a wooded picnic/ barbecue area. All student housing is air-conditioned. All rooms are car peted, and all rooms are furnished with a desk, chair, dresser closet, and bookshelf for each resident. All rooms provide basic telephone service and cable TV with a movie channel. Food service facilities are conveniently located in the Argos and Andros Complexes Nearby swimming pools as well as basketball, tennis and racquetball courts, await students seeking leisure-time recreation In addition, students have access to Residence Services Computer Lab and the opportu nity to become involved in planning activities for their hall by joining Residence Hall organizations such as RHA. For more information, contact the Residence Services As signment Office at (813) 974-4310 The Residence Services Assignment Office is open Monday Friday from 9 :00 a m to 5 : 00 p.m Off-Campus Housing The Off Campus Housing Office, located in the Marshall Center maintains lists of university-area apartments homes, condos, and other rental properties available to the public. In addition the agency accepts roommate and rental property listings from private indiv i duals who do not discriminate be cause of race, color, or national origin. The office is open throughout the year. Phyllis P. Marshall Center The Phyllis P. Marshall Center, more so than any other campus facility, serves as a focal point of daily activity for students faculty administration alumni, guests and visitors. Located at the heart of campus at the apex of Drive it is the community center of the University, providing a multitude of services and programs The Marshall Center seeks to add another dimension to the educational experience by providing an environment for informal association outside the classroom. The Marshall Center was designed with the extracurricular life of the student in mind, lo provide a sense of central place and identity for the USF student. It is the place to meet new friends, engage in lively discussions, or take adva ntage of valuable services designed to improve the quality of life of the USF student. In add i tion i t i s the goal of the Marshall Center to provide meeting space for faculty alumni and staff, t? provide recreational and informational services to the public and to foster a spirit of enthusiasm and community at USF The Marshall Center houses a diversity of and services: food services organizational offices, meeting rooms a Craft Shop, Game Room study lounges, a travel service and much more The Information Desk, located in the first level lobby, serves as the information center for student activities in the Center and the University. Services available through the Information Desk are discount and other ticket sales, residence hall voice mail sign-ups, Tampa area bus schedules official USF lost and found, and current events information. Other services located on the first level include a USF Federa l Credit Union branch with two automatic teller machines, the USF Card Center, Wellness Resource Center, travel service food court and Centre Gallery, a student directed art exhibition space. The Marshall Center's conference and meeting facilities available through the Reservations office. Meeting rooms hold from 12 to 2 250 people Large rooms, such as the 1956 Ballroom are perfect for dinners social functions and large conferences. Food service areas in the Marshall Center include the Tampa Room Food Court with Taco Bell and Pizza Hut, and Good Stuff, Etc on the first level. Cafe Bianco restaurant is located on the fourth floor Catering for events held in the Marshall Center is available through USF Dining Services for those w i shing to hold a luncheon, reception or formal dinner. The Marshall Center lower level houses WBUL Student Radio Station SG Computer Services the games and arcade area, Centre Stud i os B i ke Shop, vending machines, SAFE Team/SoberRide Offices and CYbor City.The Game Room area has billiard tables video, computer and pinball games, foosball table tennis, chess checkers and card tables. Various collegiate tournaments are also coordinated through the games area Centre Studios is available to students and non-students with classes offered in ceramics, photography silkscreening and more The Bike Shop, located on the lower level west end, provides bicycle repair supplies parts and accessories The weekly Elm Street Flea Market is coordinated every Wednesday by the Marshall Center The Market offers vendors food and a social atmosphere for students Other Marshall Center services include a stamp machine, library bookdrop, and U-Ship automated shipping service. Special Events Center The Special Events Center adds a special dimension of entertainment to the USF Campus. With spacious stage and

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STUDENT AFFAIRS & STUDENT SERVICES 31 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG orchestra areas, auditorium-style seating, exceptional acous tics and high quality lighting equipment, this center is ideal for a wide variety of programs. The center, which accomodates 2,250, hosts concerts, cultural events, lecture series, musical and theatrical performances, as well as all types of special events and is also available for private functions. The Special Events Center is connected to the Marshall Center by a Skyway over Cedar Drive Student Government Student Government (SG) is made up of three branches: the Executive (President, Vice President, Cabinet officers and agencies), Legislative (Student Senate) and Judiciary (Student Supreme Court) in which membership is open to any registered student. Student-wide elections occur in April each year Stu dent Government represents all student interests in programs, plans, policies, and procedures of the University and secures student representation to University governance. The SG office oversees the Activity and Service Fee Fund, which is allocated to student organizations and supports several services which SG offers SG's agencies include SAFE Team, Computer Services, Soberride, Student Information Services, and the Homecomming Steering committee Student Government will assist students with any type of grievance by acting as a liaison between students and University administration. To find out more information, please contact the Student Government Offic1;i in the Marshall Center, room 203 orcall 974-2401 Student Organizations The Office of Student ACtivities, on the second floor of the Marshall Center, provides advising and activities for students to experiem;:e growth outside the classroom setting. This office is an outlet for students to learn emotionally, intellectually, and physically while participating within a group Services are provided to more than 270 student organizations. Traditional USF activities such as Honors Week, Greek Week, and Student Organizations Showcase are coordinated through this office. The Student Organization Advisory Board (SOAB), an all student committee, is made up of students representing the various organizations and serves as a resource to all organiza tions in regard to their programs, problems and general welfare. The Campus Activities Board (CAB) is a unique programming organization . Made up entirely of student volunteers, CAB offers students the opportunity to participate in planning and implementing a variety of programs for the University while developing valuable skills in marketing, budgeting, and pro gram planning. Professional advisors are also available to cou!lsel students on their programming needs. Clubs and Other Organizations The clubs, councils, and organizations formed by students represent a wide variety of interests. With over 270 student organizations, the Tampa campus of USF has groups organ ized for all types of activities. New organizations are continually being formed. Profes sional staff members are available to assist individuals forming an organization, and to advise registered groups. For a current list of all organizations, or information on forming a group, contact the Office of Student Activities, located on the second floor of the Marshall Center Academic Academic organizations have grown and will continue to grow as the needs of students studying in each of the academic areas increases These groups include Africana Studies Club, Anthropology Club, Association of Computing Machinery, As sociation of Library and Information Science Studies, Associa tion of Marketin,g Students Association of Medical Science Graduate Students, Association of Minority Communicators, Colloquia for Literature and Linguistics, Economics Club, Engi neering Transition Society, Geography Club, Geology Club, Graduate Business Association, Marine and Life Science Con sortium, Mathematical Association Student Chapter, Microbiology Club, Minority Organization of Students in Education, National Student Speech Language Association Minority Or ganization of Students in' Education, Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, Religious Studies Community Forum, Sigma Alpha Iota, Social Sciences Education Club, Student Council for Exceptional Children, Student Finance Assoc i ation, and University Psy chology Association. Councils Various councils exist on the Tampa campus. Several of these councils unite organizations or people with similar pur pose. Others represent specific colleges at USF and coordinate academic, honor, and professional organizations within their colleges. Councils present on campus include Architecture College Council, Argos Events Council, Arts and Sciences Student Council, Black Pan-Hellenic Council, Black Student Union, Business College Council, College of Education Student Council, College of Medicine Student Council, Cooperative Education Advisory Council, Council of Honor Societies, Engi neering College Council, Graduate Student Association, Home coming Steering Committee, Honors Program Student Council, lnterfraterriity Council, Latino Student Council, Organization of Student Representatives, Panhellenic Council, and Public Health Student Association. Greek There are currently 17 national fraternities and 12 national sororities on the Tampa campus. These organizations provide a variety of social, educational, service, and recreational pro grams for their members. Support for these programs is coor dinated through the lnterfraternity Council, Panhellenic Coun cil, and Black Pan-Hellenic Council with the advice of faculty and staff members. Membership is open to any student through a program called Rush. Rush serves as an introduction to Greek life, allowing students to meet members offraternities and sororities in formal and informal settings. lnterfraternity Council Rush is held the first week of school in both the Fall and Spring semesters. Black Pan-Hellenic rush varies among each chapter. Panhellenic holds formal Rush the week prior to Fall Semester. The sororities include Alpha Delta Pi, Alpha Kappa Alpha, Alpha Omicron Pi, Chi Omega, Delta Delta Delta, Delta Gamma, Delta Sigma Theta, Kappa Delta, Sigma Gamma Rho, Sigma Delta Tau, and Sigma Lambda Gamma. The fraternities include Alpha Phi Alpha, Alpha Tau Omega, Beta Theta Pi, Chi Phi, Kappa Sigma, Lambda Chi Alpha, Phi Delta Theta, Pi Kappa Alpha, Omega Psi Phi, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Sigma Alpha Mu, Sigma Chi, Sigma Lambda Beta, Sigma Nu, Sigma Phi Epsilon, Sigma Tau Gamma, and Zeta Beta Tau. The Greek recognition society is the National Order of Omega. Honor Societies Honor societies recognize outstanding students for their scholastic or service achievements Membership in honor orga nizations is usually by invitation. Honor organizations include Alpha Epsilon Delta, Alpha Phi Sigma, Alpha Pi Mu, Arts and Science Honors Society, Beta Alpha Psi, Chi Epsilon, Gamma Theta Upsilon, Golden Key, Kappa Delta Pi, Mortar Board, Omega Chi Epsilon, Order of Omega, Phi Eta Sigma, Phi Alpha Theta, Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Sigma Iota, Pi Gamma Mu, Pi Sigma Alpha, Psi Chi, and Tau Beta Pi. International International student organizations help meet the needs of international students and to increase the awareness of the University and the community about international students. International organizations include Association of Filipino Stu dents, Caribbean Cultural Exchange, Chinese International Cultural Exchange, Chinese Student Union, Circulo Culturale Italiano, French Club, Friendship Association of Chinese Stu dents and Scholars, German Club, Hellenic Student Associa-

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32 STUDENT AFFAIRS & STUDENT SERVICES UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG tion, International Festival Planning Committee, Korean Stu dent Association, Latin American Student Association, Muslim Students Association, National Students Support Council for Africa, Odin Associates, Persian Cultural Society, Spic Macay, Students of India Association, Turkish Students Association, and Vietnamese Student Association Political Organizations for political and social change include College Republicans, College Democrats, Conservative Society, and Youth for Gramm. Profe ssional The professional societies at USF focus their groups on profession oriented needs and interests of students. They include Accountants National Black Association, Advertising Club, American Chemical Society, American College of Health Care Executives American Criminal Justice Association, Ameri can Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, American Insti tute of Chemical Engineers, American Medical Association, American Medical Student Association, American Medical Womens Association/Women in Medicine, American Society of Civil Engineers, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Association of Students for Public Administration, Black Gradu ate and Professional Student Organization, College Music Educators Conference, College of Nursing Student Council, Delta Sigma Pi, Family Practice Student Organization, Florida Engineering Society, Florida Medical Association, Graduate International Business Board, IEEE Computer Society, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Institute of Industrial Engineers, Legal Brief, Mathematics Education Club, Manage ment Information Systems Society, Minority Preprofessional and Sciences Society, Pi Mu Epsilon, Pre-Dental Society, Pre Nursing Society, Semper Fi Society, Society for Technical Communications, Society of Professional Journalists, Society of Women Engineers, Special Libraries Association, Student Broadcasting Association, Student National Medical Associa tion, and University Film and Video Association. Religious The University has encouraged student religious organiza tions to develop. Currently some of the religious groups are members of the Campus Ministry Association (CMA). The members of CMA include Baptist Campus Ministry, Episcopal Student Center, and Hillel Foundation Navigators. In addition to the Campus Ministries, there are diverse student religious organizations on campus. The religious organizations are: Alpha Omega, Association of Pagan Expression (APEX), Baha'i Club, Campus Advance for Christ, Campus Bible Fellowship, Catholic Student Union, Chi Alpha, Dynamis, Fellowship of Christian Students, Friends of Israel Gospel Ministry, Interna tional Fellowship, lntervarsity Christian Fellowship, Latter Day Saints Student Association, New Generation Campus Ministry, Pagan Allied Network, Students of Biblical Research, Winner's Circle, Young Israel Jewish Student Union, and Young Life Leadership. Service/Resource The many service/resource organizations at USF provide volunteer services and functions for the University and Tampa Bay area. The service/resource organizations offer aid and supp0rt to further enhance students' needs and special inter ests. Service and resource organizations include Amnesty Inter national Adoption Group, BACCHUS, Best Buddies, Big Broth ers/Big Sisters, Campus Activities Board, Circle K International, Gold Council, Greeks Advocating Mature Management of Alco hol (GAMMA), H .O.P .E. Hispanic Organization Promoting Edu cation, Paraprofessional Counseling Service, Peer Advisory Council, Project World Health, Student Government Comptrol ler, S G. Computer Services, S.G Election Rules Agency ; S G. Executive Board, S.G. Insurance, S.G Senate, S.G Supreme Court, S.G. Student Information Services, Student Organiza tion Advisory Board, Students Taking An Acti ve Role in Society, USF Ambassadors, and USF Colors Special Interest Special-interest organizations cover a wide range of diverse activities. Those of the Tampa campus include Adventurer's Guild, AFROTC, Alpha Sigma Lambda Bull Spirits, Campus Ecology, Classics Society, Club Creole, Comic Denominator, Gay/Lesbian/Bi-sexual Coalition, Florida Water Environment Association, Greek Week Committee, Groove Team, Interna tional Studies Organization, Meditation Society, USF, Minority Business Association, Model United Nations, NASW Sub Unit (National Association of Social Workers), Non Traditional Stu dents, NOW (National Organization for Women), Rhythmic Motives, Student Admissions Representatives, Student Dance Production Board, Student Support Services Club, Students Organized Against Rape (SOAR), Students Taking An Active Role in Society, USF Gospel Choir, USF Middle Eastern Dance Association, USF Radio and Electronics Club, Vegetarian Din ner Club, Virtual Reality Exploration Society, WBUL, Student Radio, Wellness Committee, and Women's Studies Student Association. Sports and Sports and recreational organizations offer students the opportunity to enhance their physical well-being as well as their social lives. The Tampa campus has many organizations dedi cated to leisure activities. Sports and recreational organizations include Aikido Club, Badminton Club, Barbender's Club, Baseline Bulls "Zoo Crew", Bicycle Club, Bicycle Racing Club, Bowling Club, Chito Ryu Karate, Crew Team, Ice Hockey Club, Karate Club, Lacrosse Club, Rugby Football Club, Sailing and Windsurfing Club, Scuba Club, Surf Club, Table Tennis Club, Ultimate Frisbee Club, USF Men's Volleyball, Wado Kai Karate/ Taijutsu Club, Water Ski Club, and Women's Rugby. Campus Recreation The Campus Recreation Program is designed to provide opportunities for participation in a wide variety of sports and recreational activities for the entire University community. The Campus Recreation Department offers five distinct divisions: informal recreation, outdoor recreation, intramurals, fitness/noncredit instruction, and sports clubs The informal recreation division administers all recreational facilities. The division assists groups in reservations and ensures availability of recreational facilities for informal, drop-in use. Facilities include indoor and outdoor pools, gymnasium, weight room/ activity rooms, tennis courts, racquetball courts, intramural fields, and jogging trail. Through the fitness/noncredit instruction division, students have the opportunity to take a wide variety of noncredit classes ranging from aerobics to scuba Also, the Campus Recreation Center offers the opportunity to work out in a state-of-the-art weight room as well as participate in racquetball on six 4-wall courts. The Outdoor Recreation Division offers students the oppor tunity to become involved in adventure trips (sailing, hiking canoeing, skiing, etc.) as participants or as group leaders. The division also administers a fully equipped outdoor rental center and resource center. In addition, the division is responsible for the USF Riverfront Park, a complete riverfront recreational site located on the Hillsborough River. The Intramural program offers competitive and recreational tournaments in a variety of sports and recreational activities. The activities represent a broad selection of sports, varying from those of a noncompetitive type and include individual, tearn, and aquatic sports. The sports clubs program supports student-organized groups ranging from aerobics to yoga. The sports clubs provide for instruction, recreation, and competition in various sports activi ties.

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STUDENT AFFAIRS & STUDENT SERVICES 33 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Injuries occurring in any of the Campus Recreation pro grams are not covered by the University or the Campus Recreation Office. Information about any of the above activities can be found at the USF Campus Recreation Center locateCl directly northwest of the Sun Dome, or by caning 974-3177. Student Publications The University has encouraged a program of campus com munication through two publications. These publications are all-University in approach and coverage They are staffed by students under the general supervision of the Office of Student Publications. A tabloid campus newspaper, the Oracle, is published five times weekly, Monday through Friday during the Fall and Spring, and two times weekly Monday and Thursday during the Summer Containing 12 to 20 pages i n each issue, it provides professional experience for those students interested in print journalism. Omnibus, a literary magazine, published annually, contains prose, poetry, photos, and graphics produced by students . Interested students are invited to apply for staff positions on both publications STANDARDS AND STUDENT JUDICIAL PROCEDURES Just as the University maintains high standards of academic performance the members of the Univers ity community sup port high standards of individual conduct and human relations Responsibility for one's own conduct and respect for the rights ofothers are essential conditions for the academic and personal freedom within the University community Self-discipline and sensitivity to the rights and interests of others are the principal elements of the University Student Code of Conduct. The Student Code of Conduct sets forth a founda tion of values that represent a standard of expected behavior both inside and outside the classroom. Student judicial procedures are followed when a studentfails to exercise his/her responsibility in an acceptable manner or commits an offense as outlined in the student handbook. The University disciplinary procedures afford students the opportu nity to participate in discussions of the matter and to present information in one's own behalf, to seek counsel in one's own best interest, and the right of appeal. Students are entitled to participate in the development of standards of conduct support ing their interests in the purpose of the University. The Univer sity Judicial procedures are described in the student handbook. The University reserves the right to deny admission or refuse enrollment to students whose actions are contrary to the pur poses ofthe University or impair the welfare orfreedom of other members of the University community. Students have often asked for advice on standards of dress and personal appearance The University does not have a formal dress code but campus attire i s expected to be appropri ate for the activity in which the individual is engaged. Grievance Procedure In order to assure students the rightto redress of grievances, the Office of Student Relations is responsible for a grievance procedure involving non-aeademic matters Any student may file a question complaint, or statement of grievance in the Office of Student Relations, in person or in writing. A course of action or other answer will be given by the Associate Dean for Student Relations, as soon as possible. For academic grievances, the student should see the college dean in which the cause for the grievance occurred. OTHER STUDENT SERVICES Intercollegiate Athletics USF fields 18 intercollegiate sports for men and women all at the NCAA Division I level. In men's competition, USF has baseball, basketball, football soccer, cross country, outdoor track, golf and tennis on the women's side are basketball, softball, tennis golf, cross country, indoor and outdoor track soccer and volleyball The school became a charter member of Conference USA in 1995. The athletic facilities at USF are also second to none. The Sun Dome, opened for the 1980-81" basketball season is undoubtedly one of the most unique and dynamic multipurpose facilities in the Southeast. Lighted stadiums for the school's softball, baseball, soccer, and track team provides pleasant conditions for both the athletes and the spectators. The school also has an 18-hole championship golf course and varsity tennis courts. The Bulls football team competes in a state of the art stadium opened in 1998 and shared with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. University Bookstores The on-campus bookstores are owned and operated by the University of South Florida and are self-supporting auxiliaries The primary function of the university bookstores is to extend services to the students faculty, staff, alumni and visitors of the the university. The University Bookstore and the Health Sci ences Bookstore are located on the Tampa Campus The St. Petersburg Campus Bookstore is located on the Bayboro Campus. VISA, MasterCard, Discover and American Express are accepted at all stores. The USFCard may also be used for purchases in the Tampa Campus store. University Bookstore -The University Bookstore is located on Martin Luther King Plaza between the Marshall Center and the Student Services Building The bookstore offers a wide variety of books and merchan dise including: all course-required supplies and textbooks; a complete selection of writing implements, folders paper and other class supplies ; a wide selection of fiction, nonfiction and magazine titles; college clothing; class rings; compact discs; imprinted souvenirs and gift items Macintosh and IBM comput ers as well as most popular software applications are available at greatly reduced educational pricing, only to USF students faculty and staff members. Personnel are available to assist customers in finding and/ or ordering course texts and general books A continuous Buyback Program offers a source for cashing in used textbooks. The store is open Monday through Thursday from 8 : 00 a.m 7:00 p m., Friday from 8:00 a.m -5 : 00 p m and Saturday from 10:00 a .m. 4 : 00 p m During the beginning of each term, the store has extended hours and additional reg i sters open to provide the fastest service possible. Ample parking is available in the Crescent Hill Parking Facility Health Sciences Bookstore Located in the Medical Center (MDC 1021), the Health Sciences Bookstore offers medical textbooks. Supplies, greeting cards, clothing candy and other items are also provided The Health Sciences Bookstore is open Monday through Friday from 8:_ 00 a m to 4:55 p m St. Petersburg Bookstore The USF Bookstore at the St. Petersburg campus is located in Coquina Hall 101 and offers textbooks for St. Petersburg classes, general books clothing school supplies and a variety of general merchand i se items. Store hours are from 9:00 a .m. to 6:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday and Friday from 9:00 a.m to 5 : 00 p.m

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34 STUDENT AFFAIRS & STUDENT SERVICES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG : Campus Dining Services Good Stuff, etc. (Marshall Center) USF's own gourmet USF Meal Plans offer a wide array of dining options. Convecoffee shop. Featuring espresso based coffeediinks, Freshen's nience, flexibility and value are built into each plan. So no matter frozen yogurt and smoothies, Manhattan bagels and much how hectic your schedule may be, we've got a plan to fit your much more. time table, lifestyle and budget. Caffe Bianco (Marshall Center) Serving Tampa's finest We offer 13 plans for resident students. New freshmen Italian cuisine from atop the Phyllis P. Marshall Center. and other students living on campus for the The Corner Store (USF Bookstore Complex) Located first tm:ie have e1gh! to choose from Returning residents adjacent to the Bookstore and the Copy Center, another convecan choose from this hst of eight or select from an additional five nient store for all (or most) of your grocery needs. plans. Cooper Cafe (Cooper Hall) Featuring the Bay area's Freshmen and Other New Resident Meal Plans If you are a new freshman and will be living on campus or a transfer or returning student living on campus for the first time, you must select from one of the following eight meal plans: Carte Blanche with $100 flex bucks, Carte Blanche 14 Meal Plan with $250 flex bucks 14 Meal Plan with $150 bucks, 150 BIC?Ck with $125 flex bucks, Straight 14 Meal Plan, 10 Meal Plan with $80 flex bucks, and Straight 10 Meal Plan. Please note: Any unused flex bucks will be carried over from the fall to spring semester. They will not be lost; however, all unused flex bucks at the end of Spring semester will be forfeited. Returning Resident Meal Plans In addition to all the meal plans listed above, returning can select from a list of five additiqnal meal plan choices: 8 Meal Plan with $350 flex oucks, 8 Meal Plan with $250 flex 8 Meal Plan with $100 flex bucks, 100 Block Plan with $100 flex bucks, and $850-Full Declining Balance program. Resident Dining Crossroads Cafe {located in the Argos Center) Cross roads offers breakfast, lunch and dinner seven days a week on an "all-you-can eat" basis. Andros Center Dining (Andros Center) Brand new to the USF campus! (So new we haven't had a ch;mce to name it yet.) The Corner Grocery (Andros Center)Serving the resident student's needs seven days a week. Other Campus Dining Locations Tampa Room (Marshall Center) -An exciting food court featuring Taco Bell and Pizza Hut. largest Subway sandwich shop . Fire.house Grill (College of Business) Located conve niently m the College of Business Administration, serving great burgers, chicken sandwiches, fries and a whole lot more. The Bean (USF Library). Fresh brewed gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads, bagels, snacks and more. Break I (College of Engineering) Pizza Hut pizza, sandwiches, salads, soup, bagels, snacks and more. Fast Break II (College of Health Sciences)Same as Fast Break I but located in the Health Sciences Complex evos Express (USF Recreation Center),,., Looking for a healthy snack or beverage? Stop by Evos before or after your workout. For More Information, call our toll free number 1 (800) 775MEAL (6325). In Tampa call 974-4385 When visiting campus, stop by our office located in the Argos Center adjacent to Crossroads. USFCard The USFCard is the official l.D. card of the University of South Florida. University policies require that all student, faculty and staff members carry the USFCard while on campus. Stu dents may be denied services if they do not have one. The USFCard may also be used to make purchases from on campus copiers, snack and vending machines equipped with card Value can be added to the vend stripe at Cash-to card machines located around campus and at most coin/card copiers in the Library. This eliminates the rieed to carry coins and even saves money. If a student has an account with the USF Federal Credit Union, the USFCard can be used as an card The USFCard can also serve as a campusMCI calling card For additional information: http:// www.auxsvc.usf.edu/

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ACADEMIC PC>.LICIES AND PROCEDURES UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 199&'99 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG The Office of the Registrar maintains the official academic Fonner Student Returning records for all students and course registrations for currently The Office of Admissions will evaluate the acceptability of enrolled students. Students are encouraged to contact the transfer of credits taken at regionally-accredited inst i tutions Office of the Registrar about general questions concerning since last enrolled at USF. The college of the student's major will academic policies and procedures of their current registration determine which courses are applicable for his/her major. In or academic record. some instances, exact course equivalents will also be deterNote: Each student must be aware of the University s academic mined by other colleges which offerthe same orsimilarcourse(s) policies and procedures insofar as they affect him/her as a part of their programs of study. Academic Regulations and Information Continuously Degree-Seeking Student The Office of Admissions will determine the acceptability of transfer credits taken at regionally-accredited institutions while enrolled at USF as a continuing, degree-seeking student. However, PRIOR WRITTEN APPROVAL MUST BE OBTAINED from the college of the student's major if these credits are to be applicable to the USF degree program. A properly-executed Transient Student Form or Cross Enrollment Form should be used for this purpose. Semester System USF operates on a semester system Semesters begin in August and January with Summer Sessions beginning in May and June. See Academic Calendar for appropriate dates. Academic Load The maximum load of an undergraduate student is 18 hours (fiall & Spring semesters) and 14 hours (Summer Term) unless approval is received from the dean or an authorized represen tative of the student's college. Students classified as Undecided must receive approval from the Center for Academic Advising In the Fall or Spring Semester 12 hours is the minimum load for a student to be considered as full-time Full-time Undergraduate Student Definition Summer Term Sessions "A" & "B" (6 weeks) For: Academic purposes 6 hours or more each session For: Financial aid . Studentsmusten rollfor12hours Session c ( 10 weeks) For: Academic purposes For: Financial aid (undergraduate) in any combina tion of.Sessions A, "B" and "C 9 hours or more Students must enroll for 12 hours in ;my combination of Sessions A," "B" and "C." Students receiving Veterans' Administration benefits should confirm their Summer Term enrollment with the Office of Veterans' Services or Veterans' Coordinator. Undergraduates may not enroll in 6000-level courses or higher without approval of the college/department in which the . Availability of Courses USF does not commit itself to offer all the courses, programs, and majors listed in this catalog unless there is sufficient demand to justify them. Some courses, for example, may be offered only in alternate semesters or years, or even less frequently if there is little demand. Transfer of Credit To USF USF will accept credits only from those institutions accred ited by one of the accrediting agencies/commissions recog nized by USF. However, USF reserves the right to deny credit for specific courses. The receipt and evaluation of total transfer credit are the responsibility of the Office of Admissions. The college of the student's major will determine which courses are applicable toward a specific degree and will assign equivalent courses (see !;valuation ofTransfer of Credit under Admissions and Related Matters). . USF subscribes fully to all of the provisions of the statewide Articulation Agreement (Rule 6A-10.024) and strongly recom mends that students complete the associate of arts degree or in certain prioM;ipproved areas the associate of science de gree, before transferring. Special details for students who do not plan to complete the associate degree requirements are available from the Office of Admissions. Also, all transfer students should refer to other entries about undergraduate transfers in the Admissions section of this catalog. Registration for Admitted Degree-Seeking Students Continuing degree-seeking students register by appointment for their next semester's courses during the preceding term, either by telephone or in person (regional campuses only) Appoint'!lent ti_ mes and instructions for all registration periods are pubhshed rn the Schedule of Classes for the appropriate semester. Prior to initial registration all newly admitted undergraduate students and readmitted foniler' undergraduate students return ing are required to participate in an orientation/academic advis ing program on the USF campus where they will take all or the majority of courses. Newly admitted students and readmitted Former Students Returning receive Orientation/Academic Ad vising/Registration instructions from the USF Office of Orienta tion Registered students may make schedule adjustments in the regular registration period during the preGeding term or in the drop/add period during the first week of classes. (Deadline information is available in the Academic Calendar.) Degree-seeking students who do not register prior to the first day of classes may late-register the first week of classes A $100 00 late registration fee is charged during this week (See the section on fees for additional information and the appropri" ate term's Schedule of Classes for dates ) To avoid cancella tion of registration fees are due and payable for all registered courses of record on the fifth day of classes (end of drop/add period). (See Academic Calendar for dates.) NOTE: A Mandatory Medical History Form is required for all students (regardless of age). According to Florida Admin istrative Code Rule 6C-6 .001 ( 4 ) "Each student accepted for admission shall, prior to registration, submit on a form, provided by the institution, a medical history signed by the student." Immunization Proof Required As a prerequisite to matriculation or registrCltion, the State University System of Florida requires all students born after 1956 to P,resent documentation of proof of immunity to MEASLES (Rubeola) All students less than 40 years of age present documented proof of immunity to RUBELLA (German Measles). (See Immunization Policy ) Academic Advising for Admitted Undergraduate Students USF seeks to provide all students with sufficient guidance and advice to select programs and courses best suited to their personal abilities educational interests, and career objectives. For students who have been admitted to the University, an academic advising office is maintained in each of the six colleges offering baccalaureate degrees as well as in the Center for Academic Advising Th i s latter office serves also as an initial point of contact for non-admitted, prospective, and/or non-degree seeking students who need information about the

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36 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG University's academic structure. Students are cautioned that admission to the University does not imply admission to all the programs and courses offered by the individual colleges; this is especially true with respect to colleges with limited access programs Colleges such as Business, Education, Engineering, and Nursing have been designated as limited access colleges and require completion of certain prerequisites before a student may declare a major in one of them It is important that students check the college section of the catalog for advising and admission requirements. Students planning to enter a limited access program should be aware that their admission by the college may be denied or delayed and should be prepared with alternative plans of action. Lower-level transfer students (entering the University with fewer than 60 semester hours) and upper-level transfer stu dents (entering with 60 or more semester hours) who do not meet the requirements of a limited access major are assigned initially to the Center for Academic Advising for advising. In the case of non-limited access colleges, students may declare a major by completing a form in the appropriate college advising office, usually during one of the orientations required by the University. Students who do not wish to declare a major or who cannot meet the necessary prerequisites of a limited access major are advised by the Center for Academic Advising. Upper level transfer students (entering the University with 60 semester hours or more) who meet the admission requirements of a major are assigned to the college of that major for advising. A student must declare a major no later than the end of the junior year (90 semester hours). It is necessary that all students determine their appropriate college and attend the appropriate University-mandated Orien tation Program. The purpose of this initial contact is to assign an academic advisor and to provide the advising unit with routine information which assists it in collecting and maintaining the necessary records to assure the student's proper progress toward education goals. Transfer students should bring an unofficial or student copy of their transcript(s) at the time of orientation. All students are encouraged to establish an advising rela tionship with a college or the Center for Academic Advising and periodically visit their advisors to keep abreast of any policy, procedural, or curriculum changes which may affect them. In fact, some colleges require advisor approval of student pro grams each semester. While the University provides advising services to assist students with academic planning, the responsibility for seeing that all graduation requirements are met rests with the student. Course Attendance at First Class Meeting This policy has been put into effect so that USF may effectively utilize classroom space and to insure that all stu dents have maximum opportunity to enroll in classes where demand exceeds availability of seats. Students are required to attend the first class meeting of undergraduate courses for which they registered prior to the first day of the term. Names of students who register pnor to the first day of the term are printed on the first roll for each course section. The first class roll is used by professors to drop students who do not attend the first day of class. Students having extenuating circumstances beyond their control and who are unable to attend the first class meeting must notify the instructor or the department prior to the first class meeting to request waiver of the first class attendance requirement. Stu dents who add courses or late-register during the first week of classes will not be on the first class roll and, therefore, will not be dropped rornon-attendance by the instructor. To avoid fee liabillty and academic penalty, the student is responsible for Insuring that he/she has dropped or been dropped from all undesired courses by the end of the 5th day of classes. This policy is not applicable to courses in the following categories: Bachelor of Independent Studies (BIS), Programs for Adult Credit Education Program (PACE), Open University (TV), FEEDS Program, Community Experiential Leaming (CEL), Cooperative Education Training, and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days/times (such as, directed reading, or study, individual research, thesis, dissertation, internship, practicums, etc.). Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these categories by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty. Adds, After a student has completed his/her registration on the date assigned, he/she may add courses until the add dradline specified in the Academic Calendar See the appropnate se mester's University Schedule of Classes for detailed instruc tions and dates Drops A student may drop a course(s) during the regular registra tion and drop/add periods (first five days of classes) No entry of the course( s) will appear on any permanent academic records and full refund of fees is due forcourse(s) dropped within those periods. Effective Fall, 1986 a student may also drop a course(s) between the second and ninth week of the semester (except for Summer Sessions see Schedule of Classes for dates), with the following limitations: From 0-59 cumulative semester hours (classification "1" and "2") the student is limited to three drops; from 60 cumulative semester hours (classification "3" and "4") to end of the undergraduate degree a student is limited to three drops Students classified as "5" are limited to three drops. Non degree seeking students are treated as lower-level under graduate students and are limited to only three drops they are classified as either non-degree or degree-seeking lower level students. [Regardless of student classification, courses at the 5000 level or above are not counted as part of this drop limitation policy.] Additional drops above these numbers will result in an automatic "F" ("U") grade. Registration fees must be paid for all course(s) dropped after the first week, and tlie academic record will reflect a "W" grade for the dropped course(s) that are within the limitations of this policy. Courses dropped after the nine week deadline (see Academic Calendar for date) will result in an automatic "F" grade. Students may not continue to attend classes once they are dropped Appeals for additional drops will be made to the Academic Regulations Committee represeFltative in the appropriate col lege or Undergraduate Studies. Further appeal is to the Aca demic Regulations Committee Total withdrawals from the University are not counted as part of the drop limitation policy. Auditing Privilege A student who wishes to sit in on a class to review the course material may do so; however, the student is not allowed to take exams nor will any grades or cred i t be given The student's status for that class is an audit and his/her presence in the classroom is as a listener. A student must register to audit courses during the late registration period. (No audit registra tions are processed during the regular registration periods.) Fees for audit are the same as for full enrollment for credit except out-of-state tuition is not charged. See University Sched ule of Classes for detailed instructions and dates Cancellation Before First Class Day Students may cancel their registration by notifying the Office of the Registrar in writing prior to the first day of classes. If fees have already been paid, the student may request a full refund of fees from the Office of Purchasing and Financial Services. Withdrawal A student may withdraw from the University without aca demic penalty during the first nine weeks of any term (except for Summer Sessions). He/she must submit a completed With drawal Form to the Office of the Registrar. No entry is made on the academic record for withdrawals submitted during the first

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ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 37 UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG week of the term. All subsequent withdrawals (through the ninth week of classes in the Fall and Spring Semesters) are posted to the academic record with "W" grades assigned to the courses. Withdrawal deadlines for the Summer sessions are listed in the Academic Calendar and are published in the Schedule of Classes for the Summer Term. Students who withdraw may not continue to attend classes. Students who withdraw during the drop/add period as stated in the Academic Calendar may receive a full refund of fees. All refunds must be requested in writing from the Office of Pt1rchas ing and Financial Services. No refund is allowed after this period except for specified reasons. See "Refund of Fees" under Financial Information for complete details. Repeat Course Surcharges Initiated by the Florida Legislature (H.B. 1545 of 1997) to reduce costs, all state universities must monitor undergraduate student progress and charge students the "full cost of instruc tion" for certain repeats of undergraduate courses. This policy, which became effective Fall 1997, requires USF to charge students a substantial per credit hour surcharge when they attempt a course three or more times at USF, unless the course is specifically designed to be repeated or is required to be repeated by their major. RequirelT)ents to earn a passing or higher grade than previously earned in a course do not exempt the surcharge. The surcharge is $153.06 per credit hour during Smm .er 1998, out will be higher in the Fall. Students will be required to pay the surcharge in addition to the appropriate in state or out-of-state tuition rates It is important to note that all attempts count including withdrawals after the first week of classes and courses with incomplete grades. Exceptions for medical or personal hardship are possible via petition to the Academic Regulations Committee "Excess" Hour Surcharges Also initiated by the Florida Legislature (S B 2330of1995) to reduce costs, all state universities must charge students an additional fee for all hours they attempt beyond 115% of the hours necessary to complete the baccalaureate degree once they have been admitted to a state university. This policy affects all students who began as FTIC's (first time in college students) Fall 1996 and thereafter, and all stud ents who transfer from a community college to a state university" during Fall 1998 and thereafter. The "excess" hour surcharge during Summer 1998 is $21.96 per credit hour; i.e., 50% of the current matricu lation fee per hdur ($43 92) but may be higher beginning Fall 1998 FTIC students will be given an "interval to surcharge" (ITS) of 138 which is 120 hours plus 15% of the typical degree at USF. The ITS is the number of hours a student may take without being subject to an excess hour surcharge. If the student's major requires more than 120 hours, then the ITS will be 115% of that number of required hours. Undeclared or undecided FTIC students will be assigned an ITS of 138 and will have their ITS recalculated if they choose a major requiring more than 120 hours. The ITS will be calculated for transfer students based on the number of credits needed to complete their degree at USF, including the 30 hour residency requirement, plus 15%. Unde clared or undecided transfer students will be given an ITS of 120, less their transferable hours, plus 15% and will have their ITS recalculated when they choose a major and are able to determine the actual number of transferable hours applicable toward their degree. Similar to repeat course calculations, all attempts count toward "excess" hour calculations but exceptions for medical or personal hardship are possible via petition to the Academic Regulations. Other exceptions to the "excess" hour calculations include: exam credits (e.g., AP, IB, CLEP and Dual Enrollment); hours necessary to complete an additional major; extra hours attempted to fulfill Honors Program require ments; extra hours attempted because of a documented learning disability or other ADA disability; ROTC hours; . extra hours required because of active military service; extra hours created by internships, cooperative education, Washington Internship Program, and study abroad courses; extra hours necessary to earn additional teacher certifica tions. The "excess" hour surcharge will be applied to graduate hours that are applied to the undergraduate degree and transfer work taken after a student matriculates to USF Further, the "excess" hour surcharge will be applied to the following categories of coursework unless the work is taken to fulfill State-mandated professional or licensure requirements, or to achieve or maintain teacher certification: all coursework taken to attempt a second baccalaureate degree if the first baccalaureate degree was earned at any SUS institution; all hours taken in excess of 115% of one degree for students attempting two baccalaureate degrees; and all post-baccalaureate coursework for students who earned a baccalaureate degree from an SUS institution, who began the work toward their baccalaureate degree Fall 1996 or thereafter, and who are not admitted to graduate statui; (provisional or otherwise). Transcript Information Transcripts of a student's USF academic record may be requested by the student through the Office of the Registrar. A student's academic record can only be released upon authori zation of the student. Students requesting transcripts may do so in person or by writing to the Office of the Registrar. By law, the request must include the student's signature and date. In order for transcripts to be issued, the student must have no financial obligations to the University. Transcripts are normally mailed/ ready for pick-up within two working days after the request is received USF Transcript Request forms are available in the following offices: Tampa Campus Registrar's Office, regional campuses' Records & Registration offices, and all campuses' Cashier's offices. Letter requests must include: ( 1) date ofrequest and student's current address; (2) student ID number and full name; (3) name and complete address of recipient; and (4) number of copies and special instructions, such as, "hold for degree statement" or "hold for current term grades," and the student's signature. Degree statements are posted approximately five weeks after the graduation ceremony. Current term grades are posted approximately one week after the final exams end. If grades for the current term are needed, clearly indicate that the transcript request is to be held for grades To order transcripts by mail, send payment ($5.00 per copy, check or money order only) and Request Form or letter to: Transcript Clerk, Registrar's Office USFSVC 1034 4202 E. Fowler Avenue Tampa, FL 33620-6950 To order transcript in person, hand-carry payment (check, money order or cash) and Request Form or letter to a USF Cashier's Office at any of the following Campus locations : Tampa -ADM 131 St. Petersburg Davis Hall, Rm. 129 Sarasota Lobby, Building D Lakeland (Drop Box)Bldg. E, Rm. 2127 Transcript request forms are available in these locations.' Stu dents may complete the request process in one stop at the cashier's offices College Level Academic Skills Test The College Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST) is a part of Florida's system of educational accountability. CLAST is a state-mandated achievement test that measures attainment of communication and mathematics skills expected of students

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38 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES UNNERSfTY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE -CATALOG completing their sophomore year in college.These skills were identified by the faculties of community colleges and. state universities and adopted by the State Board of Education. A student must pass the CLASTor achieve alternate criteria to receive an Associate in Arts or a baccalaureate degree from any Florida public institution. Students who have already earned a baccalaureate degree from a regionally-accredited institution are exempt from the CLAST requirement at USF. The State Board of Education has established minimum CLAST score standards for the awarding of the Associate in Arts degree and forthe Bachelor's degree from October 1, 1992 as follows: Reading, 295 ; English Language Skills 295; Math ematics, 295; and Essay, 6. CLAST may be taken by undergraduate, degree-seeking students who have earned 18 semester hours or the equivalent and who apply to take the test on or before the dt'.adline established for registration . Students at USF are required to take the CLAST by the time they complete 45 semester hours First-time-in-college and lower-level transfer students are en couraged to take the CLAST as early as possible. Transfer students should take the CLAST the first semester they are enrolled as degree-seeking students if they have already exce. eded the 45 hours from previous institutions. If one or more subtests of the CLAST have not been passed or exemptions have not been awarded by the time a student completes 70 semester hours, the student may not register for classes until he/she has met with the appropriate college CLAST advisor A course or method of preparation to remediate content covered in the failed subtest{s) will be selected and required. Further registration may be restricted for failure to attend the designated preparation. If a student has completed 36 hours of upper level (3000 and 4000) courses after the first attemptto pass CLAST and has not satisfied the CLAST requirement, registration will be restricted to 1000 and 2000 level courses. Preparation will be required in each of the sub.tests failed Further registration at USF. will be denied for failure to complete the reuqired preparation. Please Note: Several options for meeting CLAST require ments are available. However, none of those options {exemp tions or waivers) are acceptable for admission to or graduation from programs inthe College of E9ucation Refer to of Evaluation and Testing, SVC 2054 forthe current policies on CLAST Courses to Satisfy Rule 6A-10.030 ("Gordon Rule") Prior to receiving an Associate of Arts degree from a public community college or university or a Bachelor's degree from a public university, a student shall comple!e following: 1 Twelve semester hours of English courses in which a student is required to demonstrate writing skills. For the purpose of this rule, an English course is defined as any semester-length course within the general study area of the humanities in which the student is required to produce written work of at least 6000 words. 2. Six semester hours of mathematics coursework at the level of college algebra or above. For the purpose of this rule, applied logic, statistics, and s_uch computation coursework, which may not be placed within a mathematics department, may be used to fulfill 3 hours of the 6 hours required by this section. In order to receive credit for fulfillment of 6A-10 .030, students must receive a grade of "C" or higher in each course {no "S" grades) In order to follow the specifics of 6A-10 .030, USF has designated the following courses in which the student may demonstrate ttie writing and mathematical skills as set forth in this rule. Communication (12 semester hours) AFA 2000 Introduction to the Black Experience in Africa and Its Diaspora 3 AFA 4150 Africa and the United States 3 AFA 4335 Black Women in America 3 AFS 2250 Culture and Society in Africa 3 AMH G510 U.S. Diplomatic History to 1898 4 AML 3604 African-American Literature 3 AMS 3001 American Culture 1880-1915 4 AMS 3260 American Culture 1830-1860 4 AMS 3370 Southern Women : Myth and Reality 3 ANT 4172 Historical Archaeology 3 ANT 4226 Anthropology of Art 3 ANT 4231 Folklore 3 ANT 4241 Magic and Religion 3 ANT 4340 The Caribbean 3 ANT 4432 The Individual and Culture 3 ANT 4620 Language and Culture 3 ANT 4750 Language and Social Interaction 3 ANT 4935 Rethinking Anthropology 3 ARC 4 784 The City 3 ARH 3001 Introduction to Art 4 ARH 4710 History of Photography 4 ARH 4796 Critical Studies in Art History 4 CCJ 4934 Seminar in Criminology 3 CES 4000 Structures and Urban Environment for Non-Engineers 3 CHM 4070 Historical Perspectives in Chemistry 3 CIS 4250 Ethical Issues and Professional Conduct 3 CL T 3101 Greek Literature in Translation 3 CL T 3102 Roman Literature in Translation 3 COM 4020 Communicating Illness, Grief, and Loss 3 COM 4030 Women and Communication 3 COM 4710 Writing Lives 3 CRW 2100 Narration and Description 3 CRW 3111 Form and Technique of Fiction 3 CRW 3112 Fiction I 3 CRW 3121 Fiction II 3 DAN 2100 Introduction to Dance 3 DAN 4111 Survey History of Dance 3 EDF 3228 Human Behavior and Environmental Selection 4 EEC 4008 Literature in Early Childhood Education 3 EEX 4742 Narrative Perspectives on Exceptionality: Cultural and Ethical Issues 3 ENC 1101 Freshman English I 3 ENC 1102 Freshman English II 3 ENC 1121 Freshman English I : Honors 3 ENC 1122 Freshman English II: Honors 3 ENC 2210 Technical Writing 3 ENC 3213 Professional Writing 3 ENC 3310 Expository Writing 3 EVT 4651 Equity in Schools and the Workplace 3 FIL 2001 Film: Language of Vision 4 FIL 3510 World Cinema 4 GEA 3405 Geography of Latin America 4 GEA 3500 Geography of Europe 4 GEO 4372 Global Conservation 4 GEY 3625 Sociocultural Aspects of Aging 3 HUM 4931 Seminar in Humanities 4 IDS 3115 Values and Choices 3 IDS 3663 Critical Issues Affecting the Arts 3 LAE 4414 Literature in Childhood Education 3 LAE 4464 Adolescent Literature for Middle & Secondary Students 3 LIN 3801 Language and Meaning 3 LIT 2000 Introduction to Literature 3 LIT 2010 Introduction to Fiction 3 LIT 2030 Introduction to Poetry 3 LIT 2040 Introduction to Drama 3 LIT 3073 Contemporary Literature 3 LIT 3101 Literature of Western World -Ren. 3 LIT 3102 Literature of Western World Since Ren. 3 LIT 3103 Great Literature of the World 3 LIT 3144 Modem European Novel 3 LIT 3301 Cultural Studies and the Popular Arts 3 LIT 3383 The Image of Women in Literature 3 LIT 3451 Literature and the Occult 3 LIT 4386 British and American Literature by Women 3 MHF 4403 The Early History of Mathematics 3

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ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 39 UNNERSfTY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 199&'99 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG MUL 2111 Introduction to Music Literature NUR 4194 An Interdisciplinary Perspective on HIV PHH 2000 Introduction to Philosophy PHH 4600 Contemporary Philosophy PHH 4700 American Philosophy PHI 3700 Philosophy of Religion PHI 4300 Theory of Knowledge PHI 4320 Philosophy of Mind PHI 4800 Aesthetics PHM 3100 Social Philosophy PHM 4322 Ancient and Medieval Political Philosophy PHM 4331 Modem Political Philosophy PHM 4340 Cont(lmporary Political Philosophy PHP 3786 Existentialism PHP 4000 Plato PHP 4010 Aristotle PHP 4740 The Rationalists PHP 4745 Empiricism PHP 4784 Analytical Philosophy PHP 4788 Philosophy of Marxism PHY 4031 Great Themes in Physics POS 4413 The American POS 4694 Women and Law II POT 4109 Politics and Literature PUP 4323 Women and Politics REL 2300 Introduction to World Religions / REL 3111 The Religious Quest In Contemporary Films REL 3114 Comedy, Tragedy and Religion REL 3145 Women and Religion REL 3155 Life After Death REL 3170 Religion, Ethics and Society Through Film REL 3362 Introduction to Islam REL 3367 Islam in the Modem Wortd REL 3465 Religion and the Meaning .of Life REL 3501 History of Christianity REL 3561 Roman Catholicism REL 3600 lntr<>Quction to Judaism REL 3602 Classics of Judaism REL 3613 Modem Judaism REL 4113 The Hero and REL 4171 Contemporary Chnstian Ethics REL 4221 Who Wrote the Bible(Genesis-Kings) REL 4670 Judaism and Christianity After the Holocaust RUS 3500 Russian Civilization RUT 3110 Russian Classics in English RUT 3111 20th-Century Russian Literature in English SCE 4237 Science, Technology & Society Interactions SPC 4305 Communicating Emotions SYA 3310 Qualitative Inquiry THE 3090C Modem Theatre Practice THE 4180 Theatre Origins THE 4320 Theatre of Myth & Ritual/Northern 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 4 3 4 4 3 3 3 5 3 3 4 4 European & Oriental 3 THE 4330 Shakespeare for the Theatre 3 THE 4360 The 19th Century Theatre Revolution 3 THE 4401 O'Neill and After 3 THE 4435 Theatre of Pluralism 3 THE 4442 The Comedy of the Classic & Neoclassic Stage 3 THE 4562 Contemporary Performance Theatre 4 WST 3210 Women in Western Civilization I 3 WST 4260 Research Issues on Women of Color 3 WST 4262 Literature by American Women of Color 3 WST 4263 Third World Women Writers 3 WST 4310 Feminism in America 3 All the above courses will require 6 000 written woi-ds per course. IDH courses will fulfill the writing requirement for all University Honor students only. Computation (6 semester hours) At least 6 hours must be at the level of college algebra or above, with at least 3 hours from the Mathematics Department. Any course offered by the Mathematics Department may be used. Three hours may be taken from outside the Mathematics Department but must be taken from the following list of courses Course Number and Title Semester Hours CGS 2060 Introduction to Computers and Programming in Basic 3 PHI 2100 Introduction to Formal Logic 3 QMB 2100 Business and Economics Statistics I 3 STA 2023 Introduction to Statistics 4 STA 2122 Social Sciences Statistics 3 For students under the General Distribution Requirements, CGS 2000 Computers in Business I (3 semester hours) may also count toward fulfilling the computation requirement but will not count toward Area Ill CLEP general/subject examinations in mathematics, calcu lus, college algebra, college algebra-trigonometry, and trigonometry may satisfy this requirement. Grades, Scholarship Requirements, Review Procedures The University is interested in each student making reason able progress towards his/her educational goals and will aid each student through guidance and faculty advising. 'Fo. make students aware of their academic progress, the University has enacted system of grading and policies of Academic Proba tion and Academic Dismissal which indicates whether or not a student is showing sufficient progress toward meeting degree requirements. Notations of Grades, Academic Probation and Academic Dismissal are posted to the student's academic record. When a student is academically dismissed from the Univer sity and is ineligibleto re-enroll, it may be in his/her best interest to re-evaluate educational goals with an academic advisor in his/her college. If the student's poor academic perfor mance has resulted from extenuating circumstances or if after a period of time the student feels he/she has gained adequate maturity and motivation, he/she may petition the Academic Regulations Committee for permission to re-enroll. See "Aca demic Regulations Committee," for information on petitioning. Grading System A student's measure of academic achievement is recorded on the academic record based on the following grading system: A Superior performance B Excellent performance C Average performance D Below average performance, but passing F Failure FF Failure/academic dishonesty I Incomplete IF Incomplete grade changed to Failure IU Incomplete grade changed to Unsatisfactory M No grade submitted by instructor MF Missing grade changed to Failure MU Missing grade changed to Unsatisfactory N Audit R Repeated course S Satisfactory T Course repeated, not included in GPA U Unsatisfactory W Withdrawal from course without penalty Z Indicates continuing registration. Grade Point Average The University has a four-point system of grading used in computing grade point averages (A= 4 quality points, B = 3, C = 2, D = 1 F = 0) The grade-point average (GPA) is computed by dividing the total number of quality points by the total hours attempted at USF. The total quality points are figured by multiplying the number of credits assigned to each course by the quality point value of the grade giv.en. Credit hours f6r courses with grades of I, IU, M, MU, N, S, U, W, Z, and grades which are preceded by a are subtracted from the total hours attempted before the GPA is calculated.

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40 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Credit hours for repeated USF coursework will be awarded only once per course unless the course is a university-approved repeatable course. "D" and "F" grades, however, for repeated USF coursework will be counted in the computation of the student's GPA as many times as those grades for that course are recorded. If a student originally earns a "C" or higher in a course that may not be repeated for additional credit and earns a c or higher on a subsequent enrollment the new grade is not computed in the USF GPA unless the forgiveness policy is being applied. "I" Grade Policy An "I" grade indicates incomplete coursework and may be awarded to graduate and undergraduate students. (Under graduate rules apply to non-degree-seeking students.) It may be awarded to an undergraduate student only when a small portion of the student's work is incomplete and only when the student is otherwise earning a passing grade Until removed, the "I" is not computed in the GPA for either undergraduate or graduate students. The time limit for removing the is to be set by the instructorofthe course For undergraduate students, this time limit may hot exceed two academic semesters, whether or not the student is in residence and/or graduation, whichever comes first. "I" grades not removed by the end of the time limit will be changed to "IF" or "IU," whichever is appropriate Whether or not the student is in residence, any change to "IF" grades will be calculated in the cumulative GPA and if applica ble, the student will be placed on appropriate probation or academically dismissed. Students are not required to reregister for courses in which they are only completing previous course requirements to change an "I" grade. However, if a student wants to audit a course for review in order to complete course requirements, full fees must be paid. "M" Grade Policy An "M" is automatically assigned as a default grade when the instructor does not submit any grade for an undergraduate student. (Undergraduate rules also apply to non-degree-seek ing students ) Until removed, the "M" is not computed in the GPA. The time limit for removing the "M" may not exceed one academic semester (whether or not the student is enrolled) and/ or graduation, whichever comes first. "M" grades that are not removed by the end of the next semester/term will be changed to "MF" or "MU," whichever is appropriate. Whether or not the student is enrolled, any change to "MF" grades will be computed in the cumulative GPA, and, if applicable, the student will be placed on appropriate probation or academically dismissed. SIU Grade System No-option Courses. Certain courses have been designated as S/U courses The "S" and "U" grades are used to indicate the student's final grade. These S/U only courses are identified with (S/U only) after the course definition in this catalog. No grading system option is available to students or faculty in these courses Option Courses. Any undergraduate course may be taken on an S/U basis by a student under the following conditions and restrictions: 1. Required courses in the major may not be taken on an S/U basis. 2. Specifically designated required courses in the distribution requirements of the student's college may not be taken on an S/U basis. 3. Courses to satisfy 6A-10.30 (Gordon Rule) may not be taken on an S/U basis 4. Courses to satisfy US F's B.A. foreign language requirement may not be taken on an S/U basis 5. All elective courses for the major and all elective courses in the distribution requirements, and all other free elective courses may be taken on an S/U basis except where: a. The certifying college restricts the number of courses which may be taken on an S/U basis in any one or all of the above areas or restricts the total number of S/U courses wh ich can be accepted for all of the above areas b. The certifying college specifies that certain courses may not be taken on an S/U basis. c The instructor of a course refuses to allow the course to be taken on an S/U basis. Mechanism for Assigning S/U Grades. The method by which a student receives an "S" or "U" grade in an option course will consist of the following: 1. A written agreement signed by both instructor and student shall be filed with such offices as may be designated by the college The college shall set the deadline (no later than the last day of classes for the term) for the student to decide if he/ she wishes to take the course on an S/U basis 2. The instructor shall assign final letter grades A B, C D, F, or I but will transmit to the Registrar "S" or "U consistent with the following: a. Letter grade, A, B or C, shall be equivalent to a letter grade of "S." b. Letter grades D or F shall be equivalent to a letter grade of "U." "S" and "U" grades are not computed in the student's GPA. Grade Forgiveness Policy USF's forgiveness policy permits an undergraduate to re peat a course and have the repeated grade computed in his/her GPA in place of the original grade, providing the repeat grade is "D" or higher (exception see Honors at Graduation). A course that is repeated and the repeat grade is "F" will have both grades calculated into the GPA. Normally grade forgiveness may only be applied to a specific course that a student chooses to repeat. No course taken on the S/U grade basis may have the grade forgiveness applied Under unusual circum stances, a different but similar course may be used if the substitute course has been previously approved by the college dean and is on file in the Office of the Registrar Any undergraduate or non-degree seeking student who wishes to implement grade forgiveness must: 1. Complete a "Grade Forgiveness Request Form" (available in the Office of the Registrar) for each course to be repeated. 2 Adhere to the following conditions: a. A limitation of applying grade forgiveness to three USF courses with no more than one repeat per course. b With prior approval of the college dean a course different from a course on the approved list may be substituted in the following cases: ( 1) The substitute course is a change in prefix, number, hours, or title, but not a substantive change in content from the original course (2)The substitute course replaces a course no longer offered by the institution. c. The repeated course must be taken under the-standard grading system (A-F) and the latest grade must be D or higher (grades of S/U are not permitted). d. All grades remain on the transcript. The original course grade will be annotated with "T" to indicate that the course has subsequently been repeated and the original grade is not computed in the GPA. The repeated course will be annotated with "R" to indicate repeat course e. Individual colleges may have further restrictions, there fore, the student should consult with his/her college. This policy is applicable to undergraduate and non-degree seeking students only, and applies to 1 OOO-to-5000-level cours es. Once students have been awarded a bachelor's degree from USF, they may not repeat a course and be forgiven the original grade, taken prior to graduation. The policy applies only to courses taken originally at USF and repeated at USF. Good Standing USF students will be considered in Good Standing if they are currently enrolled or eligible to return to USF.

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ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 41 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Academic Record The student's academic record shall not be changed after the student has graduated. Academic Probation and Academic Dismissal for Undergraduate Students The first time the academic record of an undergraduate or non-degree seeking student falls below a cumulative 2.00 grade point average (GPA), counting only USF grades, he/she will be placed on Academic Probation (AP) If the cumulative GPA is not raised to 2.00 or higher at the end of the next term of enrollment, the student will be placed on Final Academic Probation (FP). A student on Final Academic Probation who fails to raise his/her GPA to 2.00 or higher at the end of the next term of enrollment will be Academically Dismissed (AD) from the university. A student admitted to the university on probationary status will be placed on Academic Probation (AP) his/herfirstterm with the above rules related to Final Academic Probation and Aca demic Dismissal applying Academic advising prior to registra tion is mandatory until the student is removed from probationary status Any student who withdraws afterthe fifth day of classes while on Academic Probation or Final Academic Probation or who has been placed on Conditional Readmission by the Academic Regulations Committee will be Academically Dismissed The determination and notification of probationary status or academic dismissal will be made by the Registrar's Office on the student's semester grade report and academic record A student who attends another college or university during academic dismissal will be classified as a transfer student and readmission will be based on the total record accumulated from all colleges and universities attended . If a student who has accumulated fewer than 60 semester hours is academically dismissed from USF or falls below a 2 0 GPA and subsequently achieves an A.A. degree or an a'1icu lated A.S. degree from a Florida public community/junior col lege (or other SUS institution), that student, when returning to the University, will be automatically credited with a maximum of 60 semester hours and have his/her academic record cleared and the USF GPA will begin again. If a student who has accumulated 60 or more semester hours is academically dismissed from USF or falls below a 2 0 GPA and subsequently receives an A.A. or an articulated A.S. from a Florida public community/junior college (or other SUS institu tion), that student, when returning to the University, will not li!Utomatically have his/her record cleared. The student must consult with his/her Academic Regulations Committee repre sentative and must either: a. Request that his/her academic record be cleared If the student chooses this option and the Academic Regulations Committee approves the request, the student will be credited with a maximum of 60 semester hours and the USF GPA will begin again; or b. Request that t he USF hours and GPA be retained and receive specific stipulations from the Academic Regulations Committee to clear the academic record. In either case, the decision must be made in the term of USF enrollment following the receipt of the AA degree and is consid ered to be a binding decision. If a student l s academically dismissed or falls below a 2.0 GPA from USF and subsequently receives a BA/BS from another four-year institution, that student, when accepted to the University with the post-baccalaureate status, will have his/her academic record cleared. A student who has earned credit at USF and is academically eligible to return to the university and who subsequently re ceives an A.A. from a Community College, the posting of the AA shall not remove the previous GPA generated at USF. Academic Amnesty USF recognizes that not every student's academic record is flawless and that many times students get off to such a poor start that their future academic opportur:iities are limited. USF can offer many of those students a second chance. The University s Academic Amnesty policy allows students, who have been engaged in non-academic activities such as work or the military for at least five years and who provide evidence that they might now achieve academic success, to renew their pursuit of baccalaureate degrees without the burden of having to over come the effects of low grades and low grade-point-averages that reflect academic work attempted years earlier. Students who believe that the Academic Amnesty policy might apply to their circumstances should contact the Office of Admissions for additional information. College Policies For Academic Progress Colleges may determine and implement standards of aca demic progress for undergraduate students (majors in the college) in addition to those established by USF. Students wtio do not meet the academic standards of progress set by their colleges will be placed on probation and may be disenrolled. The college dean is responsible for implementing standards of academic progress and for notifying students of their probation ary or disenrollment status. Colleges may restrict the course selections and the number of hours a student may take which do not apply toward comple tion of degree requirements. Students who exceed this limit may have part or all of their registration canceled. Colleges are responsible for publicizing and students are responsible for knowing their college's policies for academic progress. Class Standing A student's class is determined by the number of credits he/ she has earned without relation to his/her GPA. OC Unclassified Non-degree-seeking students 1 F Freshman 0 through 29 semester hours passed 2S Sophomore 30 through 59 semester hours passed 3J Junior 60 through 89 semester hours passed 4R Senior 90 or more semester hours passed; however, no baccalaureate degree earned here or elsewhere 5B Baccalaureate degree-holderworking on a second undergraduate program or degree 6M Graduate student admitted to Master's Degree Program 6A Graduate student admitted to Specialist Degree Program 6D Graduate student admitted to a Doctoral Degree Program 7A Professional Program (M. D.) or Post-Doctoral Status Admission to a College All newly-admitted students must be advised initially by an academic advisor. All undecided students are assigned to the Center for Academic Advising for purposes of advising until a choice of major is made. At that time, he/she may enter the college containing the major department. Undecided students may remain in this classification until a maximum of 90 semes ter hours are earned. After that time, a major must be selected. New transfer students who have completed 90 or more hours may remain undeclared for a maximum of two terms following initial USF entry. Change of Major All undergraduate students desiring to change their major should consult the Advising Office in the old and new college( s) of their interest. Administrative Holds A student may be placed on administrative hold by failure to meet obligations to the University When a student is on administrative hold he/she may not be allowed to register, receive a diploma, or receive a transcript. Settlement of finan cial accounts must be made at the University Cashier's Office. Each student placed on administrative hold should deter mine from the Office of the Registrar which office placed him/her in this status and clear the obligation with that respective office.

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42 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 199&119 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Student Information Changes recognize this academic honor. Students who are eligible Notifications regarding changes of address, name, resishould contact their College Advising Office for information dency, and citizenship should be filed promptly with the Office of the Registrar. Final Examinations Examinations in academic subjects are, for most courses, an integral part of the learning process and one part of a procedure for evaluating student performance and determining grades . USF requires certain standards for the examination process in order to protect the academic integrity of courses and the best interests of both the student and the instructor. Testing in General: In each academic course, the student is expected to undergo a meaningful testing and evaluation that will reveal the student's intellectual growth in the subject matter covered or otherwise reflect the achievement of the course objectives. The instructor has the responsibility of maintaining a fair and impartial testing and examination procedure, has the right to define and structure the testing process, and shall not be restricted as to form, style or content of the examination. It is the policy of USF that all students facing an examination (of any type) shall have equal advance notice of the form and content of that examination. The University regards the routine use of all or part of the same formal examination for successive academic terms as unsound policy except when used with adequate safeguards such as a random selection of questions from a large pool. Comprehensive Final Examinations: The last 6 days of the Fall and Spring semesters shall be set aside for final examinations, and any comprehensive final examination must be given during this designated period If a segment examina tion is give in lieu of a comprehensive examination, the segment examinatin must hbe given in the period designated during final examination week TaRe-home final examinations, papers, projects, particums, and competency examinations are excep tions to the above rule and may be scheduled for completion at any time at the discretion of the instructor The period of two hours shall be allotted for each final examination. If a student has a direct conflict of scheduled examinations or has three or more examinations scheduled on the same day, the student may petition the appropriate instructor to reschedule one of the student's examinations. The final examination schedule shall be published in the same manner and place as the Schedule of Classes . Honors Convocation The Honors Convocation is designed to recognize degree seeking undergraduate students for high academic perform ance during the previous academic year To be eligible to participate in the Fall Honors Convocation, an undergraduate student must (1) have been enrolled during Fall, Spring, orSummerofthe previous academic year; (2)have completed at least 24 USF graded (A-F) hours during that academic year; (3) have at least a 3.500 USF GPA for those minimum 24 hours; (4) have no incomplete ("I") and (5) be in the the top 10% of the qualified students for the college in which the students is enrolled at the end of Summer Term. Deari's List Full-time undergraduate who demonstrate supe rior academic achievement during one semester will be hon ored on a Dean's List." To be eligible for the Dean's List, a student must be in a "pool" (defined hereafter) and must complete 12 hours of. graded (A-F) USF courses with no incomplete grades during the semester. The "pool" consists of all students who have registered foi'_at least 12 hours of USF courses in a given semester The Dean's List shall consist of the fewer of: 1) the upper 10% of the enrollment of the college or 2) students in the college with a USF 3.5 GPA or above (ties at the 90th percentile will be included in the honors group). The dean of the college in which the student is majoring or the Dean of Undergraduate Studies for undeclared students will Academic Regulations Committee The Academic Regulations Committee (ARC) meets regu larly to i;>etitions by undergraduate students to waive University academic regulations Students must petition and secure approval of the committee to return to the University after having been academically dismissed or to waive academic deadlines. Effective Fall, 1998/99, the University is implementing a statute of limitations on student petitions for retroactive adds, drops, withdrawals, and registration. A student will be limited to two calendar years (six academic semesters/terms) for such appeals whether the student is in attendance or not. The committee normally meets once a week on Tuesday To petition the committee, a student must secure the appropri ate form from the Office of the Registrar and consult with the ARC representative from his/her college prior to submitting the petition form. Completed forms should be returned to the Office of the Registrar no later than the preceding Thursday, to be reviewed at the next week's meeting. Students will receive notification of the committee's action the following week Student Academic Grievance Procedures Student academic grievance procedures exist at USF to provide students the opportunity for objective review of facts and events pertinent to the cause of academic grievances. Such review is accomplished in a collegial non-judicial atmos phere rather than an adversary one and allows the parties involved to participate. An Academic Grievance Committee, composed of an equal number of faculty and student members, exists in each under graduate college for the general purpose of considering student academic grievances and making recommendations based on these considerations to the dean of the college in which the alleged grievance occurred. For information, contact the dean of the college in which the cause of the academic grievance occurred. Academic Dishonesty And Disruption Of Academic Process Students attending USF are awarded degrees in recognition of successful completion of coursework in their chosen fields of study. Each individual is expected to earn his/her degree on the basis of personal effort. Consequently, any form of cheating on examinations or plagiarism on assigned papers constitutes unacceptable deceit and dishonesty. Disruption of the class room or teaching environment is also unacceptable. This can not be tolerated in the University community and will be punish able, according to the seriousness of the offense, in conformity with this rule Plagiarism Plagiarism is defined as "literary theft" and consists of the unattributed quotation of the exact words of a published text, or the unattributed borrowing of original ideas by paraphrase from a published text. On written papers for which the student employs information gathered from books articles, or oral sources, each direct quotation, as well as ideas and facts that are not generally known to the public at large, or the form, structure, or style of a secondary source must be attributed to its author by means of the approP,ri. ate citation procedure. Only widely known facts and first-hand thoughts and observations original to the student do not require citations. Citations may be made in footnotes or within the body of the text. Plagiarism, also, consists of passing off as one's own segments or the total of another person's work. 1. Examples of proper citation (footnote format) are as follows: a. "Plagiarism, from a Latin word meaning 'kidnapping,' ranges from inept paraphrasing to outright theft." 1(Direct quotation] 1Harry Shaw, Concise Dictionary of Literary Terms (McGraw-Hill, 1972), pp. 209-210.

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ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 43 UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 199&'99 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG b. As Harry Shaw states in his Concise Dictionary of Literary Terms, "Plagiarism, from a Latin word meaning 'kidnap ping,' ranges from inept paraphrasing to outright' theft." 1[Direct quotation with an introductory statement citing the source.) 1(McGraw-Hill, 1972), pp. 209-210. c. Plagiarism is literary theft. To emphasize that point, Harry Shaw states that the root of the word comes from the Latin word meaning "kidnapping." 1[Paraphrasing] 1Concise Dictionary of Literary Terms (McGraw-Hill, 1972),' pp 209-210. 2. Examples of proper citation (in body of text): a. Shaw ( 1972) states that the root of the word comes from the Latin word meaning "kidnapping." [Paraphrasing; complete information about source will be cited in a section at the close of the text.] b. Shaw ( 1972) was correct when he stated that "plagiarism, from a Latin word meaning 'kidnapping,' ranges from inept paraphrasing to outright theft." [Quotation; com plete information about source will be cited in a section at the close of the text.] 3 The following are examples of plagiarism because sources are not cited and appropriate quotation marks are not used: a Plagiarism, from a Latin word meaning "kidnapping," ranges from inept paraphrasing to outright theft. b. Plagiarism comes from a Latin word meaning "kidnap ping" and ranges from paraphrasing to theft. c. Plagiarism ranges from inept paraphrasing to outright theft. [Footnoting/citation styles will depend upon those used by different academic disciplines Many disciplines in the Natural Science areas, for example, will cite the sources within the body of the text.] Punishment Guidelines: The student who submitted the subject paper, lab report, etc. shall receive an "F" with a numerical value of z ero on the item submitted, and the "F" shall be used to determine the final course grade. It is the option of the instructor to fail the student in the course. Cheating Cheating is defined as follows: (a) the unauthorized granting or receiving of aid during the prescribed period of a course graded exercise: students may not consult written materials such as notes or books, may not look at the paper of another student, nor consult orally with any other student taking the same test; (b) asking another person to take an examination in his/her place; ( c) taking an examination for or in place of another student; (d) stealing visual concepts, such as drawings, sketch es, diagrams, musical programs and scores, graphs, maps, etc., and presenting them as one's own; (e) stealing, borrowing, buying, or disseminating tests, answer keys or other examina tion material except as officially authorized, research papers, creative papers, speeches, etc. (f) Stealing or copying of computer programs and presenting them as one's own. Such stealing includes the use of another student's program, as obtained from the magnetic media or interactive terminals or from cards, print-out paper, etc. PUNISHMENT GUIDELINES FOR ACADEMIC DISHONESTY: Punishments for academic dishonesty will depend on the seriousness of the offense and may include receipt of an "F" or "Zero" on the subject paper, lab report, etc.; an "F" in the course, suspension or expulsion from the University. The University drop and forgiveness policies shall be revoked for a student accused of academic dishonesty. The internal transcript of a student who is awarded an "F" for academic dishonesty will read "FF." a. For observation of or exchanging test information with other students during the course of a classroom test, the students who receive or give such information may receive an "F" with a numerical value of zero on the test, and the "F" shall be used to determine the final course grade. It is the option of the instructor to fail the student in the course. b. For the use of any prohibited device, such as a cheat sheet, recording, calculator if forbidden on exam, etc., during the course of a classroom test to assist the student or other students, the student using such prohibited device may receive an "F" in the course. c. For the use of another student, a stand-in, to take an examination for the enrolled student, it is suggested that the enrolled student receive an "F" in the course and be sus pended from school for one year and that the stand-in, if a University student, be suspended from school for one year d. For stealing, borrowing, or buyiog of research papers, crea tive works speeches or tests and other exam materials, or the dissemination of such materials, or the manipulation of recorded grades in a grade book or other class records, the student, if enrolled in the course, may receive an "F" in the course and may be expelled from the University. e. It is suggested that students who receive or give stolen computer programs receive an "F" with a numerical value of zero on the program or programs, and the "F" be used to determine the final course grade. It is the option of the instructor to fail the student in the course. Disruption of Academic Process Disruption of academic process is defined as the act or words of a student in a classroom or teaching environment which in the reasonable estimation of a faculty member: (a) directs attention from the academic matters at hand, such as noisy distractions; persistent, disrespectful or abusive interrup tions of lecture, exam or academic discussions, or (b) presents a danger to the health, safety or well being of the faculty member or students. PUNISHMENT GUIDELINES FOR DISRUPTION OF ACADEMIC PROCESS: Punishments for disruption of academic process will depend on the seriousness of the disruption and will range from a private verbal reprimand to dismissal from class with a final grade df "W," if the student is passing the course, shown on the student record. If the student is not passing, agrade of"F"will be shown on the student record Procedures for Ha11dling Student Violations Involving Alleged Academic Dishonesty And Disruption Of Academic Process Alleged violations of academic dishonesty or alleged disrup tions of academic process will be handled initially by the instructor, who will discuss the incident with the student. It must be noted that the Faculty Senate considers the traditional relationship between student and faculty member as the primary means of settling disputes that may arise. If the instructor observes the alleged dishonesty occurring during an examina tion, he/she should, with discretion notify the student of the fact before the student leaves the examination. In all cases, the instructor must attempt to schedule a meeting with the student to discuss the alleged dishonesty or disruptions. After the discussion, if the student and instructor have reached a mutual agreement as to the solution, the instructor shall file a statement with the chairperson of the department or equivalent, e.g. campus dean, responsible for the course out lining the facts of the incident and the agreed-upon solution signed by both the instructor and student. A copy of this statement shall begiventothestudent. lfnosolution is reached, the matter should be referred to the chairperson of the depart ment or the equivalent, e.g. campus dean, for attempt at resolution. If no resolution is reached, the matter should be referred to the dean of the college for attempt at resolution If no solution is reached, the dean shall appoint a student/faculty committee consisting of an equal number of students and faculty to hear the two sides of the incident and to advise the dean regarding the disposition of the case. Academic Committee Pre-Hearing Procedure. Within a rea sonable time following the failure of the student/instructor/dean meetings to bring about a solution, and in no event later than

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44 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 19981119 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG three (3) months after such failure, the dean shall cause formal General Education Requirements* charges to be filed with the appointed academic committee The English Composition Semester Hours 6 6 6 6 6 3 i;harged student shall be provided a written notice of charges Quantitative Methods in sufficient detail to prepare for the hearing, no less than three Natural Sciences (3) days before the hearing except in cases of emergency as Social Sciences specified below. Historical Perspectives Hearings Emergency Hearings. An expedited emergency hearing may be held before an academic administrator appointed by the dean or by the appointed academic committee in cases which involve the safety health or welfare of any student or staff member. Non-Emergency Hearing before the Academic Com mittee Generaf Principles Burden of Proof. The burden of proof shall be on the complainant. The standard of proof for decision shall be "sub stantial evidence," that is, whether it is reasonable to conclude from the evidence submitted that the student did commit the violations for which he/she has been charged and shall not be the strict criminal law standard of proof beyond a reasonable doubt. Recqrd The proceedings of all hearings shall be recorded Inspection of Evidence. The student may inspect the evi dence which will be presented against him/her. Present Evidence The student may presenr evidence on his/her own behalf Question Witnesses. The student may hear and question adverse witnesses Self-Incrimination The student shall not be forced to present testimony which would be self-incriminating Advisor The student may have an advisor of his/her choice present; however the role of such a person is as an advisor to the student only The advisor may speak to and consult with the student but may not serve as the student's advocate, question witnesses or otherwise participate in the proceedings Decision Based on Evidence. The decision of the academic committee or appointed academic administrator shall be based solely on the evidence presented at the hearing Decision in Writing. The decision of the academic committee or appointed academic administrator, including findings of fact and a determination of penalty or sanction if any, shall be presented to the student in writing within a reasonable period of time following the hearing. Enrollment Status. The student's enrollment status will re main unchanged pending final decision except in c;ases of emergency, as described above If the issue remains open at the end of the semester, the instructor shall give the student an "I" grade in the course until all issues are resolved Closed Hearings. All hearings shall be closed unless specifi cally requested otherwise in writing by the charged student prior to the hearing. Failure to Appear. If a student against whom charges have been made fails to appear, the academic committee or academ ic administrator may proceed in his/her absence Hearing on Appeal. The charged student may appeal the decision of the academic committee or appointed academic administrator within thirty (30) working days of decision to the Dean of Undergraduate Studies or the Dean of the Graduate $chool, whichever is appropriate The record of the initial hearing may be considered on appeal and.the student is entitled to access the record when appealing The decision of the Dean of Undergraduate Studies or the Dean of the Graduate School is final. Liberal Arts Requirements All new USF students and Former Students Returning are required to take 45 semester tiours to satisfy the complete arts requirements. Thirty-six (36) semester hours will satisfy the general education course requirements and 9 se mester hours will satisfy the exit requirements. These require ments are distributed as follows: Fine Arts African, Latin American Middle Eastern or Asian Perspectives Requirements* 3 36 Major Works and Major Issues 6 Literature and Writing 3 *Courses may be certifed in more than one area but students may use each course in only one (1) area. Courses in the liberal arts requirements should incorporate the following components whenever they are relevant to the specific discipline: the learning skills of conceptual thinking analytical thinking, creative thinking, written expression, oral expression, and the dimensions of values and ethics interna tional perspecitves, environmental perspectives race and ethnicity, and gender. When warranted by the sub1ect matter, each course must incorporate consideration of at least one of the dimensions and one of the thinking skills to meet the liberal arts requirements. Departments should ensure that courses proposed for the liberal arts have sufficient depth and breadth. These courses will share the substantive rigor and intellectual challenge of courses offered for major credit, with the specific feature of offering an integrative perspective of the discipline and its relationship to academia as a whole. Additionally, such courses will encourage majors to interact with students from other disciplinary backgrounds Whenever possible, courses will encourage creativity and discipline in the written and oral uses of language The writing experience for students will emphasize the qualitative aspects of developing writing skills Writing requirements will entail substantive feedback for students rather than merely the cor rection of spelling and punctuation. The goal is to include a writing component in all appropriate liberal arts course require ments, even if this component is not equivalent to the Gordon Rule requirement. Courses will also encourage the develop ment of oral expression skills : Students should be given oppor tunities to improve the ability to express ideas orally, and to listen and comprehend with the ear and eye attuned to both verbal and non-verbal forms of communication Oral skills can be enhanced by employing active learning techniques such as student presentations, instructor-student dialogues debates and discussion groups. It is essential that the information about the dimensions of values and ethics international perspectives, environmental perspectives, race and ethnicity and gender be integrated whenever possible, throughout courses included in the new requirements ratherthan provided as a separate set of lectures or activities. While a particular course may emphasize only one or two of these themes, the liberal arts requirement in its entirety will have a significant portion of its course content devoted to these dimensions This requirement may necessitate a revision of the ways in which many courses are taught. The University is committed to supporting faculty as they prepare to teach these new aspects of the curriculum. Opportunities for faculty workshops will be made available through the Center for Teaching Enhancement. A student's liberal arts education will continue throughouttt:ie college years and not be limited to a relatively small number of required courses in the first two years of college Exit require ments will provide students with an opportunitx during their junior and senior yea.rs at USF to integrate their. within the context of.liberal arts. Courses that satisfy the exrt requirements will where appropriate incorporate consider ations of values and ethics; international and environmental perspectives; race and ethnicity ; and gender. By their junior and senior years, students will have a foundation in liberal arts and

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ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 45 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG be better able to reflect upon ethical issues in a constructive Civilization. Courses are not limited to those in the discipline of way. history; however, the courses will a historical perspective In the major works and major issues courses students will in that they provide students with a sense of the evolution of b!Jild upon the principles concepts, and knowledge acquired in societies and peoples including analysis of their history A lower-divisioncour5es. Themajorworksstrengthentheirknowlsense of chronology is necessary in these courses, but not edge of disciplines related to their majors or careers or to sufficient. A historical perspective also entails analyses of develop depth and/or breadth in areas of interest that are not various elements, such as the intellectual, cultural, artistic, necessarily related to their majors. economic, social, political, and religious characteristics of soci The literature and writing requirement is intended to provide eties and peoples an opportunity for students to continue their liberal arts educaFine Arts: Students are required to successfully complete a tion by allowing students to read significant literature of the minimum of three (3) semester hours of approved coursework world and write at least 6,000 words . in the fine arts Courses in the fine arts shall involve those All exit requirement courses will be seminar-size courses in disciplines considered to be fine arts in that they deal theoretwhich enrollment will be targeted at approximately 20 to 25 ically and experientially with the aesthetic dimensions of indistudents. These courses will be taught by regular faculty viduals and groups Courses will concern the creative experiGENERAL EDUCATION COURSE REQUIREMENTS (36 Semester Hours) English Composition: This requirement consists of a mini mum of six (6) semester hours of approved course work in English Composition. Students may satisfy this requirement during the second semester freshman level of composition in the following ways: by earning a letter grade of "C" or better at USF or another institution, by obtaining a sufficient score on the CLEP Freshman English test, or by receiving AP English credit. With the exception of the CLEP test, these courses will also allow students to meet a portion of their State of Florida rule 6A10 30 Gordon Rule requirements To satisfy the Gordon Rule students must earn a letter grade of "C" or better in these courses Quantitative Methods: Competence in a minimum of six (6) semester hours of approved mathematics coursework at the level of college algebra or higher is required. These courses sh6uld include both a practical component, providing students with an appreciation of how course content relates to their everyday experiences; and a historical component, providing students wih an understanding of the application of the material to other disciplines. At least three (3) semester hours must be taken in a mathematics department. The remaining hours may be taken in any approved mathematics statistics, or logic courses that include both a practical and historical component as previously described. Natural Sciences: Students should successfully complete a minimum of six (6) semester hours of approved coursework in the natural sciences Students are encouraged to enroll in courses with a laboratory component. It is a goal that all students have at least one science course with a laboratory; however, facilities and personnel resources prohibit that re quirement at this time Courses may be interdisciplinary. The courses may deal with the content theories, history, presuppo sitions, and methods of the discipline They will include demon strations and address problems ambiguit i es and different perspectives in the discipline. They will also provide students with an appreciation of how the discipline fits within the natural sciences and relates to their own lives and the broader human experience. Social Sciences: Students must successfully complete a minimum of six (6) se.mester hours of approved coursework in the social sciences; the courses may be interdisciplinary and need not be sequential. Courses in the social sciences shall involve those disciplines considered to be social sciences in that they deal theoretically and empirically with individuals and their relationships to each other and to society. Courses must deal with the content, theories, history, presuppositions and methods of the discipline. They should also address problems ambiguities, and different perspectives in the discipline These courses will provide students with an apprec i ation of how the discipline fits within the social sciences and relates to their own lives and the broader human experience Historical Perspectives : A minimum of six (6) semester hours of approved coursework in artistic, cultural economic intellectual, religious, social, and/or political history i s required At leastthree (3) semester hours will be in the history of Western ence that takes into account the perspectives of both the artist and the public. They may be interdisciplinary and must involve the content, theories, history, presuppositions, and methods of the fine arts. They will add.ress problems, ambiguities, and different perspectives in the disc i plines of fine arts These courses will also provide students with an appreciation of how the disciplines fit within fine arts and relate to their everyday experiences African, Latin American, Middle Eastern, or Asian Per spectives: Students will take a minimum of three (3) semester hours of approved coursework in one of the above listed geographical areas. Course content may include social, politi cal and economic as well as artistic cultural, and intellectual subject matter. The material will be presented within a geo graphical chronological and/or humanities background and will necessarily be selective All courses listed are certified as meeting the General Education requirement as of April, 1997 Additional courses may have been certified since that date. Please consult with an academic advisor for current and additional information. GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIR EMENT ENGLISH COMPOSITION ENC 1101 Freshman English I -6A ENC 1102 Freshman English II -6A ENC 11.21 Freshman English I: Honors -6A ENC Freshman English II: Honors -6A QUANTITATIVE METHODS MAC 2102 College Algebra -6A MAC 2132 College Algebra and Trigonometry-6A MAC 2230 Business Calculus -6A MAC 2233 Elementary Calculus I -6A MAC 2234 Elementary Calculus II -6A MAC 2281 Engineering Calculus I -6A MAC 2282 Engineering Calculus II -6A MAC 2311 Calculus I -6A MAC 2312 Calculus II -6A MGF 2131 Chaos and Fractals -6A MGF 2202 Finite Mathematics -6A MGF 3301 Bridge to Abstract Mathematics -6A PHI 2100 Introduction to Formal Logic -6A QMB 2100 Business and Economic Statistics I -6A ST A 2022 Basic Statistics -6A STA 2023 Introductory Statistics I -6A STA 2122 Social Science Statistics 6A NATURAL SCIENCES ANT 3511 Biological Anthropology ANT 4583 Prehistoric Human Evolution AST 2005 Astronomy of the Solar System AST 2006 Stellar Astronomy and Cosmology AST 3033 Contemporary Thinking in Astronomy BMS 4402 Principles of Human Pharmacology BSC 1005 Biological Principles for Non-Majors BSC 2010 Biology I Cellular Processes

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46 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG BSC 2011 Biology II Diversity BSC 2022 Biology of Aging BSC 2025 Food: Personal and Global Perspectives BSC 2030 Save the Planet: Environmental Sciences BSC 2035 Sex and Today's World BSC 2050 Environment CHM 2021 Chemistry For Today CHM 2041 General Chemistry I CHM 2046 General Chemistry II GEO 2371 Introduction to Earth Systems Science GL Y 2010 Dy,namic Earth: Introduction to Physical Geology GL Y 2030 Environmental Geology GL Y 2040 Origins: From the Big Bang to the Ice Age GL Y 2050 Science, Earth and Life GLY 2100 History of the Earth and Life GL Y 3038 Earth and Environmental Systems OCE 2001 Introduction to Oceanography PHY 2020 Conceptual Physics PHY 2038 Energy and Humanity SOCIAL SCIENCES AFA 4150 Africa and the United States -6A AFS 3251 Environmental Cultural Study in Africa AMS 2030 Introduction to American Studies AMS 3601 Material Culture and American Society AMS 3700 Racism in American Society ANT 2000 Introduction to Anthropology ANT 2410 Cultural Anthropology ANT 3100 Archaeology ANT 3610 Anthropological Linguistics ASH 3404 Modem China ASN 3012 Japan Today ASN 3105 The Pacific Century CCJ 3003 Crime and Justice in America CCJ 3024 Survey of the Criminal Justice System CLP 3003 Psychology of Adjustment COM 2000 Introduction to Communication CPO 2002 Introduction to Comparative Politics CPO 4034 Politics of the Developing Areas CPO 4204 Government and Politics in Africa DEP 3103 Child Psychology ECO 1000 Basic Economics ECO 2013 Economic Principles (Macroeconomics) ECO 2023 Economic Principles (Microeconomics) EUS 3000 Europe EUS 3022 Russia GEA 2000 Global Geography GEB 2350 Doing Business Around the World GEO 1930 Geography of Current Events GEY 3000 Introduction to Gerontology GEY 3625 Sociocultural Aspects of Aging -6A HSC 2100 Contemporary Health Science INP 2101 Applied Psychology INR 1015 World Perspective INR 3038 International Wealth and Power INR 3084 International Terrorism INR 4250 The Political Economy of the Southern Nations INR 4403 International Law INR 4502 International Organizations MMC 3602 Mass Communication and Society PAD 3003 Introduction to Public Administration PHI 1103 Critical Thinking PHI 3601 Contemporary Moral Issues PHI 3640 Environmental Ethics PHI 3700 Philosophy of Religion -6A POS 2080 The American Political Tradition PSY 2012 An Introduction to Contemporary Psychology PSY 3022 Contemporary Problems in Psychology PSY 3044 Experimental Psychology REL 311 t The Religious Quest In Contemporary Films -6A REL 3170 Religion, Ethics and Society Through Film -6A REL 3330 The Religions of India REL 3600 Introduction to Judaism -6A SOP 3742 Psychology of Women SOW 3203 Ame'ric::an Social Welfare System SPA 3002 Introduction to Disorders of Speech and Language SPC 2541 Persuasion SPC 2600 Public Speaking SPC 3301 Interpersonal Communication SPC 3712 Communication and Cultural Diversity SYG 2000 Introduction to Sociology SYG 2010 Contemporary Social Problems SYP 3000 Social Psychology WST 2380 Human Sexual Behavior WST 3010 Introduction to Women's Studies WST 3011 Issues iri Feminism HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES AFA 4150 Afilca and the United States -6A AFH 3100 African History to 1850 AFH 3200 African History since 1850 AMH 2010 American History I AMH 2020 American History II AMH 3571 African American History to 1865 AMH 3572 African American History Since 1865 AML 3453 Historical Perspectives in Early American Literature and Culture AMS 2030 Introduction to American Studies AMS 2201 Colonial American Culture AMS 2212 Nineteenth Century American Culture AMS 2270 Twentieth Century American Culture AMS 3001 American Culture 1880-1915 -6A AMS 3210 Regions of Ameriea AMS 3260 American Culture 1830-1860 -6A AMS 3370 Southern Women: Myth and Reality -6A AMS 3601 Material Culture and American Society AMS 3700 Racism in American Society ARH 2050 History of Visual Arts I ARH 2051 History of Visual Arts II ARH 3001 Introduction to Art -6A ASH 3404 Modem China ASN 3105 The Pacific Century CLA 3103 Greek Civilization CLA 3123 Roman Civilization CL T. 3370 Classical Mythology EGN 2031 History ofTechnology ENL 3323 Shakespeare from an Historical Perspective EUH 2011 Ancient History 1 EUH 2012 Ancient l:"listory 11. EUH 202 1 Medieval .I EUH 2022 Medieval History II EUH 2030 Modem European History I EUH 2031 Modem European History II EUS 3022 Russia GEA 2000 Global Geography HUM 2211 Studies in Culture: The Classical Through Medieval Periods HUM 2243 Studies in Culture: The Renaissance Through the Twentieth Century HUM 3251 Studies in Culture : The Twentieth Century LAH 2020 Latin American Civilization LAH 2734 Latin American History in Film LIT 2000 Introduction to Literature -6A LIT 2010 Introduction to Fiction -6A LIT 2030 Introduction to Poetry -6A LIT 2040 lntroouction to Drama -6A LIT 3022 Modem Short Novel LIT 3144 Modem European Novel LIT 3144 Modem European Novel LIT 3155 20th Century Literature MMC 3602 Communication and Society MUL 2111 Introduction to Music Literature .:t>A PHH 2000 Introduction to Philosophy -6A PHP 3786 Existentialism -6A POS 2080 The American Political Tradition REL 2300 Introduction to World Religions -6A REL 2306 Contemporary World Religions REL 3111 The Religious Quest In Contemporary Films -6A cg'

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ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 47 UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 199&119 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG REL 3170 Religion, Ethics and Society Through Film -6A REL 3362 Introduction to Islam -6A REL 3367 Islam in the Modem World -6A REL 3501 History of Christianity -6A REL 3600 Introduction to Judaism -6A SPC 3230 Rhetorical Theory SPC 3631 Rhetoric of the Sixties WST 2309 The Female Experience in America WST 321 O Women in Western Civilization I -6A WST 3220 Women in Western Civilizations II FINE ARTS AFS 3251 Environmental Cultural Study in Africa ARH 2050 History of Visual Arts I ARH 2051 History of Visual Arts II ARH 3001 Introduction to Art -6A ART 2201C Fabrications DAN 2100 Introduction to Dance -6A FIL 2001 Film: Language of Vision -6A FIL 3510 World Cinema -6A HUM 2024 The Arts IDS 3662 Arts Connections MUH 2051 Folk and Traditional Music of World Cultures MUH 2632 Music in the United States MUH 3016 Survey of Jazz MUL 2011 The Enjoyment of Music MUL 2111 Introduction to Music Literature -6A MUL 3001 Issues in Music MUL 3012 The Enjoyment of Music ALAMEA PERSPECTIVES AFA 2000 Introduction to the Black Experience in Africa and Its Diaspora -6A AFA 4150 Africa and the United States -6A AFH 3100 African History to 1850 AFH 3200 African History since 1850 AFS 2250 Culture and Society in Africa -6A AFS 3251 Environmental Cultural Study in Africa ANT 2000 Introduction to Anthropology ANT 2410 Cultural Anthropology ANT 3005 The Anthropological Perspective ASH 3404 Modem China ASN 3014 China Today ASN 3030 The Middle East ASN 3105 The Pacific Century CPO 4034 Politics of the Developing Areas CPO 4204 Government and Politics in Africa EUS 3022 Russia GEA 2000 Global Geography GEY 3625 Sociocultural Aspects of Aging -6A HUM 3271 Eastern & Western Culture From Antiquity to 1400 HUM 3273 Eastern and Western Culture Since 1400 INR 1015 World Perspective INR 3084 International Terrorism INR 4250 The Political Economy of the Southern Nations INR 4502 International Organizations LAH 2020 Latin American Civilization LAH 2734 Latin American History in Film LAS 3116 Latin America Through Film MUH 2051 Folk and Traditional Music of World Cultures MUL 3001 Issues in Music REL 3330 The Religions of India REL 3362 Introduction to Islam -6A REL 3367 Islam in the Modem World -6A REL 3600 Introduction to Judaism -6A SPT 2524 Women Writers of Latin America SYD 3441 Peasant Perspectives WST 3010 Introduction to Women's Studies EXIT REQUIREMENTS (9 Semester Hours) Major Works and Major Issues: A portion of the exit requirements consists of a minimum of six (6) semester hours of approved coursework concerning major works and major issues. Courses will focus on major issues, documents, or works, and will allow students to read primary texts. These courses may allow students to delve into topics on an interdis ciplinary basis Students will be encouraged to write enough to fulfill Gordon Rule requirements At least one of the Major Works and Major Issues courses will be taken outside the student's major discipline( s) and may, with the consent of the instructor, be taken for S/U credit. The major works and major issues of the discipline will be decided by the department offering the course. For purposes of this document, the term "discipline" refers to the following fields: business, education, engineering, fine arts, health sciences, letters natural sciences, and social sciences Major Works and Major Issues courses must offer the opportunity for integration of content. These courses will have a liberal arts content and, when appropriate, will contain in depth discussions of values and ethics, international and envi ronmental perspectives race and ethnicity and gender Courses may be interdisciplinary and may be team taught. This will provide students with an opportunity to explore, in-depth and on an interdisciplinary basis major topics that are important but outside of the major field of study. Literature and Writing: In addition, students will take three (3) semester hours of approved exit requirement coursework in literature and writing. These courses will allow students to read significant literature ofthe world and write at least 6,000 words. Significance of the literature will be determined by the depart ment offering the course The 6,000-word requirement meets Gordon Rule requirements and is for students who may wish to satisfy some of this requirement with upper-level courses. The writing requirement may be satisfied with assignments that include, for instance, revision and rewriting, and process writ ing. This requirement may be satisfied through comparitive literature courses. These literature courses need not be limited to the English Department. The course may be taken within the major if appropriate. The courses will focus on the dimensions of values and ethics, international and environmental perspec tives, race and ethnicity, and gender All students must achieve an overall average of"C" (2.0GPA) in the lower level requirements and a grade of "C" or better in each of the exit requirement courses. Students will take at least one of the Major Works and Major Issues courses outside their discipline(s) This course may be taken for S/U credit, with the consent of the instructor. Only courses numbered 3000 or above may be used to satisfy the exit requirements. Exit requirements must be taken at USF. Although post-secondary foreign language courses may not be required for all graduates, students are encouraged to become competent in at least one foreign language. Foreign language study enriches the command of English, enlarges cultural perspective and enhances learning skills All courses listed are certified as meeting the Exit require ment as of April, 1997. Additional courses may have been certified since that date Please consult with an academic advisor for current and additional information. EXIT REQUIREMENT COURSES MAJOR WORKS AND MAJOR ISSUES AFA 4335 Black Women in America -6A AMS 4804 Major Ideas in America ANT 4172 Historical Archaeology -6A ANT 4241 Magic and Religion -6A ANT 4302 Sex Roles in Cross-Cultural Perspective ANT 4316 Ethnic Diversity in the United States ANT 4324 Mexico and Central America ANT 4340 The Caribbean -6A ANT 4432 The Individual and Culture -6A ARC 4 784 The City -6A ARH 4455 Modem Political Iconography ARH 4710 History of Photography -6A

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48 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG BSC 4057 Environmental Issues BSC 4850 Sociobiology CCJ 4934 Seminar in Criminology -6A CES 4000 Structures and Urban Environment for Non-Engineers -6A CGN 4122 Engineering Contracts, Specifications and Ethics CHM 4070 Historical Perspectives in Chemistry -6A CIS 4250 Ethical Issues and Professional Conduct -6A CL T 3101 Greek Literature in Translation -6A CL T 3102 Roman Literature in Translation -6A. COM 4030 Women and Communication -6A ECO 3703 International Economics ECO 4323 Marxist Political Economy ECP 3201 The Economics of Women and Work ECP 3302 Environmental Economics ECS 4003 Comparative Economic Systems EDF 3228 Human Behavior and Environmental Selection -6A EDF 3542 Philosophy of Education EDF 3604 Social Foundations of Education EGN 4831 Technology & Society EIN 4365 Facilities Design II EML 4551 Capstone Design EVR 4027 Wetland Environments EVT 4651 Equity in Schools and the Workplace -6A GEB 4890 Business Policy GEO 4372 Global Conservation -6A GEO 4470 Political Geography GEO 4604 Advanced Urban Geography GET 3100 German Literature in English Translation GL Y 4045 Moons, Planets and Meteors: An Introduction to Planetary Science GLY 4154 Geology and Development of Modem Africa GLY 4734 Beaches and Coastal Environments HIS 3308 War and Society HIS 4936 Pro-Seminar in History HUM 4938 Major Issues in the Humanities IDS 3115 Values and Choices-6A IDS 3663 Critical Issues Affecting the Arts -6A INR 3018 World Ideologies INR 3033 International Political Cultures INR 4089 Conflict in the World INR 4254 Africa in World Affairs INR 4936 Senior Seminar ISS 4935 Seminar in Social Sciences LIT 3103 Great Literature of the World -6A LIT 3301 Cultural Studies and the Popular Arts -6A LIT 337 4 Bible as Literature LIT 3383 The Image of Women in Literature -6A LIT 3451 Literature and the Occult -6A LIT 4386 British and American Literature by Women -6A LIT 4804 Literature as Cultural Study MHF 4403 The Early History of Mathematics -6A MHS 4052 Human Relations Skills in Counseling MUH 3301 Music History/Baroque and Classic MUH 3302 Music History/Romantic and 20th Century MUH 4058 lntercultural Music in the Twentieth Century NUR 3829 Ethical Legal Aspects in Nursing and Health Care NUR 4194 An Interdisciplinary Perspective on HIV -6A PHH 4600 Contemporary Philosophy -6A PHH 4700 American Philosophy-6A PHI 4073 African Philosophy PHI 4300 Theory of Knowledge -6A PHI 4320 Philosophy of Mind 6A PHI 4632 Feminist Ethics PHI 4800 Aesthetics -6A PHM 4120 Major Black Thinkers PHM 4322 Ancient and Medieval Political Philosophy -6A PHM 4331 Modem Political Philosophy-6A PH M 4340 Contemporary Political Philosophy -6A PHP 4000 Plato -6A PHP 4010 Aristotle -6A PHP 4788 Philosophy of Marxism -6A PHY 4031 Great Themes in Physics -6A POS 4694 Women and Law II -6A POT 4661 The Politics of Identity, Difference and Inequality PUP 4323 Women and Politics -6A REL 3114 Comedy Tragedy and Religion -6A REL 3155 Life After Death -6A REL 3280 Biblical Archeology REL 3561 Roman Catholicism -6A REL 3602 Classics of Judaism -6A REL 3613 Modem Judaism -6A REL 4113 The Hero and Religion -6A REL 4133 Mormonism in America REL 4171 Contemporary Christian Ethics -6A REL 4221 Who Wrote the Bible(Genesis-Kings)-6A REL 4626 Reason in Religion: Talmudic Logic REL 4670 Judaism and Christianity After the Holocaust -6A RUT 3110 Russian Classics in English -6A RUT 3111 20th-Century Russian Literature in English -6A SCE 4237 Science, Technology and Society Interactions -6A SPA 4050 Introduction to the Clinical Process SPC 4201 Oral Tradition SPC 4714 Communication, Culture and Community SSE 4380 Global and Multicultural Perspectives Education SYA 4935 Senior Seminar SYO 4430 Disability and Society THE 3110 Theatre History THE 4180 Theatre Origins -6A THE 4320 Theatre of Myth & Ritual/Northern European & Oriental -6A THE 4330 Shakespeare for the Theatre -6A THE 4401 O'Neill and After -6A THE 4435 Theatre of Pluralism -6A I THE 4562 Contemporary Performance Theatre -6A WST 4260 Research Issues on Women of Color -6A WST 4310 Feminism in America -6A WST 4342 Classics in Feminist Theory WST 4350 Women and Science LITERATURE AND WRITING AML 3604 African-American Literature -6A EEC 4008 Literature in Early Childhood Education -6A EEX 4742 Narrative Perspectives on Exceptionality: Cultural and Ethical Issues -6A LAE 4414 Literature in Childhood Education -6A LAE 4464 Adolescent Literature for Middle & Secondary Students -6A LIT 3073 Contemporary Literature -6A LIT 3103 Great Literature of the World -6A LIT 3301 Cultural Studies and the Popular Arts -6A LIT 3383 The Image of Womer:i in Literature -6A LIT 3451 Literature and the Occult -6A LIT 4386 British and American Literature by Women -6A NUR 4194 An Interdisciplinary Perspective on HIV -6A POT 4109 Politics and Literature -6A REL 3613 Modem Judaism -6A REL 4221 Who Wrote the B i ble(Genesis-Kings)-6A REL 4670 Judaism and Christianity After the Holocaust -6A RUT 311 O Russian Classics in English -6A RUT 3111 20th Century Russian Literature in English -6A SYA 3310 Qualitative Inquiry -6A THE 4330 Shakespeare for the Theatre -6A THE 4360 The 19th Century Theatre Revolution -6A THE 4442 The Comedy of the Classic & Neoclassic Stage-6A WST 4262 Literature by American Women of Color -6A WST 4263 Third World Women Writers 6A "Outside the Discipline" Major Works & Major Issues Liberal Arts Exit Courses Outside the discipline in Major Works and Major lsues courses is defined as outside a cluster of departments or programs. Students with majors from one cluster must take at least one certified Liberal Arts Exit course from any of the other clusters identified below Cluster 1: Arts & Letters Students with majors in these programs must take at least one certified Majors Works & Major Issues course in Clusters 2-8

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ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 49 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG American Studies Humanities Classics & Classical Italian Languages Liberal Studies Communication Mass Communications English Philosophy French Religious Studies German Russian Spanish Cluster 2: Natural Sciences -Students with majors in these programs must take at least one certified Majors Works and Majors Issues courses in Clusters 1 or 3-8 Biology Interdisciplinary Natural Chemistry Sciences Environmental Science Mathematics and Policy Medical Technology Geology Microbiology Phyics Cluster 3: Social Sciences -Students with majors in these programs must take at least one certified Majors Works & Major Issues course in Clusters 1 or 2 or 4-8. Africana Studies Interdisciplinary Social Anthropology Sciences Criminology International Studies Economics Political Science (Social Sciences) Psychology Geography Social Work Sociology History Women s Studies Cluster 4: Business -Students with majors in these programs must take at lealstone certified Major Works & Major Issues course in Clusters 1-3 or 5-8. Accounting Economics (Business) Finance General Business Management Information Systems Management Marketing Administration Cluster 5 : Engineering -Students with majors in these pro grams must take at least one certified Major Works & Major Issues course in Clusters 1-4 or 6-8. Eng!neering Industrial & Management C1v1I Engmeenng Engineering Computer Engineering Information Systems Computer Science (Engineering) Engin.eering Mechanical Engineering Engmeenng Science Cluster 6: Fine Arts -Students with majors in these programs must take at least one certified Major Works & Major Issues course in Clusters 1-5 or 7-8. Art Art History Theatre Dance Cluster 7: Education -Students with majors in these programs must take at least one certified Major Works & Major Issues course in Clusters 1-6 or 8. Behavior Disorders Industrial-Technical Business and Office Education Education Mathematics Education Distributive Education Mental Retardation Education Early Childhood Education Physical Education Elementary Education Science Education English Education Social Studies Education Foreign Languages Specific Leaming Education Disabilities Education Cluster 8: Nursing -Nursing majors must take at least one certified Major Works and Major lsues course in Cluster 1-7 Exceptions to the Cluster Rule -For the degree programs below, the "outside the discipline criterion is met differently. Art Education -A certified course from either Education or Fine Arts Cluster can meet criterion. Drama Education -A certified course from either Education or Fine Arts Cluster can meet criterion Dance Education -a certified course from either Education or Fine Arts Cluster can meet criterion Music Educat ion -a certified course from either Education or Fine Arts Cluster can meet criterion Freshman English Requirement All first-time-in-college students are required to take Fresh man English (a sequential two-semester course of study) in accordance with the following conditions : 1. First-time-enrolled students (a}who do not intend to take the CLEP Freshman English Test or(b)who have been notified of failing CLEP prior to registration and who do not intend to attempt the exam a second time must take ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 sequentially If a student fails the first course he/ she must repeat it before proceeding to the next Freshman Students should normally take these cours es dunng year, but courses are high demand and 1t 1s possible that registration space will not always be available 2 First-time-enrolled students (a) who have not taken CLEP prior to their arrival on campus or (b )who have failed but wish to repeat the test should attempt CLEP during their first nine (9) weeks During thi s semester they should not enroll in ENC 1101. If a student either fails or doesn t attempt the CLEP examination during his/her first nine (9) weeks the student normally should take ENC 1101 in the following semester In this case the student will normally complete the sequence by the first semester of his/her sophomore year These policies do not apply to first-time-enrolled students who can meet the Freshman English requirement with credit transferred from another institution or those with appropriate AP English credit. Credit by Examination A student who feels he/she has already acquired the basic content of a course on his/her approved schedule should inquire about credit-by-examination. Some exams are offered through the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) and others may be offerep within departments Interested students should obtain additional information from their advisors or the Office of Evaluation and Testing Graduation Requirements Baccalaureate Degree University Requirements University minimum requirements for graduation consist of the following: earn a minimum of 120 semester hours with an overall 2.00 GPA including a 2 00 GPA in all courses attempted at USF ; a tr!'lnsfer student must have a GPA of 2 0 or higher com.bmed with all work attempted at other institutions; complete CLAST and the writing and computation course requirements of6A-10.30; earn a minimum of 40 semes ter hours of upper-level work (courses numbered 3000 and above); Liberal Arts requirements; complete resirequirement; complete program requirements as deter mined by the college; and be recommended for graduation by the dean of the appropriate college The requirements must be met by every student upon whom a degree is conferred. The total number of semester hours needed to complete the bacca laureate degree depends upon the academic major field of study No grades may be changed following graduation All students entering USF with fewer than 60 semester hours of credit are required to earn at least 9 semester hours of credit prior to graduation by attendance during one or more summer The University may waive the application of this rule m cases of unusual hardship to the individual. (See Summer Enrollment Requirement below ) Summer Enrollment Requirement stated effective September 1, 1976 all students entenng USF with fewer than 60 semester hours of credit are required to earn at least 9 semester hours of credit prior to

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50 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG graduation by attendance during one or more summer semes ters. The University may waive the application of this rule in cases of unusual hardship. A student who wishes to have the rule waived must complete a "Request for Waiver of Mandatory Summer Enrollment Form" available in the Office of the Registrar After submission of the form to the Office of the Registrar, the student will be notified by mail of the action taken. The requirement may be fulfilled only by attending one of the universities in the State University System. They are: University of South Florida, Tampa; Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, Tallahassee; Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton; Florida Gulf Coast University Fort Myers; Florida International University, Miami; Florida State University, Tallahassee; Uni versity of Central Florida, Orlando; University of Florida, Gainesville; University of North Florida, Jacksonville; and Uni versity of West Florida, Pensacola. Foreign Language Graduation Requirement for B.A. Students In addition to the foreign language entrance requirement (as required by FS 240.233) all students applying for a Bachelor of Arts degree from USF must demonstrate competency in a foreign language. To demonstrate this competency, students may take either two semesters of a beginning college-level foreign language or one semester of a higher-level course and earn a letter grade of "C" (no "S" grades) or above in the appr:opriate level course or demonstrate equivalent compe tency by passing an examination. Languages should be se lected from among the ones listed below: Classical Languages Greek (Ancient) Hebrew (Classical) Greek (New Testament) Latin Modern Languages Arabic Hebrew (Modem) Portuguese Chinese Italian Russian French Japanese Spanish German Polish Yoruba Greek (Modem) American Sign Language Approval needed by the student's program/department ma jor. The following programs accept Sign Language Compe tency for the exit requirement: Africana Studies, Anthropology, Communication, Criminology, Geography, Gerontology, Mass Communications, Political Science, Theatre, Women's Stud ies, and all programs in the College of Education Students electing to take the examination in French, Ger man, Italian, Portuguese, Russian or Spanish should apply to the Director of the Division of Languages and Linguistics. Students taking the examination in Ancient or Modem Greek or in Latin should also apply to the Director of the Division of Languages and Linguistics. Students taking the examination in New Testament Greek or in Hebrew should apply to the Chair person of Religious Studies. Students utilizing American Sign Language should apply to the Chairperson of Communication Sciences and Disorders. Foreign Language Placement Students with two or more years of study in a foreign language in high school, or with postsecondary course(s) in foreign language, or with experiential learning of a foreign language may not enroll for credit in courses in that language without first taking a placement examination administered by the Division of Languages and Linguistics. Should the place ment examination indicate that remedial work is required ( 11201121 ), the student will be allowed to enroll with the understand ing that the grade eventually earned will be either an "S" or "U." Under no circumstances will a student who places above the first year level or who passes a higher-level course be allowed to register for or receive credit for a lower-level course in that specific language Students to whom this regulation applies should inquire of the Division of Languages and Linguistics for the placement examination Academic Residence Candidates for graduation must have completed at least 30 hours of the last 60 hours of their undergraduate credit in USF courses. The approval of the dean of the college granting tlile .ir degree must be secured for any transfer credits offered for any part of these last 60 hours . Exceptions to the above rules are students who are enrolled at other universities on approved exchange programs, cooper ative education students enrolled in other institutions (prior approval having been secured from their USF advisors) while on their training periods, and students taking correspondence work from the University of Florida : CLEP credit does not count toward academic residency. Academic Major USF offers curricula leading to the baccalaureate degree in the following fields. The degree is indicated in parentheses after each major code. For clarification, the following terms are defined: Specialization: Those courses required to give the student academic concentration and baccalaureate identification such as Mathematics, Accounting, Psychology, etc. Supporting or Related: These courses may be prerequisites to the specialization courses, or they may support spe cialized courses by giving preparation or breadth to the area of specialization. These courses are often referred to as college or program core courses Program Electives: These are usually a broad band of courses offered by the college offering the major to further enrich the student in the general academic field of the major. College of Arts and Sciences: Africana Studies (AFA) (B.A.) American Studies (AMS) (B.A.) Anthropology (ANT) (B.A.) Biology (BIO) (B.S.) Cell and Molecular (CAM) (B S.) Ecology (ECL) (B.S.) Marine (MRN) (B.S ) Physiology (PGY) (B.S.) Chemistry (CHM) (B.A.) Biochemistry/Biotechnology (CBY) (B.A.) Environmental (CHV) (B.A.) Health Professions (CHH) (B.A.) Chemistry (CHS) (B.S.) Environmental (CHV) (B.S.) Classics (Classical Languages) (CLS) (B.A.) Classics (Latin) (CLL) (B.A.) Communication (SPE) (B.A.) English (ENS) (B.A.) Interpersonal & Organizational (SIO) (B.A.) Performance (SPM) (B.A.) Public & Cultural (SPL) (B.A.) Theater (STA) (B.A.) Criminology (CCJ) (B.A.) Community Corrections (COC) (B.A.) Juvenile Justice (JVJ) (B.A.) Urban Law Enforcement (ULE) (B.A.) Economics (ECO) (B.A.) English (ENG) (a.A.) Literature (LIT) (B.A.) Creative Writing-Fiction (CWF) (B.A.) Creative Writing-Poetry (CWP) (B.A.) Professional-Technical Writing (CWT) (B.A.) Environmental Science and Policy (ESP) (B.S.) French (FRE) (B.A.) Geography (GPY) (B.A.) Environmental (EVG) (B.A.) Urban and Social (USG) (B.A.) Geology (GL Y) (B.A.) Geology (GLS) (B S.) Environmental (GLE) (B S ) German (GER) (B.A.)

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ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 51 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Gerontology (GEY) (B.A.) Gerontology (GES) (B S ) History (HTY) (B.A.) Humanities (HUM) (B.A.) Interdisciplinary Classics (ICL) (B.A.) Interdisciplinary Natural Sciences (INS) Biology(INB) (B.A.) Chemistry (INC) (B.A.) Clinical L.,aboratory Sciences (INL) (B.A.) Environmental Science and Policy (INE) (B.A.) Geology (ING) (B.A.) Mathematics (INM) (B.A.) Physics (INP) (B.A.) Interdisciplinary Social Science (ISS) (B.A.) American Sign Language (ISA) (B.A.) Speech/Language/Hearing Science (ISH) (B.A.) Urban Studies (ISU) (B.A.) Interpretor Training (ISi) (B.A.) Interdisciplinary Studies (BIS) (B.l.S.) International Studies (INT) (B.A.) Italian (ITA) (B.A.) Liberal Studies (ALA) (B.A.) Mass Communications (COM) Advertising (ADV) (B.A.) Broadcast News (NWS) (B.A.) BroadcastProgram & Production (PGM) (B..A.) Journalism Magazine (MAG) (B.A.) Jourrftilism News Editorial (JOU) (B.A.) Pu blic Relations (PUR) (B.A.) Mathematics (MTH) (B.A.) Environmental Biology (MEB) (B.A.) Environmental Chemistry (MEH) (B.A.) Environmental Geology (MEY) (B.A.) Mathematics 5-year program (MBM) Medical (MET) (B.S.) Microbiology (MIC) (B.S.) Philosophy (PHI) (B.A.) Physics (B .Ad Ph sics PHS) (B.S cience (P L) (B.A.) Psychology (PSY) (B.A.) Religious Studies (REL) (B.A.) Russian (RUS) (B.A.) Social Work (SOK) (B.S W ) Sociology (SOC) (B.A.) Spanish (SPA) (B.A.) Women's Studies (WST) (B.A.) College of Business Administration (B.A./B.S.optlon): Accounting (ACC) Business Economics (ECN) Finance (FIN) . General Business Administration (GBA) Management Information Systems (ISM) Management (MAN) Marketing (MKT) College of Education (B.A./B.S. option): Business and Office Education (BBE) Distributive and Marketing Education (DEC) Early Childhood Education (BEC) Elementary Education (BEE) English Education (BEN) Foreign Language Education (FLE) French (BFF) (B.A.) German (BFG) (B.A.) Italian (BFI) (B.A.) Russian (BFR) (B.A.) Spanish (BFS ) (B.A.) Industrial Education (BIT) Mathematics Education (BMA) Physical Education (PET) Elementary (BPE) Secondary (BPS) Wellness (BPW) Science Education (SCE) Biology (BSB) Chemistry (BSC) Physics (B$Y) Social Science Education (BSS) Special Education Behavior Disorders (BBD) Mental Retardation (BMR) Specific Leaming Disabil i ties (BLD) Varying Exceptionalities (5 yr Program) (BVE) College of Engineering: Chemical Engineering (ECH) (B S C H ) Civil Eng i neering (ECE) (B.S.C E ) Environmental (ENV) (B S.C.E ) Computer Engineering (ECP) (B S.C P.) Computer Science (ECC) (B.S C.S.) Electrical Engineering (EEL) (B S E E ) Engineering, General (EGU) (B S.E.) Engineering Science (EGC) (B.S E.S.) Industrial Engineering (EIE) (B.S.l.E ) Information Systems (EIF) (B S l.S ) Mechanical Engineering (EME) (B S.M E ) College of F i ne Arts: Art (ART) (B.A.) Art History (AHi) (B.A.) Art Education (ARE) (B A./B.S ) Dance (DAN) (B.A.) Dance Education (ONE) (B.S ) Dance Performance (B.F A ) Dance Studies (B.A.) Music (MUS) (B.M ) Composition (MUC) (B.M ) Jazz Composition (MJC) (B.M.) Jazz Performance (MJP) (B M.) Performance (MPF) (B.M ) P i ano Pedagogy (MPP) (B M.) Music Education (MUE) (B.A./B .$.) General (MEG) (B.A./B S ) Instrumental (MEI) (B A./B S ) Voice (MEV) (B A ./ B S ) Theatre (TAR/TFA) (B A./B .F.A.) Arts (TAA) (B.A.) Design (TAD) (B.A.) Performance (TAP) (B.A.) Theatre Education (TAE) (B.A.) College of Nursing (B S .): Nursing (NUR) Nursing (Registered Nurse) (NRN) Academic Minor In addition to major programs many departments offer an academic minor that requires approximately one-half the up per-level credits required for a major Students interested in a part i cular minor should obtain the specific requirements from the appropriate department. The department may require the same admission or retention standards as required for the major Each academic minor conforms to the University require ments : 1. A minimum of 8 semester hours of credit used to satisfy the requirements of a minor must be from USF courses 2. A student des iring a minor must have a major in a different program option 3. USF coursework for a minor must have a GPA of at least 2 0 4. Only an undergraduate degree seeking student at USF is eligible for a minor 5 A minor can be applied for and received only in conjunction with applying for and receiving a baccalaureate degree

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52 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG except for students who have already received a baccalau reate degree from USF who may earn certification of a minor by taking additional undergraduate coursework at the Uni versity and applying for the certification. USF offers curricula leading to an academic minor in the following fields : College of Arts and Sciences: Africana Studies African Studies African-American Studies American Studies Anthropology Communication Criminology Economics English : Creative Writing English: English and American Literature English : Professional-Technical Writing French Geography Geology German Gerontology Greek History Humanities Interdisciplinary Classics International Studies Italian Latin Linguistics Mass Communications Mathematics Modern Greek Philosophy Physics Political Science Psychology Religious Studies Russian Sociology Spanish Women's Studies Women's Studies: Women of Color College of Business Administration: Business Economics Finance General Business Administration International Business Management Management Information Systems College of Fine Arts: Art Dance Music Theatre Student's Choice of Catalog In order to graduate from USF, each degree-seeking student must meet all of the graduation requirements specified in the USF catalog of his/her choice A degree-seeking student may choose any USF catalog published during his/her continuous enrollment. Students who have transferred from one Florida public institution to another are affected by the following Board of Regents policy : Graduation requirements in effect at the receiving SUS institution at the time a student enrolls at a Florida public institution of higher learning shall apply to that student in the same manner that graduation requirements apply to its native students provided the student has had continu ous enrollment as defined in the SUS institution's catalog At USF, "continuous enrollment" is defined as enrolling as a degree seeking student at least one term each twelve month period. Therefore students cannot choose a USF catalog published prior to or during an academic year in which they did not maintain continuous enrollment. Each catalog is considered to be published during the academic year printed on the title page. If the student cannot meet all of the graduation requirements specified in the catalog of his/her choice due to decisions and changes by the University in policy matter, course offering, etc., appropriate substitutions will be determined by the chairperson of the department or program of the student's major. US F's policies are subject to change and apply to all stu dents regardless of their choice of catalog If the student's graduation requirements are affected by changes in University policies, appropriate arrangements will be made to preclude penalization of the student. Repeat Course Work The hours for a course which has been repeated may be counted only once toward the minimum 120 semester hours of credit required for graduation. (See Repeat Course Surcharges.) Double Undergraduate Major Students may elect to graduate with two majors In that event, they must apply independently to each college and be assigned an advisor in discipline. The student must meet all requirements of each major separately and musfbe certified for graduation by the appropriate dean(s). Second Undergraduate Major A student who wishes to work for a second major, after receipt of a baccalaureate degree, must apply through the Office of Admissions and meet the major requirements as determined by the college. (Exceptions to this rule are students who had been previously accepted for a "Double Undergradu ate Major'' but graduated with only one major ) After acceptance by the appropriate college and proof of completion, the stu dent's "permanent academic record" will be posted accord ingly.* "Note that those students who complete the requirements for a second major must be aware that they will not receive a second degree Two Degrees (USF Students) A student at USF may receive two baccalaureate degrees provided he/she meets University graduation requirements for both degrees. In addition to theminimum 120 semester hours that apply toward the first degree and include at least 60 semester hours from a baccalaureate institution, the student must also earn at least a minimum of 30 semester hours in on campus USF undergraduate courses that will apply foward the second degree. The student must also meet the requirements of the college awarding the degree and the residency ment. Second Baccalaureate Degree (Transfer Students) A student already graduated from an accredited four-year institution must earn a minimum of an additional 30 semester hours of USF undergraduate courses to apply toward his/her second baccalaureate degree. Students must also meet the University's regular graduation requirements, including the 9 semester hours of Exit Requirements as well as the require ments of the college awarding the degree and the residency requirements . Availability of a Baccalaureate Degree for Students Enrolled in or Graduated from a Five-year Master's Program A student may enroll in a baccalaureate degree program while enrolled in or after graduation from a five-year master's degree program. In consultation with an advisor in the five-year program and an advisor in the baccalaureate-level program and

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ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 53 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG with the approval of the college dean(s) offering the program( s ), the student is required to complete the following: a Satisfy degree requirements for the five-year master's pro gram b. Satisfy requirements for the baccalaureate-level program. B.A. Degree for Medical and Dental Students Students who are admitted to a medical or dental school after completing their junior year at USF may be awarded the B.A. degree in Interdisciplinary Natural Sciences from the College of Arts and Sciences (see College of Arts and Sciences). Application for Graduation In order to graduate, a student must submit an application for the bachelor's degree, graduate degree, or associate of arts certificate to the Office of the Registrar. This application must be submitted in the term of expected graduation by the deadline noted in the academic calendar. If a student applies for gradu ation and is not approved, a new applie(3tion fordegree must be submitted by the deadline in a new term. In degree statement to appear on a student's academic record, the student must file the aforementioned application whether or not participation in the commencement ceremony is desired The application for the bachelor's degree is available from the student's college advising office The application for a graduate degree is available from the Office of the Registrar or the student's college advising office. The application for an associate of arts degree is available from the Center for Aca demic Advising in Academic Support and Achievement. The application must first be certified (signed or stamped in the section "Office Use Only") by the student's college (Center for Academic Advising for the A.A. degree). The college retains one copy, and the student must suomit the remaining copies to the Office of the Registrar prior to the graduation application deadline. Inquiries concerning approval or denial of graduation should be made to the appropriate college or to the Center for Academic Advising in Academic Support and Achievement. It is the student's responsibility to clear all "I" grades pletes) in courses required for graduation and to provide official transcripts of all transferred course work needed for graduation at least 3 weeks prior to the end of the term in which he/she expects to graduate. A student applying for a second undergraduate major must do so within the same deadline set for applying for a degree. A student applying for a minor must: 1. File a separate request for certification for the minor in the department of the minor during the semester of graduation; 2. Apply for the minor on the "Application for Degree," listing both the minor and college responsible for the minor on the application; and 3. Have no "I" grade in required courses. For purposes of honors recognition at the ceremony, stu dents must have a 3 500 GPA before the term in which they plan to graduate to have honors recognized publicly at the com mencement ceremony. Honors at Graduation A baccalaureate candidate must first have an overall GPA for all work attempted at USF on the standard grading scale of a 3.500 or higher to be considered for honors In addition transfer students and USF students who have post-secondary work elsewhere to be eligible for honors must have a GPA of 3.500 or higher when combined with all work attempted at other institutions (including developmental classes) The forgiveness policy at USF or other institutions will not be applicable in computing the GPA for honors nor are plus/minus grades awarded at other institutions. Candidates with a GPA of 3.500 but below 3 710 shall receive a diploma designation of cum laude (with honor). Candidates with a GPA of 3.710 but below 3.900 shall receive a diploma designation of magna cum laude (with higher honor). Candidates with a GPA of 3.900 or above shall receive a diploma designation of summa cum /aude (with highest honor) In addition, each dean has the option to select on the basis of exceptional achievement 1% of the college's graduates student per semester for graduating with distinction. Please note for purposes of honors recognition at the ceremony, students must have a 3 500 GPA before the term in which they plan to graduate to have honors recognized publicly at the commencement ceremony Commencement Commencement ceremonies at USF (Tampa) are held three times a year : Fall, Spring, and Summer To receive information regarding the Commencement cer emonies, students must submit an application to graduate. Information regarding the ceremony will be mailed to the stu dents during the term in which they should participate. If information is not received, the student should contact the Office of the Registrar Graduate students (masters, specialists, and doctorates) will not participate in commencement exer cises unti! all requirements for such degrees have been fulfilled. Certification Requirements Associate of Arts Upon the student's successful completion of the minimum requirements forthe Associate of Arts Certificate, the University will present the student who has properly made application with an appropriate certificate 1. To receive the Associate of Arts, the student must complete 60 semester hours of university credit; at least twenty of the last thirty semester hours must be completed in residence at USF; the minimum grade point average must be 2.0 based on work attempted atthe USF; in addition, a transfer student must have a GPA of 2.0 or higher when combined with transfer work accepted and evaluated by the USF Office of Admissions ; and the General Education Requirements of USF must be satisfied Physical Education and military science credits do not count within the 60 semester hours toward the Associate of Arts. In addition the student must present a score (passing score after August 1994) on the College-Level Academ i c Skills Test and fulfill the writing and computation course requirements of 6A-10 030 prior to receiving the Associate of Arts Cert i ficate 2. Application Procedure for the Associate of Arts Certificate. The Application for an Associate of Arts Certificate can be obtained from the Center for Academic Advising prior to the application deadline. The deadline to apply for a degree in each semester is stated in the Academic Calendar in the catalog. 3. The Associate of Arts certificate must be awarded prior to the term that the student becomes eligible for the baccalaureate degree. 4. Final processing for the Associate of Arts will be done after grades are processed at the end of the semester for which the student applied. All work, including transfer work taken in that semester will be evaluated with respect to the require ments for the Assoc i ate of Arts Certificate 5. Any incomplete grades shown on the permanent record of an Associate of Arts applicant at the time grades are pro cessed will be treated as an Fin the calculation of grade point average 6 The General Education Requirements will be based on the approved University policy in effect in the catalog year the student chooses according to the University policy regarding the choice of catalog. The consideration of whether or not General Education Requirements are met will be made without consideration of the student's choice of major at the time he/she applies. 7 Residence credit will be broadly defined to include USF sponsored student exchange programs and the University of Florida Correspondence Division. Where the grades from these institutions except those earned through the Univer sity ofFlorida Correspondence Division are recorded on the

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54 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG permanent record at USF, and included in the grade point average calculation, they will also be counted in the student's grade point average as work attempted at USF for the Associate of Arts Certificate. 8. An applicant who has not been enrolled at USF for three semesters may be contacted to ascertain whether or not that applicant meets the residency requirements 9. In approving any application for the Associate of Arts Certifi cate, satisfactory/unsatisfactory grades will be accepted according to the approved University policy in effect during the terms of the student's enrollment without regard for the student's declared major. Students must be aware that if they have taken any courses on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis where such grades are not acceptable by the college of the major, the students may be required to repeat particu lar courses for a traditional letter grade or take additional courses for a traditional letter grade to meet the college requirements. 10. All USF colleges with undergraduate programs will' accept the Associate of Arts from USF. That is, the student will be placed at least, at the junior level and will be considered to have met the University's General Education Requirements. The applicability of the courses taken by the student toward his/her major program will be determined by the college of the student's major. Similarly, any special requirements for a student's professional certification (e.g Education and Engineering) are not necessarily met by the Associate of Arts certificate, but could be included as part of the General Education Requirements. Thus, students should check with their colleges concerning meeting any special requirements in an efficient manner. 11. The awarding of the Associate of Arts is posted on the permanent record but does not alter the calculation of the grade point average nor does it interrupt the accumulation of the student's record. 12.Students who follow a baccalaureate degree program as recommended by a college will not necessarily be eligible for the Associate of Arts certificate prior to the completion of 90 semester hours. Student Records Policy Pursuant to the provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act ("FERPA"; 20 USC Par 1232g), 34 CFR Par. 99.1 et seq, Florida Statutes Sub Par. 228.093 and 240.237 and USF Rule 6C4-2.0021, Florida Administrative Code, stu dents have the right to : 1. Inspect and review their education records 2. Privacy in their education records 3 Challenge the accuracy of their education records 4 Report violations of FERPA to the FERPA Office, Depart ment of Education, 400 Madison Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20202 and/or bring actions in Florida Circuit Court for violations of Rule 6C4-2.001, Florida Administrative Code. Copies of the University's student records policy, USF Rule 6C4-2 0021, may be obtained from: University Registrar or USF Agency Clerk SVC 1034 Office of the General Counsel 4202 Fowler Avenue 4202 Fowler Avenue -ADM 254 Tampa, Florida 33620 Tampa, Florida 33620 Release of Student Information Pursuant to requirements of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), the following types of information, designated by law as "directory information," may be released via official media of USF (according to USF policy): Student name, local and permanent addresses, telephone listing, major field of study, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height of members of athletic teams, dates of attendance, degrees and awards received, full and part-time status, and the most recent previous educational agency or institution attended, and other similar information. The University Directory, published annually by the Univer sity, contains only the following information, however: student name, local and permanent address, telephone listing, classi fication, and majorfield of study The Directory and other listings of"directory information" are circulated in the course of Univer sity business and, therefore areacce!?sibletothe public, as well as to students, faculty, and staff . Students must inform the USf Office of the Registrar in writing (forms available for that purpose), if they wish directory information to be withheld. Such requests must b e received within the first two (2) weeks of the semester and will remain in effect until the student has not been enrollee! at US F forthree (3) consecutive terms. Notification to the University of refusal to permit release of "directory information" via the University Directory must be received no later than the end of the first week of classes in the Fall Semester.

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ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND SERVICES UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Special Academic Programs Independent Study USF/Florida Public Community College Undergraduate students wishing to take a course by inde-Cross Enrollment pendent study must contact the instruc t or of the course for Some stu dents may.find it advantageous to permission. The instructor specifies the requ irements to be enroll at a Flonda pubhc C?mmunity college while attendcompleted by the student including tests periodic class attening USF. Pr?cedure s to permit this type of registration are dance term papers, etc available dunng specified times printed in the University Sched-Not all courses in the University may be taken by independ.of Credit hours for the course(s) taken atthe host ent stu.qy . The respective colleges have jurisdic ti on in the inst1t.ut1on will apply toward graduation only if prior approval was determination of which courses may be taken i n this manner. received the student's USF advisor. The grade point The regular grading system applies to all independent study average will not transfer to USF See a USF college advisor for students Grades earned by independent study have t he same detailed registration instructions and course approval. status as acquired through reg ular class attendance Transient Students USF degree-seeking students who wish to enroll at another regionally-accredited institution MUST HAVE PRIOR WRIT from their college academic advisor to re ceive credit for courses taken. The transient student/cross enrollment form should be used for this purpose College Level Examination Program (CLEP) USF grants credit for partial fulfillment of the Liberal Arts General Education requirements and for a number of specific courses through CLEP General Examinations and CLEP Sub ject Performance levels necessary to achieve credit are established at a common level for all universities and community colleges in the State system. Generally the perform ance levels are based on the average score of students who have already taken the courses. The following policies apply to this program : 1 the General Examinations are not equated to specific courses, there are two cases in which the content is sufficiently similar to be considered as duplicate credit. Thus, credit may not be received for both in the following: Test Courses English Composition with EssayENC 1101 and ENC 1102 Mathematics MAC 2102 and MGF 2202 2. Transfer students from SUS or Division of Community Colinstituti<;>ns must haye scores or CLEP credit posted on their transcnpts to receive CLEP credit at USF Transfer stude.nts non-SUS or non-Division of Community Col lege institutions must have scores which meet the State of minimu"'! standards posted on official transcnpts. The receiving college will determine, based upon guidelines, the applicability of these credits to the (baccalaureate) degree requirements 3 Credit for CLEP Subject Examinations will be awarded for scores only on those examinations which are recog nized by USF and do not constitute duplicate course credit. 4. CLEP Examinations (General or Subject) for English do not satisfy the writing requirements for SBE 6A-10 030 although they do provide credit for the appropriate English courses. 5 CLEP General/Subject Examinations in mathematics cal culus, college algebra, trigonometry satisfy the semester hours of mathematics required (College Algebra or above) for SBE 6A-10 030 6. does not count toward academic residency Applications for and additional information on CLEP are available in the Office of Evaluation and Testing Advanced Placement Credit Program USF participates in the Advanced Placement Program con ducted by the College Entrance Examination Board. Examination papers are graded by selected committees on a scale. The University allows advanced placement credit for scores of 3, 4 or 5 No credit is allowed for scores of 1or2. Additional information is available in the Office of Evaluation and Testing. Students taking a course by independent study must r egister for the specific course section in the regular manner College Reach-Out Program Reach-Out .is an designed for and educationally disadvantaged iunior and senior high students who have the academic pote(ltial for success ni a postsecondary institution and plan to pursue an education beyond high school. The focus the is to prepare s t udents to meet higher education requirements established for admission to colleges and universities Tutoring services are prov i ded to enhance students' academic skills '.he program.is to provide counse l ing in personal social, educational, career opportunities and a summer ennchment program Admission requirements are listed: 1 Family income must meet federal and state guidelines. 2. Students must have completed the 8th grade. 3 Students must have a 2 0 grade average in Engl ish mat h ematics, history and science 4. Students must attend schools in Hillsborough County Applications should be forwarded to the College Reach-Out Program HMS 497 or499, USF Information may be obtained by calling (813) 974-3713. Enrollment in Evening Courses Evening courses at USF are part of the regular academic program.; are offered at times convenient to people within commuting distance who wish to continue their educat i on at night occupied during the day with other respons i b i lit i es. Requirements for day and evening courses are the same See the University Class Schedule for evening registration dates and times Learning Program The Community Expenential Leam ing (CEL) Program offers students the opportunity to explore the relat i onsh i p between their learning and the broader community With faculty students design their own community experi ences and between one and four academic credit(s) upon completion Students may choose to work as an intern ""'.ith a community
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56 ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND SERVICES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Florida State University, the University of Florida, the University of North Florida, and the University of South Florida. Founded in 1968, the external degree program is for adults who find it difficult to attend regular university classes because of career or family commitments. The BIS student proceeds at his/her own pace and, for the most part, in his/her own setting The exception is the summer seminars which require periodic, short-term campus residence The administration office for the Programis located on US F's Tampa Campus For detailed information, see the College of Arts and Sciences. State University System Correspondence Courses The Univers i ty ofFlorida's Department of Independent Study by Correspondence administers all correspondence instruction for Florida's State University System (SUS) Over 150 college credit, high school credit and continuing professional education courses are available anytime, any where through regular mail or fax In many cases, students also have the option to e-mail their assignments to the instructor. Enrollment in all courses is possible at any time of the year; however, prior approval of an advisor is needed if a course is to be used toward a diploma or a degree. For a FREE brochure please contact: Department of Inde pendent Study, 2209 NW 13th Street, SuiteD, Gainesville, FL 32609-3498; (352) 392-1711, ext. 200; or e-mail: Learn@nervm.nerdc.ufl.edu. Be sure to check out the home page: http : //www doce ufl.edu/indstudy USF considers independent study by correspondence as resident credit. Grades are not transferable. Exception: grades for courses taken by Cooperative Education students while on a training period are transferred and will be used in computing the USF GPA Upward Bound Upward Bound is a pre-college program for students from low-income families who have academic potential, but who have inadequate secondary school preparation or have not achieved success in school. Its purposes are to assist these students in developing goals and academic skills, and to provide the motivatibn necessary to obtain entrance and achieve success in a college or post secondary program. To qualify, the applicant must meet the following criteria : 1. Family income must meet federal guidelines 2. Applicant should be a potential first-generation college stu dent. 3 Student must have completed the 9th grade and presently be enrolled in the 10th or 11th grade in an accredited high school. 4. GPA must be 2.0 ("C") or above in basic pre-college courses. 5. Attend weekly scheduled tutorial sessions 6. Attend six-week summer residential component on the USF Tampa Campus Applications should be forwarded to Director, Project Up ward Bound, USF International Student Exchange Program (ISEP) USF maintains cooperating programs for the exchange of undergraduate students with various universities in England, France, Scotland, Australia, Israel, Sweden, Japan, Korea, Russia, Wales, and Mexico. These exchanges are provided through the International Student Exchange Program (ISEP). Because new schools are continuously added to the ISEP, an updated listing of exchange universities is available from the ISEP office. It is much less expens i ve to attend a foreign university on exchange than it would be on one's own. Costs approximate those at USF. Decisions about covered charges and services are based upon cooperating contractual agreements. There is a deposit of $250 00 for international exchange, which is refunded only if a qualified applicant cannot be placed While on exchange, students are considered to be enrolled full-time for all purposes including financial aid. Duration of exchange can be a full year or one semester depending on the specific exchange agreement. A minimum 2.5 (3.0 for some institutions) cumulative GPA is required for exchange. It is recommended, though not required, that students exchange during the sophomore or junior years Courses and grades earned on exchange are accepted and entered into the USF record (transcript) and grades earned on exchange are merged into the USF GPA. Students who wish to exchange in the Fall are advised to apply by March 1 Students wishing to exchange in the Spring are advised to apply by September 15. The number of place ments is limited, so early application is desirable. The date .of application (as well as year in college, scholastic record, etc.) carries considerable weight in situations where demand ex ceeds supply The ISEP office maintains a library of materials about the universities cooperating with USF Study Abroad Programs USF students are eligible, if they meet the specific academic requirements for enrollment in a wide variety of study abroad programs sponsored by the SUS of Florida as well as by many other U .S. colleges and universities, national educational orga nizations, and foreign institutions of higher learning. The following overseas study programs are administered by USF under the auspices of the Overseas Study Programs Office of the International Affairs Center (located in CPR 468). *One, two, three months or longer programs in Paris, Tours, and in Aix-En-Provence or Avignon, France An intensive program in French culture is offered in June or July which combines lectures, on-s i te visits and day-long excursions. A four-week summer program of Italian language and culture located at Perugia, Italy in conjunction with the Italian University for Foreigners. *A four-week summer program of study of Spanish language and culture centered in Madrid, Spain with a study tour to Barcelona or Andalucia. *A year-round program in San Jose, Costa Rica in collaboration with the Forester International Institute. This flexible program of Spanish study offers intensive courses from two weeks to three months. *A summer program in Mexico offered in collaboration with the University of the Americas in Cholula, Mexico It provides participants with an opportunity to study Spanish language, Mexican culture and to visit many archeological sites. *A summer program in photography or art histo,.Y conducted in Paris, France. (Class alternates each year ) *A three-week to eight-week summer program in German language and culture in Berlin. *A six-week summer program in Russian language and culture in Moscow, Russia *A two, three, or four-week international summer school pro gram at Cambridge University in England. And approximately 3 doz!'ln semester and summer academic programs in more than 25 countries available through USF's membership in the College Consortium for International Stud ies (CCIS) New study abroad opportunities are added 1each year. In addition to residential programs, USF offers a variety of short term study-tour programs managed by the Overseas Study Programs Office (CPR 468 ) These programs include classroom study on the Tampa campus prior to the travel segment. Recent programs have focused on Africa, the Caribbean, South America, France Germany, Ireland, and Tahiti/Moorea The programs described in this section are approved study abroad programs and all carry USF credits The University of South Florida also offers reciprocal ex change programs for students in the following countries : Aus tralia Brazil, China, Costa Rica, England (10 universities}, Estonia, France (6 universities), Israel, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico (4 universities), the Netherlands, Russia, Scotland, Spain, Sweden, Venezuela, and Wales

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ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 57 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG A sampling ofresidential or study-travel programs offered by Academic Services and Support other universities in the SUS follows: Administered by Florida A & M University: study and exchange programs to Haiti, Jamaica and Sri Lanka. Administered by Florida Atlantic study ex change programs to Austr.alia, China, Denmark, Finland, Lithuania, Poland, and Russia. "Administered by Florida lntemationat University: study exchange programs to the Bahamas, the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Mexico, and Sweden. "Administered by Florida State University: study and exchange programs to Australia, Barbados, Costa Rica, Eastern Europe, Italy, Korea, Switzerland, and England. "Administered by the University of Central Flonda: study and exchange programs to Austria, Canada, Chile, China, Korea, Russia and Switzerland. "Administered by the University of Florida: study and exchange programs to Denmark, England, Finland, Germany, Greece, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Sweden, Taiwan and "Administered by the University of North Flonda: study and exchange programs to the Czech Republic, England, France and Ireland. "Administered by the University of West Florida: study and exchange programs to Austria, Canada, Costa Rica, Germany, Israel, Japan, Norway and Taiwan. Students who plan to participate study programs should consult their departmental advisors to determine whether the course of study they plan to pursue will be acceptable for meeting degree requirements . Information about these and other programs, as well as advising on study abroad, may be obtained from the Study Programs Office in CPR 468, 974-4314; e-mail: jhale@lang.usf.edu. Florida College Exchange Program Through an exchange agreement, students of USF, with !he approval of their advisors, may elect courses at nearby Flonda College ereditfor acceptable may be trans.ferred to USF and counted as elective credit toward graduation. Students from Florida College have a similar transfer arrangement. Costs for students under these cross enrollment plans are based on credit hours of work taken, and payment is made to the appropriate institution in accordance with its per-hour fee rate. Florida College students enjoy full privileges of the wide articulation agreement and of USF transfer student poli cies, such as academic salvage and full acceptance of the Associate of Arts degree. Washington, D.C. Internship Program All USF undergraduates seeking to live and learn in the nation's capital are eligible to apply for the Washington, D:C. Internship Program. Students participate in either the fall, spnng or summer semesters and can earn course credit. Study in Washington, D.C. consists of two major components: (1) work ing 35 hours perweekatyourselected internship and, (2) taking one seminar which meets once per week. Opportunities for internships are not limited to government positions, but include a vast array of non-profit and for-profit options. In conjunction with the Washington Center located in Wash ington, D.C., students are housed in a located apartment complex within walking distance to public transpor tation (the Metro). The Washington Center also provides a student lecture series and a number of special events (e.g., breakfast with Members of Congress, cultural events at !he Kennedy Center). The costs of the program vary depending upon your date of attendance. Generous scholarships are available Applications for the program can be obtained in the Depart ment of Government and International Affairs, SOC 352. For details on the USF Washington, D.C. Internship Program, please contact Dr. Kathryn Dunn Tenpas, F acuity Liason forthe Washington, D.C Internship Program, 4202 East Fowler Av enue, SOC 107, Tampa, FL 33620-8100 orcall 813-974-0830. EDUCATIONAL OUTREACH Educational Outreach provides access to the University experience through credit courses and noncredit programs using a wide variety of delivery . formats, content and scheduling options. These offerin.QS pe:rsonal and pro fessional development opportunities for ind1v1duals, promote workforce development through customized training, and able students constrained by time and/or place to meet their educational goals. Educational Outreach advances US F's teach ing, research and service by supporting faculty, stu dents and the programs in which they enroll, both onand off campus. Visit our website at http://www.outreach.usf.edu Educational Outreach supports the teaching and learning process for distance and residential instruction through its Distance and Technology Mediated Learning (DTML) unit. Services are organized around four primary areas of support: faculty, students, courses, and classrooms. Distance Learning Faculty Support helps faculty incorpo rate a range of instructional to the learn ing experience of the students . This support involves c;ourse production and devel?pment instruc tion, videoconferencing, two-way v1deo/aud10 courses videotapes, and one-way audio studio classroom instruction. These applications of technology ex pand access for students constrained by time and/or place. Educational Outreach provides additional faculty support through its participation in USF's Teaching, Leaming and Tech nology Roundtable (TL TR) and VITAL (Virtual Instructional Team for the Advancement of Learning) Distance Learning Student Support provides registration, invoicing, and materials distribution services for students en rolled in USF's distance learning and off-campus courses, including PACE (Program for Adult Credit Education). These students may be remote learners in distance learning or off-campus face-to-face instruction, or those whose schedules and lifestyles make it difficult to enroll in traditionally formatted courses This supp?rt serves students at participating corporate and community sites, as well as individuals in distributed learning programs. Students have easy access to information through the USF Distance Learning Catalogue, a comprehensive institution-wide listing of courses. (To request a catalogue, please call 813/974-2996 or send email to: distance@dtml.usf edu). Distance Learning Course Support provides network ser vices and coordination for USF's distance learning infrastruc ture including the Instructional Television Fixed Services (ITFS) neW:.orkand other broadcast video systems videoconferencing, Open University (in with '(VUSF-!\f). and satellite uplink/downlink capab1llt1es. Support 1s provided for courses delivered to corporate and other educational sites as well as courses distributed to individuals through asynchronous mod els of instruction. Some of these courses are collaborative efforts with other SUS institutions, expanding students' options by sharing instructional resources. Technology in the Classroom Support !ncludes delivery, set-up, and maintenance of audiovisual equipment; ment of a multi-media distribution system; and graphic design support to help faculty communicate ideas and.concepts print-based media and This prehensive service model includes traditional aud1ov1sual equip ment, such as overhead projectors, slide and VCR's and more recent additions to the classroom, including computer projection systems and digital cameras. Automated sound/ lighting/audiovisual systems are being to classrooms, giving faculty greater con!rol overthe1r educatlonal environment and enhancing the teaching and learning process. PACE (Program for Adult Cred!t Education) Program for Adult Credit Education (PACE) offers credit courses for adult and non-traditional students. Methods of delivery include, but are not limited to: off-campus classes

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58 ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND SERVICES UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 199.W!I UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG offered with instructors coming to the site, concentrated classes offered in one or two weeks weekend classes, and Internet courses These courses complement US F's Distance Leaming offerings enhancing access for students constrained by time and/or place. PACE enables USF to respond quickly and flexibly to meet the region's professional educational needs, e.g., licensure or certification. PACE also works with area businesses, school boards, and organizations to offer credit courses to their em ployees often by contract with a sponsor. All courses delivered by PACE are listed in the USF Under graduate or Graduate Catalog and are taught by USF instruc tors. Students in PACE programs must meet all USF admis sions academic standing, and graduation requirements. All registration is handled through PACE. Textbooks are delivered to off-campus sites or made available at convenient locations. Payment for PACE courses is made directly to PACE, usually by mail. Costs are ordinarily a bit higher than regular Tampa Campus rates to cover additional expenses incurred in coordinating and offering a largely off-campus program VISA and MasterCard are accepted by phone or in person on campus (but not at off-campus locations) as payment for course fees. For details contact the University of South Florida, 4202 East Fowler Ave., SVC 1072, Tampa, FL 33620-6910; e-mail: pace@dtml.usf.edu or 813/974-2996. Open University (O.U.) Courses Via Television The Open University offers credit courses via WUSF-TV, Channel 16, for the Tampa, St. Petersburg, Sarasota, Lakeland campuses and their surrounding areas. Some of the courses are available only on audio or video tapes This method of instruction is especially convenient for those students who cannot attend on-campus due to work/ home responsibilities or transportation difficulties. Some courses can be used to fulfill liberal arts and/or major requirements and can be used as elective credit for most degree programs. Students should check with the department of their college major for clarification. Registration dates/times coincide with the University's registration periods. A complete list of Open University classes is in the Schedule of Classes. Or, visit the Open University s web page at http:/lwww.outreach.usf.edu. Courses have on-campus sessions or web-based modules for orientation, reviews and student interaction components. The majority of review sessions are videotaped and available for view ing in the Open University office during office hours in Tampa. The majority of Open University courses DO NOT have a mandatory first day attendance policy Most Open University telecourse programs are broadcast once within a week. Typically there is an original broadcast O.fl a weekday afternoon or on the weekend In some cases, students may view missed programs in the University Media Center Lab located on the 6th floor of the Tampa Campus Library It is recommended that students tape the programs off the air with their VCR's. Many of the courses are also broadcast at different times on cable systems in Tampa and Hillsborough County For cable times call the Tampa Educational Consortium at (813) 2542253 Most of the courses are available for rental from RMI Telecourse Rental. Call for more information Students are evaluated by some combination of exams, quizzes, term papers, special projects, etc. Final grades are available by telephone by calling (813) 972-8120. For most courses students may electto receive a letter grade or exercise a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory option if desired. St. Petersburg, Sarasota and Lakeland students may obtain a syllabus at their respective campuses. All students must register by telephone. Students enrolling on the Tampa campus are responsible for obtaining a course syllabus before classes begin. Most course syllabi are available one week before classes begin. Due to large enrollments syllabi are not mailed to students However, syllabi will be available outside SVC 1080 for stu dents to pick up after hours and on weekends Most course syllabi are available electronically at http:I/ www.outreach.usf.edu. Textbooks and materials for courses may be purchased at the Tampa campus bookstore in the YOU section. For more information call the Open University office at (813) 97 4-2864 or the 24 hour Open University information hotline at (813) 974-3063 Continuing Education Educational Outreach, through its Continuing Education unit, provides personal and professional development opportu nities for individuals and promotes workforce development through customized training programs for businesses and organizations. In 1996-97, more than 14,000 people were served through a wide variety of noncredit and credit programs. Primary programming divisions include: Community Music, Conferences and Institutes, Lifelong Leaming, Mediation Insti tute, and Senior Programs. Division of Lifelong Leaming The Division of Lifelong Leaming provides open enrollment continuing education programs for workforce education, pro fessional development, and personal growth. Courses are noncredit and offer instruction in writing and communication skills, foreign languages, computer applications, visual and performing arts, test preparation, and personal development. The Division also offers specialized certificate programs and pre-college programs for youth.Various educational programs (workshops, seminars, and short courses) are scheduled throughout the year in conjuction with the Colleges and Depart ments of the University. The programs vary in length from one day to one year, and the subject matter is concentrated as needed for the group being served. The Division of Lifelong Leaming also develops programs for workforce development in business and industry govern ment, professional, civic, and service groups A variety of instructional methods assures maximum educational effective ness and encourages individual participation. Distinguished faculty from USF and national and international res0urce per sons serve as consultants, instructors, and facilitators in the programs. The Continuing Education Unit (CEU) is awarded to partici pants who successfully complete programs that are sponsored by the Division and approved by the appropriate academic unit. Transcripts indicating awarded CEUs are available on written request. Professional program coordinators provide program plan ning, budget preparation and evalutaion, and are available to assist organizations, both within the University and in the local community, in developing programs consistent with the needs of the group and the overall educational objectives of the University. The Florida Center for Writers, a joint project of the Depart ment of English and the Division of Lifelong Leaming at USF was established to foster an appreciation of literature and to help writers of all levels master their craft. The Center sponsors the annaal Florida Suncoast Writers' Conference and Work shop, ongoing classes in writing, the publication of Sunscripts: Writing from the Florida Suncoast Conference and Workshop, and various lectures and readings. For more information, contact the Division of Lifelong Leam ing, Educational Outreach, University of South Florida, MHH 116, 13301 Bruce B Downs Blvd., 33612; 813/974-5201. Mediation Institute The USF Mediation Institute provides F:lorida Supreme Court approved courses used for certification in family and circuit civil mediation. In addition, the Mediation Institute provides educa tional programs that incorporate conflict resolution skills in parenting classes for divorcing families ; juvenile dependency mediation; orientation materials for mediating parties ; advanced mediation training; and assistance in developing training pro grams in emerging areas of conflict resolution through media tion.

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ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 59 UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG For further information, contact the USF Mediation Institute, Educational Outreach, 13301 Bruce B. Downs Blvd., MHH 116, Tampa, FL 33612-3899 Community Music Division The USFCommunity Music Division is a full-service com munity music school and a member of the National Guild of Community Schools of the Arts. Utilizing facilities ofthe School of Music, the Division also uses music facilities in selected area schools and brings quality music instruction to various neigh borhoods The Division provides non-credit instruction for chil dren and adults in both private and group settings. The schpol year is divided into two semesters of fourteen weeks each plus a summer session. Programs range from pre-school music classes through adult private instruction. Dedicated to providing the highest quality musical instruc tion, the Division has a talented teaching staff comprised of musicians active as both teachers and performers. These include Florida Orchestra members in addition to leading com munity-based music teachers and free-lance musicians. For details, contact the USF Community Music Division, 13301 Bruce B Downs Blvd MHH 116, Tampa, FL 33612-3899. Ph. 813/974-5792. Division of Conferences and Institutes As a unit of Educational Outreach, the Division of Confer ences and Institutes plans and implements continuing educa tion programs such as conferences, seminars, workshops, symposia and institutes for University units and external spon sors. The Division provides comprehensive program manage ment services including program development/planning, finan cial planning and management, promotion, instructional re sources, registration, logistics, Continuing Education Units, on site management, evaluation and certificates. Over6,000 people participated in DCI programs during 1996-97 The Division is committed to excellence in services and the enhancement of continuing education opportunities for con stituents. Programs assisted by the Division are educational in nature complementary of the University's mission, nonpropri etary and approved by appropriate University units. For additional information about developing programs or learning about upcoming programs, contact the Division of Conferences and Institutes, Educational Outreach, USF, 13301 Bruce B Downs Blvd., MHH 116, Tampa, FL 33612-3899; telephone 813-974-5731; fax 813-974-5732; e-mail laura@conted.usf.edu. Division of Senior Programs The Division of Senior Programs initiates and coordinates programs for adults of retirement age Many of these programs are planned in conjunction with seniors who play an active volunteer role in facets of the programs. Programs inlcude: Senior Citizen Tuition Waiver Program: Florida residents who are 60 years of age or older by the first day of a respective semester may take certain undergraduate or graduate courses on a space available basis without paying tuition. Academic credit is not awarded, examinations are not required, and grades are not given. An orientation-registration is held at the beginning of each semester. Peer advisors are available for advising. SeniorNet: An international, non-profit organization, SeniorNet is for seniors age 55 and over wl)o are interested in learning to use computers. Members who join SeniorNet share and exchange knowledge and interest with members through an online network. Members may take courses taught by senior volunteers with exte.nsive computer experience. Courses and fees are described in information sent to seniors who ask to be on a SeniorNet mailing list. Learning in Retirement Institute: As an outgrowth of Eld erhostel, the Leaming in Retirement Institute builds on the motivations and experiences of adults in retirement as they continue learning, expanding their horizons and enhancing their personal development. Learners develop intellectually stimulating educational programming within an organizational structure which distinguishes the Institute as an educational community of older learners Learners must be members of the Institute and pay fees for study groups each semester Member ship information, study groups and study group leaders are described in information available to seniors who request inclusion on the UR mailing list. Other programs and courses are offered each term. For details on all Senior Programs, or to be placed on our mailing list, contact Division of Senior Programs, USF, 13301 Bruce B. Downs Blvd., MHH 116, Tampa, FL 33612-3899; e-mail lee@conted.usf edu or call (813) 974-2403. The English Language Institute College of Arts and Sciences The English Language Institute offers intensive English as a Second Language (ESL) to non-native speakers of English. Students are given a placement test upon registering for the program. This test determines the proficiency level into which the student is placed, ranging from elementary, low-intermedi ate, high-intermediate, to advanced pre-university ESL. Students attend non-credit classes 25 hours a week. The curriculum includes training in English pronunciation, listening comprehension, spoken English, grammar drills, reading com prehension, and composition skills Students who complete Advanced ESL usually score above 500 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The English Language Institute is authorized to issue the Certificate of Eligibility (1-20) to students who require a Student Visa (F-1) and who meet criteria set forth by the United States Immigration and Naturalization Service. The cost of the program is $2,485 00 per semester There is an additional non-refundable $50.00 application fee. For complete details contact the English Language Insti tute, USF, Tampa, FL 33620, or call (813) 974-3433; fax (813) 974-2769. THE USF LIBRARY SYSTEM The six libraries of USF consist of the three libraries of the Tampa campus: Tampa Campus Library, Health Sciences Library, Florida Mental Health Institute Library; Nelson Poynter Library at the St. Petersburg Campus; Jane Bancroft Cook Library at the New College/Sarasota Campus; and a joint use facilitiy with Polk Community College in Lakeland. The System provides access to information resources to fulfill the instruc tional, research, and artistic needs of students, faculty, and staff of USF. In addition, the System also has a responsibility to serve the educational, cultural, business, and professional informa tion needs of the citizens of US F's service area and the national academic community The USF library system contains over 1,500,000 volumes, and the SUS libraries together contain over 10,000,000 vol umes of information resources. Books and periodicals are cataloged and arranged on open shelves using the Library of Congress Classification System. Books may be checked out with renewal privileges; periodicals may not be checked out. Library User Information Service (LUIS), the online catalog, may be searched by author, title, subject, and keyword to identify the library's holdings. LUIS contains records for the USF libraries, all ten SUS libraries in Florida, online catalogs world wide, and serves as a gateway to over 140 periodical and full text databases. Workstations located in various USF libraries provide access to the online catalog Remote access to the same catalog is also possible through any campus workstation linked to the USF mainframe, via dial-in procedures or the World Wide Web. Regional Exchange Center (REC) service can obtain mate rials from other USF campus libraries upon request. Thus, students and faculty have access to resources beyond the on site collections at each campus. REC forms are available at reference and circulation service desks. More information about the USF Library System, including the new Virtual Library and statewide library services to dis-

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60 ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND SERVICES UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG tance learners, is available on the World Wide Web at http:// w.vw.lib.usf.edu/virtual and http://www.lib.usf.edu/distance Tampa Campus Library Central to the philosophy of the Tampa Campus Library is the view that the people it serves are equally as important as the books on its shelves. Students are encouraged to become familiar with the collection, to master the techniques of using it, and to achieve a familiarity with information resources that will carry over into later life. The Tampa Campus Library contains a collection of more than 960,000 volumes, 4,500 periodicals and 2 million micro forms of all types to support a broad range and depth of faculty and student research, as well as personal knowledge and cultural advancement. Reference Collection: The Reference Collection is located on the first floor of the Tampa Campus Library. Reference librarians assist students and faculty with both electronic and print resources. The Reference Collection consists of over 40,000 volumes including encyclopedias, dictionaries, indexes, and abstracting services. Reference librarians present library orientation sessions as well as subject specific lectures. Ac cess to electronic information includes LUIS and the Web version called WebLUIS, the online catalog for USF and the other nine state universities; over 140 databases; full-text material and document delivery services; over 50 CD-ROM databases; and World Wide Web access. CALL/USF, the fee based information service for community users, offers borrower's cards, document delivery, and customized research. Periodicals Collection: The Periodicals Collection is lo cated on the second floor with service provided at the Periodi cals Information Desk and the Copier Assistance Desk. The collection contains more than 4,500 current periodicals and selected newspapers from Florida and major cities in the U.S. and foreign countries. A large collection of periodicals and newspapers in microfiche and microfilm are also located in the Periodicals Microform Room. LUIS and Internet workstations provide access to full-text databases and electronic journals. Also located here is a fee-based copy service as well as self service photocopying equipment. Government Documents: The Library is a selective de pository for U .S. and Florida government publications, main tains a U.S. patent depository, and acquires United Nations committee reports on microfiche. The documents collection, which is housed in the lower level of the Library, contains over 2.5 million items, including a wide variety of materials in print, microform, and electronic format. The collection is augmented by the acquisition of selected publications of other public agencies, selected reference tools, and other specialized in dexes and finding aids. Assistance with the location and use of government publications is provided at the Documents Informa tion Desk. Special Collections: The fourth floor Special Collections Department houses the library's rare books, maps, documents, manuscripts, and the University Archives With more than 1 million items, the Department contains a number of nationally significant research resources, including the papers of Florida's governors, congressmen, and other key leaders. Other impor tant collections include the nationally recognized Children's Book Collection, the NationsBank Black Sheet Music Collec tion, and the extensive holdings of mutual aid societies and immigrant history materials. These rich resource items are in closed stacks, but with assistance are available at the Special Collections service desk. AccessServices(Circulation, Interlibrary Loan, Reserve, and REC: Regional Exchange Center): The Access Services' Circulation and Reserve departments are located on the first floor. The Reserve collection, containing books and articles "reserved" at faculty request for use of a particular class, is available at the Reserve service desk. Many reserve itesm are available on the Electronic Reserve System, which is acces sible from any networked workstation. Circulating books that are shelved on the third through fifth floors can be checked out at the sel'Vice desk. The Library uses an automated circulation system which facilitates easy and quick check out of books. A statement of the Library's circulation policy is available at the Access Services desk on the first floor Library Media Center and Lab: The Library Media Center (LMC) provides media materials for instruction, research, and curriculum support. Videocassettes, sound recordings, slides, transparencies, kits, and other audio-visual formats as well as music scores are available for loan The LMC Lab provides equipment to utilize all media in the collection, including large projection screen multimedia classrooms. The LMC houses media supporting distance learning programs, including the Open University, Engineering FEEDS, and the Instructional Television Fixed Service (ITFS). Instructional and Open-Use Labs: The Library supports three state-of-the-art labs of networked workstations. Two labs, located on the second and sixth floors, are reserved for library instruction. The third lab, located on the first floor, is jointly maintained with Academic Computing as an instructional and open-use lab with facilitates for word processing, electronic mail, and printing. More information about the collections and services of the Tampa Campus Library is available on the World Wide Web at http://www.lib.usf.edu. ACADEMIC COMPUTING Academic Computing provides services in direct support of instruction and research. Support for USF's "corporate" com puting, including all aspects of student records, is provided by Information Technologies. All USF students are provided with computing accounts, email and Internet access upon request. Contact the appropriate college support group or Academic Computing. Systems and Facilities There are several locations on campus where small comput ers are maintained in open access labs These labs. may also provide access to the second tier computing facilities and the Internet. Second-tier facilities include a variety of UNIX servers operated by the colleges and Academic Computing. In many cases the individual Colleges have support groups Students and faculty should regard these groups as their PRIMARY resources for computing information. When no local group is available or when the general academic facilities are involved, Academic Computing will provide assistance Programming Languages Compilers forthe usial range of applications are available on a variety of machines across campus. Guidance is available concerning access to the compilers, but we are not able to provide programming assistance. There are some exceptions to this. For numerically intense applications, the mathematical packages, and certain statistical programming languages, help is available. Applications Software For second tier computing, the principal applications avail able deal with mathematics, statistics and database activities. Support is available in each of those categories. In the PC area, support is available for a variety of common office applications and free classes are provided for many of these. See the www site for details and registration or contact Academic Computing. User Services There are service groups within many of the colleges and units. Users are encouraged to seek help from these groups first, because of the intimate knowledge of local systems. For IBM 9672 problems, or those associated with USF's corporate or student record activities, call Information Technologies. Users with problems associated with Novell networks should also seek help from Information Technologies if no local help is available. In general, faculty and students may seek help from Academic Computing if no local help is available. The excep-

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ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 61 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG tions are for problems dealing with student records and admincommunity. The main purpose of the Institute on Black Life is to istrative computing, supported by Information Technologies. serve as a vehicle to utilize the research expertise of faculty, More information is available at http://www.acomp usf.edu students, and staff to identify and assist in the needs for INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES/CFRDC USF is the host institution for a large scale computing facility designated as the Central Florida Regional Data Center (CFRDC). This facility operates as a computing utility within the SUS and provides instructional research, and administrative computing support for the University and numerous other agencies. CFRDC is a division within Information Technologies (IT) and its support staff consists of Computer Operations, Voice Network Operations, and Technical Support Computing accounts are established through the IT Financial Services group. Central site computing equipment located in the Student Services Building on the Tampa campus includes an IBM 9672 Model R32 Enterprise Server supporting tape and disk storage subsystems, laser and impact printers providing MVSNM operating system environments in addition to a UNIX platform, and large NT file and print servers CFRDC manages and operates the campus-wide Backbone Network providing ac cess to research facilities on campus and the world via SURANET. PC's and workstations are available at various locations on campus In addition, remote access workstations are located at the St. Petersburg, Sarasota and Lakeland campuses. Microcomputers, printers, and other associated equipment are also maintained in "open use" areas to enable students, faculty, and staff access to the network and central site processing support These remote open use areas may vary in their scheduled hours ofoperation, but, generally speak ing, each provides significant amounts of access, normally seven days a week. PUBLIC BROADCASTING WUSF-TV (Channel 16, Tampa) is a noncommercial educa tional television station serving the communities of the Tampa Bay region as an important outreach arm of the University One of the most watched public TV stations in Florida, WUSF-TV provides high-quality educational, instructional, informational, cultural, and public affairs television programming and services to viewers in the greater Tampa/St. Petersburg/Sarasota areas including Polk, Pasco, and Hernando Counties, as well as USF faculty, staff, students, and other educational agencies. The station is a member of the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS), National Educational Telecommunications Association (NETA}, Florida Public Broadcasting Service Inc. (FPBS), American Public Television Station Inc (APTS) and WUSF-TV is a charter member of the Program Resources Group Inc (PRG). WUSF(FM) 89.7MHz (Tampa/St. Petersburg) is a member supported noncommercial public radio station serving USF and its campuses and surrounding communities with 24 hours a day of classical music, jazz, educational, and news and information programming The station is a member of National Public Radio (NPR), Public Radio International (PRI), Florida Public Broad casting Service Inc. (FPBS), and Southern Public Radio (SPR). The station's program service reaches more than 4 million people from Crystal River to Winterhaven to Venice The WUSF and Radio Reading Service (RRS) broadcasts daily readings of newspapers, magazines, and other materials from Tampa and Sarasota for the print and physically disabled. More than 30,0 volunteers provide material on a 24-hour sched ule. RRS airs on sub-carrier frequencies of WUSF-FM and on the SAP channel of WUSF-TV; qualified listeners receive the programming on special crystal-tuned receivers, loaned from the RRS. INSTITUTE ON BLACK LIFE As an outgrowth ofthe University of South Florida's concern for and commitment to cultural diversity, the Institute on Black Life was established in the Fall of 1986, under the Office of the Provost, to serve as a bridge between USF and the global res earch, training, and program development that will enhance the economic, educational, social, political and religious life of the community. The Institute on Black Life provides support and encouragement for African-American and other minority stu dents faculty, and staff through scholarships, fellowships, research grants, conferences, and program development. The Institute accomplishes its mission through three major compo nents: research, development, and University/community ser vice. The Institute on Black Life maintains a highly professional applied research program. Faculty from various disciplines conduct research in the areas of cultural diversity and other issues critical to the quality of life. Funding to support research projects is sought through contracts, grants and private foundations. This support assists in either the initiation of new projects or in providing resources to faculty and student research that is already in progress. The Institute holds workshops, seminars and conferences to dis cuss the findings of its research projects. The Development component links the Institute with the private sector to establish support for students through scholar ships, fellowships, book funds, and program development. The Institute on Black Life seeks funds from private foundations, corporations, and community organizations to assist in recruit ing and retaining minority students. The Institute develops community enhancement programs concerned with minority issues. These programs include a Speaker's Bureau, lectures, workshops seminars forums and conferences These programs are offered in conjunction with civic, non-profit organizations, local government agencies and businesses/corporations. Center for African Diaspora In November 1992 The Institute on Black Life initiated an agreement between the University of South Florida and the International Center for Bantu Civilizations (CICIBA) in Libreville, Gabon (Africa); thus becoming the first American university to officially affiliate with CICIBA. The Center for African Diaspora was established within the Institute on Black Life as an out growth of the CICIBA agreement. The Center is a major part of the Institute on Black Life's commitment and ongoing efforts to combine and provide more focus on African issues and activi ties. The mission of the Center is to promote research and cultural activities through educational, economic, ahd cultural exchanges between the University of South Florida students, faculty, scholars, and the community regarding the political and socio-economic issues facing Africa and descendents of the African Diaspora. OFFICE OF RESEARCH Creative research and scholarly activities are essential aspects of the undergraduate educational experience at USF. The promotion and administration of such are the responsibili ties of the Office of Research and its divisions which provide services that enable USF faculty, staff, and students at all academic levels to be competitive in a dynamic research environment. The Office of Research administers both spon sored and non-sponsored activities and projects that include institutional research projects, research contracts and grants, patents and copyrights, federal and state research compliance regulations, USF's own internal award programs, economic development initiatives, public-private partnerships, participa tion on the local research and development authority research park development, technology transfer, and research activities of affiliated hospitals and institutes. From developing a grant proposal to filing a patent to removing biohazardous waste from laboratories, the Research staff are trained professionals committed to meeting the needs of USF researchers. In turn, the dedication of USF undergradu ate as well as graduate students and faculty researche,rs has

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62 ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND SERVICES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 199&'99 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG contributed to the phenomenal growth in research that USF has experienced. In 1996/97 USF received over $106 million in research funding-quite a feat when compared to the $22 million received just 11 years ago. USF faculty, students, and staff are active in the search for new knowledge and consistently demonstrate their concern about the world in which they live. With the support of private and public a!ilencies, they contribute to our knowledge about the world in which we live and apply their findings and skills to solving many of the problems facing contemporary society. Many contributions evolve from basic research; others, from practical applications of new knowledge. Other projects make specialized training available to public officials to organizations working for social betterment, to religious and educational institutions, and to business and manufacturing organizations. Through sponsored and non-sponsored activities, USF faculty, students, and staff make significant contributions to the University's instructional programs. Additional information about services and programs is available on the World Wide Web (http : //www research.usf.edu/) LOUIS DE LA PARTE FLORIDA MENTAL HEAL TH INSTITUTE The de la Parte Florida Mental Health lnstitute's (FMHI) mission is to strengthen mental health services in the State of Florida by providing research, training and education on men tal health services (Florida Statute 240 514). The lnstitute's programs are conducted by four departments: Aging and Mental Health, Child and Family Studies Community Mental Health, and Mental Health Law and Policy. The Institute conducts a broad range of applied research, training, and dissemination activities related to the planning, development, delivery and evaluation of public mental health services. FM Hi's training and consultation activities are provided for a variety of audiences including mental health and health care profession als, the Florida legislature, administrators, policy makers plan ners consumers students, and the public FMHI provides continuing education opportunities for men tal health and health professionals. FMHI is approved to provide continuing education credits for the following professional or ganizations : American Psychological Association, Florida De partment of Professional Regulation, Florida Board of Nursing, and the Certification Board of Addiction Professionals of Florida. FMHI also provides continuing education credits to professional groups such as physicians and attorneys through the following organizations: the USF Continuing Medical Education Office and the Florida Bar Association. FMHI offers undergraduate and graduate students research assistantships, volunteer and part-time employment opportuni ties. Students may earn academic credit for independent re search performed at the Institute in conjunction with USF courses. FMHI faculty teach credit courses in degree-granting programs in cooperation with other USF colleges. FM Hi's pre-doctoral internship program for psychologists is approved by the American Psychological Association. Under graduate and graduate students participate in FMHl's Multicul tural Mental Health Training Program designed to attract minor ity students to the mental health field.

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG The College of Arts and Sciences is a community of Information on admission criteria departments, majors scholars dedicated to the idea that educated people are the programs, counseling and other services of the College may basis of a just and free society The essences of education be obtained from the Office of Academic Affairs (SOC 102), are a capacity for and an appreciation of social change within College of Arts and Sciences, University of South Florida, a context of prior human achievement. The faculty of the Arts Tampa Florida 33620 . and Sciences strive to instill in their students a history of human ideas a sense of love for learning and an under standing of the means which scholars have used in thei r search for beauty and order in the natural world. The education provided by the disc i plines of the Arts and Sciences is the foundation upon which the lives and profes sions of our students are built, and the basis from which personal growth occurs. The College of Arts and Sciences tal
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64 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES The College of Arts and Sciences offers three undergradu ate degrees : Bachelor of Arts Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Social Work. A minimum of 120 semester hours credit (124 semester hours for Mass Communications) with an overall average of 2.0 or better in all work completed at the University of South Florida must be attained in order to earn the undergraduate degree The Independent Studies is an external degree program m which the student proceeds at his/her own pace IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO MEET GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS. 1. You must complete at least 120 accepted semester hours with an overall gpa of 2 000 Mass Communications requires 124 hours for the 1 987-88 catalog and 2. You must have an overall maiorgpa of 2 000 Note: m Mass Communications you must have a 2 500 gpa in major courses in the 1989 catalog or after Social Work requires a 2 .75 major gpa 3. You must complete the Foreign Language Entrance Re quirement if you entered USF fall semester 1987 or later If you are pursuing a B.A. degree, you must complete the Foreign Language Exit Requirement 4 If you first enrolled in a co llege in January, 1983 or after, you must satisfy State Rule 6A-10.30 (Gordon Rule) concern ing computation and communications Transfer students who enter the University of South Florida with 60 or more semester hours from a regionally accredited institution are considered to have met the communicat i ons portion of the Gordon Rule. 5. You must satisfy Liberal Arts Requirements. General Education Requirements (36) Six (6) hours credit in English Composition Six (6) hours credit in Quantitative Methods Six (6) hours credit in Natural Sciences Six (6) hours credit in Social Sciences Six (6) hours credit in Historical Perspectives Three (3) hours credit in Fine Arts Three (3) hours credit in African Latin American, Middle Eastern, or Asian Perspectives Exit Requirements (9) Six (6) hours credit in Major Works and Major Issues Three (3) hours credit in Literature and Writing 6 Elective Physical Education is limited to 2 semester hours 7. ROTC is limited to 9 semester hours. 8. Maximum of20 hours ofS/U option; none in major courses. 9 The Audit option is available only during the first 5 days of classes; none permitted later. 10. You must complete at least 9 semester hours during summer terms if you entered USF with fewer than 60 semester hours 11. "D" grades are not acceptable in the major and supporting sciences for all natural sciences majors "D" grades are not acceptable for the major area in Communication Sciences and Disorders Psychology Social Work Soci ology, Mass Communications English, History, Humani ties, and Communication. Only one "D" is allow _ed in major for Criminology. (lmportanl! All grades including D"s and F"s are used to calculate all Arts and Sciences major gpa ) 12. You must satisfy all major course requirements. 13 You must complete a minimum of 40 hours of courses (numbered 3000 or above) Most of the maior hours tit here Lower-level course work from 2-year or 4year schools though equivalent to a 3000-level course at USF, does not meet this requirement. 14 Thirty (30)mthe last 60 semester hours must be com pleted at USF to fulfill the residency requirement. The departments of Biology, Chemistry Mathematics, and Physics have established minimum major course hours to be taken in residency at USF. See the department section of the catalog for the required hours. There must be a minimum of 80 hours (90 for Mass Communications) outside of your major department for all majors in arts and letters and social sciences 15. You must take and pass the CLAST (College Level Academic Skills Test) exam the semester in which you achieve or pass 45 semester hours or in your first term as an upper level transfer student. Only a baccalaureate degree or who have a previous exemption do not have to take the test. (If not passed by 70 hours, remediation will be required You may still take other courses If not passed by 96 hours, contact the Office of Evaluation and Testing for further information regarding course work. 16 A maximum of 14 hours of non-degree seeking hours (special student classification) will count for graduation 17 All USF degree seeking and non-degree seeking stu dents are bound by the drop policy From the second through the ninth week of classes (time period is different in summer-check class schedule) and between 0-59 semester hours, 3 drops are allowed and between 60 semester hours and graduation 3 more drops are al lowed Students classified as 5 (usually second degree seekers) are also allowed only 3 drops Additional drops above these numbers result in an automatic F grade. Drops within the first 5 days of classes are not Students can drop classes by telephone or by submitting a drop form to the Registrar's Office. Total withdrawal from all classes in a term is not considered toward the drop limitation. After the ninth week or for additional drops students must petition the Academic Regulations Committee (ARC) 18. Students must be in attendance the first day each class meets for all classes registered before classes begin. Failure to attend w ill result in an automatic drop from the class Do not use this policy as a way to drop classes. Submit a drop slip or drop by telephone. Mandatory First Day Attendance policy is not in effect for any classes for which registration occurs during the first week. Open University courses and certain other categones of courses as indicated in the Schedule of Classes must be dropped with a drop slip or by telephone. 19. Students are allowed to repeat a course in which a B,C,D or F has been earned and have only the second grade of A B, C, or D count in the gpa by a Grade Forgiveness Form. A maximum of 3 grade forgiveness are allowed and grade forgiveness may be used for a course only once Note : Both the original and repeated courses must be taken at USF All grades (transfer and USF) are considered for honors. 20 Students are in good academic standing unless the grade point average falls below a cumulative 2.000 for USF courses (Transfer grades are not considered ) The first semester the gpa falls below a cumulative 2.000 students are placed on academic probation (AP) If the gpa is n<;>t raised to a 2.000 the next term of enrollment students will be placed on final academic probation (FP) Students in this category who fails to raise his/her gpa to 2 oqo or higher at the end of the next term of enrollment will be academically dismissed (AD) from the University Stu dents who have documentation to support readmission may petition the Academic Regulations Committee Tum in your graduation application to SOC 102 during the 1st to the 4th week of the semester in which you plan to graduate. Applications arenot accepted late The Departmental Minor . In order to help students develop some concentration m elective work taken in conjunction with their chosen major, the College of Arts and Sciences offers minors in the following

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 65 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 11198199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG departments/programs: Africana Studies, American Studies, Anthropology Classics, Communication, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Criminology, Economics, English, Foreign Languages, Geography, Geology, Gerontology, His tory, Humanities, International Studies, Linguistics, Mass Communications, Mathematics, Philosophy, Physics, Politi cal Science Psychology, Religious Studies, Sociology, and Women's Studies In general, these require half as many hours as are required for the major. There are certain that apply to students earning a minor: (a) students who major and minor in the social sciences and arts and letters may not use courses in the major for the minor or for general education requirements; and (b) ISS majors may not earn a minor in any of the social and behavioral sciences incorporated in their contracts. In some departments, S/U grades within the minor curriculum are not countable. Spe cific requirements for the different minors appear under the departmental summaries listed under Programs and Cur ricula. SIU Grades ln the College of Arts and Sciences some courses have S/ U as an option. S/U contracts must be negotiated in writing within the first three (3) weeks of the term. A maximum of 20 hours of optional S/U credits may be counted towards the 120 hours (124 hours for Mass Commu nications) needed for the degrees. None ofthe 20 credits may be taken in the student's major unless S/U is the only grading option. Freshman English may not be taken S/U. Community Experiential Learning Program The Community Experiential Leaming (GEL) Program offers students the opportunity to explore the relationship between their classroom learning and the broader commu nity With faculty guidance, students design their own commu nity experiences and receive between one and four academic credit(s) upon completion Students may choose to work as an intern with a community organization/agency or to explore a community issue through independent research. The com munity can be as close as a neighborhood just beyond the campus or on the other side of the world. Students may participate in GEL anytime during their academic career. Good standing at the university and a 2.0 GPA is required for acceptance into the Program GEL courses are offered throughout the entire year Students should plan their GEL projects during the term prior to their implementa tion. PROGRAMS LEADING TO THE BACCALAUREATE DEGREE The departments and programs in the College of Arts and Sciences are Africana Studies, American Studies, Anthropol ogy, Biology Chemistry, Classics, Communication Com munication Sciences and Disorders, Criminology, Econom ics, English, Environmental Science and Policy, Geography, Geology, Gerontology, Government & International Affairs, History, Humanities, Independent Studies, Interdisciplinary Social Sciences; International Studies, Liberal Studies, Li brary and Information Science, Marine Science Mass Com munications, Mather;natics, Medical Technology, Modem Lan guages and Linguistics, Philosophy, Physics, Political Sci ence, Psychology, Public Ad ministration, Rehabilitation Coun seling, Religious Studies, Social Work, Sociology, and Women's Studies. The College of Arts and Sciences offers 53 major fields of study as described in the following pages. In addition to the departmental majors, interdisciplinary majors are offered Economics offers two majors, one in the College of Arts and Sciences and the other in the College of Business Administration. Bachelor of Arts Africana Studies (AFA) American Studies (AMS) Anthropology (ANT) Biology (NSB)* Chemistry (CHM) (NSC)* Classics Latin (CLL) housed in Division of Languages and Linguistics Classics Latin/Greek (CLS) housed in Division of Languages and Linguistics Communication (SPE) Criminology (CCJ) Economics (ECN) English (ENG) French (FRE) Geography (GPY) Geology (GL Y) German (GER) Gerontology (GEY) History (HTY) Humanities (HUM) Interdisciplinary Classics (ICL) housed in Division of Languages and Linguistics Interdisciplinary Natural Sciences : Biology (INB) Chemistry (INC) Clinical Laboratory Sciences (INL) Geology (ING) Mathematics (INM) Physics (INP) Interdisciplinary Social Scierices (ISS) Communication Sciences and Disorders Speech-Language-Hearing Concentration (ISH) American Sign Language Concentration (ISA) Educational Interpreter Concentration (ISi) International Studies (INT) housed in Government & International Affairs Italian (IT A) Liberal Studies (ALA) Mass Communications (COM) Mathematics (MTH MAE*) Philosophy (PHI) Physics (NSP*, PHY) Political Science (POL)-housed in Government & International Affairs Psychology (PSY) Religious Studies (REL) Russian (RUS) Sociology (SOC) Social Science Education (SSE)* Spanish (SPA) Women's Studies (WSJ) Bachelor of Science Degree Biology (BIO) Cherriistry (CHS) Environmental Science and Policy (ESP) Geology (GL Y) Gerontology (GES) Medical Technology (MET) Microbiology (MIC) housed in Biology Physics (PHS) Bachelor of Social Work Degree (B.S.W.) Social Wo'rk (SOK) Bachelor of Independent Studies (B.l.S.) Independent Studies (BIS) *Offered jointly with the College of Education Honors Programs Faculty and selected students in the college participate in the University Honors Program. In addition, the College of Arts and Sciences offers undergraduate honors programs in Anthropology Biology, Classics, Communication, Geology,

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66 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 199&'99 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Mathematics, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology. Students interested in one of these honors pro grams should consult the appropriate department for further information. CERTIFICATES OF CONCENTRATION Certificate Programs The Certificate of Concentration is a short-term program for students who are interested in taking a series of courses in a selected area of Arts and Sciences, but are not necessar ily interested in a degree. A minimum of 1 of a pp.roved course work are required Students working for a Certificate of Concentration register as special rather than as degree seeking students For more information, contact the Coordi nators of Advising in the College office. Certificate in Asian Studies Requirements for the Certificate in Asian Studies: The certificate in Asian Studies is designed for majors in any field who wish to gain a broad of a world area that is of unique importance. Requirements are as follows: 1. 18 semester hours from the courses listed below 2 At least two courses must be from Group A and at least two courses must be from Group B. (Other relevant courses may be substituted with the approval of the program advisor ) 3 Students must declare their intention to be awarded the certificate by notifying the program advisor at least one full semester prior to graduation . 4 Students who fa ii to achieve a cumulative2.5 GPAorh1gher in the will be denied the certificate. Courses credited toward the Asian Studies Certificate: Group AArt ARH 4530 (4) ARH 4796 (4) Humanities: HUM 3271 (4) HUM 3273 (4) HUM 4402 (4) HUM 4404 (4) HUM 4405 (4) Languages : CHI 1120 (4) CHI 2201 (4) JPN 1120 (4) JPN 2201 (3) Religion: REL 3330 (3) REL 4333 (4) GroupBGeography : GEA 3194 (4)* History. ASH 3404 (4) Int'/ Studies: ASN 3012 (3) INR 4900 (1-3)* Political Science: CPO 4930 (3)* CHI 1121 (4) CHI 4905 (1-5) JPN 1121 (4) JPN 4905 (1-5) REL 4343 (4) REL 4344 (4) ASH 3501 (4) ASN 3014 (3) INR 4910 (1-3)* CPO 5934 (3) CHI 2200 (4) CHI 4930 (1-5) JPN 2000 (3) JPN 4930 (1-5) REL 3350 (3) ASN 3105 (3) INR 4931 (1-4)* INR 5086 (3) "with approval by the Advisor for the Certificate in Asian Studies The advisor for the Certificate in Asian Studies is Professor Renu Khator. She may be contacted at SOC 363, 974-5019, and by e-mail : khator@luna.cas.usf.edu Certification in Corrections The Department of Criminology offers a certificate in corrections. This certificate is recognized by the Florida Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission (FCJSTC) and by the Florida Departm ent of (FDOC) as satisfying some of th. e Basic Recruit Train1n.g objectives for Correctional Probation Officers (CPO). This certificate program consists of 21 semester hours com prised of the following courses: CCJ 3024 (3) CCJ 4282 (3) CCJ 4316 (3) CCJ 4331 (3) CCJ 4341 (3) CCJ 4306 (3) and CCJ 4940 (3). Students must approval department prior to starting their c:oursework within this certification program. The program 1s open to all USF stu dents including Criminology majors and minors as well as to persons who have already received their baccalaureate de grees. All of the required coursework within this certification program must be taken at USF and all additional training requirements must be taken at an FCJSTC approved pro gram in order to qualify as a Florida Correction Probation Officer. Students working toward corrections certification are also subject to the Department's 2 D" rule Certificate in Latin American and Caribbean Studies The College of Arts and Sciences offers a in Latin American and Caribbean Studies for students who wish to gain an intensive multi-disciplinary understanding of this important area This certificate is designed for students who want to learn more about the region and have that knowledge formally recognized in their academic record. . The Certificate is granted to a person who takes a mini mum of 15 semester hours of courses about Latin America and the Caribbean plus at least two semesters of relevant foreign language credit. One course must be taken in each of four areas: 1) Anthropology, 2) & International Affairs, 3) History, and 4) Art/Humarnbes/L1tera ture. A fifth course may be taken from a list of other courses or from one of the four core areas. Students must take at least one of the indicated surveys(*) If ANT 4162 and ANT 4163 are both taken they will also count as the required survey. Students must also demonstrate proficiency in a Latin American or Caribbean language (Spanish, French, Portuguese) . Study abroad programs are encouraged and will be credited toward the Certificate . The following courses fulfill the certificate requirement. However these should be considered as a partial list only. The is stronly encouraged to review the Schedule of Classes each semester for current course offerings. 1 ) Anthropology ANT 4162 South American Archaeology**' ANT 4163 Mesoamerican Archaeology** ANT 4340 The Caribbean ANT 4324 Mexico and Central America ANT 4495 Methods in Cultural Research*.** 2) Geography/Government & International Affairs GEA 3300 Geography of Middle America GEA 3400 Geography of Latin America* CPO 4930 Latin American Politics* LAS 3002 Latin America* INR 4931 Americas (TV)* INR 4931 Latin America through Film CPO 5934 Selected Topics: Latin America 3) History LAH 2734 Latin American History in Film LAH 3130 Colonial Latin America LAH 3200 Modem Latin America* LAH 3430 History of Mexico LAH 3470 History of the Caribbean LAH 3480 History of Cuba LAH 3930 US/Latin American Relations 4) Art/Humanities/Literature ARH 4 796 Latin American Art HUM 4462 Ancient Latin American Culture HUM 4464 Latin American Culture Since 1492* SPN 3520 Spanish American Civilization* SPN 5525 Modem Spanish American Civilization SPW 3030 Introduction to Hispanic Literature SPW 4131 Survey of Spanish American Literature* SPW 5135 Colonial Spanish American Literature SPW 5355 Spanish American Drama and Poetry SPW 5387 Spanish American Prose cg'

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 67 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CA TA LOG SPT 2524 Women Writers of Latin America 5) Others ECO 4935 Selected Tbpics : Economics of Latin America S .SE. 4380 Global & Multicultural Perspectives in . Education Students must take at least one of the indicate<;l surveys ** ANT 4162 and ANT 4163 may be taken together-as the required survey course ***Field School When the student has completed the above requirements, the Latin American Studies Advisor will recommend the student for the Certificate, which will be awarded upon the successful completion of all degree requirements for the major. Information and advice about the certificate program may be obtained from the Latin American and Caribbean Studies Office, CPR 478. Call 974-3547. The program is open to all majc:irs in all colleges. Certificate in Modern Western European Studies The College of Arts and Sciences offers this certificate through the collaboration of the Departments of English, Geography, History, Humanities and American Studies Gov ernment aAd International Affairs Languages & Linguistics and Philosophy It is designed for majors in any field who wish to gain a multi-disciplinary understanding of a part of the world that has shape d much of our civilization and holds great significance for Americans in present and future . Tt:1e student and the Coordinator will plan the individual course of study, requires between 21 and 24 semester hours. Students must declare their intention to be awarded the certificate py the Coordinator at least one full semester prior to graduation. A cumulative GPA of 2.5 in the certificate course work is required Please contact Professor Georg H. Kleine at SOC 274, 974-2688, and by e-mail: kleine@luna cas usf.edu I. Language Requirement. (6) Students will enroll in two additional semesters of the foreign language they have taken in fulfillment of the College of Arts and Sciences language requ ir ement. II. Core Courses. ( 9-10) Students will take a total of three courses from the follow ing; one of them must be either EUS 3000 or GEA 3500 EUS 3000 GEA 3500 EUH 3206 HUM 3251 LIT 3144 PHM 4331 Europe Geography of Europe History of Twentieth Century Europe Studies in Culture: The Twentieth Century Modem European Novel Modem Political Philosophy Ill. Elective Courses. ( 6-8 ) A. Overseas Experience Students should make Western European study and travel an important component of their academic work. !hey are required to enrol l' for at least 3 elective credit hours in courses that involve Western European study and travel. These may be taken in one of three ways : (1) as IDS 4955 (Off-Campus Term International Program), (2) as one or two of the courses below as Elective Courses,. or (3) as part of overseas study courses offered by other U.S.F. colleges and other universities. Western European study and travel allows stu dents to concentrate on one of the areas of electives . Elective courses under options (2) and (3) will be chosen in consul tation with the Coordinator and an Advisory Committee. Students may want to use overseas experience credits to fulfill their summer enrollment requirement. A structured alternative experience in the United States may be substituted forthe Overs eas Experience The CertifiUSE' cate accepts IDS 4943 (Off-Campus Term Special Project) or any of the courses listed below as Elective Courses for credit for this requirement. Coordinator Advisory Committee and student will tailor the experience to fit the student's individual needs B . English ENL 3230 ENL 3251 ENL 327.3 ENL 3331 ENL 3332 LIT 3102 C. History EUH 3142 EUH 3202 E!JH 3205 EUH 3206 EUH 3461 EUH 3462 EUH 3501 EUH 3502 HIS 3930 HIS 4900 (3) British Literature 1616-1780 British Literature 1780-1900 British Literature 1900-1945 Early Shakespeare Late Shakespeare Literature of the Western World II ( 1-4) Rena i ssance and Reformation History of 17th and 18th Century Europe History of Nineteenth Century Europe History of Twentieth Century Europe German History to 1870 German History 1870 to Present British History to 1688 British History 1688 to P r esent Special Topics Directed Reading D. Humanities and American Studies ( 1-4) HUM 4437 Italian Renaissance Culture HUM 4438 Northern Rena i ssance Culture HUM 4440 Arts and Letters if the 17th and 18th Centuries HUM 4442 Arts and Letters of the Romantic Period HUM 4444 19th Century European Arts and Letters HUM 4445 20th Century European Arts and Letters HUM 4905 Directed Study HUM 4941 Study on Location E. Government and International Affairs ( 3) CPO 4930 Comparative Government and Politics INR 3955 Overseas Study POS 3931 Selected Topics POS 4905 Independent Study POT 4054 Modern Political Theory F. Languages and Linguistics ( 1-4) (Note: the student should take courses from the list below after complet i ng the two additional semesters of the foreign language requirement (see I ) or, if already advanced in language, with the instructor s approval. These courses are generally taught in the target language ) FRENCH FRE 3230 FRE 3440 FRE 3500 FRW 4100 FRW 4101 FRE 4905 FRE 4930 GERMAN GER 3500 GET 3100 GEW 4100 GEW 4101 GEW 4900 GEW 4930 ITALIAN ITW 4100 llW 4101 ITW 4905 SPANISH 3440 SPN 3441 SPN 3500 SPW 3030 SPW 4100 Reading in French Literature and Culture French for Business French Civilization Introduction to French Novel Introduction to F r ench Drama and Poetry Directed Study Selected Topics German Civilization German Literature in English Survey of German Literature I Survey of German Literature II Directed Study Selected Topics Survey of Italian Literature I Survey of Italian Literature II Directed Study Spanish for Business Spanish for Business Writing Spanish Civilization Introduction to Hispanic Literature Survey of Spanish Literature I

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68 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG SPW 41O1 Survey of Spanish literature 11 SPW 4900 Directed Study SPW 4930 Selected Topics G. Philosophy ( 3) PHH 3420 History of Philosophy PHH 4440 Continental Philosophy PHM 4331 Modem Political Philosophy PHP 3786 Existentialism PHP 4410 Kant PHP 4740 The Rationalists PHP 4745 The Empiricists Courses not included in the above list may be included in the program if approved by the Coordinator and an Advisory Committee. Certificate in Russian Studies The College of Arts and Sciences offers a Certificate in Russian Studies for students who wish to gain an intensive multidisciplinary understanding of this important area. A minimum of 23 to 26 semester hours is required of all students seeking such a certificate, and will be distributed in the following manner : Language-Linguistics-Literature Twelve hours from the following courses, 8 of which must be in language: LIN 4930 Selected Topics in Linguistics (1-3) RUS 2200 RUS 2201 RUS '3240 RUS 3500 RUS 4241 RUT 3110 RUT 3111 RUS 2270 RUS 3470 RUS 4471 (Russian or another Slavic language) Russian Ill (4) Russian IV (4) Conversation I ( 4) Russian Civilization (3) Conversation II ( 4) Russian Classics in Translation (3) Twentieth Century Russian Literature in Translation Overseas Study Overseas Study Overseas Study (3) (1-6) (1-6) (1-6) History.Political Science-Economics Six to eight hours from the following courses: CPO 3002 Introduction to Comparative Politics (4) ECO 4323 Marxist Political Economy ECO 4935 Russian Political Economy 3) EUH 3571 Russian History to 1865 4) EUH 3572 Russian History from 1865 to Present(4) International Studies-Geography-Philosophy. Six to eight hours from the following courses: EUS 3022 Russia GEA 3554 of the USSR ( INR 5086 Issues in International Relations (3 INR 3018 World Ideologies (3) INR 3770 Comparative Military Systems (3) PHP 4788 The Philosophy .of Marxism (3) INR 4900 Directed Readings* (1-4) INR 4910 Directed Research* INR 3955 Overseas Study* 1-6) INR 4931 Selected Topics* 1-4) *When topic is defined as Russian or directly related area. Other courses may be substituted for those listed above upon approval of the Russian Studies coordinator. Certificate in Urban Studies The Urban Studies Certificate offers students the oppor tunity to supplement their education and training with a focus on the problems and potentials of the urban world around us. Eighty percent of Americans live in one of the country's nearly 400 major metropolitan areas. Understanding the economic, cg social, cultural, political and spatial phenomena of urban areas, and how they came to be, is essential if one is to thrive in today's world. The Urban Studies curriculum begins with an interdisciplinary Introduction to Urban Studies and then weaves the multidisciplinary urban offerings into a coherent understanding of urban life. The Urban Studies Coordinator helps each student fashion a curriculum that meets his/her unique intellectual and careerneeds The curriculum, through its courses and internship possibilities, focuses on the real world," thus providing students with a valuable foundation for their career planning and advancement. With the help of the Urban Studies Coordinator, students can design concentra tions in urban planning urban management, community development, community organizing, etc. The Certificate requires a of 24 credits. I. CORE COURSES (9-10 credits) URS 3002 Introduction to Urban Studies 3 And 2 of the following: ANT 4442 Urban Life and Culture 3 EPC 3613 Economics of the Urban Environment 3 GEO 3602 Urban Geography 4 POS 3142 Introduction to Urban Politics and Government 3 SYD 4410 Urban Sociology or 3 ISS 4162 City and Urbanization 3 Courses may prerequisites within the discipline. II. METHODS COURSES (select 1 of the following: credits) ANT 4495 ECO 4935 POS 3713 STA 2122 SYA 3300 SYA 3310 GEO 4100C GEO 4114C Methods in Cultural Research Economics Statistics Empirical Political Analysis Social Science Statistics Research Methods Qualitative Inquiry Cartography Geographic Techniques and 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 Methodology 4 GEO 4164C Quantitative Methods 4 3-4 Courses may have prerequisites within the discipline. Ill. ELECTIVES (select 4 from the following list or from the CORE COURSES not counted above: minimum of 12 cred its) African Studies PFA 4331 Social Institutions and the AMH 3572 AMS 3700 PFA 4335 PFA 4931 African-American Community 3 African American History since 1865 3 Racism in American Society 3 Black Women in America 3 Social and Cultural Issues in Black Urban Life PUP 3313 Blacks in the American Political Process Anthropology ANT 4316 ANT 4462 ANT 4705 ANT 4930 Architecture ARC 4784 Ethnic Diversity in the U .S. Medical Anthropology Applied Anthropology Special Topics in Anthropology The City Communications SPC 3712 Communications and Cultural 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 SPC 4714 Communications, Culture and Community 3 Civil and Engineering TIE 4004 Transportation Planning and Economics

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 69 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Criminology CCJ 3003 CCJ 3024 CCJ 3610 CCJ 3621 CCJ 4110 CCJ 4501 CCJ 4511 CCJ 4550 CCJ 4652 Economics ECO 4323 ECO 4504 ECP 3201 ECP 3203 ECP 3302 ECP 3530 ECO 4935 Geography Crime and Justice in America Survey of the Criminal Justice System Theories of Criminal Behavior Patterns of Criminal Behavior American Law Enforcement Systems Juvenile Justice System Police and Juvenile Delinquency Developmental Aspects of Juvenile Delinquency Juvenile Substance Use Radical Politic .al Economy Public Finance Economics of Women and Work Labor Economics Environmental Economics Economics of Health Economics of Crime 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 GEO 4502 Economic Geography 4 GEO 4604 Advanced Urban Geography 4 GEO 4700 Transportation Geography 4 URP 4052 Urban and Regional Planning 4 Gerontology HUS 1001 Introduction to Human Service 3 History AMH 3423 AMH 3500 AMH ;3530 AMH 3572 HIS 3930 HIS 3930 HIS 3930 Modem Florida 4 American Labor History 4 Immigration History 4 African American History since 1865 3 Special Topics: The City in History 3 Special Topics: The History of Tampa 3 Special Topics: The History of St. Petersburg 3 Humanities and Americ .an Studies AMS 3700 Racism and American Society Interdisciplinary Social Sciences ISS 4162 The City and Urbanization 3 ISS 4164 Urban Social Issues: An Interdisciplinary Approach 3 Political Science POS 2112 State and Local Government and Politics 3 POS 3145 Governing Metropolitan Areas 3 POS 4165 Community Leaders and Politics 3 POS 3931 Special Topics: Politics of St. Petersburg 3 PUP 3313 Blacks in the American Political System 3 PUP 4002 Public Policy 3 POS 5155 Issues of Urban Government and Politics 3 Public Administration PAD 3003 lntroductio51 to Public Administration 3 PAD 4204 Public Financial Administration 3 PAD 5333 Concepts and Issues in Public Planning 3 PAD 5807 Administration of Urban Affairs 3 Social Work SOW 3203 The American Social Welfare System 3 Sociology SYG 3120 SYO 3530 SYD 3700 SYP 4510 SYP 4530 Sociology of Families 3 Social Stratification 3 Racial and Social Relations 3 Sociological Aspects of Deviance 3 Sociology of Juvenile Delinquency 3 IV. INTERNSHIPS (1 of the following can be substituted as an ELECTIVE) CCJ 4940 Internship for Criminal Justice HUM 4941 IOS 4942 IDS 4956 Majors Study on Location CEL Community Internship CEL International Community Internship POS 4941 Field Work SYA 4949 Sociological Internship See: Robin R. Jones, SOC 220, 974-8452. IV. MAJORS, CONCENTRATIONS ETC.: 3 3 3 3 3 3 The Certificate is available in addition to existing majors, to degree seeking and special (non-degree seeking) stu dents. Through the careful selection of electives and courses in a student's major a number of concentrations can be created Here is a possible list of concentrations: 1) Anthro pology, 2) Administration 3) Criminology 4) Economics, 5) Geography, 6) Gerontology, 7) Policy and Politics, 8) Social Work 9) Transportation. When the student has completed the above requirements, The Urban Studies Coordinator will recommend the student for the Certificate, which will be awarded upon the successful completion of all degree requirements for the major Information and advice about the certificate program may be obtained from the Urban Studies coordinator. Call 9748452. The Office is SOC 220. Special Non-Degree Program The HUMAN SERVICES courses are designed for stu dents interested in careers in the human sciences and services, and may be taken in conjunction with any major or by special students. These courses are coordinated by the Department of Gerontology, and the courses are listed as: HUS 1001 HUS 2100 HUS 4020 HEAL TH PROFESSIONS The University of South Florida is an excellent location to prepare for a health profession. The Veterans Administration Hospital, University of South Florida Medical Center, Shriner's Hospital for Crippled Children, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, University of South Florida Mental Health Institute, and University Community Hospital are within walking distance of the campus and offer students excellent opportunities for observation, research, and experience. The College of Arts and Sciences offers programs de signed to prepare students for admission to professional schools of medicine, osteopathic medicine, dentistry, optom etry, podiatric medicine, and veterinary medicine. Usually these professions require four years of preprofessional preparation followed by four years of training in a professional school. A few well prepared students with exceptional quali fications may be admitted to some professional schools as early as the completion of the junior year of preprofessional work. The preprofessional programs do not meet require ments for a degree, but students should plan to also complete a degree while at USF because, while not specifying a major, professional schools prefer students with a bachelor's de gree. Most preprofessional students major in the sciences because of their interests in the health sciences, and be cause of the considerable overlap between the preprofessional curriculum and the degree requirements for majors in the biology and chemistry departments. Entrance into all professional schools or programs is competitive, and

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70 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG students should begin establishing a record of excellence with the first semester at USF. Furthermore, it is essential that students pursue courses developing a sense of understand ing of cultural and humane values and bas ) c social problems. The College of Arts and Sciences provides academic advising in the Science Advising Center. The office maintains a library of current catalogs and on admission require ments for professional schools and is an important resource center for preprofessional students. Students considering one of the health professions should contacrthe College of Arts and Sciences during the first semester at USF to declare their interest in a health professions program. Students' are then assigned to the Science ;A.dvising Center for curriculum planning, and each semester the office provides students with updated academic records. At the time of application professional schools, students are provided information admission tests and the appliq:ition process, and they are assisted in the process of obtaining faculty evaluati.ons. Pre-dental Pre-medical Pre-podiatry Program This program is designed to prepare students for admis sion to schools of dentistry, medicine, osteo pathic medicine, and pediatric medicine. All of these sional schools have in common the following cour5e require ments, which should be completed by the end ofthe junior year, the usual time of application: Biology: BSC 2010, 2010L (3,1) BSC 2011, 2011L (3,1) Chemistry: CHM 2041 (3) CHM 2210 (3) CHM 2045L (1) CHM 2210L (2) CHM 2046 (3) CHM 2211 (3) CHM 2046L (1) CHM 2211L (2) Physics: PHY 2053 (3) ] [PHY 2048 (3) PHY 2053L ( 1) or PHY 2048L ( 1) PHY 2054 (3) PHY 2049 (3) PHY 2054L (1) PHY 2049L (1) In addition to these requirements it is generally expected that preprofessional students will complete two semesters of English and mathematics appropriate for their degree. Some schools require calculus and some require one or two COl.lrses in biochemistry CLEP credit usually is not acceptable to professional schools. . The following courses are recommended by some profes sional schools: (4) PCB 3063, 3063L (3, 1) PCB 5235 (3) zoo 4603 (4) PCB 3023, 3023L (3, 1) PCB 4723, 4723L (3,1) ZOO 2713C (4) ZOO 4753C (4) Chemistry: BCH 3023 (3) BCH 4034 (3) CHM 3120C (4) CHM 3400 (3) CHM 3401 (3) An early admission program has be.en established in affiliation with the University of Florida College of Dentistry, which would allow students to be admitted to dental school after three years at the University of South Florida, completing a baccalaureate degree and dental school in a total of seven In order to be eligible for early to of Dentistry, a high school student must. be ac;cepted. by the University of South Florida ano must meet the following requirements: overall high school gpa of no less than 3.4, as computed by the University ofFlorida; total SAT of no less than 1200, or ACT of no less than 28, or EACT of no less than 29; high school science gpa of no less than 3.0 with courses completed ill both biology and apply during the senior year df high school and be approved for admission by the College of Dentistry Admissions Committee following a formal interview. Following admissi'b'n into the joint program; final acceptance to the College of E>ehtistry is contingent upon the student completing all required courses; earning a gpa of no less than 3.2 for all courses attempted and no less than 3.0 for courses in biology, chemistry, physics, and mathemat ics; and completing the Dental Admissions Test with a score than 15 on each section of the test. ltis also possible for students to apply for early admission during the freshman and sophomore years at the University of South Florida. Additional information is available in the Health Professions Advising Office. Pre-optometry Program schools differ somewhat in but all optometry schools require at least two years of pre optometry studies, and most schools require the following courses: Biolog : 2010, 2010L (3,1) MCB 3030C (4) Chemistry: BSC 2011, 2011L (3,1) CHM 2041 (3) CHM 2046L (1) CHM 2211 (3) CHM 2045L (1) CHM 2046 (3) CHM 2210 (3) CHM 2210L (2) CHM 2211L (2) Math'ematics: MAC 2233 (4) STA 2023 (4) or STA 2122 (3) Physics: PHY 2053 (3) PHY 2053L (1) PHY 2054 (3) PHY 2054L (1) Most schools require at least one semester of psychology (PSY 2012). Students should check requirements of iQdi vidual schools and complete requirements for those schools where they plan to apply for admission. A joint program between USF and Nova-Southeastern University College of Optometry al. lows studenls to complete a baccalaureate degree and doctor of optometry 'degree in a seven-year program. Freshmen may apply for the joint program by applying for admission to USF and also applying for admission to Nova-Southeastern. To be eligible for admission, students must meet all admission requirements for USF, and in addition must have an SAT minimum score of 1100, an ACT minimum of 25 or an EACT minimum of 27; a minimum high school GPA of 3.3; three years pf high school science including biology and chemistry; and high school mathematics through algebra and trigonometry. Once admit ted to the program students must earn a min.imum GPA of 3 0 each term and satisfactorily complete required courses and the Optometry Admissions Test. Students must be Florida residents by the time they Pre-veterinary Medicine Program The pre-veterinary medicine program meets admission requirements of the University ofFlorida College ofVeterinary Medicine, the only veterinary school in the state. Admission into veterinary school is highly selective, and to be competitive students should obtain experience working with animals, preferably through employment with a veterinarian. Pre-vet erinary students should complete a degree in the major of their choice while including the following entrance require ments: Biolog-: BSC 2010, 2010L (3,1) MCB 3030C (4) BSC 2011, 2011L (3,1) PCB 3063, 3063L (3,1) Chemistry: CHM 2041 (3) CHM 2046L (1) CHM 2211 (3) Mathematics: CHM 2045L (1) CHM 2046 (3) CHM 2210 (3) CHM 2210L (2) CHM 2211 L (2) BCH 3023 (3) MAC 2233 (4) and MAC 2234 ('4) or MAC 2311 (4) STA 2023 (4) Physics: PHY 2053 (3) J [PHY 2048 (3) PHY 2053L (1) or PHY 2048L (1) PHY 2054 (3) PHY 2049 (3) PHY 2054L ( 1) PH.Y 2049L ( 1) It is required that students have a minimum of 80 hours

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 71 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 11191199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG in
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72 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CA TA LOG experiences of people of African descent in the United States, Africa, the Caribbean, and elsewhere; (2) to study the influ ence of Africa and people of African descent on world and U.S. thought, culture, and politics; (3) to study the social construc tion and consequences of race and racism; (4) to develop needed critical thinking skills to address the often narrow .and Eurocentric bias in the current knowledge base; and (5) to examine their personal experiences, prejudices, and pos sible contributions in a multi-racial, multi-cultural society. Students who major or minor in Africana Studies have the option of emphasizing African-American Studies (including the Caribbean), African Studies, or both. Admission to the Africana Studies major or minor is open to all students who have been duly admitted to the University of South Florida. Requirements for the Major in Africana Studies The major in Africana Studies consists of a minimum of 36 hours. Students may choose an area of emphaisis in African American Studies, African Studies, or Africana Studies (both). The requirements for the majors are as follows: Required Core Courses for all areas (15 er. hours) : AFA 2000 (3) AFH 3200 (3) AMH 3572 (3) AFH 3100 (3) AMH 3571 (3) Required Electives (select 21 er. hours): l' African-American Studies (suf gested) AFA4331 (3) ANT 4340 3) PUP 3313 (3) AFA 4335 (3) AML 3604 3) HUM 2420 (3) AMS3700(3) PHM4120(3) AFA4931(1-3) African Studies (suggested) AFS 2250 (3r CPO 4244 (3) AFA4150(3) INR 4254 (3) CPO 4204 (3) HUM 2420 (3) Africana Studies (suggested) AFA 4331 (3) ANT 4340 (3) AFA 4335 (3) CPO 4204 (3) AFS 2250 (3) CPO 4244 (3) AML 3604 (3) HUM 2420 (3) INR 4254 (3) PHI 4073 (3) AFA4931 (1-3) PHI 4073 (3) PHM 4120 (3) PUP 3313 (3) AFA4931 (1-3) Requirements for the Minor in Africana Studies The minor in Africana Studies requires a minimum of 18 credit hours As in the major, students may choose an area of emphasis in African-American Studies, African Studies, or Africana Studies (both). The requirements for the minor are as follows: Africana Studies (Minimum of 18 hours): Required Core Courses (select 9 er. hours) AFA 2000 (3) AFH 3100 (3) or AFH 3200 (3) AMH 3571 (3) or AMH 3572 (3) Required Electives (select 9 er. hours) AML3604(3) INR4254(3) AFA 4335 (3 ANT 4340 (3) PHI 4073 (3) AFA4931 (3 CPO 4204 (3) PUP 3313 (3) AMS 3700 (3) HUM 2420 (3) African-American Studies (Minimum of 18 hours): Required Core Courses (9 er. hours) AFA 2000 (3) AMH 3571 (3) AMH 3572 (3) Required Electives (select 9 er. hours) AFA4150 (3) AML 3604 (3) PHM 4120 (3) AMS3700 PUP3313(3) AFA4335 3) ANT 4340 (3) AFA4931 1-3) HUM 2420 (3) African Studies (Minimum of 18 hours) Required Core Courses (select 9 er. hours) AFH 3100 (3) CPO 4204 (3) AFH 3200 (3) INR 4254 (3) Required Electives (select 9 er. hours) AFA4150 (3) CPO 4244 (3) INR 4254 (3) AFA4931 (1-3) HUM 2420 (3) PHI 4073 (3) Prerequisites (State Mandated Common Prerequisites) Complete the A.A. degree at the community college. Some courses required for the major may also meet General Education Requirements thereby transferring maximum hours to the university. A minimum of 60 semester hours must be completed at the university unless prior approval is secured from the university advisor listed above If you transfer without an A.A. degree and have fewer than 60 semester hours of acceptable credit, you must meet the university's entering freshman requirements including ACT or SAT test scores, GPA, and course requirements. Students are encouraged to complete the following pre requisites, or major, support, or elective courses if available, during the program of study at the community college, and when feasible in General Education/Gordon Rule courses. AFA2000 Introduction to the Black Experience In Africa & Its Diaspora 3 AFS 2250 Culture and Society in Africa 3 AMH 3571 Afro-American History I 3 AMH 3572 Afro-American History II 3 There are no State Mandated Common Prerequisites for this degree program. Please be aware of the immunization, foreign language, and continuous enrollment policies of the university. This is a non-limited access program with the above courses recom mended ANTHROPOLOGY (ANT) Anthropology aims at comprehending people as biologi cal and social beings. It is concerned with all forms of people through time and space consequence of this broad ranging view is the presence within anthropology of four branches: physical anthropology, archaeology cultural an thropology, and linguistics. Exposure to anthropological information and the cross-cultural perspective produces heightened sensitivity in the student to the world about him/ her. This helps the student to adopt an irltellectual posture of disciplined skepticism with respect to any scheme which purports to define and account for regularities in human life. In 1986 the department instituted an honors program to provide its best students with an opportunity to engage in a significantacademic experience. Outstanding seniors may participate in a year-long course of study and original re search in an area of their choosing under the guidance of a faculty mentor Students majoring in other fields may find anthropology coursework an exciting and valuable supplement to their primary academic interest. A minor in anthropology has been developed with this purpose in mind. The minor program is structured to allow the student maximum flexibility in course selection within a broadly defined progression of anthropo logical concerns. Thus, the student is able to tailor a minor in anthropology to best suit special wants and needs in the context of an overall curriculum. The Center for Applied Anthropology is concerned with applying anthropological knowledge, theory, method, and perspectives to problems of contemporary society Illustrative areas of activity include human services needs assessment ; program planning and evaluation, social and environmental impact assessment, and public policy analysis Requirements for the Major in Anthropology The major in Anthropology consists of a minimum of 33 credit hours. ANT 2000 is prerequisite to all subsequent courses. ANT 3100, ANT 2410, ANT 3511 and ANT 3610 are required as intermediate level training in the main subdivi sions of the field and ANT 4034 and ANT 4935 complete the specific requirements. Majors are required to complete a minimum of 1 ;2 hours of 4000-level elective coursework, including courses from at least three of the four subfield areas shown below Archaeology ANT 4153 (3) ANT 4162 (3) ANT 4172 (3) ANT 4180 (4) ANT 4181 (4) ANT 4163 (3) ANT 4124 (4) ANT 4158 (4)

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 73 UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA-1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Physical Anthropology ANT 4520 (3) ANT 4552 (3)' ANT 4587 (3) Anthropological Linguistics ANT 4620 (3) ANT 4750 (3) Cultural Anthropology ANT 4583 (3) ANT 4226 3) ANT 4312 3l ANT 4442 (3) ANT 4231 ANT 4316 3 ANT 4462 (3) ANT 4241 3 ANT 4324 3 ANT 4495 (3) ANT 4302 3 ANT 4340 3 ANT 4705 (3) ANT 4305 ANT 4432 3) MUH 4054 (3) Anthropology majors are urged to become competent readers and speakers of a to acquire communicative and quantitative skills appropnate to their interests and to achieve at least a level of computer literacy. Exceptions to course prerequ1s1tes require the consent of the instructor. Required Core Courses (21 er hrs ) ANT 2000 ANT 3511 (3) ANT 4034 (3) ANT 3100 3 ANT 3610 (3) ANT 4935 (3) ANT 2410 3 Requirements for the Minor. in The minor in Anthropology consists of a minimum of 18 credit hours with a "C average (2.0), distributed among three areas. Students will normally progress through in the order l i sted below selecting courses prerequ1s1te or otherwise appropriate to courses desired in subsequent areas. Exceptions to this pattern must be approved by the department's undergraduate advisor. are urged to consult with the major and minor student advisors to create the most beneficial specific set of courses. 1. 2000-level required core course (3 er. hrs ) ANT 2000 (3) 2. Intermediate level core courses (3-6 er hrs ) ANT 2410 (3) ANT 3100 (3) ANT 3511 (3) ANT 3610 (3) 3 4000-level elective courses (9-12 er. hrs.) (as descnbed above) Requirements for the Anthropology Honors Program The purpose of the Honors Program is to provide outstand ing Anthropology undergraduates with individually tailored training in areas of anthropology of interest .tot. hem. The program operating independently of the major itself, involves a year of coursework and research culminating in the writin!iJ of an Honors in the second semester of their Junior year, pnor to completion of 90 semester hours, may apply to the program which begins in the Fall semester Admission is competitive, based on the student's overall academic record (minimal 3.0 GPA overall 3 5 GPA for USF anthropology course work) and a letter of recommendation from a member of the Department of Anthropology. Success ful completion of the program requires maintenance of a 3.0 overall and a 3.5 major GPA levels completion of ANT ( 4) (Honors Seminar) with a grade of "B" or better completion of ANT 4970 (3) (Honors Thesis) with a grade of "S" and completion of all other requirements for graduation. See the Anthropology Department Undergraduate Advisor for further information and application forms . ments The transfer student should also be aware of the immunization, foreign language, and continuous enrollment policies of the university Students should complete two lower level, introductory courses in Anthropology prior to entering the University lfnot taken at the community college they must be completed before the degree is granted A grade of C is the minimum acceptable grade BACHELOR OF INDEPENDENT STUDIES (BIS) The Bachelor of Independent Studies (BIS) Program is State University System External Prowam The. uni versities currently involved are univer sity Florida State University the of Flonda, the University of North Florida, and the ofSout.h Flonda. The administrative office for the statewide program 1s located at USF in Tampa. Founded in 1968, the external degree program is for adults who find it difficult to attend regular university classes be cause of career or family commitments. The BIS student proceeds at his/her own pace and, for the most in own setting The exception is the summ er seminars which require periodic, short-term campus residence. Curriculum The curriculum consists of four study areas : the Humani ties, Natural Sciences, Social Sciences and Inter-area Study The first three areas of study are completed through a tutorial and a resident seminar While the seminar is of sho(t dura tion the tutorial for each area requires a longer commitment of time The student may begin in any of the first three study areas and is encouraged to start in his/her area of strength Tutorials The tutorial or guided independent study predominently print intensive, with core and readings drawn fr<;>m the BIS Guide to Independent Studies. In the tutorial for example, the student across the of the Humanities Study Area which include Language, Litera ture Philosophy, Art Drama and "".'orks are reviewed within the framework of historical periods. Tutorial objectives include knowledge of the basic principles of each of the genres and periods, the ability to visualize relationships between the disciplines gra sp of the clature of the disciplines, and the capacity to apply basic concepts to current issues The student is for systematic interaction with the faculty mentor who directs the reading process and evaluates the student's progress . In the Natural Sciences tutorial, the BIS learner studies Science -Science for the non-scientist. Emphasis is placed on the interrelationships of the disciplines of Science. Topics illustrative of this interdisciplinary approach to Sciences include Mathematics Physics Chemistry, Biology Astron omy, Geology, Ecology History and Philosophy of and the impact of Science on Technology As 1s the case with other tutorials the learning objectives involve concepts, no menclature, cross-disciplinary insights, and application of concepts/methods to current issues In the Social Sciences tutorial the student reads selected core and supplementary reading and completes written projects in each of the basic disciplines of the Science Prerequisites (State Mandated Common Prerequisites>.. Study Area. These include Anthropology, Economics GeogStudents wishing to transfer to USF should complete the raphy, History, Political Women's StudA.A. degree at the community college. Some courses reies and Sociology. Tutorial objectives of quired for the major may meet Education the basic concepts and principles of each d1sc1phne, fam1harRequirements thereby transfemng maximum hours to the ity with major social science research university. A minimum of 60 semester hours must be comstanding of the relationships ai:iiong thE'. d .1sc1phnes, pleted at the university unless prior approval is secured. If and the ability to apply d1sc1phnary or interd1sc1phnary constudents transfer without an A.A. degree and have fewer than cepts or models to current issues. 60 semester hour:; ?f acceptable credit, the Following each tutorial the student completes a coi:iipremeet the university s entenng freshman requirements inhensive examination in order to demonstrate that a sat1sfac-cluding ACT or SAT test scores GPA and course requiretory level of proficiency has been attained in the independent USE'

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7 4 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CA TA LOG study component of a particular area. The exam may be taken on or off campus. A major research paper is also undertaken in each of the tutorials. It is normally done at the end of a tutorial. Seminars Students are required to attend two-week long seminars on the USF campus. There is a seminar for each of the first three study areas (Humanities, Natural Sciences, and Social Sciences). Each semmar represents a period of intensive residential learning under the direction of a team of faculty members. Seminar faculty teams identify the sbject matter and activities of each sem i nar. Humanities seminars, for example are often theme-oriented but the focus is on inter disciplinary concerns A number of historical periods may be approached through discussion of art, music, literature, and architecture. In a Natural Sciences seminar, the focus is on an interdisciplinary approach to learning about Science. Social Sciences seminar faculty focus on the knowledge gained in the tutorial with an emphasis on synthesis, exten sion, and application of this lea ming to selected topics such as energy, patterns of human behavior, and human rights. Seminar activities also vary with the study area. A visit to a museum or art gallery goes with a Humanities Seminar. In Science, laboratory experiences and field trips are utilized to show students the ways of Science and to allow them to experience the excitement of discovery. Many of the activities described in a Social Sciences seminar syllabus are used in other seminarsas well, i.e : lectures by faculty team members or guest lecturers, presentations by group members, group discussion, library research, learning journals, and a re search paper. Students in all seminars may be asked to read materials related to the seminar theme prior to the seminar and to complete written assignments after the completion of the two week seminar period. Seminars meet for two consecutive six day weeks and activities take up a full day. Further study and assignments occupy the evening hours. Undergraduate Thesis The fourth study area or Inter-area Study calls for a synthesis of the first three study areas via the preparation and defense of an undergraduate thesis. The student the Area with Inter-area reading leading to the completion of an undergraduate thesis prospectus under the direction of a primary adviser Following approval of the prospe c tus by a committee composed of three faculty, the student writes the study under the direction of the committee chairperson. The final step is to complete successfully an oral examination on the thesis Admission Procedures Applicants must qualify for admission to the University of South Florida and for admission to the B l.S. Program. ihe USF Director of Admissions rules on the admission of an applicant to the University. The BIS Committee rules on admission of an applicant to the BIS Program BIS applicants typically welcome the challenge of liberal studies and the rigor of independent study. BIS students pay regular USF tuition for undergraduate students. Mechanisms for Recognizing Prior Learning Program policy allows for recognition of prior learning. Applicants, for example, who demonstrate sufficient compe tence may waive up to a maximum of two areas of guided independent study Applications for waivers are processed after pre-enrollment procedures have been completed Individuals with an A.A. degree from a State of Florida community or junior college, and Registered Dental Hygien ists, Registered Nuclear Medicine Technologists, Regis tered Nurses, Registered Radiologic Technologists, and Registered Respiratory Therapists with an A.S. degree from a state-approved program qualify for a "two-plus-two inter face" with BIS requirements. In other words, those with an UliF appropriate associate's degree complete two substantive study areas involving two tutorials and two seminars The two study areas (Social Sciences & Natural Sciences or Humani ties & Social Sciences or Natural Sciences & Humanities) are stipulated by the BIS Committee The BIS Committee nor mally picks the two areas in which a student has the least background. The Program is academically responsible to the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. The BIS Committee is advisory to the Provost. For further information, contact ttie State University Sys tem, External Degree Program, Bach' elor of. Independent Studies (BIS) located at HMS 443 University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620-8400. Telephone: 813-974-4058. E mail : bis@luna cas.usf.edu Prerequisites (State Mandated Common Prerequisites) Students wishing to transfer to USF should complete the A.A. degree at the community college. Some courses re quired for the major may also meet General Education Requirements thereby transferring maximum hours to the university. A minimum of 60 semester hours must be com pleted at the university unless prior approval is secured. If students transfer without an A.A. degree and have fewer than 60 semester hours of acceptable credit, the studentsmust meet the university's entering freshman requirements in cluding ACT or SAT test scores, GPA and course requirements There are no State Mandated Common Prerequisites for this degree program. BIOLOGY (BIO/MIC) Two specific Bachelor of Science degrees, Biology and Microbiology, are available for students interested in the biological sciences. The B .S. in Biology allows students to concentrate ih such areas as Ecology, Cell & Molecular Biology, Physiology, and Marine Biology. The degree is pre paratory for careers in such areas as teaching, agriculture, medicine, dentistry, conservation, and biotechnology, or for post-baccalaureate study in the various li( e sciences The B.S. in Microbiology provides students with the broad range of courses necessary to qualify for certification by the National Registry of Microbiologists, American Society of Microbiology, and employment in microbiology and related fields . In addition to a set of courses in biology, students must have a thorough preparation in other areas of natural sci ences to be competitive for jobs or for further study beyond the baccalaureate. A modem biology curriculum is built on a foundation of mathematics, chemistry and physics Students shpuld study the requirements listed below and then make maximum use of the vigorous advising program maintained by the Department in structuring their programs. See the Undergraduate Program Assistant for further details of advis ing Requirements for the Biology S.S. Major (BIO) 1 Department of Biology Courses minimum 40 credit hours a. BSC 2010, BSC 201 OL, BSC 2011, BSC 2011 L b. PCB 3023, PCB 3043, and PCB 3063 c. ONE of the following: PCB 3023L, PCB 3043L, or PCB 3063L d. ONE of the following (with laboratory): BOT 3373, MCB 3030, ZOO 3205, ZOO 3323C, ZOO 4603, or ZOO 4 753 e ONE of the following (with laboratory) : BOT 4503, MCB 4404, or PCB 4723 f The remaining credit hours to meet the minimum requirements must come from among structured de partmental courses that are applicable to the major and BCH 3023. At least eight (8) of these credit hours must be at the 400.0 level or higher. g. A maximum of four (4) credit hours of Un dergraduate Research (BSC 4910) or Biology Honors Thesis (BSC 4970) may be applied.

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 75 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CA TA LOG h. A minimum of 20 hours of Biology courses must be taken in residency and be applicable to the major. 2. Supporting Courses in the Natural Sciences minimum 34 credit hours a CHM 2041, CHM 2045L, CHM 2046 and CHM 2046L b. CHM 2210, CHM 221 OL, CHM 2211, and CHM 2211 L c MAC 2233 and MAC 2234 OR MAC 2281 and MAC 2282 OR MAC 2311 and MAC 2312 OR MAC 2233 and STA 2023 d. PHY 2048, PHY 2048L, PHY 2049, and PHY 2049L OR PHY 2053,.f?.l::IY 2053L ; PHY 2054, and PHY 2Q54L 3. Liberal Arts Courses minimum 45 credit hours 4. Free Elective Courses needed to complete 120 credit hours. Prerequisites (State Mandated Common Prerequisites) ; Students should complete the following prerequisite courses listed below at the lower level prior to entering the University If these courses are not taken at the community college they must be completed before the degree is granted. Unless stated otherwise, a grade of "C" is the minimum acceptable grade. BSC 1010/101 OL Introduction to Biology I-Cellular Processes (with lab) Acceptable substitutes: PCB X010, PCB X011, PCB X021, PCB X131, BSC X040, BSC 2012 BSC 1011/1011 L Introduction to Biology II-Diversity (with lab) Acceptable substitutes: ZOO X010, BOT X010, BSCX041, BOT X013 CHM 1045/1045L General Chemistry I (with lab) CHM 1046/1046L General Chemistry II (with lab) CHM 2210/2210L Organic Chemistry I (with lab) Acceptable substitutes: PHY 2043/2043L, PHY 2048/2048L, PHY 2049/2049L, or equivalent CHM 2211/2211L Organic Chemistry II (with lab) Acceptable substitutes: PHY 2053/2053L, PHY 2048/2048L PHY 2049/2049L, or equivalent MACX311 Calculus I Acceptable substitutes : MAC 2233, MAC 2253 MAC X281 MACX312 Calculus II Acceptable substitutes: STA .21. 22 2014, 2023, 2034, 2321 or equivalent; MAC 2234, 2254, 3282 Please be aware of the immunization, foreign language, and continuous enrollment policies of the university. This is a non limited access program with the above courses recommended. Requirements for the Microbiology B.S. Major (MIC) 1. Department of Biology Courses minimum 42 credit hours a. BSC 2010, BSC 201 OL, BSC 2011, BSC 2011 L b. PCB 3023, PCB 3023L, PCB 3043, and PCB 3063 c. MCB 3030, MCB 4115 MCB 4404, and MCB 4404L d. Ten (10) hours from the following list: BOT 4434, MCB 4502 MCB 4652, MCB 4910, MCB 4934, MCB 5206, MCB 5815, PCB 5235, ZOO 5235, BC' H 3023L e. A maximum of four (4) credit' hours of Undergraduate (MCB 4910) ot Biology Honors Thesis (BSC 4970) may be applied. f. A minimum of twenty (20) hours of Biology courses must be taken in residency and be applicable to the major. 2. Supportir:ig Courses in the Natural Sciel'.lces minimum 37 credit hours a. CHM '.2041, CHM 2045L, CHM-2046, and CHM 204ol' b CHM 2210, CHM 2210L, CHM 2211, and CHM 2211L c. MAC 2233 and MAC 2234 OR MAC 2281 and MAC 2282 OR MAC 2311 and MAC 2312 OR MAC 2233 and ST A 2023 d PHY 2048 ; PHY 2048L, PHY 2049 and PHY 2049L OR PHY 2053, PHY 2053L PHY 2054, and PHY 2054L e .SCH 3023 3. Liberal Arts Courses minimum 45 credit hours 4 Free Elective Cour5es needed to complete 1?0 credit hours : Prerequisites (State Mandated Common Prerequisites) Students should complete the following prerequisite courses listed below at the lower level prior to entering the University. If these courses are not taken at the community college, they must be completed before the degree is granted Unless stated otherwise, a grade of C is the minimum acceptable grade BSC 1010/101 OL Introduction to Biology I-Cellular Processes (with lab) Acceptable substitutes: PCB X010 PCB X011, PCB X021, PCB X131, BSC X040 BSC 2012 BSC 1011/1011 L Introduction to Biology II-Diversity (with lab) Acceptable substitutes: ZOO X010, BOT X010, BSC X041, BOT X013 CHM Chemistry I (with lab) CHM 1046/1046L General Chemistry II (with lab) CHM 2210/2210L Organic Chemistry I (with lab) Acceptable substitutes: PHY 2043/2043L, PHY 2048/2048L, PHY 2049/2049L, or equivalent CHM 2211/2211L Organ i c Chemistry II (with lab) Acceptable substitutes: PHY 2053/2053L, PHY 2048/2048L PHY 2049/2049L, or equivalent MACX311 Calculus I Acceptable substitutes : MAC 2233 MAC 2253, MAC X281 MACX312 Calculus II Acceptable substitutes: STA 2122 2014 2023, 2034 2321 or equivalent; MAC 2234, 2254, 3282 Please be aware of the immunization, foreign language, and continuous enrollment policies of the university. This is a non-limited access program with the above courses recom mended. Minimum Grade for Majors A student must receive a "C" grade or better in all Depart ment of Biology courses and Supporting Courses in the Natural Sciences, except if they are used as Free Elective courses. This specification applies to both USF and transfer courses D and F grades earned in attempting to satisfy major requirements will be used in calculating the GPA, except ifthey are removed by grade forgiveness. Biology Honors Program The Honors Program provides a greater depth and breadth of knowledge to outstanding biology students, provides them an intense research training opportunity, and encourages them to pursue very high academic standards In addition to sat i sfying requirements for the Biology or Microbiology de gree, successful completion of the program requries a GPA of 3.5 in Department of Biology coursework an overall GPA of 3'.0 in USF coursework ; and successful completion of BSC 4931', SSC 4932, and BSC 4402L. The c ulmination of the Honors Program is the completion and defense of an honors thes is. Invitation to participate in the Program will take place during spnng semester of each academic year Criteria for selection include, but are not limited to, freshman/sopho more status; A/B in science courses at USF, including BSC 2010; and recomrriendation from BSC 2010L laboratory instructor . See the Honors Program Coordinator fo r further details of the program

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76 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG CHEMISTRY (CHS/CHM) The Department of Chemistry awards two degrees at the baccalaureate level, the Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry and the Bachelor of Science in Chemistry, and three degrees at the graduate level, a non-thesis Master of Arts the Master of Science and the Ph.ilosophy. Each the graduate in the areas of analytical chem istry, b1ochem1stry, inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry and physical chemistry In addition, a Master of Arts degree is offered as part of a carefully integrated accelerated B.A.-M.A. program. The chemistry faculty is comprised of 24 full-time '!!embers all of whom hold the Ph.D degree. The combina tion of a l<;1rge and faculty with a wide variety of courses and provides with programs of study which can be tailored to fit ind1v1dual needs while maintaining a sound background in all general aspects of chemistry Majors in c.hemistry are well-prepared to enter a wide of careers as well as many interdisciplinary act1v1tles which are the hallmark of modem science and These include teaching and research in aca demic, government and private settings bio-medical re search and clinical practice, environmental activities mate rials science, law, business and other profession's. The of .is particularly designed for students wishing to. graduate training in chemistry and closely-allied d1sc1phnes and graduates are certified for membership in American Chemical Society. The Bach el?r of Arts provides opportunities for curricula individually tailored to meet many career objectives. Requirements for the Majors in Chemistry A grade of C O'. better is in each chemistry course and each supporting c.ourse specified for a chemistry degree. All courses in a chemistry program must be taken with letter grade (A,B,C,D,F,I) except those courses which are graded S/ U onl.y. (D F in attempting to satisfy cht:mistry requirements will be used in calculating the maior GPA.) Nine hours of upper-level chemistry courses mu st be completed at USF. The required sequence of Chemistry courses should be started immediately in the freshman year and the mathematics and physics requirements should be completed before the junior year so that CHM 3400 (BA degree) or CHM 441 o (8.S dewe.e) can be commenced by that time. CHM 4410 is a to ?ther advanced courses required forthe B.S.' degree in chemistry. CHM 4060 also is a prerequisite to several B.S. degree courses. Liberal Arts Requirement. The student is required to the Liberal Arts Requirement. Chem istry and Mathematics courses required for chemistry de grees satisfy the Liberal Arts requirements in the areas of Natural Science and Quantitative Methods Free Electives. Courses over and above the required courses should be taken to a 120-hour program. Recommended are in the degree require ments Add1t1onal courses in computer programming, economics, management, engineering, statistics writing and other applied disciplines are strongly strengthen the degree for subsequent professional employ ment. BA in Chemistry (CHM) The B.A. degree in Chemistry provides a course of study for whose careers will require a thorough under of chemist'.Y required for a variety of professional as .in health-related professions, science teaching, business, law and other areas. Inherent in this program is a high degree of flexibility which permits tailoring a course of study to the student's own educational objectives. The B.A. student whose goals change in the direction of waduate study supplement this curriculum by addi tion and/or subsJ1tut1on of a selection of advanced courses from the B.S. program. Required Chemistry Courses CHM 2045 (3) CHM 2045L (1) CHM 2046L (1) CHM 3610C (4) CHM 2210L (2) CHM 2211 (3) CHM 3120C (4) CHM 3400 (3) CHM 3402L (1) (33 er hrs ) CHM 2046 (3) CHM 2210 (3) CHM 2211 L (2) CHM 3401 (3) Required Chemistry Electives (6 er. hrs.) 3000 level or above; may include not more than 1 hr. of CHM 4970. Suggested courses: BCH 3023, BCH 3023L CHS 4310 CHM 4060, CHM 4070, CHM 4610, CHM 4970, CHM 4932*' eontentvarieseachsemester. Required Supporting Courses MAC 2311 (4) ) or MAC 2312 (4) ( (14-16 er. hrs.) MAC 2281 (3) MAC 2282 (3) PHY 2053 (3) PHY 2054 (3) PHY 2053L ( 1 ) PHY 2054L (1) Required natural science or engineering electives (8 er. hrs.) Suggested courses: BSC 2010, BSC 2011, GL Y 201 O GLY 2100, EVR 2001, CGS 2060. BA in Chemil!'try, emphasis in (CHM) The Chemistry B.A. offers a unique opportunity for students later and/or professional emphasis in Biotechnology along with a strong founda tion in the chemical knowledge and skills that are essential to areas. The following ofcourses meets the requirements for a B.A. in Chemistry and provides core courses in other disciplines basic to biochemistry and bio technology. Required Chemistry Courses CHM 2045 (3) CHM 2045L (1) CHM 2046L (1) CHM 2210 (3) CHM 2211 (3) CHM 2211 L (2) BCH 3023 (3) BCH 3023L (2) (27 er. hrs ) CHM 2046 (3) CHM .2210L (2) CHM 3120C (4) Rf!quired Chemistry Electives. (12 er. hrs.) Minimum of 12 hrs. selected from the following : CHM 3400 (3)* CHM 3610 (4)* BCH 4034 (3) CHM 3401 (3)* CHS 4310 (4)* CHM 4060 (3) students anticipating graduate study are advised to select these courses Required Supporting Courses MAC2311 (4) ) or MAC 2312 (4) PHY 2053 (3) PHY 2053L (1) BSC 2010 (3) BSC 2010L (1) ( (22-24 er. hrs.) MAC 2281 (3) MAC 2282 (3) PHY 2054 (3) PHY 2054L (1) PCB 3023 (3) PCB 3023L (1 ) Other suggested electives important for advanced studies in biochemistry: CHM 4932*, CHM 4070, PCB 3063, PCB 5235, PCB 5525, ST A 3023, MCB 3030,MCB 4502 PCB 4253 PCB 5845, EVR 2001. ' Content varies each semester BA in Chei:nistry, en:iphasis Health Professions( CHM) A chem1st'.Y C?re 1s essential for preparation for medical, dental, vetennanan and other health-related professions The B.A. in Chemistry includes this core as well as the to incorporate other science courses required for adm1ss1on to programs in the health professions. The course of study outlined belowincorporates the goals for health-related careers. Required Chemistry Courses CHM 2045 (3) CHM 2045L (1) CHM 2046L (1) CHM 2210 (3) CHM 2211 (3) CHM 2211L{2) (30 er. hrs.) CHM 2046 (3) CHM 2210L (2) CHM 3120C (4)

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 77 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG CHM 3400 (3) BCH 3023 (3) CHS 4300 (3) CHS 4 .301 L (2) though courses may carry the same common course num ber, topics may vary sufficiently from school to sch?o! to leave the transfer student ill-prepared to proceed within a se quence. Required Chemistry Electives . (9 er. hrs ) Minimum of 9 hrs. selected from the following: CHM 3400 (3) CHM 3401 (3) CHM 4060 (1) CHM 3610 (4) BCH 3023L (2) CHS 4310 (4) BCH 4034 (3) Required Supporting Courses MAC2311 (4) ) or MAC 2312 (4) PHY 2053 (3) PHY 2053L ( 1 ) BSC 2010 (3) BSC 2010L (1) (22-24 er. hrs.) ( MAC 2281 (3) MAC 2282 (3) PHY 2054 (3) PHY 2054L ( 1 ) PCB 3023 (3) PCB 3023L (1) Other suggested electives important for advanced studies in health professional vocations: BSC 2011, PCB 3063, PCB 5235, PCB 5525, ST A 3023, MCB 3030, PCB 4 723, ZOO 4753, ZOO 3713, MCB 4502, CHM 4932", PCB 4253, PCB 5845. eontent varies each semester. BS in Chemistry (CHS) The Bachelor of Science in Chemistry is a rigorous pro gram which supplies the foundation in chemistry required for both the student who begins a chemical vocation immediately upon graduation as well as the one who adyanced study in chemistry or related areas !n with this goal, the curriculum for the B .S. degree in Chemistry meets the requirements fordegree certification by the American Chemi cal Society. Because of the strong base developed in this curriculum, the B .S. in Chemistry also provides entry into other chemistry-related advanced studies. Required Chemistry Courses CHM 2045 (3) CHM 2045L (1) CHM 2046L (1) CHM 3120C (4) CHM 221 QL (2) CHM 2211 CHM 3610C (4) CHM 4060 CHM 4131C (4) CHM 4410 3 CHM 4412 (3) CHM 4610 (3 (50 er. hrs.) CHM 2046 (3) CHM 2210 (3) CHM 2211 L (2) CHM 4130C (4) CHM 4411 (3) BCH 3023 (3) Required Supporting Courses MAC 2311 (4) J MAC 2312 (4) or MAC 2313 (4) PHY 2048 (3) (20-23 er. hrs.) ( MAC 2281 (3) MAC 2282 (3) MAC 2283 (3) PHY 2049 (3) PHY 2048L (1) PHY 2049L (1) A natural science or engin elective (except PHY 3020) (3) Suggested courses : PHY 3101, BSC 3092, MAP 4302, CGS 2060, EVN 3001. Other suggested Chemistry electives : CHM 4970, BCH 3023L, CHM 4070, CHM 4932". eontentvarieseach semester. Environmental Concentration: Chemical science is a core component of environmental science both in the analysis of environmental conditions and in the solution of environmental problems. B.A. and B.S. chemistry majors wishing to concentrate on environmental concerns should complete BSC 2011C and 2010C, GLY 2010 and 2010L, and EVR 2001 and 2001L Electives that should be considered include GL Y 4822, GLY 5246 STA 3023 and EVR 4910 Transfer Credit: It is strongly recommended that students transferring fr?m community/junior colleges to the University of South Flonda complete whole sequences of chemistry courses, such as general and organic chemistry, before the transfer. Even Teacher Education Programs: For information concerning the degree programs for sec ondary school teachers, see College of Education section this Catalog and junior college teachers, see USF Graduate Catalog. Combined BA-MA Program Admission Regular admission to the program will normally occur towards the end of the sophomore year or early in the junior year or at transfer from junior college. Students who have completed not less than ten semester credit hours of chem istry courses, and have maintained a "B" average in chemistry courses and overall, may apply Applications will be consid ered individually and applicants may be called for interview. Provisional admission may be granted to incoming freshmen whose academic background and performance indicate the likelihood of their meeting the requirements in due course. It should be noted that, in view of the heavy research component and orientation of the program, and the limita tions of facilities and individual faculty time available for research direction, admission to the program is by no means automatic upon meeting minimum requirements. Course Requirements Undergraduate: The B.A. coursework curriculum (q. v.) is augmented as follows: 1 CHM 4410, 4412, and 4130C (or CHS 4310C) replace CHM 3400, 3401 and 3402C. 2. Chemistry coursework hours (excluding research) total 42 rather than 41. 3. Natural sciences supporting coursework hours total 25 rather than 24. Graduate: Not less than 20 credit hours of formal, regularly scheduled chemistry graduate courses, including not less than two of the five core courses (BCH 5065, CHM 5225, CHM 5425, CHM 5621, CHM 6150). At least 10 of the credit houi:s must be. at the 6000 level. The core course requirement 1T1ay be waived in part or entirely by recommendation of the supervisory committee on the basis of past work, performance on a test, or substitution of more comprehensive and advanced courses. Research and Thesis CHM 4970 (12) CHM 6973 and CHM 6971 (10) To satisfy the research credit hour requirements and to produce results suitable for publication in a refereed scientific journal, it will be necessary for the student to be enrolled during the summers of his jun ior, and years Completion of the program will require the presentation and formal defense of a research thesis for the master's degree. Supervision and Promotion A supervisory committee consisting of two faculty mem bers will be. appointed for each stu9ent admitted to the program. A carefully planned individual timetable will be worked out and progress will be "!'onitored each Continuation from the senior year into the graduate year will be contingent upon the maintenance of the "B" average in chemistry and overall, and upon satisfactory recommenda tion by the student's research Diagnostic and qual i fying examinations will not be required of students in this program. The supervisory committee during waduate year will consist of three faculty members, including the research director Prerequisites (State Mandated Common Prerequisites) Students should complete the following prerequisite

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78 COLLEGE OF A .RTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CA TA LOG courses listed below atthe lower lever prior to entering the University. These include two semesters each of General Chemistry lecture and lab, Organic Chemistry lecture and lab Calculus and General Physics lecture and lab If these courses are not taken at the community college, they must be comp l eted before the degree is granted. Unless stated otherw i se, a grade of C is the minimum acceptable grade. CHMX045/X045L Gene ral Chemistry I (with lab) or CHM 1040&1041 or1045C, or1045E CHM X046/X046L General Chemistry II or CHM 1046C or 1 046E MAC 2311 Calculus I MAC 2312 Calculus II CHM 2210/2210L Organic Chemistry I (with lab) or CHM 2210C CHM 2211/221 1 L Organic Chemistry II (with lab) or CHM 2211C PHY 2048/2048L General Physics I with Lab or PHY 2048C, or PHY 2053C PHY 2049/2049L General Physics II with Lab or PHY 2049C or PHY 2054C Please be aware of the i mmunization foreign language, and continuous enrollment policies of the university This is a non-limited access program with the above courses recom mended COMMUNICATION (SPE) Communication studies focus on the concepts, theories and practice of human communication in a variety of contexts. Students apply their understanding of communication re search and principles to personal professional and com munity relationships and concerns The department encourages students to tailor their pro gram of study to meet the i r own interests Majors select from one of three areas o f concentration described below. The Honors Program in Communication allows qualif led students to pursue advanced study A minor in Communica tion is also available Requirements for the Major in Communication A major in Communication requires a minimum of 46 credit hours from departmental offerings. A final grade of "D" within a departmental course will not be counted toward a Communication major Courses may not be taken S/U where a grade option exists. The requirements for the Communica tion major are : I. Prerequisites (3 hours) This course i s a prerequis i te for declaring the communi cation major SPC 2600 P u blic Speaking (3) II. Core Distribution Requirements (12 hours) Students must take each of these four courses as early as possible in the major These courses are prerequisites for tak ing many of the more advanced courses in the respective areas. COM 2000 Introduction to Communication (3) ORI 2000 Introduction to Communication as Performance (3) SPC 3301 Interperso nal Communication (3) SPC 2541 Persuasion (3) Ill. Area of Concentration (9 hours) Students must take a minimum of nine hours in one of the three areas of concentration. Performance Commun i cation ORI 3950 ORI 4931 ORI 4120 ORI 4310 SPC 4201 Interpersonal and Organizational Communication COM 3120 COM 3014 COM 4020 COM 4124 COM 4710 COM 4942 SPC 3210 SPC 3441 SPC 4305 SPC 4310 SPC 4431 Public and Cultural Communication COM 4030 SPC 3230 SPC 3513 SPC 3631 SPC 3653 SPC 3712 SPC 4683 SPC 4632 SPC 4680 SPC 4714 IV. Departmental Electives (12) hours Students must take twel v e additional hours of elective coursework i_n the Department of Communication at the 3000-level or higher which must include at least six hours from outside the student's area of concentration. Communication Honors Program The Honors Program in Communication provides an opportunity for exceptional undergraduate students in Com munication to work closely with a faculty member in ah intensive research experience. Each Honors student is re quired to complete and defend an undergraduate Honors Thesis. Application to the program ordinarily occurs during the second semester of the j 1.m1or year or prior to completion of 90 semester hours Admission to the program is based on the student's overall acac:lemic record performance in com munication courses, and recommendations of faculty To be admitted to the program, a student should have at least a 3 5 GPA in all communication courses and a 3 0 cumulative GPA. Students are required to complete 3 hours of Honors Reading and 3 hours of Honors Thesis Students interested in the Honors Program should consult the department for further information about admission and program requirements. Requirements for the Minor in Communication The minor in Communication is available to students pursuing any other major at USF The minor in Communica tion requires a minimum of 18 hours of departmental coursework, including : SPC 2600 Public Speaking (3) COM 2000 Introduction to Communication (3) The other 12 hours may be selected from among departmen tal offerings and must include a minimum of 6 hours at the 3000-level or higher A grade of"D" will not be counted toward a Communication minor Courses may not be taken S/U where a grade option exists Prerequisites (State Mandated Common Prerequisites) Students must complete SPC 2600, Public Speaking, before being admitted to the Communication major. A student c .an be admitted to the University without SPC 2600 but it must be completed as part of requirements for the major'. A grade of C is the minimum acceptable grade Please be aware of the immunization, foreign language and cont i nuous enrollment policies of the univers i ty Th i s is a non-limited access program with the above courses recom mended. COMMUNICATION SCIENCES AND DISORDERS (ISH, ISA, ISi) Unde r graduate concentrations in the Communication Sci ences and Disorders are available through the program of Interdisciplinary Social Sciences (ISS). Concentrations in Speech-Language-Hearing Science American Sign Lan guage, and Educational Interpreter Training lead to the B.A. degree. The undergraduate concentration .in Speech Language-Hearing Science (ISH) provides preprofessional study for Master's level preparation as a Pathologist, Audiolog i st, or Deaf Educator. The American Sign Language (ISA) concentration focuses on the study of deaf culture through the development of proficiency in ASL and prepares individuals to work with the deaf in a vari ety of social service agencies. The Educational Interpreter Training (ISi) concentration prepares indiv i duals to work in educational settings with students who require assistance with educational skills due to their hearing impair ment or deafness. Students interested in these concentra tions should contact the Department of Communication

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 79 UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG d Th bonaily prot1c1ent students may quahfY as interpreters ffi1s Sciences and re: concentration also does not qualify students for admission also ouers t e as e s cience into the M.S. programs in Speech-Language Pathology or in Speech-Language and Deaf Educa Clinical and Rehabilitative Audiology, or Deaf Education. tion, as y.iell a Ph.D. spec1ahzation in Speech, Langufge, Those students choosing to become teachers of the deaf or Science the department of Psycho ogy must pursue the 15H concentration in Speech-Language(Expemnental Psychology) .. The department a 5dyefr Hearing Science and obtain the M.S. degree in Aural RehaM S. course of study combining underwaduate gra ua e bilitation/Deaf Education however, enrollment into this program is currently General admission requirements and recommendations not available. for ISA are identical to the ISH concentration in Speech Concentrations in Communication Sciences and Disorders (ISH) A. General Information All undergraduates seekinQ in this concentra tion must !;>e in good academic stand1.ng as students at the University of South Flonda. Pnor to coursework in the junior year in the concentration, most students should complete general academic distribution requirements, successfully pass the CLAST, and haye achieved 60 semester hours of coursework. Students with advising concerns relative to their first 60 semester hours encouraged to meet with undergraduate departmental ady1sors since required and recommended courses for admis sion into the ISH or ISA concentration will also meet other university requirements. B. Prerequisites for Admission 1. Required Courses [ BSC 1085 Human Anatomy and Physiology I BSC 1085L Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lab BSC 1086 Human Anatomy and Physiology II BSC 1086L Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab or BSC 2092 Human Anatomy and Physiology 2. Recommended Courses LIN 3010 or LIN 3801 or CGS 2060 . Courses in this category must be completed with a mini mum grade of "C." C Other Requirements for.the ISH Degree (min. 9 er. hrs.) 1. Required Courses (6-7 er. hrs.) STA 2122 (3) or PSY 3213 (4) and ISS 3010 (3) 2. Additional Courses (3 er. hrs.) SYG 2000 or ANT 2000 or equivalent D. Speech-Language-Hearing Concentration (ISH) (min. 39 er. hrs.) . Coursework is sequenced for the ISH concentration in Speech-Language-Hearing Science. All students. mu.st plete study in basic knowledge of the sci ences and in basic knowledge of communication Upon admission to the con?entrat ion, student will be assigned an advisor to provide guidance in academic plan ning. The course of study includes: SPA 3002 3 SPA 3112 (3! SPA 4222 (3) SPA3004 3 SPA3110(3 SPA4363(3) SPA 3011 3 SPA 4050 (3 SPA 4562 (3) SPA 3030 3 SPA 4201 (3 SPA 3101 3 SPA 4210 (3) SPA 3380 4 (Recommended) Students interested in teacher certification in deaf educa tion must complete required courses in addition. to all ISS requirements listed under Sections B and C. July 1989 the academic requirement for employment 1n the publ1ic school system for Speech-Language Pathologists is the Master's degree. E. American Sign Language Concentration (ISA) (min. 30 New students are not being admitted to the /SA Ma1or for the 1998199 year while the curriculum is being restructured. The ISA concentration seeks to educate students to com municate with the deaf and to apply this knowledge in work settings where knowledge of the culture is for the provision of social services. This ISA concentration 1s not intended to prepare interpreters for the deaf although excepUSE' Language-Hearing Science. The specific course of study for the ISA concentration also assumes that the student has completed an A.A. degree or its equiyalency .. Upon to the concentration each student will be assigned an advisor for the purpose of academic planning. The following courses are included in the major: SPA 3002 SPA 3004 (3) SPA 3030 (3) SPA 3310 (3 SPA 3380 (4) SPA 4332 (3) SPA 4363 (3 SPA 4382 (4) SPA 4383 (4) Other electives (6). F. Educational lnterpreterTraining Concentration (ISi) The ISi concentration seeks to educate students to be come educational interpreters for deaf students in the public school system. A program of credit hours is for the student majoring in the Educational Interpreter Training Con centration. Course content is distributed across five categc_> ries of information and skills necessary for a career in Educational Interpreting : . 1. Role of the Educational Interpreter in the Public School Setting 2. Cognitive Psychosocial, and Language Development of Hearing and Deaf in Public S<:hools 3. Techniques and Apphca1tons of Educational Interpreting in the Public School 4 Professional Practices of the Educational Interpreter 5 Internship . General education requirements as well as liberal arts exit requirements for ISi are identical to those for ISA and ISH concentrations. The specific course of study for the ISi con centration assumes that the student has completed an A.A. degree in Interpreter or prerequisites include in ASL signing inter preting skills. Upon adm1ss1on to the concentration, each student will be assigned an advisor for the purpose of academic planning Interested students shou!d. contact the coordinator of the Educational Interpreter Training Program in the Department. . The following courses are included in the maior: SPA 3001 (3) SPA 3001L (1) SPA 3003 (3) SPA 3003L (1) SPA 3004 (3) SPA 3028 (3) SPA 4386 (3) SPA 4386L (1 SPA 4387 (3) SPA4387L(1) SPA4371 (3 SPA4503 (4) EDF 3214 (3) EDF 3604 (3 EOG 4620 (3) EEX 4070 (2-3) EME 2040 (:3) ISS 3010 (3) Minimum Grade for Majors A student must receive a "C" grade or better in all courses within the major and those that are. Any student who receives a grade of D or lower in more than two USF Communication Sciences and Disorders courses will be automatically barred from as an under graduate major in ISH, ISA, or ISi. Grade forgiveness may be used for two courses only and may be used for cour:se work taken in the first year of study. Courses which compnse the second year of the major may not be repeated. HONORS PROGRAM The Honors Program in Communication Sciences and Disorders (ISH, ISi) provides outstanding undergri;iduates with advanced, individualized training in their areas of interest as well as additional research training. Admission to the Honors Program requires the student to submit evidence of (1) having completed 70 hours of college level course work with a 3 25 average or better, (2) 9 credit hours within the

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80 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) curriculum with at least a 3 5 average in these courses, and (3) a letter of recommendation from a CSD faculty member. After accep tance to the Honors Program, the student will complete the requirements for the major with a GPA aqove 3.5 for courses taken within the department and an overall GPA above 3.25. The Honors Student will complete 6 credit hours in advanced level courses that pertain to the major, complete 2 credits in Honors Colloquia and write an Honors Thesis Requirements for the Minor in American Sign Language Students seeking a minor in American Sign Language (ASL) must complete a minimum of 18 credits: 1. A minor must include these four courses: SPA 3380 Basic ASL SPA 4382 Intermediate ASL SPA 4383 -Advanced ASL SPA 4363 Nature and Needs of the Hearing Impaired 2 In addition, a minor must include one of the following: SPA 4331 Fundamentals of Finger Spelling SPA 4332 Structure of Sign Language 3. Students transferring credit hours toward a minor in ASL must complete 12 credit hours within the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders regardless of the number of credit hours transferred. 4. A GPA of 2.0 or better must be achieved in minor course work in order for a studentto be certified for graduation with a minor in American Sign Language. Prerequisites (State Mandated Common Prerequisites) Complete the A.A. degree atthe community college. Some courses required for the Speech-Language-Hearing (ISH) or ASL (ISA) major may also meet General Education Require ments thereby transferring maximum hours to the university. A minimum of 60 semester hours must be completed at the university unless prior approval is secured Students entering the university without an A.A. degree and fewer than 60 semester hours of acceptable credit, must meet the university's entering freshman requirements includ ing ACT and SAT test scores, GPA, and course requirements. Students who plan to major in ISH and ISA are encouraged to complete the following prerequisites during the program of study at the community college: I. ANT 2000 Introduction to Anthropology 3 or PSY 2012 Introduction to Psychology or SYG 2000 Introduction to Sociology 3 3 II. And each of the following: BSC 1085 Human Anatomy & Physiology I 3 BSC 1085L Human Anatomy & Physiology I Lab 1 BSC 1086 Human Anatomy & Physiology II 3 BSC 1086LHuman Anatomy & Physiology II Lab 1 or equivalent work such as: BSC 3092 Human Anatomy & Physiology STA 1023 Introduction to Statistics (or equivalent) 5 4 Ill. Complete the foreign language requirement NOTE: Students who select ASL as their foreign language and are seeking a bachelor of arts degree in ASL are required by the Department of Communication Sciences and Disor ders to complete satisfactorily at least one upper level course in ASL at the University of South Florida or to demonstrate proficiency in ASL. IV. Admission to the program of study for Educational Inter preters requirement: ability to use ASL at the intermediate level of a standardized ASL competency test such as the Sign Communication Proficiency Index (SCPI) or other equivaTent evaluation. It is fUrther recommended that the candidate will have completed a community college interpreter training program curriculum. There are no State Mandated Common Prerequisites for this degree program. Please be aware of the immu11ization, foreign language, and continuous enrollment policies of the university. This is a non-limited access program with the above courses recom mended CRIMINOLOGY (CCJ) The major in Criminology provides students with an in depth exposure to the total criminal justice system including law enforcement, detention, the judiciary, corrections, and probation and parole. The program concentrates on achiev ing balance in the above aspects of the system from the perspective of the criminal justice professional, the offender, and society. The program provides a solid background in the theory, issues and methodology comprising Criminology The objective of the program in Criminol ogy is to develop a sound educational basis either for gradu ate work or for professional training in one or more of the specialized areas comprising the modem urban criminal justice system The program offers four areas of concentra tion within the major as well as a certification program in corrections. Requirements for the Major in Criminology: A minimum of 42 semester hours is required of all under graduate majors in Criminology including the following courses or their equivalents: CCJ 3024 (3)* CCJ 3204 (3) CCJ 3610 (3)* CCJ 4501 (3) CCJ 4934 (3) These are gateway courses and must be taken first In addition to the above, the student must select and complete the course requirements from within one of the four areas of concentration described below 1. Generalist: CCJ 3621 (3) CCJ 3701 (3) CCJ 411'0 (3) CCJ 4273 (3) CCJ 4306 (3) CCJ 4700 (3) plus a minimum of 9 hours of Criminology electives 2. Law Enforcement: CCJ 3701 or 4700 (3) CCJ 4109 or 4450 (3) CCJ 4110 (3) CCJ 4273 (3) CCJ 4306 (3) CCJ 4511 (3) CCJ 4940 (3) CJT 4100 (3) plus a minimum of 3 hours of Criminology electives. Students may earn up to 6 hours toward their major by successfully completing a Florida Criminal Justice Stan dards and Training Commission (FCJSTC) approved Basic Recruit Training Academy in Law Enforcement as part of the internship experience within the Law Enforcement area of concentration. 3. Corrections: CCJ 3701 or 4700 (3) CCJ 4110 (3) CCJ 4273 (3) CCJ 4316 (3) CCJ 4331 (3) CCJ 4341 (3) CCJ 4306 (3) CCJ 4940 (3) plus a minimum of 3 hours of Criminology electives. 4. Juvenile Justice: CCJ 3701 or 4700 (3) CCJ 3621 (3rCCJ 4511 (3) CCJ 4513 (3) CCJ 4540 (3) CCJ 4550 (3) CCJ 4652 (3) CCJ 4940 (3) plus a minimum of 3 hours of Criminology electives. Note: No more than five (5) hours of CCJ 4900, CCJ 491 O or any combination of the two will be accepted toward the minimum number of hours in the major. Transfer students should be aware that by University regulation they are obligated to establish academic resi dency by completing the equivalent of one academic year (30 semester hours) in "on-campus" courses. All undergraduate

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 81 UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG students sleeting Criminology as their major will be AFA2001 Introduction to the Black Experience required, moreover, to take a minimum of 30 credit hours in POS 1001 Introduction to Political Science 3 3 3 3 3 3 major coursework at the University of South Florida POS These residence requirements are designed to insure POS.22014121 American National Government th t State and Local Government a trans er students who subsequently receive their baccaPSY 2012 Introduction to Psychology laureate degree from the University of South Florida with a SYG major in Criminology will have been exposed to the same 2000 Introduction to Sociology body of knowledge in their major as those students who complete all or a major portion of their coursework at the University of South Florida. Any student who receives a grade of D or lower in more than on. e USF CCJ. cc;>urse will be automatically barred from continuing as a Cnminology major. Certification in Corrections: The Department of Criminology offers a certificate in 1:'his certificate is recognized by the Florida Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission (FCJSTC) and by the Florida Department of Corrections (Fl?O
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82 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CA TA LOG students should elect ECP 4451 (Law and Economics). ECP 3413 (Economics of Regulation and Antitrust) and ECO 4935 (Economics of Crime) are strongly recommended. Additional courses of interest are: ECO 4504 (Public Finance), ECP 3530 (Economics of Health}, ECP 3302 (Environmental Eco nomics), ECP 3203 (Labor Economics), ECP 3201 (Econom ics of Women and Work). The Economics Pre-Law Curriculum tits easily within the Economics major or minor but is open to other students. The Economics Department Undergraduate Advisor has helpful advice for students taking the Law School Admissions Test or applying for admission to law schools. Prerequisites (State Mandated Common Prerequisites) Students should complete the following prerequisite courses listed below at the lower level prior to entering the University. If these courses are not taken at the community college, they must be completed before the degree is granted. Unless stated otherwise, a grade of "C" is the minimum acceptable grade. ECO X013 Economic Principles II (Macroeconomics) and ECO X023 Economic Principles I (Microeconomics) or ECOXXXX Any level economics course, 3 semester hours, and ECOXXXX Any level economics course, 3 semester hours Please be aware of the immunization, foreign language, and continuous enrollment policies of the university. ENGLISH (ENG) Freshman English Requirement All first-time-in-college students are required to take Fresh man English (a sequential two-semester course of study) in accordance with the following conditions: 1. First-time-enrolled students (a) who do not intend to take the CLEP Freshman English Test, or(b) who have been notified t>f failing CLEP prior to registration and who do not intend to attempt the exam a second time must take ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 sequentially If a student fails the first course, he/she must repeat it before proceeding to the next Freshman English course. Students should normally take these courses during their freshman year, but these courses are in high demand and it is possible that regis tration space will not always be available. 2. First-time-enrolled students (a) who have not taken CLEP prior to their arrival on campus, or (b) who have failed but wish to repeat the test, must attempt CLEP during their first nine (9) weeks. During this semester, they should not enroll in ENC 1101. If a student either fails or doesn't attempt the CLEP examination during his/her first nine (9) weeks, the student normally should take ENC 1101 in the following semester. In this case, the student will normally complete the sequence by the first semester of his/her sophomore year. These policies do not apply to first-time enrolled students who can meet the Freshman English requirement with credit transferred from another institu tion or with appropriate AP English credit. Requirements for the Major in English: The program in English provides options in English and American literature, creative writing, and professional and technical writing. The literature option covers the major peri ods of English and American literature. The creative writing option includes training in writing and coverage of English and American literature. The professional and technical writing option combines the study of English and American literature with an introduction to writing found in the profes sional workplace. The English Education program is de scribed under the section for the College of Education. Major requirements for English majors are listed below. A grade of "D" will not be counted toward fulfilling the major require ments. Students may not use more than one Directed Study toward meeting the major requirements OPTlON I: English and American Literature. Twelve courses (36 hrs.) as follows: 1. Both of the following: AML 3031 AML 3032 2. Four of the following: ENL 3015 ENL 3230 ENL 3251 ENL 3273 ENL 3331 or ENL 3332 3. Five of the following, at least two of which must be at the 4000 level: AML3051 AML4121 ENG 4060 ENL 3251 ENL 3332 ENL 4171 ENL 4338 LIN 4680 LIT 3073 LIT 3144 LIT 3410 LIT 4930 4. ENG 4013 AML3604 AML4261 ENL 3015 ENL 3273 ENL 4122 ENL 4303 ENL 4341 LIT 3022 LIT 3101 LIT 3301 LIT 3700 OPTION II: Creative Writing. AML4111 AML4330 ENL 3230 ENL 3331 ENL 4132 ENL 4311 LIN 4671 LIT 3043 LIT 3102 LIT 3374 LIT 4011 This option .is designed for aspiring writers of fiction or poetry. In addition to giving credit for writing through a variety of course offerings, it provides information about procedures for publishing 1. Writing Requirements CRW 3111 or CRW 2100 CRW 3311 Any three of the following: CRW 3112 CRW 3121 CRW 3321 CRW 4120 CRW 4930 CRW 3312 CRW 4320 Note: CRW 3111 must be taken before any other courses inthe Fiction series, and CRW 3311 must betaken before any other courses in the Poetry series. 2. Literature Requirements The student must select six literature cour:ses from those listed in OPTION I. Two courses must be from group "1," two more from group "2," and two from group"3." OPTION Ill: Professional and Technical Writing. This 36-hour program allows undergraduates to concen trate their studies in professional writing, wherein they will master special writing skills demanded by industry, busi ness, government and the professions. Semester-long in ternships may be arranged by the English Department with local businesses, industries, and professional organiza tions. Interns will earn three credit hours and, in some cases, receive compensation for their duties. Students choosing this concentration will also assure themselves of a core of liberal arts studies since they must 1 take 21 credit hours of literature courses in addition to 15 hours of composition courses. 1. Composition requirements : Five of the following : CRW 2100 ENC 2210 ENC 3310 ENC 4260 ENC 4931 ENC 3213 ENC 4311 2. Literature requirements: ,, ... The student must select seven literature courses from those listed in OPTION I as follows: Two courses from group "1," four cqurses from group "2," and one course from group "3." Requirements for ttie Minors in English English and American Literature Minor (15 hours) 1. One of the following: AML 3031 AML 3032 2. Two of the following: ENL 3015 ENL 3230

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 83 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CA TA LOG ENL 3251 ENL 3273 ENL 3331 br ENL 3332 3. One course, at the 4000 level 4. One additional 3000-of 4000-level course with AML CRW, ENC, ENL or LIT prefix Creative Writing Minor (15 hours) 1. CRW 3111 or CRW-2100 CRW 3311 Any two of the following: CRW 3112 CRW 3121 CRW 3312 CRW 3321 CRW 4120 CRW 4320 CRW4930 2. One AML or ENL course listed in OPTION I. Professional and Technical Writing Minor (15 hours) 1. ENC 2210 2 ENC 4260 3. One AML or ENL course listed in OPTION I 4. Two of the following courses : CRW 2100 ENC 3213 ENC 3310 ENC 4311 ENC 4931 Prerequisites (State Mandated Common Prerequisites) Students wishing to transfer to USF should complete the A.A. degree at the community college Some courses re quired for the major may also meet General Education Requirements thereby transferring maximum hours to the university. A minimum of 60 semester hours must be com pleted at the university unless prior approval is secured If students transfer without an A.A. degree and have fewer than 60 semester hours of acceptable credit, the students must meet the university's entering freshman requirements in cluding ACT or SAT test scores, GPA, and course require ments. The transfer student should also be aware of the immuni zation, foreign language, and continuous enrollment policies of the university. Studen ts should complete the following prerequisite courses listed below at the lower level prior to entering the University. If these courses are not taken at the community college, they must be completed before the degree is granted Unless stated otherwise, a grade of "C" is the minimum acceptable grade . . !;NC 1101 Freshman English I ENG 1102 Freshman English II or Six semester hours earned in courses taught in the English Department, each with 6,000 y.tords of evaluated writing tor a total of 12,000 words. Suggested electives: AMH 2010 American History I 3 AMH 2020 American History II 3 EUH 2021 Medieval History I 3 EUH 2022 Medieval History II 3 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLICY (EVR) The status of the earth's environment has been a major concern since the 1960s . As we enter the 2151 century,_ it represents one of the most critical issues facing nearly all nations individually as well as the earth community as a wh ole'. Increased population, technqlogy, globalization and diminishing natural resources all play .an important roJe in the changing environment. As a consequence, governments at all levels are devoting resources to help understand the problems that we are facing and to aid in their mitigation This includes everything from public education to cleaning up toxic waste sites. The environmental industry is a growing arena for employment for degree holders at all levels. The Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Environmental Science and Policy was approved in 1995. This interdisciplinary program spans multiple colleges within the University but is housed in the College of Arts and Sciences All students must complete the University's General Education Requirements All majors in the program must complete the required courses including two introductory courses in environmental science and policy, 2 semesters each of general biology and general chemistry environmental ethics environmental policy sta tistics or physical science (either geology or physics) In addition, majors take six courses that allow them to sub specialize in science or in policy Students choosing to sub specialize in science take 2 semesters of calculus and 4 electives related to physical earth or life science. Students choosing to sub-specialize in policy take environmental law and environmental economics and 4 electives related to policy and planning, ethics or economics Finally, all majors must complete an upper division seminar and an internship or project. ESP majors are advised by the Program Advisor. Requirements for the Major in Environmental Science and Policy All students majoring in Environmental Science and Policy are required to see the advisor each semester prior to registration for the following term. Students who are eligible for an internship must see the internship coordinator four weeks prior to the beginning of the semester in which they will the internship REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL MAJORS EVR 2001 EVR 2001L BSC 2010C BSC 2011C CHM 2045L CHM 2046 PUP 4203 PHI 3640 STA 2023 or QMB 2100 EVR 2861 CHM 2041 CHM 2046L EVR 4921 GL Y 2010 (with lab) or GL Y 2100 (with lab) or PHY 2048 (with lab) or PHY 2053 (with lab) EVR 4910 or EVR 4940 Science Track MAC 2233 and MAC 2234 OR MAC 2281 and MAC 2282 OR MAC 2311 and MAC 2312 plus four approved science/engineering electives: only one of which may be an introductory course and three must be selected from within one of the areas of earth science life science or physical science. Policy Track ECO 3302 and POS 3697 plus four approved policy-related electives : only one of which may be an introductory course Prerequisites (State Mandated Common Prerequisites) Students wishing to transfer to USF should complete the A.A. degree at the community college. Some courses required for the major may also meet General Education Requirements thereby transferring maximum hours to the university. A minimum of 60 semester hours must be com pleted at the university unless prior approval is secured If students transfer without an A.A degree and have fewer than 60 semester hours of acceptable credit, the students must meet the university's entering freshman requirements in cluding ACT or SAT test scores, GPA, and course require ments. There are no State Mandated Common Prerequisites for this degree program. The transfer student should also be aware of the immuni zation", foreign language and continuous enrollment policies of the university. : Students should complete the following prerequisite cou rses listed below at the lower level prior to entering the University. If these courses are not taken at the community college, they must be completed before the degree is granted Unless stated otherwise, a grade of "C" is the minimum acceptable grade.

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84 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CA TA LOG MAC 2233 & MAC 2234 Elementary Calculus or MAC 2281 & MAC 2282 Engineering Calculus or MAC 2311 & MAC 2312 Calculus and BSC 2010, 2010L & BSC 2011, 2011L Biology I and II with Lab and 4 4 3 8 CHM 2045 & CHM 2045L General Chemistry & Lab 4 CHM 2046 & CHM 2046L General Chemistry II & Lab 4 plus ST A 2023 Statistics One approved Geology or Physics Course with Lab GEOGRAPHY(GPY) 3 4 The degree program in Geography provides options in Environmental Studies, Urban Studies, and General Geogra phy: The Environmental Studies option focuses .on major environmental systems including the geosphere, hydro sphere, atmosphere, pedosphere, and biosphere. Particular emphasis is put on the human modification of the natural environment and the global interconnections of the major systems . The Urban Studies option focuses on the and spatial effects of the growth of cities, including issues such as the historical evolution of urban form and function, land-use changes and conflicts, economic restruc turing, the growth and decline of inner-cities, and urban racial ethnic relations. The General Geography option offers instruction in a broad range of topics in geography, including both physical and human processes. Requirements for the Major in Geography A major in geography consists of 37 credit hours as follows: Required core courses (21credit hours): GEO 3013 (4) GEO 4100C (4) GEO 4933 (1) GEO 3402 (4) GEO 4114C (4) or GEO 4164 (4) Plus one course with a GEA prefix (4) Supporting Courses (16 credit hours) : Students may select Option 1 (Environmental), Option 2 (Urban), or Option 3 (General). Option 1: Environmental Studies In to required Geography core courses, students in Option 1 select: Required: GEO 4372 (4) and Two of the following (8 credit hours): MET 4002 (4) GEO 4201C (4) GEO 4280C (4) MET (4) 421. 0 (4) GEO 4340 (4) Any add1t1onal 4 credit hours m Geography excluding: GEO 3901 GEO 4900 GEO 1930 GEO 3931C GEO 4910 Option 2: Urban Studies In addition to required Geography core courses students in Option 2 select: Required: GEO 3602 (4) and Two of the following (8 credit hours): URP 4052 (4) GEO 4502 (4) GEO 4604 (4) GEO 4470 (4) GEO 4700 (4) Any additional 4 credit hours in Geography excluding: GEO 3901 GEO 4900 GEO 1930 GEO 3931C GEO 4910 Option 3: General Geography In addi\ion to required Geography core courses students in Option 3 select: One of the following (4 credit hours): MET 4002 (4) GEO 4210 (4) MET 4010C (4) GEO 4280C (4) One of the following (4 credit hours): GEO 3602 (4) GEO 4460 (4) GEO 4604 (4) GEO 4421 (4) GEO 4470 (4) GEO 4700 (4) GEO 4440 (4) GEO 4502 (4) Any additional 8 credit hours in Geography excluding: GEO 1930 GEO 3901 GEO 4900 GEO 3931C GEO 4910 Requirements for the Minor A minor in Geography consists of 16 credit hours with a minimum grade-point average of2.0. The required courses are: GEO 3013 (4) GEO 3402 (4) One GEA elective(4) and one upper level GEO MET or URP elective (3000-5000 level) (4) Prerequisites (State Mandated Common Prerequisites) Students wishing to transfer to USF should complete the A.A. degree at the community college Some courses re quired for the major may also meet General Education Requirements thereby transferring maximum hours to the university. A minimum of 60 semester hours must be com pleted at the university unless prior approval is secured If students transfer without an A.A. degree and have fewer than 60 semester hours of acceptable credit, the students must mee.t the university's entering freshman requirements in cluding ACT or SAT test scores, GPA, and course require ments. The transfer student should also be aware of the immuni zation, foreign language, and continuous enrollment policies of the university. Students should complete two lower level, introductory courses in Geography prior to entering the University lfthese courses are not taken at the community college, they must be completed before the degree is granted. Students are en couraged to complete the following prerequisites, or major, support, or elective courses if available, during the program of study at the community college and when feasible in General Education/Gordon Rule courses. Unless stated oth7rwise, a grade of "C" is the minimum acceptable grade. Ma1or and Supporting Courses: GEA 2000 Global Geography GEO 3013 Introduction to Physical Geography GEO 3402 Human Geography GEO 4421 Cultural Geography And any other geography course offered in the community college A.A. Electives: AMH 2010 American History I AMH 2020 American History II World Civilization I II (EUH Courses) POS 2041 National Government POS 2112 State and Local Government GLY 2100 Geology BOT 201. 0 Botany ANT 2000 Anthropology GEOLOGY (GL Y) The Department of Geology offers programs leading to Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Geology is one of the broadest of all sciences because of its dependence on fundamentals of biology, chemistry, and physics as applied to the study of the earth As a result, undergraduate students expected to obtain a broad background in the other sciences as well as a concentration in geology. The Bachelor of Science degree program has two tracks the Geology Track and the Environmental Geology Track. Both provide the student with a broad foundation in the basics of the science The Geology track is designed for the student !nterested in pursuing graduate studies or employment in indus trv and government agencies The Environmental Ge olog y is designed for the student interested in the fields of hydrogeology or environmental geology. The Bachelor of Arts program is d esigned primarily forthe liberal arts student who has interest in the subject but is not preparingfor a career in the field or for the pre-professional school student. A



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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 85 UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CA TA LOG student who elects the B.A. program and decides to pursue the geology profession or attend graduate school will need at least physics and field geology in his/her program. The graduate program in geology allows the student to pursue advanced studies in nearly all areas of geology. As a result of faculty interests and geographic location several geologic subdiscipJines are emphasized, including applied geophysics, carbonate geology, coastal geology, experimen tal mineral kinetics, geochemistry hydrogeology, paleontol ogy and volcanology. Requirements for the Major in Geology (B.A.} 1. Geology Courses (32 sem. hrs ) GLY 2010 (3) GL Y 3200 (4) GL Y 4550 (4) GLY 2010L (1) GL Y 3400C (4) GL Y 4532 (4) GLY2100(3) GLY3610(4) GLY2100L(1) GLY4310(4) 2. Supporting Courses (22-28 sem. hrs.) a. CHM 2041 (3) CHM 2046 (3) CHM 2045L (1) CHM 2046L (1) b One year of calculus (MAC 2233, 2234 or 2311, 2212 or 2281, 2282 c . Two courses in biology or physics selected from: BSC 2010 (3) BSC 2011 (3) BSC 2010L (1) BSC 2011L (1) PHY 2053-2053L (4)'\ or (PHY 2048-2048L (4) PHY 2054-2054L (4)J PHY 2049-2049L (4) 3. Liberal Arts Requirements / The student is required to complete the University's Liberal Arts Requirements 4. Free Electives Courses over and above required courses should be taken to complete a 120-hour program 5. D and F grades earned in attempting to satisfy major requirements will be in calculating the major GPA. Requirements for the Major in Geology (B.S.) 1. Geology Courses (32 sem. hrs.) GL Y 2010 (3) GLY 3200 (4) GL Y 4552 (4) GLY2010L(1). GLY3400C ( 4) GLY4550(4) GLY 2100 (3) GLY 3610 (4) GL Y 2100L (1) GLY 4310 (4) 2. Geology Track or Environmental GeologyTrack(6-8 sem. hrs ) a The Geology track has a field geology requirement: A minimum sixweek, six-hour field course, approved by the geology advisor b. The Environmental Geology track requires: GLY 4822 (4) and GL Y 4700 (4) or GEO 4210 (4) 3. Supporting Courses (22-24 sem hrs.) CHM 2041 (3) CHM 2046 (3) CHM 2045L (1) CHM 2046L (1) MAC 2281 (3) or ( MAC 2311 (4) MAC 2282 (3) MAC 2312 (4) PHY 2048 (3) PHY 2049 (3) PHY 2048L (1) PHY 2049L (1) 4. Liberal Arts Requirements The student is required to complete the University's Liberal Arts Requirements. 5. Free Electives 19-25 sem. hrs The student will choose, in consultation with his/her Ge ology adviser, such courses in the natural sciences that support his/her major interest in the field of geology. Courses in computer programming and additional math ematics are of particular value. Those students who antici pate continuing for a doctorate in graduate school are encouraged to take a foreign language, preferably French, German or Russian. All geology majors are stron gly urged to take a course in technical writing. All entering students anticipating a major in Geology are advised to enroll in: GLY 2010 GLY 2100 CHM 2041 CHM 2046 GLY 2010L GL Y 21bOL CHM 2045L CHM 2046L in the freshman year and to seek curriculum counseling with a Geology advisor. 6 D and F grades earned in attempting to satisfy major requirements will be used in calculating the major GPA Geology Honors Program The purpose of the Honors Program is to provide a select group of undergraduate Geology majors an opportunity to undertake an intensive, individualized research experi ence. The culmination of the program is the completion and presentation of an honor's thesis. To apply interested students should contact the Geology undergraduate advi sor during the second semester of the student's junior year. Admission to the program requires a GPA of 3.5 in the major and an overall GPA of 3.2 Requirements for the Minor in Geology A minor in geology consists of 16 credit hours and must include GL Y 2010, GL Y 2010L and GLY 2100, GL Y 2100L. Additional courses, approved by the geology advisor are designed to complement the student's major program. Only those courses which are acceptable toward the major in geology may be used toward the minor. Teacher Education Programs Prospective elementary and secondary school teachers desiring to teach science should include basic courses in Geology and related sciences as part of their curriculum. Prerequisites (State Mandated Common Prerequisites) Students wishing to transfer to USF should complete the A.A. degree at the community college. Some courses re quired for the major may also meet General Education Requirements thereby transferring maximum hours to the university. A minimum of 60 semester hours must be com pleted at the university unless prior approval is secured. If students transfer without an A.A. degree and have fewer than 60 semester hours of acceptable credit, the students must meet the university's entering freshman requirements in cluding ACT or SAT test scores, GPA, and course require ments. The transfer student should also be aware of the immuni zation, foreign language, and continuous enrollment policies of the university. Students should complete the following prerequisite courses listed below at the lower level prior to entering the University If these courses are not taken at the community college, they must be completed before the degree is granted. Unless stated otherwise, a grade of "C" is the minimum acceptable grade. CHM 1045/1045L General Chemistry I (with lab) or CHM 1040 &CHM 1041orCHM 1045C or CHM 1045E CHM 1046/1046L General Chemistry II (with lab) or CHM 1046C or CHM 1046E GL Y 2010C Introduction to Physical Geology GL Y 2100 History of the Earth and Life or other GL Y course MAC 2311 Calculus I PHY 2048C General Physics and Laboratory I or PHY 2048/2048L PHY 2049C General Physics and Laboratory II or PHY 2049/2049L PHY 2053C Physics PHY 2054C Physics The choice physics sequence depends on the area of geology specialization. GERONTOLOGY (GEY) Gerontology is the study of the process of human aging in all its many aspects: physical, psychological, and social. In the Department of Gerontology particular emphasis is placed

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86 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG upon applied gerontology, with the goal of educating students any undergraduate major, but it should be particularly benefiwho in their professional careers will work to sustain or ciaJ to persons majoring in such disciplines as anthropology, improve the quality of life of older persons Since Gerontology communication sciences and disorders, government and is an interdisciplinary field, dual majors with other departinternational affairs, nursing psychology, health care, social ments are encouraged. The Departmen t offers the degrees work, and sociology Requirements for the minor in Gerontol-of Bachelor of Arts in Gerontology, Bachelpr of Science in ogyareatotalof16hoursofthefollowingupper-levelcourses: Gerontology a minor in Gerontology, and Master of Arts in GEY 3000 (3) GEY 3625 (3) HUS 4020 (4) Gerontology. The Department of Gerontology also hosts the GEY 3601 (3) GEY 4360 (3) University-wide Ph.D. in Aging Studies Requirements for the Major in Gerontology (B.A.) The Bachelor of Arts Degree in Gerontology entails 37 semester hours of required course work. In this program the course of study is intended to provide students with a liberal education in gerontology and some exposure to the various career opportunities in the field of aging This degree is especially appropriate for students who plan to pursue gradu ate or professional work in gerontology or some other field, or who plan to work w ith older adults in careers other than Nursing Home Administration. Required Courses : GEY 3000 (3) HUS 4020 (4) HUS 3001 (3) GEY 4327 (3) GEY 3601 (3) GEY 4360 (3) GEY 3625 (3) GEY 4401 (3) GEY 4640 (3) GEY 4935 (3) GEY 4945 (6) A required prerequisite is STA 2122. BA students may, upon approval of the departmental advisor, arrange to complete the B.A. internship (GEY 4945) half-time ove r two semesters, or to substitute 6 hours of GEY electives for the internship. The departmental advisor will also consider other requests for course substitution as long as the 37 semester hours in Gerontology are attained. Requirements for the Major in Gerontology (B.S.) The Bachelor of Science Degree in Gerontology is a 39 semester hour specialist degree which in addition to prov i ding students with a basic education in gerontology is in tended to prepare them for entry level positions in Nursing Home Administration It is especially appropriate for students who intend to begin working immediately following comple tion of the degree program Required courses: BUL 3320 (3) GEY 4329 (3) GEY 3601 (3) GEY 4360 GEY 4327 (3) GEY 4640 3) GEY 4328 (3) GEY 4945 9) MAN 3025 (3) MAN 3240 (3) MAN 3301 (3) Students also complete the following twelve (12) hours of prerequisites : ACG 2021, ACG 2071, CGS 2000, and GEY 3000 These courses are intended to reflect educational require ments mandated by the State of Florida and specified in Chapter 21z.11 of the Florida Code Students in the B .S. program should understand that they will only be allowed to register for the full-time internship (GEY 4945) after successful completion of all (or all but one) of the required courses in the B S major Because the B S intern ship requires full-time effort students will be allowed to take no more than four (4) credits concurrent with the B.S internship . The gerontology prerequisite can only be satisfied by a student's having taken GEY 3000 at this university or its equivalent at another institution. The prerequisites of ac counting can be fulfilled by taking ACC 2021 and ACG 2071 at this univers ity or comparable work at another institution. Students interested in either the B.A. or the B S option should contact the Department as early as possible in their careers at the University of South Florida Requirements for the Minor in Gerontology An undergraduate minor in Gerontology is available for students interested in pursuing careers in conjunction with Prerequisites (State Mandated Common Prerequisites) Students wishing to transfer to USF should complete the A.A. degree at the community college Some courses re quired for the major may also meet General Education Requirements thereby transferring maximum hours to the university. A minimum of 60 semester hours must be com pleted at the university unless prior approval is secured. If students transfer without an A.A. degree and have fewer than 60 semester hours o f acceptable credit the students must meet the university s entering freshman requirements in cluding ACT or SAi test scores GPA, and course require ments The transfer student should also be aware of the immuni zation foreign language, and continuous enrollment policies of the university. For those seeking the Bachelor of Science degree students complete the prerequisite courses listed below prior to be admitted to the upper-division major. Unless stated otherwise, a grade of "C" is the minimum acceptable grade. ACG X021 Financial Accounting or ACG X001 ACG X071 Managerial Accounting orACGX01'1orACG CSG XOOO X630 Computers in Business or EM E X'402, COC X317, CSGX101 X361, X001, or.X060 GEYXOOO Introduction to Gerontology For those seeking the Bachelor of Arts degree studehts should complete STA X122 (Social Science Statistics) at the lower level prior to entering the University. If this course is not taken at the community college, it must be completed before the degree is granted. A grade of "C" is the minimum accept able grade Acceptable substitutes for STA X122 are : QMB 2150 or QMB X100, STA 2022 X013 X014, X040, X023, or X024. There are no other common prerequisites for the Gerontology leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree GOVERNMENT & INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS (INT/POUPAD) The Department of Government and International Affairs includes programs in International Studies, Political Science and Public Administration Its goal is to provide students the opportunity to study the nature of government, politics and administration at the local, national and international levels as well as the interdisciplinary of the international system Towards that end it offers students a choice of two undergraduate degrees, one in International and ahother in Political Science. The Department of Go v ernment and International Affairs provides students with a range of courses of study and areas of concentration, induding elec tives offered through the Public Administration program For more specific details students are advised to consult the of each specific program b elow INTERNATIONAL STU DIES (INT) The major in fnternational Studies enables students to undertake programs of study which emphasize (a) preparat ion for careers in international activities or the study of particular international themes or topics, or c) the stuqy of particulc,ir regions or cultures : The program-0 study is devel oped by each student in consyltation with the International Studies Adviser so as to best serve the education and career goals of the individual.

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 87 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 19911199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Requirements for the Major in International Studies The major conslSts of a minimum of 37 semester hour$. At least 18 of these hours (six courses) must be from the International Studies Program offerings. The six required courses are: INR 3003 (3) INR 3081 (3) INR 3038 (3) INR 4936 (3) plus one topical and one area studies course chosen from the INT upper division electives. It is recommended that the student complete INR 3003 before taking INR 3081. The additional 19 hours may be selected from course offerings of other departments, which are approved by the major adviser as having adequate international or cross cultural content. Students may also take upper level electives from the International Studies curriculum. With the approval of the major adviser, credits earned in INR 4900 (1-3) and INR 4910 (1-3) may be used to augment or substitute for the foregoing requirements. Students are encouraged, but not required, to engage in study abroad programs, a large number of which have been approved by the USF International Affairs Center. Credits earned in such programs apply toward graduation and many also apply to the INT major. Required Supporting Courses Students must pass a 2000 level foreign language course (that is, at least one semester of foreign language study beyond the first year introductory courses), or complete one year of study of a non-Western language. Students who are bilingual orwho are already conversationally fluent or who can translate with facility from a foreign language text are exempt from the above course requirement, but the INT faculty may require demonstration of proficiency. Students will be provided with academic advice and coun sel ab out other courses offered throughout the university which may support and complement their major program. INT majors should plan their programs in conjunction with the adviser who is empowered to make appropriate substitu tions when educationally justified. Requirements for the Minor in International Studies The minor in International Studies is a set of International Studies qourses taken by a student that approximates one half of the upper level credits required for a major. The minor consists of 18 credit hours made up of six courses as follows: INR 3003 (3) INR 3081 (3) INR 3038 (3) and 3 upper levet courses chosen from the International Studies Program's offerings. Each student's program must be planned with the International Studies Program major advisor, who is empowered to approve appropriate substitu tions when educationally justified Prerequisites (State Mandated Common Prerequisites) Students wishing to transfer to USF should complete the A.A degree at the community college. Some courses re quired for the major may also meet General Edcation Requirements thereby transferring maximum hours to the university. A minimum of 60 semester hours must be com pleted at the university unless prior approval is secured. If students transfer without an A.A. degree and have fewer than 60 semester hours of acceptable credit, the students must meet the university's entering freshman requirements in cluding ACT or SAT test scores, GPA, and course require ments. The transfer student should also be aware of the immuni zation, foreign language, and continuous enrollment policies of the university. Students should complete two lower level introductory courses in International Relations prior to entering the Univer sity. If these courses are not taken at the community college, they must be completed before the degree is granted A grade of "C" is the minimum acceptable grade. Students are encourUS/i' aged to complete the following prerequisites, or major, sup port, or elective courses if available; during the program of study at the community college, and when feasible in General Education/Gordon Rule courses AMH 2010 American History I 3 AMH 2020 American History II 3 ANT 2000 Introduction to Anthropology 3 ECO 2013 Principles of Economics I 3 ECO 2023 Principles of Economics II 3 Foreign Language 11 GEA 3000 World Geography 4 POS 2041 American National Government 3 Western or World Civilization I, II 6 Courses to improve writing & speaking skills POLITICAL SCIENCE (POL) The undergraduate program leading to the B.A. degree in political science offers a general purpose degree, and a number of more specialized alternatives. The program is designed for students interested in and seeking to under stand political problems and issues, and the nature of the political process, as well as the philosophical and legal basis of political structures and processes at local, state, national, and international levels. Satisfying the degree requirements prepares students for positions in the public and private sectors, for law school, for graduate work in political science, international relations, public administration, and related disciplines, for positions in education, and for applied politi-cal activity. Requirements for the Major in Political Science Students who earn a B.A. degree in political science should be able to relate knowledge from their major field to other anied disciplines as well as being well-grounded in political science. In fact, it is impossible to understand fully and to explain political events and behavior without some knowledge of history, economics, sociology, and other re lated fields. To aid and encourage political science majors in this endeavor, students must take a minimum of 18 hours in courses from among history, economics, anthropology, ge ography, sociology, psychology, philosophy, or other ap proved Social Sciences. Six hours must be in history, three in economics, and nine from the remaining fields. Six of the eighteen hours must be taken at or above the 3000 level. A minimum of 36 credit hours is required to satisfy the requirements of the major. Students must take the 12 credit hours of required core courses in political science No more than six credit hours can be taken from POS 4905, POS 4910, and POS 4941. (A GPA of 3.0 is required to enroll in these courses; special exception may be granted by the Chair for students with a GPA between 2.70 and 2 99) Students transferring credit hours toward a major in politi cal science must complete a minimum of 21 credit hours within the Department, regardless of the number of credits transferred, in order to satisfy the requirements of the major. The undergraduate curriculum in political science is com posed of the following: Required Core Courses (12 er. hrs.) CPO 2002 (3) or INR 2002 (3) POS 2041 (3) POT 3003 (3) POS 3713 (3) Note that either CPO 2002 or INR 2002 must be taken as a core course. However, the other course not taken as a core course may be taken as an elective. Students should complete POT 3003 and POS 3713 by the end of the first semester of their junior year; students trans ferring with 45 credit hours or more must complete these courses within their first two semesters in residence at USF. A grade of "C" or better is required in all core courses. Electives from the seven fields (24 er. hrs.) with at least one course from Field I, one course from Field II or Ill, and one course-fromanyofFieldslV, V, VI, orVll; nocoursefromagiven field or field grouping can be taken until the core course has been completed.

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88 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNNERSITYOF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Field I Field II Field Ill Field IV FieldV Political Theory POT 3013 (3) POT 4064 (3) POT 4054 (3) POT 4204 (3) POT 5626 (3) Comparative Government and Politics CPO 4034 (3) CPO 4930 (3) CPO 5934 (3) International Relations INR 3102 (3) INR 3370 (3) INR 3038 (3) INR 4035 (3) INR 3336 (3) INR 4254 (3) INR 5086 (3) INR 4403 INR 4502 3) INR 4334 3) American National and State Governments POS 2080 (3) POS 3273 (3) POS 4413 (3) POS 2112 (3) POS 3453 (3) POS 4424 (3) POS 3173 (3) POS 4204 (3) POS 5094 (3) POS 3182 (3) PUP 4323 (3) Urban Government and Politics POS 3142 (3) POS 4165 (3) URP 4050 (3) POS 3145 (3) POS 5155 (3) PUP 4534 (3) Field VI Public Policy INR 3102 (3) PUP 4002 (3) PUP 4323 (3) URP 4050 (3) INR 4334 (3) PUP 4007 (3) PUP 4534 (3) POS 3145 (3) PUP 4203 (3) PUP 5607 (3) Field VII Law and Politics INR 4403 (3) POS 3691 (3) POS 4624 (3) POS 3283 (3) POS 4614 (3) POS 4693 (3) The following courses are not included within any of the seven fields, but may still be used as elective hours: PAD 3003 (3) POS 4936 (3) PAD 4204 (3) POS 4941 (3-15) POS 4905 (1-3) POS 4970 (3) POS 4910 (1-3) POS 3931 (3) POT 4109 (3) POT 4661 (3) POT 4936 (3) Requirements for the Minor in Political Science A minor in political science consists of a minimum of 18 credit hours, made up of two courses (6 credit hours) from among CPO 2002 (or INR 2002), POS 2041, and POT 3003. An additional 12 credit hours in regularly scheduled political science courses are required. Students transferring credit hours toward a minor in politi cal science must complete 12 credit hours within the Depart ment, regardless of the number of credit hours transferred, in order to be certified for a minor. Field Work The Department of Political Science has a field work program which provides students with part-time internships with state and local government and with political parties at the state and local level. Academic credit is available for such internships. For further information, contact the Department of Government and International Affairs. Honors in Political Science Honors in Political Science is designed for the outstanding undergraduate who seeks an intensive program plus aca demic recognition during the senior year. Admission to the honors sequence, which is available to all undergraduate majors, will be controlled by grade average, personal interviews and close scrutiny of the student's program and record. Students admitted will write an honors thesis, POS 4970 (3). Prerequisites (State Mandated Common Prerequisites) Students should complete any two introductory courses with a POS, INR or CPO prefix (ideally POS 1041 or POS 2041, and POS 1112 or POS 2112) atthe lower level prior to entering the University. If these introductory courses are not taken at the community college, they must be completed before the de gree is granted. A grade of "C" is the minimum acceptable grade. Economics (any ECO) ENC 1101 English I-Essay Writing 6 3 ENC 1102 English 11--Essay Writing Foreign Language I Foreign Language II Geography (any GEO) History (any AMH or EUH) POS 2112 State and Local Government Psychology (any PSY) Sociology (any SOC) SPC 2600 Public Speaking Requirements for the Pre-Law Plan in Political Science 3 4 4 3 6 3 3 3 3 The area of Political Science offers a pre-law plan de signed for the undergraduate considering a career related to law. (Courses on Law and Politics are listed under Filed VII of the Political Science undergrdu<1te curriculum ) The courses making up the field are of particular interest to law-oriented students, but may be taken by others as well. Majors are guided to those courses which develop skills and provide information needed for good performance in the study of law. Students receive the skills and information needed for entry into a number of law-related positions in business and government. An integral part of this plan is a high degree of student to the Political Science's pre-law advisor. Prior to admission to law school, a student must take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) This test is given by the Educational Testing Service of Princeton, New Jersey. The Law School Admission Test is given simultaneously several times each year at the University of South Florida and numerous other testing centers throughout the state. Stu dents should plan to take the test at least one year prior to planned enrollment in law school. Additional information is available from the Department of Government ana Interna tional Affairs, University of South Florida. Prerequisites (State Mandated Common Prerequisites) Students wishing to transfer to USF should complete the A.A. degree at the community college. Some courses re quired for the major may also meet General Education Requirements thereby transferring maximum hours to the university. A minimum of 60 semester hours must be com pleted at the university unless prior approval is secured. If students transfer without an A.A. degree and have fewer than 60 semester hours of acceptable credit, the students must meet the university's entering freshman requirements in cluding ACT or SAT test scores, GPA, and course require ments. There are no State Mandated Common Prerequisites for this degree program The transfer student should also be aware of the immuni zation, foreign language, and continuous enrollment policies of the university. Students are encouraged to complete the following pre requisites, or major support, or elective courses if available, during the program of study at the community college, and when feasible in General Education/Gordon Rule courses. Unless stated otherwise a grade of "C" is the minimum acceptable grade. AMH 2010 American History I AMH 2020 American History II ENC 3310 English-Essay Writing EUH 1000 World Civilization I EUH 1101 World Civilization II POS 2112 State and Local Government SPC 2600 Public Speaking International Affairs Focus in Political Science 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 The area of Political Science offers a number of courses that prepare students for graduate study in International Relations and career opportunities in private or public transnational organizations Basic courses in the area include : INR 2002 Introduction to International Relations

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 89 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG CPO 2002 Introduction to Comparative Politics pursue graduate work should take a minimum of two years INR 3102 American Fore i gn Pol i cy of classical or modern foreign language Open University In addition, Rolitical Science offers the following uppercourses are not eligible for major field credit. level courses : CPO 4034 Pol i t i cs of Developing Areas CPO 4930 Comparative Politics of Selected Areas INR 4334 Defense Policy'' INR 4035 International Political Economy INR 4403 International Law INR 4502 International Organizations CPO 5934 Selected Topics in Comparative Politics INR 5086 Issues in International Relations Students desiring careers in international affa irs or inter national administration are encouraged to supplement these courses with courses offered in International Studies, Man agement, Economics Business Administrat ion, Foreign Lan guages and Public Admin i stration PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (PAD) The Public Administration Program offers courses which serve as electives for undergraduate students. Completion of these courses will benefit those students preparing for a career in local state or federal ag encies of government non profit organizations and special service districts and/or gradu ate work in public administration and related fields. The courses listed be l ow may be taken for undergraduate credit. Please note that the 5000-level courses listed are available to seniors and g r aduate students only PAD 3003 Introduction to Public Administration PAD 4204 Public F i nancial Administration PAD 5035 Issues in Publ i c Administration and Public Policy PAD 5333 Concepts and Issues i n Public Planning PAD 5605 Administrative Law PAD 5612 Administrative Regulation PAD 5700 Research Methods in Public Administration PAD 5807 Administration of Urban Affairs PAD 5836 Comparative Public Administration For further information please contact the Pl.lblic Admini stration Program HISTORY(HTY) The discipline of history embraces a world of ideas, peoples, and events Our faculty seek to inform and question, to provoke, and to challenge our students to a higher level of understanding of the past. History at South Florida offers the student an opportunity to explore civilizations from around the globe and from the ancient through contemporary eras We encourage diversification Our faculty endeavor to move stu dents beyond traditional memorization of material to a critical level of thinking analysis and synthesis. Requirements for the Major in History A minimum of 32 semester hours is required for a major in history Twelve hours of2000 level courses or their equiva lent, constitute the lower level requirements. At least 12 hours of course work mast be drawn from the 3000-4000 level in addition to HIS 4104 and 4936 which constitute the upper level requirements fo ( the degree A minimum grade of "C" or better must be attained in each course counted for the 32 hours of h i story. Grades of "D or F in history coursework will, however, be used in calculating the major GPA unless the cour5e is retaken under the grade forgiveness policy It is recommended that history majors take ENC 3310, "Advanced Expository Writing ," SPC 2023 "Fundamentals of Speech Communication," LIS 2001, "Information Resources and Library Research computer service courses Additional hours can be profitably drawn from the following disciplines: Africana Studies American Studies, Anthropology, Econom ics Geography Government and International Affairs, Psy chology Philosophy Sociology Women's Studies Litera ture the Humanities and the Fine Arts. Majors intending to Requirements for the Minor The m i nor in History entails a 15-hour program organized and contracted by the student and the department around the specific needs of the student's major program A minimum of8 hours must be completed atthe University of South Florida and the student must maintain a 2.0 GPA irr the minor A minimum grade of "C" or better must be attained in each course. Only one lower level sequence counts earning 4 credit hours Certification of the minor will be supervised by the department. Students interested in a minor in history are encouraged to see the History department advisor as early in their undergraduate program as possible Open University courses are not eligible for minor field credit. Prerequisites (State Mandated Common Prerequisites) Students wishing to transfer to USF should comp l ete the A.A. degree at the community college. Some courses re quired for the major may also meet General Education Requirements thereby transferring maximum hours to the university. A minimum of 60 semester hours must be com pleted at the university unless prior approval is secured If students transfer without an A.A. degree and have fewer than 60 semester hours of acceptable credit the students must meet the university s entering freshman requirements in cluding ACT or SAT test scores, GPA, and course require ments The transfer student should also be aware of the immuni zation, foreign language, and continuous enrollment policies of the university. Students should COfllplete two lower level introductory courses i n History prior l o entering the University. Students are encouraged to complete the following prerequisites, or major support or elective courses i f available, during the program of study at the community college, and when feasible in General Education/Gordon Rule courses If these courses are not taken at the community college they must be com pleted before the degree is granted Unless stated otherwise a grade of C is the minimum acceptable grade Western or World Civilization I II American History I, II Latin American History I II EnglishEssay Writing Fore i gn Languages Anthropol ogy, Geography, Economics, Political Science Phi losophy, Literature Humanities St>ciology, Black Stud ies HUMANITIES & AMERICAN STUDIES (HUM/AMS) The Department of Humanities and American Studies offers students a choice of two undergraduate degrees one in Humanities and one in American Studies Students may also minor in each area. For more specific details, students are advised to consult the description of each specific pro gram below HUMANITIES(HUM) The Humanities Program is an interdisciplinary curricu lum that deals with the visual arts, mus i c literature and the culture from whi ch they emerge. Secondary sources are used sparingly ; students are encouraged to make a vigorous, personal response to specific works of art literature, and music. Requirements for the Major in Humanities 1 HUM 2211 (Studies in Culture : the Ancient through the Medieval Periods) and HUM 2243 (Studies in Culture: the Renaissance through the Twentieth Century), six credit hours

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90 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2 22 credits of upper-level Humanities courses (3000 or 4000 level) 3 HUM 4931 (Seminar in Humanities), four credit hours 4. Two or more classes in the creative or performing arts either lower or upper level, totaling at least four semester hours 5. Majors must earn a "C" or better in all Humanities courses Requirements for the Minor in Humanities The curriculum for the Humanities minor is comparable to that of the program for the B.A. degree, but it is less compre hensive Course requirements are as follows: 1. Eighteen semester hours of Humanities courses. 2 Not over eight of these eighteen hours may be taken below the 3000 level. Prerequisites (State Mandated Common Prerequisites) Students wishing to transfer to USF should complete the A.A. degree at the community college. Some courses re quired for the major may also meet General Education Requirements thereby transferring maximum hours to the university A minimum of 60 semester hours must be com pleted at the university unless prior approval is secured If students transfer without an A.A. degree and have fewer than 60 semester hours of acceptable credit, the students must meet the university s entering freshman requirements in cluding ACT or SAT test scores, GPA, and course require ments. There are no State Mandated Common Prerequisites for this degree program. The transfer student should also be aware of the immuni zation, foreign language, and continuous enrollment policies of the university Students should complete the following prerequisite courses listed below at the lower l d vel prior to entering the University. If these courses are not taken at the community college, they must be completed before the degree is granted Unless stated otherwise, a grade of "C" is the minimum acceptable grade ENC 1101 English I 3 ENC 1102 English II 3 Humanities (HUM 2000-level courses) 6 Imaginative Writing courses (CRW courses) 3-6 Introductory courses in applied and non-applied Fine Arts (ART, MUS) 6 Literature in Translation (RUT CL T courses) 3-6 Social Science (AMH, EUH courses) 6 AMERICAN STUDIES (AMS) The American Studies major is designed for students who seek to understand the cultural patterns beliefs and values that have unified and sometimes divided Americans. Ameri can Studies is an interdisciplinary program which empha s i zes the diversity of American people and institutions; the importance of gender, race, ethnicity and social class ; the material and technological foundations of American society; the development of distinctive regions within the United States ; and creative expression in art, architecture, film, literature, music and photography Requirements for the Major in American Studies 36 credit hours distributed as follows : 1. One 2000-level survey course either AMS 2201 (Colonial American Culture), AMS 2212 (Nineteenth-Century Ameri can Culture) or AMS 2270 (Twentieth-Century American Culture). 3 credits. 2 AMS 2030 {Introduction to American Studies) 3 credits 3 One additional 3000-level period course (e .g. AMS 3230, AMS 3001, AMS 3260). 4 credits 4 One 3000or 4000-level regions or genre course (e .g. AMS 3210, AMS 3601, AMS 4152) 3 or 4 credits. 5. AMS 4804 (Major Ideas in America) 3 credits 6. One 4000-level Research Seminar (AMS 4935 or AMS 4936) 4 credits 7 6 additional AMS credit hours 8 9-10 additional credit hours of supporting courses to be chosen in consultation with the undergraduate advisor Requirements for the Minor in American Studies 18 credit hours distributed as follows: 1. One 2000-level survey course (AMS 2201, AMS 2212, AMS 2270). 3 credits 2 AMS 2030 {Introduction to American Studies). 3 credits. 3. 6 additional AMS credit hours 4. 6 additional credit hours of supporting courses to be chosen in consultation with the undergraduate advisor. Prerequisites (State Mandated Common Prerequisites) Students wishing to transfer to USF should complete the A.A. degree at the community college Some courses re quired for the major may also meet General Education Requirements thereby transferring maximum hours to the university A minimum of 60 semester hours must be com pleted at the university unless prior approval is secured If students transfer without an A.A. degree and have fewer than 60 semester hours of acceptable credit the students must meet the university's entering freshman requirements in cluding ACT or SAT test scores, GPA, and course require ments There are no State Mandated Common Prerequisites for this degree program. The transfer student should also be aware of the immuni zation, foreign language, and continuous enrollment policies of the university Students are encouraged to complete the following pre requisites, or major, support or elective courses if available, during the program of study at the community college, and when feasible in General Education/Gordon Rule courses Unless stated otherwise a grade of C is the minimum acceptable grade AMH 2010 American History I 3 AMH 2020 American History II 3 ENC 1101 English I 3 ENC 1102 English II 3 ISS 2221 International Relations 3 POS 2041 American National Government 3 INTERDISCIPLINARY NATURAL SCIENCES (INB/INC/ING/INUINM/INP) The Bachelor of Arts in the Interdisciplinary Natural Sci ences major is designed for majors seeking a broad program in the natural sciences and for majors in Science Eaucation and Mathematics Education Concentrations exist in Interdis ciplinary Natural Sciences-Biology {INB) Interdisciplinary Natural Sciences-Chemistry (INC) Interdisciplinary Natural Sciences Clinical Laboratory Sciences (INL), Interdiscipli nary Natural Sciences-Geology (ING), Interdisciplinary Natural Sciences-Mathematics (INM), and Interdisciplinary Natu ral Sciences-Physics (INP) For information on teacher certi fication in science or mathematics, prospective teachers should consult the section entitled Teacher Education Pro grams, and also consult the College of Education sect i on of the catalog The requirements for graduation for this degree are the same as those contained in Arts and Sciences General Requirements for Degree except for the following: 1a. For Science Education and Mathematics Education Ma jors only, completion of a major consisting of a minimum of 45 hours in natural sciences courses applicable to majors in the sciences In these emphases, there must be a minimum of 24 credit hours in a discipline of major concentration and a minimum of 16 credit hours in

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 91 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199.UNDERGRADUA TE CATALOG supportin g courses outside the discipline of major con. Computer c 0 mpetency is essential for work in a modern centration selected from natural science courses. At least laboratory Students lacking computer skills should take two of the supporting coursE;is must be at the 3000 level or CGS 2060. aboye The student must earn a grade of "C" or l;>etter in each course in the major concentration and in each supporting course 1b. ForBiology(INB), Chemistry(ING), Geology(ING), M"the matics (INM), and Phrsics (INP) concentrations there must be a minim!Jm o 24 credit hours in a discipline of major arid a minimum core of supporting courses comprising a calculus sequence and the introduc_t9ry. science sequence from each of the following departments: BSC 20'.lpC (4) BSC 2011C (4) CHM 2041 (3) I CHM 2046(3) CHM 2045L (1) CHM 2046L(1) MAC 2233(4) (MAC 2311(4)) (MAC 2281(3) MAC 2234(4) or MAC 2312(4) or MAC 2282 (3) PHY 2053 (3) l [ PHY 2048 (3) PHY 2053L (1) or PHY 2048L (1) PHY 2054 (3) PHY 2049 (3) PHY 2054L (1) PHY 2049L (1) GL Y 2010 (3) GLY 2010L ( .1) GL Y 2100 (3) GL Y 2100L (1) The student must earn a grade of "C" or better in the major concentration and in each supporting course Unstructured courses are not counted to fulfill the major requirements. 1c. The Clinical Laboratory Sciences emphasis is designed to prepare students for appliq:ition to a clinical program in Medical Technology or Cytology following graduation or employment in a laboratort. Students planning to apply to clinical programs in Medical Technology need to include a co1,1rse.in Immunology. Students contemplating gradu ate study should pursue a major in the discigline of their interest, such as Biology, Chemistry, or Microbiology For the Clinical LaQoratory emphasis, completion of a minimum of 54 credit hours in natural sciences with a "C" or higher in each major and supporting course. Supporting Courses: . BSC 2010, 201 OL (3, 1) BSC -2011, 2011 L (3, 1) CHM 2041, 2045L (3, 1) 'CHM 2046,2046L (3, 1) MAC 2233 (4) STA 2023 (4) Major Courses: -BCH 3023 or CHS 4300 (3) CHM ?210, 221 OL (3,2) CHM 2211, 2211 L (3,2) MCB 3030C (4) Two (2) Biology major electives including at least one with lab (min. 6 hours) Select from the following list noting prerequisites where applicable: BOT 4434C MCB 4404, 4404L PCB 3063, 3063L PCB 5115C ZOO 4753C MCB 4115 PCB 3023, 3023L PCB 4064C PCB 5235 !'-1ajors in Biology, Chemistry, or Phys ics to total minimum of 54 hours. Select from the following list noting prerequisites applicable, and not dl.lpli courses used to meet the above requirements: B .CH. 3023 BCH 3023L BCH 4034 BOT 4434C CHM 3120C CHM 4060 CHS 4100C CHS 4300 CHS 4301L MCB 4115C MCB 4404 MCB 4404L MCB 4502C MCB 5206 MCB 5815 PCB 3023 PCB 3023L PCB 3063 PCB 3063L PCB 4064C PCB 4 723 PCB 4 723L PCB 5235 PCB 5525 PHY 2053 PHY 2053L PHY 2054 PHY 20541-ZOO 4 753C ZOO 5235 NOTE: .Transfer students with credit for two semesters of ani:ttomy and physiology with laboratories may substitute these courses for BSC 2011, 2011 L. US1" Prerequisites (State Mandated Common Prerequisites) Students wishing to transfer to USF should complete the A.A. degree at the community college. Some courses required for the major may also meet General Education Requirements thereby transferring maximum hours to the university. A minimum of 60 semester hours must be com pleted at the university unless prior approval is secured If students transfer without an AA. degree and have fewer than 60. semester hours of acceptable credit, the students must meet the university's entering freshman requirements in cluding ACT or SAT test scores, GPA, and course require ments There are no State Mandated Common Prerequisites for this degree program Students are encouraged to complete the following pre requisites, or major, support, or elective courses if available during the program of study at the community college, and when feasible in General Education/Gordon Rule courses Unless stated otherwise, a grade of C is the minimum acceptable grade. One year each, if offered, of: Biology I (BSC 2010, 2010L) and Biology II (BSC 2011, 2011L) 8 Calculus (MAC 2233 and MAC 2234 or MAC 2311 and MAC 2312) 6-8 General Chemistry (CHM 2041, OHM 2045L and CHM 2046, CHM 2046L) General Physics (PHY 2053, PHY 2053L and PHY 2054, PHY 2054L or PHY 2048, PHY 2048L and PHY 2049, PHY 2049L) Introduction to Physical Geology (GL Y 2010, GL Y 2010L) and History of the Earth and Life (GL Y 2100 GL Y 2100L) INTERDISCIPLINARY SOCIAL SCIENCES (ISS) 8 8 The ISS program is designed to provide an interdiscipli nary ihtegration of the social sciences for students who are interested in a broad educational experience. ISS offers a wide choice of courses, and an opportunity to design a quality program geared toward individual needs and interests. Stu dents plan their program in. ongoing consultation with the advisor who approves each individual curriculum contract. Specific requirements for a B.A. degree in Interdisciplinary Social Sciences (ISS) include: 1 required core courses for the major are ISS 301 O, ISS 4935, and STA 2122. 2. the ISS student chooses between two cognate areas and twelve hours in each Twenty available cog nates (hsted below) range from Africana Studies to Crimi nal Justice, Sociology, and Women's Studies. Three spe cial electives--emphasizing cultural diversity--are added 3. it is suggested thatthe student work out a program of study at the on.set of the junior year, particularly before too many courses are completed in CAS. No student should as sume that coarses already completed in CAS will automatically couot toward the ISS degree. 4 the completion of 42 approved hours of course work from the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS), with a minimum of 30 hours at the 3000 or above level. 5. students must maintain a minimum grade point average of 2.0 in ISS to graduate. 6 ISS majors must satisfy two semesters of a foreign lan guage in order to graduate. 7 other personal curricula may be tailored for those highly motivated students, with a minimum grade point average of 3.2, developed with the approval of the advisor. This course of study will be directed toward the special educa tional interests of these students An in-depth Honors

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92 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CA TA'LOG Research Paper will be required of students taking this option. 8. students in Communications Sciences and Disorders major in ISS with an emphasis in (a) Speech and Hearing Science, (b) Interpreter Training for the Deaf, or ( c) Ameri can Sign Language. Advising for this concentration is handled at the Communication Sciences and Disorders Department. No transfer courses with grades of "D" are acceptable for credit in the ISS major. COGNATE AREAS you select two areas and take 12 hours in each. Cognates must be selected from the areas of study listed below: AFA, ANT CCJ, ECN, EVR, GEY GPY, HTY HUM HUS INT, ISA, ISH, LAS, PAD, POL, PSY, SOC, SOW, and WST. Interdisciplinary Core Courses Two of these courses, an introductory course (3010) and the senior seminar (4935), introduce and employ the inter disciplinary social science perspective These courses in volve studel"!ts in the study of human systems; the various concepts, theories and methods studied in the social sci ences; and apply them to the issues of the day. Social Science Statistics is the third core course required for majors in Interdisciplinary Social Sciences Prerequisites (State Mandated Common Prerequisites) Students wishing to transfer to USF should complete the A.A. degree at the community college. Some courses re quired for the major may also meet General Education Requirements thereby transferring maximum hours to the university. A minimum of 60 semester hours must be com pleted at the university unless prior approval is secured If students transfer without an A.A. degree and have fewer than 60 semester hours of acceptable credit, the studentsmust meet the university's entering freshman requirements in cluding ACT or SAT test scores GPA, and course require ments. There are no State Mandated Common Prerequisites for this degree program. The transfer student should also be aware of the i mmuni zation, foreign language, and continuous enrollment policies of the university. Students are encouraged to choose from the following courses if available, during the program of study at the community college, and when feasible in General Education/ Gordon Rule courses. A grade of "C" is the minimum accept able grade. AFA 2000 Black Experience 3 AMH 2010 or 2020 American History 3 ANT 2000 Introduction to Anthropology 3 ECO 2013 Economic Principles (Macroeconomics) 3 ECO 2023 Economic Principles (Microeconomics) 3 GEA 3000 World Geography 4 POS 2041 National Government or POS 2112 State and Local Government 3 3 SYG 2000 Introduction to Sociology 3 WST 3010 Women's Studies 3 Please be aware of the immunization, foreign language, and continuous enrollment policiies of the university. This is a non-limited access program with the above courses recom mended. LIBERAL STUDIES (ALA) The Liberal Studies Degree is conceived to fulfill the intent of the traditional Liberal Arts degree and is offered for students who require a broad academic approach for realization of their conceived academic or pre-professional goals. For admission to the program, the students must (1) have a minimum of 20 (to a maximum of 80) semester hours, (2) have a minimum overall grade point average of 3.00 at the time of admission and (3) submit a written proposal explain ing the student's special academic c i rcumstances and goals for which this major is appropriate. Th i s proposal must be approved by a faculty committee of three professors (Chair to be selected by the student) to be assembled by the student and the Director in the Dean s Office. The student must complete the General Education Re qu i rements (and all other university requirements), and a minimum of 4 semesters of one foreign language. The remaining hours will be devoted to interdiscipl i nary study in the College of Arts and Sciences. Ideally, the 90 hours will include courses in the sciences, letters and social and behavioral sciences. In the student's last semester, a senior paper must be approved by the faculty committee. When admitted to the program, the student will formulate in collaboration with the faculty committee a program of studies to be pursued toward h i s/her particular academic goals. For information, contact the Coordinator of Advising in soc 102. Prerequisites (State Mandated Common Prerequisites) Students wishing to transfer to USF should complete the A.A. degree at the community c9llege. Some courses re quired for the major may also meet General Education Requirements thereby transferring maximum hours to the university A minimum of 60 semester hours must be com pleted at the university unless prior approval is secured If students transfer without an A.A. degree and have fewer than 60 semester hours of acceptable credit, the students must meet the university s entering freshman requirements in cluding ACT or SAT test scoreg, GPA, and course require ments. There are no State Mandated Common Prerequisites for this degree program. The transfer student should also be aware of the immuni zation, foreign language and continuous enrollment policies of the university. To be admitted to the Liberal Studies program, the student must have a minimum of 20 (to a maximum of 80) semester hours, have a m i nimum overall GPA of 3.0 at the time of admission, and submit a written proposal explaining the student's special academic circumstances and goals for which this major is appropriate. Unless stated otherwise, a grade of "C" is the minimum acceptable grade. LANGUAGES AND LINGUISTICS The Division of Languages and Linguistics offers stu dents several undergraduate degrees Although a baccalau reate degree is not offered in Linguistics, a minor is available tq students Comprehensive information about these pro grams is listed below CLASSICS (CLL, CLS, ICL) The major in Classics i s designed to meet the needs of students who desire competence in Latin and/or Greek and a broad understanding of ancient culture and literature. The major is of particular interest to students who wish to teach the languages, to those who plan graduate study in a human istic discipline, and to those who want an undergraduate major which focuses on the ancient civilizations which are the cornerstone of the Western tradition. Requirements for the major in Classics: The Major in Classics requires 10 courses, earning a minimum of 30 credit hours. Of those courses a minimum of 4 courses must consist of language courses in any combination of courses offered in Latin (LAT and LNW) and in Greek,GRE and GRW). The remaining 6 courses are to be chosen from a list of approved courses with the advice of the Classics advisor.

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 93 UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Requirements for the minor in Classics: The minor in Classics consists of 4 courses, earning a minimum of 12 credit hours, chosen from a list of approved courses with the advice of the Classics advisor. HONORS PROGRAM Admissions Criteria 1. Senior status. 2 Completion of the "core" courses required for a major in the Department with a GPA above 3 5 3. An overall GPA above 3.0 4 Two letters of recommendation from Departmental faculty followed by Departmental approval. Dismissal Procedures The student must maintain a Departmental GPAof 3.5, must submit the Honors Thesis on time, and must pass the scheduled Departmental Honors Examination. Otherwise, the candidate receives no Honors Requirements for Completion of Departmental Honors: 1 Completion of requirements for a major in the Department with a GPA above 3.5 and an overall GPA of 3.0. 2. Acceptance of a Senior Thesis by a committee of faculty members in the Department. 3 A grade of A on a sight translation from a Latin or Greek author 4. A written examination on a designated area of Latin or Greek literature (for example the Golden Age, the Silver Age, etc .). 5. Successful completion of an upper-level Greek or Latin course designated as an Honors Seminar Prerequisites (State Mandated Common Prerequisites) Students wishing to transfer to USF should complete the A.A. degree at the community college. Some courses required for the major may also meet General Education Requirements thereby transferring maximum hours to the university. A minimum of 60 semester hours must be com pleted at the university unless prior approval is secured. If students transfer without an A.A. degree have fewer than 60 semester hours of acceptable credit, the students must meet the university's entering freshman requirements in cluding ACT or SAT test scores GPA, and course require ments. The transfer student should also be aware pf the immuni zation, foreign language, and continuous enrollment policies of the university. Students should demonstrate proficiency at the interme diate level within the target language. This may be accom plished by completing 6-12 hours within the langauge or by demonstrated competency at the intermediate level. If this coursework (or associated competency) is not completed at the community college, it must be completed before the degree is granted. A grade of "C" is the minimum acceptable grade. Students are encouraged to complete the following prerequisites or majpr, support, or elective courses if avail able, during the program of study at the community college, and when feasible in General Education/Gordon Rule courses . ENC 1101 English I 3 ENC 1102 English II 3 EUH 2011 Ancient History I 3 EUH 2012 Anc i ent History II 3 Beginning and Intermediate Basic Preparation forMajor(LAT 1120 1121, orGRE 1120 1121) 16 LINGUISTICS (LIN) Linguistics is primarily an upper level and graduate disci pline with strong interdisc i plinary concerns Although no baccalaureate degree is offered the minor in linguistics may provide a broader educational experience for students major ing in adjacent arts and sciences such as Anthropology, Communication Commun i cation Sciences and Disorders, English, Foreign Languages, Philosophy, Psychology, Soci ology, and others. Requirements for the Minor The minor in Linguistics requires a minimum of 18 se mester hours as folrows : LIN 3010 (3) plus 15 semester hours from the following: ANT 3610 (3) CL T 3040 (3) DEP 4135 (3) EXP 4640 (3) LIN 3801(3) LIN 4040 (3) LIN 4600 (3) LIN 4710 (3) SPC 3210 (3) SPC 3712 (3) MODERN LANGUAGES (FRE/GER/IT A/RUS/SPA) Foreign Language major programs are designed to meet the needs of students who desire competency in a language and an expanded understanding of its culture and literature They are of particular interest to students who wish to teach languages, those who plan to further their studies in graduate school, and those who seek careers in various types of foreign or foreign-related employment either in government or business Major programs leading to the bachelor of arts degree are offered in French, German, Italian, Modern Greek Russian, and Spanish. All major programs in foreign language require a total of 32 hours of coursework above the intermediate level. The following languages may also be taken as a minor : French German, Italian, Latin, Modem Greek Russian, and Spanish. The minor consists of 15 hours of course work in French and Spanish above the second-year level, and 16 hours in the other languages except for the less commonly taught languages. In order to begin taking courses for the minor, the student will have satisfactorily completed the interm ediate level or have equivalent proficiency in the foreign language. Instruction in less commonly taught languages may be available upon sufficient demand. French (FRE)' Required courses for the major (15 er. hrs ) FRE 3230 (3) FRW 4100 (3) FRE 2240 (3) FRW 4101 (3) FRE 3420 (3) Supporting courses required for the major 17 hours in 3000, 4000, or 5000 level courses planned with the advisor Required courses for the minor (6 er. hrs.) FRE 2240 (3) FRE 3420 (3) Supporting courses required for the minor 9 hours in 3000, 4000, or 5000 level courses except courses in translation. German (GER) Requirements for the major (14 er. hrs.) GER 2240 (3) GEW 4100 (4) GER 3420 (3) GEW 4101 (4) Supporting courses required for the major 18 hours in 3000, 4000, or 5000 level courses including approved courses in related disciplines planned with the advisor. Required courses for the minor (6 er. hrs.) GER 2240 (3) GER 3420 (3) Supporting courses required for the minor 10 hours in 3000, 4000, or 5000 level courses except courses in translation. Modern Greek (GRK) Required courses for the minor (16 er. hrs.) GRK 2200 (4) GRK 4905 (4) GRK 2201 (4) GRK 4930 (4) Italian (IT A) Required courses for the major (15 er. hrs.) ITA2240(4) ITW4100(4) ITA 3420 (3) ITW 4101 (4) Supporting courses required for the major 17 hours in 3000 or 4000 level courses including ap-

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94 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 19981l19 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG proved courses in related disciplines, planned with the advisor. Required courses for the minor (7 er. hrs.) ITA 2240 (4) ITA 3420 (3) Supporting courses required for the minor 9 hours in 3000 or 4000 level courses except courses in translation Russian (RUS) Required courses for the major (14 er. hrs.) RUS 3240 (4) RUT 3110 (3) RUS 4241 (4) RUT 3111 (3) Supporting courses required for the major 18 hours in 3000 or 4000 level courses planned with the advisor. Required courses for the minor (8 er. hrs.) RUS 3240 (4) RUS 4241 (4) Supporting courses required for the minor 8 hours in 3000 or 4000 level courses. Spanish (SPA) Required courses for the major (15 er. hrs ) SPN 3300 (3) SPW 4301 (3) SPW -4101 (3) SPW 4131(3) SPW 4100 (3) Supporting courses required for the major. 17 hours in 3000, 4000 or 5000 level courses planned with the advisor. Required courses for the minor (3 er. hrs.) SPN 3300 (3) Supporting courses required for the minor 12 hours in 3000, 4000 or 5000 level courses except courses in translation. Prerequisites (State Mandated Common Prerequisites) Students wishing to transfer to USF should complete the A.A. degree at the community college. Some courses re quired for the major may also meet General Education Requirements thereby transferring maximum hours to the university A minimum of 60 semester hours must be com pleted at the university unless prior approval is secured. If students transfer without an A.A. degree and have fewer than 60 semester hours of acceptable credit, the studentsmust meet the university's entering freshman requirements in cluding ACT or SAT test scores, GPA, and course require ments The transfer student should also be aware of the immuni zation, foreign language, and continuous enrollment policies of the university. Students should demonstrate proficiency at the interme diate level within the target language. This may be accom plished by completing 6-12 hours within the langauge or by demonstrated competency at the intermediate level. If this coursework (or associated competency) is not completed at the community college, it must be completed before the degree is granted Students are encouraged to complete the following prerequisites, or major, support or elective courses if available, during the program of study at the community college and when feasible 1 in General Education/Gordon Rule courses. Unless stated otherwise, a grade of "C" is the minimum acceptable grade. ECN 1101 English I 3 ECN 1102 English II 3 Social Science (any HIS, SOC, ANT, etc.) 6 Humanities (any HUM) 6 Beginning and Intermediate "Target Language" (XXX 1120, 1121, and 2200) 14-19 LIBRARYAND INFORMATION SCIENCE (LIS) The School of Library and Information Science offers undergraduate classes to meet a wide range of information literacy needs in support of the university's academic pro grams The courses provide the understanding and skills needed to access essential information resources in an increasingly information-driven, technological world, whether in support of scholarship in academic disciplines or the occupational demands of society. Students are able to take a variety of classes that will prepare them to access and evaluate these information resources. Topics taught in these classes include: using the Internet to answer educational and research needs; design ing and creating web pages; efficiently finding and using the information resources of the modem, and increasingly electronic, library . The School's faculty will counsel those undergraduates interested in graduate study in librarianship. The Librar:y and Information Science Master s program is accredited by the American Library Association, and graduates are pr.epared for professional positions in all types of libraries, media centers, and information agencies The Library and Informa tion Science program at the University of South Florida meets the Florida state Board of Education requirements for certifi cation as an Educational Media Specialist (grades K-12). For more information, visit our web site at http : // MARINE SCIENCE (MSC) Although the department does not offer an undergraduate degree, graduate courses in the Department of Marine Sci ence are open to advanced undergraduates in other natural science disciplines. In addition, the Department of Marine Science has recently increased the number of courses spe cifically geared for undergraduates; consult the Schedule of Classes for course titles currently being offered".-Sor.ne De partment of Marine Science courses are available on all campuses by means of distance learning. The Department of Marine Science (OMS ) atthe University of South Florida offers M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Marine Science The student may emphasize biological, chemical, geological or physical oceanography, or develop an interdis ciplinary program in Oceanography through course work and thesis or-dissertation research. More than 100 students are currently pu..Suing degrees under the direction of 26 full-time faculty. Study areas range from estuarine and near-shore systems to remote areas of tlie Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans, as well as the Arctic and Antarctic. Additional information on faculty research and departmental facilities is available from the department upon request. The department's location on St. Petersburg's Bayboro Campus allows immediate access to Tampa Bay and the Gulf of Mexico Bayboro Harbor is home port to the RN Bellows (71 ft.) and the RN Suncoaster (110 ft.). These vessels are operated by the Florida Institute of Oceanography (FIO) forthe entire State University System. The department's principal building is shared with FIO and is adjacent to the Florida Marine Research Institute (FMRI), the research arm of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection. A newly occupied research building is shared by OMS and FMRI and houses a remote-sensing, satellite data-acquisition center. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) center for Coastal Geol ogy and Regional Studies the office of the Tampa Bay National Estuary Program, FMRI, and the Department of Marine Science all located on the Sayboro Campus Consequently, St. Petersburg is home to one of the largest concentrations of marine scientists in the southeastern United States; many of these scientists serve on advisory commit tees of OMS graduate students. MASS COMMUNICATIONS (COM) The School of Mass Communications, accredited by the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications, offers approximately 70 courses varying in content from the highly technical ana in some cases to an essential liberal arts orientation in others : The program introduces students to the theories, and problems of communications, emphasizing the concept of freedom of information as the cornerstone of Constitutional

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 95 UNIVERSfTY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Democracy and preparing students for future leadership roles in communications media. Graduates should under stand the structure and functions of mass media systems as well as the basic processes of communication In addition, students specialize in an area of mass communications (advertising, journalism, public relations, or telecommunica tions) to blend a strong introduction to professional skills with the theoretical orientation. Majors seeking careers in the mass media will be directed to the various media with which the School maintains close contact for summer internsh ips, practica and part-time work. A limited number of students will have the opportunity to serve as interns with a mass communications organization and take MMC 4945 for three hours credit. See MMC 4945 in catalog course listings. Note: Students may not receive credit for both an internship (MMC 4945) and a practicum (ADV 4940, JOU 3940, JOU 4941, JOU 4944 PUR 4 700, RTV 3941, RTV 4942, VIC3943) Requirements for the Major in Mass Communications To be admitted to the core curriculum in Mass Communi cations, students must have completed general education requirements including a minimum of 45 hours with a 2.7 minimum Overall Grade Point Average and ENC 1101 and 1102 with a minimum grade of "C" in each Applicants must establish a minimum score of 60 percent on the Mass Communications Diagnostic Test prior to entering MMC 2100 (Writing for Mass Media). (Students who transfer MMC 2100 or its equivalent must pass the Mass Communications Diagnostic Test with a score of at least 70 percent, which is the same score required for the successful completion of MMC 2100 at USF ) Both courses in the Mass Communica tions core curriculum (MMC 2100 and MMC 3602) must be completed with a minimum grade of "C" before any other Mass Communications course may be taken Students fail ing to achieve a minimum grade of"C" in both MMC 2100 and MMC 3602 will be disallowed as majors in the School. A 2 5 GPA in Mass Communications courses is required for gradu ation, and no student may graduate with a grade lower than c in any Mass Communications course. The Mass Communications major requires six hours of core curriculum courses (MMC 2100 and MMC 3602) and 28 hours of a combination of required and selective sequence courses for a total of 34 hours in Mass Communications within the 124-hour degree requirement. Six hours in Mass Communications writing courses (three hours in addition to MMC 2100) are a part of the graduation requirement. Mass Communications majors are required to take a minimum of 90 hours in courses outside the journalism and mass communications areas, with no fewer than 65 hours in the basic liberal arts and sciences. (Liberal Arts courses are listed in materials available from the School program advi sor ) To facilitate this no more than 34 hours of Mass Communications courses may be applied toward the bachelor's degree within the 124-hour graduation require ment. Mass Communications majors taking more than 34 hours of Mass Communications courses, regardless of the departments in which those courses are listed, must add those hours to the 124 hours required for graduation. In particular, film and photography courses offered in other departments may be considered to be Mass Communica tions courses and added to the 124-hour degree require ment. A maximum of nine semester hours in Mass Communica, tions courses will be accepted from a community college or other lower-level program toward a degree in Mass Commu nications. It is suggested that the nine hours include the equivalent of the School core curriculum and one sequence introduction course. Approval by an appropriate advisor is required At least eighteen ( 18) hours of resident School courses are required All material submitted by as assignments in writing, reporting, editing, photography and electronic news gathering and production classes is subject to publication or broadcast. The School uses a variety of print and electronic media outlets Sign Language may be used as an option by Mass Communications majors to fulfill the language requirement. The School sequence requirements are : School Core Curriculum MMC 2100 (3) MMC 3602 (3) Sequence Requirements 1. ADVERTISING Requirements ADV 3000 ADV 4800 (3) ADV 3101 3) ADV 4940 (1) ADV 3300 3) MMC 4203 (3) MMC 4420 (3) Selective Requirements (9 hrs required, selected with advisor's approval) Note: The following courses are required outside the School to complete sequence requirements : ACG 3074, ECO 1000, and MAR 3023 See specific courses for prerequi s ites 2. JOURNALISM Requ i rements News-Editorial Option JOU 2100 (3) JOU 4200 (3) JOU 3101 (3) MMC 4200 (3) JOU 4104 (3) Selective Requirements (10 hrs. advisor's approval) Magazine Option JOU 2100 (3) JOU 3101 (3) JOU 3300 (3) JOU 4200 (3) JOU 4206 (3) or PGY 3610 (3) required selected with MMC 4200 (3) MMC 4420 (3) MMC 4936 (3) Selective Requirements (7 hrs. required, selected with advisor's approval) Note: The following courses are required outside the School to complete sequence requirements: ECO 1000, PHI 1103, POS 2041, and POS 2112 or POS 3142, and SYG 3010 For Magazine sequence, CRW 2100 is also re quired. See specific courses for prerequisites 3. PUBLIC RELATIONS Requirements ADV 3000 (3) PUR 3000 (3) PUR 4100 (3) JOU 2100 (3) PUR 4001 (3) PUR 4401 (3) MMC 4420 (3) Selective Requirements (7 hrs required, selected with advisor's approval) Note: The following courses are required outside the School to complete sequence requirements: ECO 1000, MAN 3025, POS 2041, and POS 2112 or POS 3142 4. TELECOMMUNICATIONS Requirements News Option MMC 4200 (3) RTV 3001 (3) MMC 4420 (3) RTV 3304 (4) RTV 4301 (3) Selective Requirements (12 hrs. required selected w ith advisor's approval) Programming and Production Option MMC 4200 (3) RTV 3001 (3) MMC 4420 (3) RTV 3304 (4) RTV 2100 (3) RTV 4220 (3) RTV 4320 (3) RTV 4500 (3) Selective Requirements (3 hrs required, selected with advisor's approval) Note: The following courses are required outside the School to complete sequence requirements : For News: ORI 2000, PHI 1103, POS 2041, POS 2112 or POS 3142 and SPC 2600 For Programming and Production: CRW 2100 or ENC 3310, and PHI 1103 See specific courses for prerequi sites. Note : Most Mass Communications courses have prerequi sites They are specified in the course description Refer to each prerequ i site listed to determine progressive pre requisites for each course

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96 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Prerequisites (State Mandated Common Prerequisites) This is a limited access program. Students wishing to transfer to USF should complete the A.A. degree at the community college. Some courses required for the major may also meet General Education Requirements thereby transferring maximum hours to the university. A minimum of 60 semester hours must be completed at the university unless prior approval is secured If students transfer without an A.A. degree and have fewer than 60 semester hours of acceptable credit, the students must meet the university s entering freshman requirements including ACT or SAT test scores, GPA and course requirements The transfer student should also be aware of the immuni zation, foreign language, and co ntinuous enrollment policies of the university. Students should complete 18 semester hours outside the Mass Communications curriculum at the lower level prior to entering the University. If these courses are not taken at the community college, they must be completed before the de gree is granted A grade of "C" is the minimum acceptable grade Students are encouraged to complete the following prerequisites or major, support, or elective courses if avail able, during the program of study at the community collee and when feasible in General Education/Gordon Rule courses. English Composition (minimum grade of "C") 6 MMC 3602 Mass Communications and Society 3 Prior to being admitted to the School of Mass Communications a student must: Complete a minimum of 45 semester hours including all General Education requirements and six hours of English composition (with a minimum grade of "C") earn a 2 7 overall GPA, and pass a School-administered English diagnostic test. Requirements for the Minor in Mass Communications The minor in Mass Communications is available to stu dents pursuing any other major at USF. Students who wish to minor must apply for admission to the School of Mass Communications and must meet all admission standards required of majors Please see "Requirements for the Major in Mass Communications" for more admission information. The minor in Mass Communcations requires a minimum of 18 hours of School coursework, including : MMC 2100 (3) MMC 3602 (3) The other 12 hours may be selected from among School offerings and must include a minimum of 9 hours at the 3000level or higher All major course prerequisites must be met. A grade of "D" or "F" will not be counted toward a mass communications minor and a 2.5 grade point average in all minor coursework must be maintained. All minor hours must be completed at USF. MATHEMATICS (MTH) The Department of Mathematics offers a diversity of courses designed not only to enable the student to pursue a profes sion in mathematics itself, but also to enhance the student's competence in the fields of engineering, the physical sci ences, the life sciences, and the social sciences. The ment offers programs leading to the B.A. M.A. and Ph.D. degrees The undergraduate program emphasizes the broad nature of modem mathematics and its close associations with the real world The program is designed to prepare students for entry into graduate school or careers i n industry or secondary education The Department of Mathematics consists of 31 full-time faculty members, whose areas of interest include: algebra, applied mathematics, approximation theory, celestial me chanics complex analysis, dynamical systems functional analysis graph theory, logic number theory, ordinary differ ential equations, partial differential equations, potential theory, probability theory, real analysis, statistics, theoretical com puter science, and topology. Requirements for the Major in Mathematics The courses taken to satisfy the requirements below will constitute the major program referred to in the general gradu ation requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences. A minimum of 12 hours of 4000 level or higher mathematics courses must be taken in residency and must be applicable to the major 1 Mathematics Requirement (Min. 45 er. hrs.) Majors must complete the following core courses: COP 4313 Symbolic Computations in Mathematics 3 MAA4211 Intermediate Analysis I 4 MAC 2311 Calculus I 4 MAC 2312 Calculus II 4 MAC 2313 Calculus Ill 4 MAP 2302 Differential Equations 3 MAS 3105 Linear Algebra 3 MAS 4301 Elementary Abstract Algebra 3 MAT2936 Technology Seminar 1 MAT 4937 Mathematics Majors Seminar 1 MGF 3301 Bridge to Abstract Mathematics 3 ST A 4442 Introduction to Probability 3 In addition, majors must complete three (3) courses from the following electives: CGS 3414 Problem Solving Using Pascal or C 3 MAA4212 Intermediate Analysis II 3 MAA4402 Complex Variables 3 MAD 4401 Numerical Analysis 4 MAD 4504 Theory of Computation 3 MAD 5305 Introduction to Graph Theory 3 MAP 5345 Applied Partial Differential Equations 3 MAP 5407 Methods of Applied Mathematics 3 MAS 4124 Numerical Linear Algebra 3 MAS4156 Vector Calculus 3 MAS 4214 Elementary Number Theory 3 MHF 5405 History of Modem Mathematics 3 MTG 4212 Geometl)I 4 MTG 4302 Introduction to Topology 3 STA4321 Introduction to Statistics 3 STA 5166 Computational Statistics 3 STA 5228 Sampling Techniques 3 Special topics courses listed und' er MAT 4930 or other 5000-level mathematics courses can also be taken as elec tives, with the approval of an undergraduate advisor In addition, one elective of high mathematical content can be taken from another department, w ith the approval of an undergraduate advisor and the chairman. An undergraduate advisor will work with the student t n recommending electives which are appropriate for the student's interests and goals. The following is a typical mathematics course program for mathematics majors: Semester 1 MAC 2311 Calculus I 4 Semester 2 MAC 2312 Calculus II 4 MAT2936 Technology Seminar 1 Semester 3 MAC 2313 Calculus Ill 4 MGF 3301 Bridge to Abstract Mathematics 3 Semester 4 MAP 2302 Differential Equations 3 MAS 3105 Linear Algebra 3 Semester 5 MAS 4301 Elementary Abstract Algebra 3 COP 4313 Symbolic Computations in Mathematics 3 Semester 6 STA4442 Introduction to Probability 3 Elective 3-4

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 97 UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Semester 7 MM4211 Intermediate Analysis I Elective Semester 8 MAT 4937 Mathematics Majors Seminar l;:lective 2. Mathematics-related Courses (6-8 er hrs ) 4 3-4 1 3-4 Majors, except for majors in mathematics for teaching, must take two courses with laboratories in the Departments of Biology, Chemistry, Geology, or Physics that are required courses for the major within those departments. Majors will not receive credit toward graduation for the following courses: AST3033 QMB2111 STA2023 PHY 2020 QMB 3200 STA 2122 Majors wishing to take a course in statistics should take STA4321. Requirements for the Minor in Mathematics The minor in mathematics is open to all students Stu dents with majors in the sciences engineering, business, and the social sciences are particularly encouraged to pur sue the minor. A student wishing to receive a minor in mathematics must meet the following course requirements (minimum of 24 er hrs.): 1. Required Courses (18 er hrs.) Either MAC2311 MAC 2312 MAC2313 Or MAC 2281 MAC2282 MAC2283 MAP2302 Calculus I Calculus II Calvulus Ill Engineering Calculus I Engineering Calculus II Engineering Calculus Ill Differential Equations Also, both of the following: MAS 3105 Linear Algebra MGF 3301 Bridge to Abstract Mathematics 2. Elective Courses (Min 6 er. hrs ) 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 Any 2 courses (3 or more credit hours each) which are required or elective for the major in mathematics. Teacher Education Programs For information concerning the degree programs for sec ondary school teachers, see the description given in the Mathematics Education section of this catalog. Technical Concentrations The Department of Mathematics offers specialized techni cal concentrations within the general Bachelor of Arts degree in mathematics that emphasize a subfield of Environmental Science These concentrations are more structured than the general B.A. program and require additional study in a related field comparable to earning a minor in that field. This cross disciplinary tr.aining prepares the student for a career in Environmental Science Furthermore, the student is able to pursue graduate work in either mathematics or the related field. Environmental Biology Concentration 1. Mathematics requirement Completion of the mathematics major, including STA 4321 Introduction to Statistics 3 2. Supporting courses CHM 2041 Introductory General Chemistry 3 CHM 2045L General Chemistry I Lab 1 CHM 2046 General Chemistry II 3 CHM 2046L General Chemistry II Lab 1 3. Biology corses BSC 2010 Biology I Cellular Processes 3 BSC 2010L BSC 2011 BSC 2011L ZOO 3203C PCB 3063 PCB 4043C PCB 4674 Biology I Cellular Processes Lab Biology II Diversity Biology II Diversity Lab Invertebrate Zoology General Genetics Principles ofEcology Organic Evolution Environmental Chemistry Concentration 1 Mathematics requirement Completion of the mathematics major including STA4321 Introduction to Statistics 2. Chemistry courses CHM 2041 Introductory General Chemistry CHM 2045L General Chemistry 1 Lab CHM 2046 General Chemistry II CHM 2046L General Chemistry II Lab CHM 2200 Organic Chemistry CHM 4410 Physical Chemistry I CHM 4411 Physical Chemistry II And either CHM 3120C Elementary Analytic Chemistry or CHM 3610C Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry Env ironmental Geology Concentration 1. Mathematics requirement Completion of the mathematics major, including STA 4321 Introduction to Statistics The student must complete one of the sequences MAS 4123 Numerical Linear Algebra MAD 4401 Numerical Analysis or MAP 5407 Methods of Applied Mathematics MAP 5345 Applied Partial Differential Equations 2 Supporting courses PHY 2053 General PHY 2053L General Physics Lab PHY 2054 General Physics and Lab PHY 2054L General Physics Lab 3 Geology courses GL Y 2010 Dynamic Earth: Introduction to GLY 2010L GLY 2100 GLY 2100L GLY 4822 And either GLY 3400C or GLY 5827 Physical Geology Dynamic Earth Lab History of the Earth and Life Earth History Lab Introduction to Hydrogeology Structural Geology Advanced Hydrogeology Accelerated BA/MA Program 1 4 1 4 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 1 4 3 3 4 4 3 3 4 3 3 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 4 4 4 This program is designed for superior students having a solid background in high school mathematics and the ability to handle a fast paced, challenging program leading to a BA and MA degree in mathematics in four to five years. The program meets all the requirements for the BA degree, but requires the students to take those 5000 and 6000 level courses required fQr the MA degree during the last two years in the program. By awarding up to 20 hours of dual credit (undergraduate and graduate), the student also uses these courses to satisfy the requirements for the MA in mathemat ics For admission to the program, a student must have completed at least 30 hours of college credit including 8 hours of 3000-level or above mathematics courses; have an overall grade point average of 3.0 or above ; and have a grade point average of 3.5 or above in all mathematics courses taken at the 3000-level or above. Further information is available on request from the Department of Mathematics (974-2?43).

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98 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CA TA LOG Honors Program in Mathematics The program is designed for students who wish to obtain a B.A. degree that will indicate unusual strength in the field of mathematics. Successful completion of the program will be prominently displayed on the student's diploma and will be recorded on the official U.S.F. transcript of the student's work. Students are eligible for admission to the program when they 1. have completed Elementary Abstract Algebra (MAS 4301 ), 2. have at least a 3 0 average in all college courses, and 3. have at least a 3.5 average in college mathematics courses. Applications are submitted to the Undergraduate Commit tee of the Department of Mathematics. The requirements for a B.A. degree in mathematics with honors are as follows: 1. completion of requirements for the major in mathematics, 2. six credit hours of graduate mathematics courses at USF, 3. completion of MAT 4970, Mathematics Senior Thesis, 4 .. at least a 3.0 average for all courses, and 5 at least a 3.5 average for mathematics courses. Prerequisites (State Mandated Common Prerequisites) Students wishing to transfer to USF should complete the A.A. degree at the community college. Some courses re quired for the major may also meet General Education Requirements thereby transferring maximum hours to the university A minimum of 60 semester hours must be com pleted at the university unless prior approval is secured. A student who transfers without an A.A. degree and has fewer than 60 semester hours of acceptable credit must meet the university's entering freshman requirements including ACT or SAT test scores, GPA, and course requirements. The transfer student should also be aware of the immunization, foreign language, and continuous enrollment policies of the university. Students should complete the following prerequisite courses listed below at the lower level prior to entering the University. If these courses are not taken at the community college, they must be completed before the degree is granted. Unless stated otherwise, a grade of "C" is the minimum acceptable grade. COP XXXX Computer Language Course (Pascal, FORTRAN, C, C+ or C++) MACX311 Calculus I MACX312 Calculus II MACX313 Calculus Ill Students must also complete two laboratory-based sci ence courses, 4 -8 semester hours total, from the respective science majors: Biology, Chemistry, or Physics. MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY (MET) The University of South Florida offers a four-year program leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in Medical Technol ogy The first three years are completed on campus; the fourth year (12 months) is completed at one of five affiliated hospi tals in Florida, located in Tampa Orlando, and Ji:icks onville Ad mission to the fourth year is limited by the number of openings in affiliated hospitals, and at the present time is competitive. Selection for the clinical program is made by the hospitals and students not admitted to a clinical program may need to select an alternative degree Generally hospitals require a minimum GPA of 2.5, and our students admitted to clinical programs in recent years have had a mean GPA of about 3.0. All courses required for admission to the clinical program must be completed prior to beginning the clinical year. These requirements include: 1 A minimum of 90 semester hours (excluding physical education.) 2 All University Liberal Arts requirements. 3. Writing and computation requirements for 6A10.30. 4. All sciences and mathematics requirements listed below, including Common Prerequisites and those specific to USF, with a "C" or higher in each course. Prerequisites (State Mandated Common Prerequisites) Students wishing to transfer to USF should complete the A.A. degree at the community college. Some courses re quired for the major may also meet General Education Requirements thereby transferring maximum hours to the university. A minimum of 60 semester hours must be com pleted at the university unless prior approval is secured. A student who transfers witho1,1t an A.A. degree and has fewer than 60 semester hours of acceptable credit must meet the university's entering freshman requirements including ACT or SAT test scores, GPA, and course requirements. The transfer student should also be aware of the immunization, foreign language, and continuous enrollment policies of the university. Students should complete the following prerequisite courses listed below at the lower level prior to entering the University. If these courses are not taken at the community college, they must be completed before the degree is granted. Unless stated otherwise, a grade of "C" is the minimum acceptable grade. They may be completed at a community college or other institution or at USF. Courses available at USF are indicated with an asterisk. 1) General Biology I with lab (e.g BSC 1010, 1010L; BSC 2010, 2010L*) 2) Human Anatomy and Physiology I with lab (e.g. BSC 1085, 1085L) and Human Anatomy and Physiology II with lab (e.g. BSC 1086, 1086L) or or or Human Physiology with lab (e g. PCB 4703C; BSC 3092*) and one of the following options : General Biology II with lab (e.g. BSC 1011, 1011L; BSC 2011, 2011L*) Genetics with lab (e.g. PCB 3063, 3063L*) Cell Biology with lab (e.g. PCB 3023, 3023L *) or Human Anatomy with lab (e g. BSC 1095, 1095L; ZOO 3733C) 3) General Microbiology with lab (e.g. MCB 2010, 2010L; MCB 3030C*) 4) General Chemistry I & II with labs (e.g. CHM 1045, 1045L, 1046, 1046L; CHM 2041, 2045L, 2046, 2046L *) 5) Organic Chemistry I with lab (e.g CHM 2210, 2210L*) 6) Organic Chemistry II with lab (e.g CHM 2211, 2211L*) or Quantitative Analysis (e.g. CHM 2120C; CHM 3120C*) 7) Statistics (e g. STA 2023*) (4) (4) (4) (4-5) (4) (4) (4) (4) (4) (8) (4-5) (4-5) (4) (3-4) In addition to the Common Prerequisites listed above, the following courses are required for the degree at USF: College Algebra (MAC 2102 or MAC 2132) (3) Determinative Bacteriology ( M CB 4115) ( 5) Immunology (PCB 5235 or equivalent) (3) Clinical Chemistry (CHS 4300) (3) Ability to use computers is essential for work in a modem laboratory. Hospitals recommend elective courses in use of computers and in management. Upon successful completion of this curriculum and accep tance by one of the affiliated hospitals, the student will

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 99 UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG complete 12 continuous months of training at that hospital. PHI 4320 Philosophy of Mind Hospital programs begin in July or early year, PHI 4300 Theory of Knowledge and some hospitals also have programs beginning in Jan1;1-PHI 5225 Philosophy of Language ary or February. During this training the will PHP 4784 Analytical Philosophy continue to be registered as a full-time student of the l:'niver-Group 2 sity and will receive a total of 30 credit hours of work in: PHI 2600 Ethical Theory Conterriporary Moral Issues Philosophy of Religion Aesthetics MLS 4031 MLS 4861 MLS 4863 MLS 4865 PHI 3601 MLS 4860 MLS 4862 MLS 4864 MLS 4866 PHI 3700 These courses, listed u nder Interdisciplinary Arts and PHI 4800 Sciences," will be taught at the hospital. A C or higher m ust PHM 3021 be earned in eae
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100 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG The curriculum allows enough flexibility in electives to enable students to combine a physics major with another major in such areas as mathematics, biology, chemistry, computer science, engineering, business, and teacher education. The B.S. program is for students planning to pursue graduate studies in physics, applied science or engineering. For those students who desire additional capabilities in physics be yond the General Physics sequence, they may pursue a Minor in Physics. At the graduate level, the Department of Physics offers three Master's degrees, the Master of Science in Physics, the Master of Science in Applied Physics and the Dual-Master Degrees in Physics and Engineering Science. A Ph.D. pro gram in Applied Mathematics or Engineering Scinece with an emphasis in Applied Physics is conducted in collaboration with the Department of Mathematics and with the College of Engineering. Requirements for the Majors in Physics 1. Physics Courses B.A. PHYSICS (PHY) (34 er. hrs.) PHY 2048 (3) PHY 3221 (3) PHY 2048L ( 1) PHY 3323C ( 4) PHY 2049 (3) PHY 3822L (2) PHY 2049L (1) PHY 4222 (3) Physics Electives (6) B.S. PHYSICS (PHS) (44 er hrs.) PHY 2048 (3) PHY 3323C (4) PHY 2048L (1) PHY 3424 (4) PHY 2049 (3) PHY 3822L (2) PHY 2049L (1) PHY 4222 (3) PHY 3101 (3) PHY 4324C (4) PHY 3221 (3) PHY 4523' (3) PHY 4324C (4) PHY 4823L (2) PHY 4910 (1-4) PHY 4930 (1) PHY 4604 (3) PHY 4823L (2) PHY 4910 (1-4) PHY 4930 (1) PHZ 5405 (3) 'The sequence PHZ2101 (2), PHY2053(3), PHY2053L(1 ) PHY2054(3) and PHY 2054L ( 1) maybe substituted for the sequence indicated. 'Substitutions pennitted subject to approval of adviser. 2. Supporting Courses in the Natural Sciences B.A. and B S PHYSICS (20 er. hrs.) CHM 2041 (3) CHM 2046L (1) MAC 2313 (4) CHM2045L(1) MAC2311(4) MAP2302(3) CHM 2046 (3) MAC 2312 (4) 'The sequence MAC 2281 (3), MAC 2282 (3), and MAC 2283 (3) may be subs\ituted for the sequencaindicated. 3. Liberal Arts Requirements [General Education Requirements (36 er hrs.); Exit Re quirements (9 er hrs.)] The student is required to complete the University's Liberal Arts Requirements. 4. Free Electives Courses over and above required courses should be taken to complete a 120-hour program. 5. Residency Requirement A minimum of 20 credit hours of physics courses ( 1 above) in residency. 6. D and F grades earned in attempting to satisfy major requirements will be used in calculating the major GPA. Requirements for the Minor in Physics The minor in Physics is open to students with majors in the sciences, engineering and mathematics. A minor in Physics consists of 19 credit hours, which include, PHY 2048 (3), PHY 2048L (1 ), PHY 2049 (3), PHY 2049L (1 ), PHY 3101 (3), PHY 3822L (2), and two electives from the approved Physics courses. Teacher Education Programs For information concerning the degree programs for sec ondary school teachers, see Teacher Education Programs this college; for junior college teachers, see USF Graduate Catalog. Prerequisites (State Mandated Common Prerequisites) Students wishing to transfer to USF should complete the A.A. degree at the community college. Some courses recg quired for the major may also meet Education Requirements thereby transferring maximum hours to the university. A minimum of 60 semester hour's must be com pleted at the university unless prior approval is secured. If students transfer without an A.A. degree and have fewer than 60 semester hours of acceptable credit, the students must meet the university's entering freshman requirements in cluding ACT or SAT test scores GPA, and course require ments. The transfer student should also be aware of the immuni zation, foreign language, and continuous enrollment policies of the university. Students should complete the following prerequisite courses listed below at the lower level prior to entering the University. If these courses are not taken at the community college, they must be completed before the degree is granted. Unless stated otherwise, a grade of is the minimum acceptable grade. CHM 1045/10451.. General Chemistry I (with lab) or CHM 1040 & CHM 1041 or CHM 1045C or CHM 1045E CHM 1046/1046L General Chemistry II (with lab) or CHM 1046C or CHM 1046E Students must complete the prerequisite courses listed below prior to be admitted to the upper-division major. Stu dents who do not complete these prerequisites can be admitted to the University, but not to the upper-division major. Unless stated otherwise, a grade of "C" is the minimum acceptable grade. MAC 2311 Calculus I MAC 2312 Calculus II MAC 2313 Calculus Ill PHY 2048/2048L General Physics I with Lab or PHY 2048C PHY 2049/2049L General Physics II with Lab or PHY 2049C PSYCHOLOGY (PSY) Psychology involves the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Because of this focus, psychology is relevant to many other areas of study both inside and outside of the social and behavioral sciences. The undergraduate program in Psycholqgy offers the student a well-rounded liberal arts education. In addition the program provides excellent training for qualified students who wish to pursue graduate work in such disciplines as Clinical, Experimental or Industrial Psychology, Education, Gerontology, Counsel ing, Management, Medicine, Law, and other human service programs. The undergraduate major emphasizes the breadth of psychology while allowing the student some electives to pursue in depth a particular aspect of the field. The graduate faculty of the Psychology Department are divided into three broad program areas: Clinical, Experimental, and Industrial/ Organizational. Each of these program areas offer5 Ph.D. level training as well as instruction at the undergraduate level. Requirements for the Major in Psychology Majors must complete at least 34 semester hours in the field. A minimum grade of "C" or better must be attained in each course in the major. All majors must complete: 1. 2000/3000 Level Requirement (6 semester hours) Successful completion of: PSY 3044 (3 semester hours) and one of the following : INP 2101 PSY 2012 PSY 3022 SOP 3742 2. Methods Course Requirement (7 semester hours) Successful completion of: PSY 3213 and one ofthe follow ing: CLP 4433 PSY 4205 or another methods course approved by the undergraduate advisor in Psychology. 3. 4000 Level Requirement (21 semester hours) Successful completion of 7 additional Psychology courses numbered at the 4000 level selected as follows: At least two courses from each of the two groups below:

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 101 UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Group I EXP 4204C EXP 4404 PSB 4013C EXP 4304 EXP 4523C Group II CLP 4143 INP 4004 SOP 4004 DEP 4005 PPE 4004 and 3 additional courses numbered at the 4000 level. Note: No more than a total of 3 hours of the following courses may count toward the major: PSY 4913 Directed Study PSY 4970 Honors Thesis PSY 4932 may not count toward the major. PSY 4205 is recommended for students planning gradu ate training. Statistics and Biological Science are required. Otherwise, students majoring in psychology are encouraged to complete a varied undergraduate program. A prerequisite for all 4000-level courses is a grade of "C" or better in both PSY 3044 and PSY 3213. For students min?ring i.n Psychology or those majoring in Interdisciplinary Social Sciences, a grade of "C" or better in any college-level statistics course will substitute for the PSY 3213 requirement. Requirements for the Minor in Psychology A minor in Psychology consists of a minimum of 15 credit hours, comprising PSY 2012, PSY 3044, and any three 4000level psychology courses except PSY 4913. A GPA of2.0 or better. in th.e minor is required for certification. The purpose of the '!1inor 1s to students majoring in other disciplines to obtain an appropnate psychology background that will comple ment their work in their major. See the Psychology Depart ment Undergraduate Advisor for suggested minor programs for students majoring in various fields . Psychology Honors Program The purpose of the Honors Program is to provide a select group of undergraduate Psychology majors an opportunity to intensive individualized research experience. The culmination of the Honors Program is the completion and defense of an .honors thesis. Application for the program will take place second of the student's junior year or, typically, pnor to completion of 90 semester credits. Admission to the program is competitive and based on the student's overall academic record, performance in psychol ogy courses, and a letter of recommendation from a m ember of the Psychology Department faculty. Successful completion of the program requires a GPA of 3 5 in major coursework, an overall GPA of 3 25 at USF, and, typically, completion of 43 hours in Psychology including PSY 4932 (6) and PSY 4970 (6). See the Psychology Department Undergraduate Advisor for details of the program and an application form. Prerequisites (State Mandated Common Prerequisites) Students wishing to transfer to USF should complete the A.A. degree at the community college. Some courses re quired for the major may also meet General Education Requirements thereby transferring maximum hours to the university. A minimum of 60 semester hours must be com pleted at the university unless prior approval is secured. If students transfer without an A.A. degree and have fewer than 60 semester hours of acceptable credit, the students must mee.t the university's entering freshman requirements in cluding ACT or SAT test scores, GPA, and course require ments . The transfer student should also be aware of the immuni zation, foreign language, and continuous enrollment policies of the university. should complete the following prerequisite listed below at the lower level prior to entering the University. If these courses are not takeri at the community college, they must be completed before the degree is granted Unless stated otherwise, a grade of "C" is the minimum acceptable grade. PSY X012 Introduction to Psychology or Any other lower level Psychology course STAXXXX Any level Statistics course BSCXXXX Any level Biology course or Any lower level Zoology course REHABILITATION COUNSELING (REF) A five-year master's program is available to undergradu ates where an M.A. degree in Rehabilitation Counseling and a bachelor's degree in another major (if desired) can be earned in a total program of 150 semester hours. Students admitted through the five-year program (REF) must have completed 90 semester hours of work, and have satisfied General Distribution, CLAST, and Rule 6A-10.30 (Gordon Rule) requirements. Minimum admission requirements in clude a total Verbal-Quantitative score of at least 1000 on the GRE or a "B" average over the last 60 semester hours The GRE must be by all applicants whether or not they have a 3.0 grade-point average. A detailed description of the M.A. program in Rehabilitation Counseling may be found in the .Graduate Catalog and on the internet at http:// www.usf.cas.edu/rehab_conseling/index.html. Undergraduates interested in the five-year program (REF) should contact the department during their sophomore year. They should concentrate on taking required courses in their and should generally defer taking electives until admitted to the five-year program. Applications for the five-year program are available from the Department. GRE scores must be reported to USF before any application can be processed, and three letters of recommendation are required . The of.Rehabilitation Counseling is to help indi viduals with physical, mental, and psychiatric disabilities return to full, rewarding, and productive lives Rehabilitation work wi. de variety of $ettings, including public and pnvate rehab11itat1on programs and facilities mental health treatment settings, and substance abuse t;eatment settings. Some establish their own private rehabilitation or mental health counseling practices Rehabilitation Counseling has roots in both the national movement and counseling move ment. Training emphasizes psychological, social, medical, and vocational aspects of disability; and also the develop ment and refinement of personal adjustment counseling skills. Graduates with an M .A. degree from the USF Depart ment of Rehabilitation Counseling are prepared for careers both .mental health counselors. A spe cial elective concentration in substance abuse is offered and other study concentrations can be aranged on an indiv0idual basis. The program in Rehabilitation Counseling is fully accredited by the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE), the national accrediting body for rehabilitation coun selor training completion of the program, graduates are eligible to sit for the national certification examination of the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Cer:tification .. After passinQ examination, the graduate is registered with the Comm1ss1on as a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) Within the 60 hour M.A. program, gradu ates are also able to meet Florida's educational standards for licensure as a Clinical Mental Health Counselor RELIGIOUS STUDIES (REL) In Religious Studies, stqdents are exposed to a cross cultural and multi-disciplinary study of the way in which both an_ d .civilizations are deeply influenced by human religious expenence. The goal is to enable the educated to the various ways in which reli gious values and inst1tut1ons shape human behavior through a comparative study of religions and cultures. Such an edu cation is invaluable for careers as diverse as journalism, law,

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102 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG medicine, business, as well as careers more d irectly related to the practice ofreligion. Majors in Religious Studies will also find courses designed to give them the methodological, theoretical and linguistic skills needed to go on to advanced graduate study in the field. Requirements for the Major in Religious Studies A total of 36 credit hours chosen from Religious Studies courses. Transfer students may not apply more than 12 hours take.n elsewhere toward the major at the University of South Florida Only letter grades will be counted toward the (mini mum of 24 credit hours taken at the University of South Florida for transfer students or) 36 (for no n -transfer students) credit hours necessary to complete the 36 credit hours requi'red for the major . Students taking Religious Studies as a second major need to complete only 30 credit hours To do so they must make a written request to the Undergraduate Director at the time they declare their major All majors must take a. REL 3003 Introduction to Religion (3); and b REL4949TheDevelopmentofReligiousStud i es(3) ;and c. REL 4931 Sem i nar in Religion (3) d. An add i tional 27 credit hours chosen from Religious Studies courses Students are expected to study at least two different religious traditions All transfer student must take a minimum of 24 hours in Religious Stud ies courses at the University of South Florida It is the prerogative of the Department of Religious Studies to determ i ne whether courses taken at other universities may be applied toward the ma j or at the University of South Florida This will be decided as soon as the student becomes a ma j or in the Department of Relig i ous Studies at the University o f South Florida The department's course offerings are sufficiently varied that a student should expect to enroll in its scheduled classes No more than three directed studies courses may be applied toward the major. Any student who wishes to take any type of directed study including REL 3900 must have the (wr i tten) approval of h i s/her instructor and the director of undergradu ate studies. Requirements for the Minor in Religious Studies A total of 18 credit hours chosen from Rel igious Studies c o urses Transfer students may not apply more than 6 credit hours taken elsewhere toward the minor at USF. Only grades will be counted for transfer Requests for transfer of credit must be made to the Undergraduate Director in writing when dec l aring a minor. All minors must take a. REL 3003 Introduction to Religion (3) ; and b. REL 4949 The Development of Religious Studies (3) ;and c REL 4931 Seminar in Relig ion (3) var iou!,) topics d. An addit i onal 9 credit hours chosen from Religious Studies courses. Students are expected to study at least two different religious traditions. It is the prerogative of the Department of Religious Studies to determine Whether courses taken at other univers i ties may be applied toward the minor at USF Th i s will be decided as soon as the student declares a minor in the Department of Religious Studies at USF Prerequisites (State Mandated Common Prerequ i sites) Students w i shing to transfer to USF should complete the A.A. degree at the community college. Some courses re quired for the major may also meet General Education Requirements thereby transferring maximum hours to the university A minimum of 60 semester hours must be com pleted at the university unless prior approval is secured . If students transfer without an A.A. degree and have fewer than 60 semester hours of acceptable credit the st u dents mu st meet the university's entering freshman requirements in cluding ACT or SAT test scores GPA, and course require ments . There are no State Mandated Common.Prerequ i sites for this degree program SOCIALWORK(SOK) The University of South Florida offers a program leading to a Bachelor of Social Work (B S.W.) degree in the School of Soc ial Work College of Arts and Sciences. Th i s program has been developed in accordance with the guidelines set forth by the Council on Social Work Education, the national accred iting body for social work educat i on programs, and in accor dance with the recommendations of the National Association of Soc ial Worke .rs. The B S .W. program is fully accredited by the Council on Social Work Education The primary objective of the B.S.W. program is the preparation of the graduate for beginning level professional pract i ce as a social work generalist. The secondary objectives of the B.S.W program are 1 to provide for the soc ial work human resources needs of the Univers i ty service district (the central Florida west coast area), the State ofFlorida and the Southeast Region; 2. to prepare graduates for additional professional training at the graduate level i n soc ial work or in related human service professions; . 3 to provide an exposure to social work as a profession and to contemporary issues in the social welfare field. In preparing the B.S.W gradL:Jate for beginning profes sional practice, the curriculum provides the student with an opportunity to develop a knowledge base arid skill base as a "generalist practitioner The student will develop an under standing of var i ous interventive methods and skil ls in their application to a variety of client systems For example i ntervent i ve me t hods may take the form of individual and group counseling resource development consultation teach ing advocacy etc. Client systems may be individuals fami lies groups organizations or communities. The student will develop an understanding of the dynamics of human behav ior in individual, group and organizational contexts and the influences of the sociocultural environment upon those be haviors The student will learn about the development of social welfare systems and i nstitutions and the social eco nomic and political processes affecting pol i cy development and program implementation The student will develop an understanding of the utilization of basic social research skills part i cularly related to the processes of problem-solv i ng planning and evaluation. The student will also become aware of the value base of the pro f ess i on and engage in a self-examination process as it relates to the development and reflection of ethical and effective professional practice The B.S W. program, as any professional program places grea t emphasis on the devel opment of a professionally respons i ble graduate in terms of one s obligations to the client system served, the profession itself the organ i zation in which one works, and to the general public which ultimately provides any profession with legiti. Enrollment in the B S.W program is limited Unlike many academic programs where the student may declare a major, the B S W program i s a limited access program Students may apply for admission to the School for the B.S W. program after having satisfied the admission criteria described below However the completion of the prerequisites does not guarantee the student's admission to the program. Limited state funding places constraints on the size of the social work faculty and in order to maintain a high quality of instruction it is necessary to achieve ari appropriate faculty-student ratio. This means that it may be necessary to deny admission to the B .S W program solely on the basis of no available space Any student applying for admission to the program should be aware of this possibility. Additionally, any student who does not maintain a GPA of at least 2 .75in social work courses while enrolled in the B.S .W. program -or who clearly does not exhibit responsible professional behavior may be subject to dismissal from the

PAGE 19

COLl..,EGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 103 UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG program A social work major receiving a grad e of less than "C" in a core course will be required to repeat the course. Furthermore no student will be allowed to enter field place ment with a "D" grade on any SOW core courses, even ifthe student's GPA is 2.75 or above with the inclusion Oflne"D" grade Admission to the B.S.W program is a three-stage pro cess, ie., common prerequisites, foundation, and core cur riculum Any student who holds a minimum of Sophomore standing and has completed common prerequisite work in political science, biology, economics, psychology and soci ology (see specific requirements below) may declare a presocial work major Th i s is done by filing a declaration of major form with the College of Arts and Sciences, Records and Advising Office All pre-major's will be assigned to an advisor within the School who will assist the student in selecting courses Many students will have already taken most of the common prerequisite courses as part of general distribution at USF or in their course of study at a community college After completion, a student will be ready for founda tion courses in the pre-social work major a final step in applying for admission to the B S.W. program as a full major. It is necessary to be admitted as a major before taking core social work courses. Admission requirements for the social work major are as follows : 1 A student must have completed a minimum of one semes ter as a pre-social work major 2 A student must have completed required common prereq uisites and foundation courses (see listing). 3 A student must complete an application for admission and file it with the School of Social Work before the beginning of the semester in which admission is sought ; dates will be posted in the Social Work office 4 A student may be asked to complete an admission inter view with a favorable action from the Undergraduate Com mittee 5. A student must achieve a grade of "B" or better in SOW 3302, Introduction to Social Work, and SOW 3203, The American Social Welfare System, to be considered for admission. 6. A student must have successfully completed CLAST. CLAST may be repeated and the applicant may reapply to the program after successful completion of CLAST. A student must achieve a GPA of 2.75 in all Social Work courses to enroll in field placement and subsequently gradu ate with the B S.W degree. Common Prerequisite Courses (P) A student must successfully complete, by earning a "C" or better : One course in each of the following cognate areas or equivalencyHuman Biology: Food : Personal and Global Perspectives Sex an_d Today's World Principles of Biology for Non-majors Human Anatomy & Physiology Human Sexual Behavior Political Science: American National Government State and Local Government and Politics Florida Politics and Govemme11t Psychology: Introduction to Contemporary Psychology Contemporary Problems in Psychology Experimental Psychology Psychology of Adjustment Sociology : I ntroduction to Sociology Contemporary Social Problems Social Psychology Sociology of Sex Roles Social Stratification Sociological Aspects of Deviance Economics: Basic Economics -SS Foundation Courses (P*) for Pre-Social' Work Majors 1 One of the following cross-cultural courses or equivalency Africana Studies: Introduction to the Black Experience Social Institutions and the African-American Community Black Women in America Culture and Society in Africa Racism in American Sociefy Blacks in the American Political Process Anthropology : Introduction to Anthropology The Anthropological Perspective Cultural Anthropology Ethnic Diversity in the USA The Individual and Culture Sociology: Racial Ethnic Relations Women's Studies : Introduction to Women's Studies Psychology of Women Sex Roles in Cross-Cultural Perspective Women and Politics Issues in Feminism American Women in Contemporary Society I American Women in Contemporary Society II Literature by American Women of Color The Image of Women in Literature (also offered in English) Third World Women Writers (also offered in English) 2 Both of the following Social Work courses, earning a "B" or better: American Social Welfare System Introduction to Social Work Requirements for the Major in Social Work (Core Courses) 1. Human Behavior and Social Environment Courses sow 3101 (4) sow 3102 (4) 2. Social Welfare: Policy & Program Course sow 4233 (4) 3. Social Research Course sow 3401 (4) 4 Social Work Practice Courses sow 4341 (5) sow 4343 (5) 5. Directed Field Experience SOW 4510 (3) SOW 4510L (6) 6. Multi-cultural America sow 4522 (3) Summary : Core Courses 29 hours Field Experience 9 hours TOTAL 38 hours Prerequisites (State Mandated Common Prerequ i sites) This is a limited access program. Students wishing to transfer to USF should complete the A.A. degree at the community college Some courses required for the major may also meet General Education Requirements thereby transferring maximum hours to the university. A minimum of 60 semester hours must be completed at the university unless prior approval is secured. If students transfer without an A.A. degree and have fewer than 60 semester hours of acceptable credit, the students must meet the university's entering freshman requirements including ACT or SAT test scores GPA, and course requirements. The transfer student should also be aware of the immuni zation, foreign language, and continuous enrollment policies of the university

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104 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Students shou!d complete the following prerequisite courses listed below at the lower level prior to entering the University. If these courses are not taken at the community college, they must be completed before the admission to the Social Work major is considerect.. Unless stated otherwise, a grade of "C" is the minimum acceptable grade in these courses: 'American Government Biology Introduction to Economics Macroeconomics or Microeconomics Introductory Psychology Introductory Sociology or Introduction to Social Problems Once the following courses are completed and other admissions criteria are met, students may be admitted to the School of Social Work. Cross-cultural issues, 3 semester hours SOW 3302 Introduction to Social Work, minimum grade:; B. SOW 3203 American Social Welfare, minimum grade:; B. SOCIOLOGY (SOC) Sociology is the study of social life and the social causes and consequences of human behavior Sociologists investi the structure of groups, organizations, and societies. Because all human behavior is social, the subject matter of sociology ranges from intimate families to hostile mobs; from crime to religion; from the divisions of race, gender, and social class to the shared beliefs of a common culture; from the sociology of work to the sociology of emotions. The Sociology major is designed to provide students with a broad liberal arts education and a greater understanding and insight into the social systems and processes that bear upon everyday lives. Opportunities for students with Bachelor's degrees in Sociology are quite varied. Some go on tb work for human service agencies; others work in personnel, criminal justice, and urban planning; others enter graduate programs in sociology, education, law, medicine, or social work. Toward these ends, all students are encouraged to become skilled in the use of computers and libraries. Requirements for the Major in Sociology The major consists of a minimum of 36 credit hours of Sociology coursework plus ISS STA 2122: Social Science Statistics or its equivalent. All university-wide regulations regarding transfer credits and credits needed for graduation apply, at least 27 of the 36 hours of coursework in Sociology must be USF credits. Only courses in which a grade of "C" or better is attained will count toward the minimum hours although lower grades are included in calculating the major GPA. The minimum of 36 credit hours in Sociology must include the following four core courses (12 hours): SYG2000 Introduction to Sociology (May be replaced with an upper level sociology elective if a total of 12 or more hours of sociology coursework is completed before declaring a Sociology major) SYA3010 Classical lheory SYA3300 Research Methods (Prerequisite: STA 2122 S ocial Science Statistics or its equivalent) SYA 4935 Senior Seminar (Students earning a grade less than "C" in this course must take an additional course in Sociology. In that event, the minimum number of Sociology credits is 39) The remaining 24 hours of sociology coursework may be comprised of any of the courses offered by the Sociology department with the exception of SYG 2412 Marriage This course counts toward the total number of hours needed to graduate but it does not count toward the minimum number of sociology hours needed for the major No more than three hours ofSYA4910 individual Research may count toward the 36 hour minimum Students are encouraged to make an appointment to tall< with the Sociology Department Undergraduate Advisor when they have questions about major requirements or about which electives offered each semester would best meet their educational and career goals. Requirements for the Minor in Sociology A minor in Sociology consists of a minimum of 18 credit hours in Sociology, at least 12 of which must be USF credits. Minors musttake SYG 2000 Introduction to Sociology and SYA 3010 Classical Theory. No more than three hours of SYA 491 O Individual Research, may count toward the 18 hour minimum; SYG 2412 Marriage does not count toward the total number of minimum hours for the minor. Only courses in which a grade of "C" or better is attained will count toward the mini mum hours. VVhile students do not declare a Sociology minor until application for graduation, they are encouraged to make an appointment with the Sociology Department Undergraduate Advisor if they wish to discus's which Sociology electives offered each semester would best meet their educational and career goals. Undergraduate Honors Program in Sociology The purpose of the Honors Program in Sociology is to provide exceptional undergraduates with advanced, individu alized training in research and writing, as well as more direct contact with faculty mentors. Students in the Honors Program can expect more intensive work and greater challenges than sociology students in the senior year ordinarily face; yet, students are not admitted to the program without the confi dence of faculty in the student's abilities to complete the Program. The rewards upon successful completion of the program include : Students will receive advanced training in research design, data collection, analysis, and scholarly writing all experiences beyond those normally given to soci ology majors; Assuming the student is in good standing at the time of application to graduate school, a letter from the Honors Program director outlining the Program's requirements and special features will be sent to each graduate program to which s/he applies; Upon successful completion of the Honors Program requirements, the student's transcript will state that the student graduated with Honors in Sociology. I. Requirements for Admission A) Completion of the following courses by the end of the Semester II of the junioryearwith a Grade point Average of at least 3.5: "SYITTOOO Introduction to Sociology SYA 3010 Classical Theory SYA 3300 Research Methods B) An overall Grade Point Average of 3 2 or higher. C) Completion of at least 72 semester hours by the start of the program in Semester I. D) At least one course in the substantive area of the student's preliminary research interests, by the time of or during Semester I of the program lfduring Semester I, the student must have documentation that the course will be offered at the 3000, 4000, or 5000 level, and that s/he will be able to enroll in the class If at all possible, this course should be in Sociology, although in some instances, a course outside the department may be approved by the director. E) Tentative agreement by a faculty member to serve as chair of the thesis commitee. This faculty member ahould indicate her/his willingness in a letter of recom mendation to the director of the Honors Program Successful completion of the Honors program requires completion of the Sociology program with a GPA of 3 5 or better, completion of Honors Seminar and Honors Collo quium, and completion of Honors Thesis See Sociology Undergraduate Advisor for more information

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 105 UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Prerequisites (State Mandated Common Prerequisites) Students wishing to transfer to USF should complete the A.A. degree at the community college. Some courses re quired for the major may also meet General Education Requirements thereby transferring maximum hours to the university. A minimum of 60 semester hours must be com pleted at the university unless prior approval is secured. If students transfer without an A.A. degree and have fewer than 60 semester hours of acceptable credit, the students must meet the university s entering freshman requirements in cluding ACT or SAT test scores, GPA, and course require ments. The transfer student should also be aware of the immuni zation, foreign language, and continuous enrollment policies of the university. Students should complete two lower level introductory courses in Sociology prior to entering the University. If these courses are not taken at the community college, they must be completed before the degree is granted. A grade of "C" is the minimum acceptable grade. Students are encouraged to take the following prerequisites, or major, support, or elective courses, if available, during the program of study at the community college, and when feasible in General Education/ Gordon Rule courses. STA 2122 Social Science Statistics 3 SYG 2000 Introduction to Sociology 3 WST 2010 Introduction to Women's Studies 3 WOMEN'S STUDIES (WST) Requirements for the Major in Women's Studies The major in Women's Studies provides a well-rounded Liberal Arts education based on the best and most current scholarship on women in many disciplines Its subject is not only the evolution of historical attitudes, ideologies, and practices concerning women but also an analysis of the current status of different classes, races and groups of women Women's Studies offers excellent undergraduate prepa ration as well for ( 1) those who wish to apply to law school or to graduate study in a variety offields, e : g., Urban or Medical Anthropology, Counselor Education Criminal' Justice, Ger ontology, History, Rehabilitation Counseling, Social Work, Women's Studies; (2) those who want to focus on women in specific disciplines or professions; and (3) those whose training would benefit from a close scrutiny of the major issues facing women today. Majors must complete 36 hours distributed as follows: Required Core Courses (6 hours) WST 3011 WST 4935 and at least 1 course from each of the following 6 areas of concentration (18 hours) and 12 hours of electives 1. MULTICULTURAL ISSUES 2 HISTORY WST 3275 AMH 3561 AFA4335 AMH 3562 ANT 4302 WST 3210 WST 4260 WST 3220 WST 5266 WST 2309 3 HUMANITIES REL 3145 WST 4335 AMS3370 WST 4262 WST 4263 5. THEORY/PHILOSOPHY WST 4342 PHI 4632 PHM 5125 WST 5001 WST 5318 WST 4310 4. SCIENCES SOP 3742 SYD 4800 WST 2380 WST 4320 WST 4350 6 PUBLIC POLICY POS 4693 POS 4694 PUP 4323 The following courses, not included within the six areas of concentration, may be used to complete elective hours : WST 3010 WST 4930 WST 3360 WST 5934 WST 4900 STA2122 WST 4910 .... Students electing to major in Women's Studies should consult the Undergraduate Advisor for timely scheduling of classes. Requirements for the Minor in Women's Studies A student wishing to minor in Women's Studies will be required to take six cou.rses: WST 3010 or WST 3011 Plus 5 electives chos'en from the 6 areas of concentration with no more than 2 courses from any one area and with at least 2 courses at the 4000 level and above Students who minor in Women's Studies must be certified by the Undergraduate Advisor. Minor in "WOMEN OF COLOR" Women's Studies offers a specific concentration in the area of Women of Color whose focus will be to examine the relationship between women of color and institutions of power For those interested in the difficult task of creating a harmonious multi-ethnic world, this course of study should be personally socially rewarding as well as academically challenging The concentration prepares students for graduate work and/or professional careers in traditional and non-traditional areas such as health and education, internatfonal relations, the creative arts, law, medicine, social work, government and public policy, the social sciences, and community organiza tion. The requirements for the minor are 15 hours which are to be selected from the following upper-level courses: AFA4335 WST 4260 WST 4930 ANT 4302 WST 4262 WST 5266 WST 3275 WST 4263 Prerequisites (State Mandated Common Prerequisites) Students wishing to transfer to USF should complete the A.A. degree at the community college Some courses required for the major may also meet General Education Requirements thereby transferring maximum hours to the university A minimum of 60 semester hours must be com pleted at the university unless prior approval is secured. If students transfer without an A.A. degree and have fewer than 60 semester hours of acceptable credit, the students must meet the university's entering freshman requirements in cluding ACT or SAT test scores, GPA, and course require ments There are no State Mandated Common Prerequisites for this degree program The transfer student should also be aware of the immuni zation, foreign language, and continuous enrollment policies of the university Students are encouraged to take the following prerequi sites or major, support, or elective courses, if available, during the program of study at the community college, and when feasible in General Education/Gordon Rule courses Unless stated otherwise, a grade of "C" is the minimum acceptable grade Social Sciences Liberal Arts WST 3010 Intro to Women's Studies Courses to improve reading and writing skills STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS IN THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES Alpha Epsilon Delta (AED) National Premedical Honor Society Open to all USF students with an interest.in health professions. Io be inducted into the national honorary,

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106 COLLEGE OFARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG students must have 3.0 overall GPA and science GPA with a minimum of 3 semesters of college work completed includ ing one semester at USF Students do not need to be in the national honorary in order to participateTrllfle chapter at USF Alpha Phi Sigma-To recognize and promote high scholastic achievement among students in the Criminal Justice major by supporting service prpjects, tutoring services and other goal directed activities. Americari Chemical Society-To enhance the students knowl edge of chemistry and chemistry related fields. American Criminal Justice Association-To offer students an organization that exposes them to career opportunities in fields related to criminology We also provide interaction between students and professionals in the field of criminal justice American Medical Student Association (AMSA)-Opentoall Pre-Medical students. AMSA sponsors student-run projects carried out at the local level that allows future physicians to work in their communities as teachers and advocates of health promotion and disease prevention. Anthropology Club-To promote and encourage an interest in Anthropology among individuals within the USF community to provide a forum .for the exchange of anthropological ideas between faculty and students and foster an informal and creative atmosphere for interaction Arts and Sciences College Council-To represent the stu dents of the College of Arts & Sciences in expressing their opinions, to help them participate in determining college policy, to provide services that may help in furthering their interests and education in the Arts and Sciences. Arts and Sciences Honor Society-To recognize high aca demic achievement by students in the College of Arts and Sciences Association of Minority Communicators-To inform and help facilitate minority students interested in Communication about the profession and help them gain practical experience. Blacks Organized for Social Science This is a service club for students majoring or interested in the social science field who wish to enhance studies and broaden leadership skills. Colloquia in Literature and Linguistics-Provides a stimulat ing in which graduate students in French, Span ish, and Linguistics can share and expand their scholarly endeavoi:s. Sponsors guest lectures. Communication Council-To encourage and promote extra curricular learning as well as social interaction among com munication majors and minors. French ClubTo promote the interest of the French language Francophone culture and civilization through programs sched uled ar club meetings and through social events of the club Gamma Theta Upsilon-To foster academic excellence in the Geographic disciplines. Geography Club-To foster understanding of and stimulate interest in the discipline of Geography and its subfields Geology Club The Geology Club at USF involves its mem bers along with the department in many activities such as trips, annual T-shirt sales and extracurricular academic par ticipation. These events include hosting weekly lecture series by professional geologists and providing opportunities for members to teach geology to local elementary schools German Club-To promote the interest of German language, culture, and civilization through programs scheduled at club meetings and through social events of the club. HOSA Health Occupations Students of America (HOSA) is a national organization which supplements and compli ments the health education curriculum HOSA develops the whole person not just job-specific skills. HOSA's purpose is to foster leadership skills, communicat i on skills and other occupational competencies and soc ial skills that will lea'd to a successful career in the health field Humanities and American Studies Society Th i s organization s stated purpose accor.d ing to its Constitution is to inspire a greater appreciation of our past and present through the study and enjoyment of various art forms." Activi ties range from gallery strolls to lectures film ser i es and campus theatre performances International Studies Organization-To promote interaction between students and faculty To enlighten the student populace of USF of the values of International studies and to foster gender relations among international studies majors. Italian Club-The purpose of the Circolo Culturale Italiano is to provide educational opportunities and experiences in the American Life to its members and help them to improve their knowledge of the Italian language and culture It also spon sors lectures, social events and grants scholarships to deserving students of Italian. Legal Brief -To publish an annual law journal devoted to the exploration of legal issues through articles interviews and practice experiences. Minority Preprofessional and Science Society The objec tives of the Society are to : (1 )promote minority student interest in careers in the natural sc i ences and the health professions ; (2)provide a support network to enable students to be academ i cally successful. The Society meets twice monthly on Wednesday afternoons Membership is open to all students in the College of Arts and Sciences For further information call the Health Professions Advising office, 974-2674/3874 NASW Sub Unit (National Assoc. of Social Workers )-To be a subunit of the National Association of Social Workers and to provide a social organization for the School of Social Work students. National Student Speech Language Association-Associa tion was created because of students desire fo r a closer affiliation with professionals in the discipline of human com munication sciences and disorders Phi Sigma Iota International Honor Society for outstanding majors and minors in Classics all Foreign Languages and Literatures Bilingual Education Foreign Language Educa tion and Comparative Literature Pi Gamma Mu-International Honor Society for the Social Sciences Pi Mu Epsilon The mathematics honor soc i ety to wh i ch the best scholars among our students are invited. Particular emphasis is given to performance in mathematics courses. Pi Sigma Alpha-To function as an integral part of the political science department in the promotion of worthwhile extracur ricular activities related to affairs. Pre-Dental Society The Pre-Oental Society is open to all students with an interest in Dentistry. Through the Society cg'

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 107 UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG students have an opportunity to not only get to know other Pre Dental students, but to meet and hear presentations from dental school admissions officers and practicing dentists. The Society also has organized an extensive mentor program through which students can arrange to observe dentists from each of the specialties as they work in their offices. Preoptometry Society This new society will provide stu dents an opportunity to learn more about the profession of optometry and to meet other students interested in the profes sion. Any interested student is invited to join. Preveterinary Society USF Preveterinary Society provides fellowship and exchange among students interested in vet erinary medicine, animal science and/or research Member ship is open to students from USF and other local colleges who wish to participate in a variety of activities which will enhance their knowledge in animal science. Activities have included tours at EPCOT the Land of the Seas Sea World, Lowry Park Zoo, an ostrich farm, and University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine Students meet a variety of spe cialists in the area Religious Studies Community Forum (RSCF) The purpose of RSCF is two-fold First we establish cohesion among students and among students and faculty. Secondly, we also build a social structure that supports our academic goals and extends our interaction beyond the classroom. Student Broadcasting Association-To give students with an interest in television/radio journalism on-hands experience and the opportunity to produce a news program for public access television. Student Chapter of the Mathematical Association of America -A club for students who enjoy doing, discussing and learning mathematics. Student Society for Technical Communication-SSTC offers students scholarships, publication competitior:is, internship opportunities, resume and computer workshops and net '."'orking socials with local professionals who are established in the field. . Women's Studies Student Association-to promote interest in women's issues and provide an informative and social atmosphere for all interested Women's Studies affiliates. ARTS AND SCIENCES FACULTY Africana Studies Director: N. C. James; Associate Professors: K. R. Glover, N. C.James, D. G. Plant, T. W. Purcell;AssistantProfessor:C R. Rodriguez, D Turner; Other Faculty : F. U Ohaegbulam L. W. Morehouse, P . J Collins, K. Davis, S. Garcia, M. Mitchell, J.B. Moore, H. Regis, A. A. Smith, S M D Stamps, D Thomas, B. Townsend., K. Vaz, K Wiredu Anthropology Chairperson : L. M. Whiteford; Distinguished Service Profes sor: A. W. Wolfe; Professors : M V Angrosino, G Kushner,L M Whiteford, C W. Wienker; Associate Professors : R. D. Baer S. D. Greenbaum, L. Madrigal, J. J Smith, N. M. White ; Assistant Professors: C T. H. Ho, N Romero-Daza, R.H. Tykot, B. R. Weisman, K. A. Yelvington; Courtesy Faculty: J Coreil, C. Rodriguez A. Smith; Other Faculty : K. Borman, T Purcell, J. Sokolovsky. Bachelor of Independent Studies Director: F. Steier; Coordinator : F. Eilers ; Area Coordinators: W. Heim (BIS Humanities), R. Wheeler(BIS Social &.Behavioral Sciences). Biology Chairperson: J T. Romeo, Distinguished Research Profes sors: C. J Dawes, G. E Woolfenden ; Professors: M'. R. Alvarez G. W. Arendash, S s Bell, B. C Cowell-, F E. Friedl, 'G.W. Hinsch, J.M. Lawrence, D V Lim, R. L. Mansell, E. D. McCoy, H R. Mushinsky,G. G. Robinson, J. L. Simon, S. L. Swihart, D TeStrake, R. P. Wunderlin ; Associate Professors: B. J. Cochrane, M. L. Dao, F. I. Eilers, F B Essig P. J. Motta, M J. Saunders, P D Stiling; Assistant Professors : J. R. Brooks, A C. Cannons, J. R. Garey, K M. Gray, N. Hallquist-Hulse, S. A. Karl M. Kimble, C. Pomory, M. B Rogers; Lecturer : J. El-Rady. Chemistry Chairperson: J.C. Davis, Jr.; Distinguished Research Profes sors : R. M. Castle, B Stevens; Distinguished Service Professor: D. F Martin; Professors: J S. Binford, Jr., R. S Braman, J. C. Davis, Jr., S. H Grossman, M. D. Johnston, Jr., G R. Jurch, Jr., L. Mandell, G. Meisels G. R. Newkome, E D. Olsen, R. M. O'Malley T C. Owen, J. H Worrell ; Associate Professors: L. J Ming, R. L. Potter, J. A. Stanko, E. Turos,,J. E. Weinzierl, G. R. Wenzinger; Assistant Professors: L. Carlacci, J. Harmon, K. W. Jung, A. Malik, J. Robert; Adjunct Faculty: J. A. Barltrop, R. Benson, J. W. Palmer; CourtesyFaculty:M. Ben, R. Conan, P Dooris, B. B. Martin, L. H. Garcia-Rubio, W. E Swartz, Jr. Communication Chairperson: E. Eisenberg; Professors : A. P. Bochner, K . N. Cissna, E. M. Eisenberg, C. S. Ellis LS. Pettegrew, R. J. Schneider; Associate Professors: B. F. Downs, C. J Jablonski ; N.C. James, M. Neumann A. D. Payne F. Steier, M. L. Vanderford; Assistant Professors: E E Bell, J Jorgenson,.G Rodman; Courtesy Faculty: M. Myerson. Comm unication Sciences and Disorders Chairperson : A. M Guilford; Professors: A. M. Guilford, J. F. Scheuerle, D. C. Shepherd, E. R. Silliman, W. Strange; Asso ciate Professors: J :B. Crittenden, T. Hnath-Chisolm; Assistant Professor: R. Huntley Bahr, T. Champion; Instructors: L. Bess, P. Blake-Rahter ; P. Carr, L. Carrera, W Clements W Collins, S. Diehl, C Fernandez, C. Ford S. Graham, M .L. Humphrey, E. Kaplon, V Laughlin, N. Patterson, K. Smith, K. Richardson, M.J. Witkind. Community Experiential Learning Coordinator: R.R. Jones Criminology Cf1.airperson: W. R. Blount ; Professors: W. R. Blount, R. Dembo,J B. Halsted, K. M. Heide, l.J.Silverman, M. Silverman, L. Territo; Associate Professors : M Bromley, J. Cochran, C. Greek, T. Mieczkowski, C. Sellers; Assistant Professors: W Palacios; Professor Emeritus; J .T. Reilly, M. Vega; Courtesy Appointment: J. Feegal; Academic Administrator. M. Johnson. Economics Chairperson: J. W Rowe, Jr.; Professors : D. M. Bellante, T D. Curtis, J. S. Desalvo, K. Gyimah-Brempong, J. S. Hodgson, M. G. Herander, P K. Porter, J. W. Rowe, Jr., E.W. Shows; Professors Emeriti : G. Brunhild; W. J. Herman; Associate Professors J.P. Cooke, E J Ford, C. A. GFeen, E. A. Hanni, J. G. Spenc;e, C.R. Thomas, R. M. Wilson; Assistant Profes sors : B. Kamp, G Picone, J Racine, J. Swinton; Lecturers : .S. Bartlett, S. Brandmeyer English Chairperson.' S. M. Deats; Professors: J. p. w : 'Rogers (De Bartolo Chair in the Liberal Arts), L. R. Broer, S. M. Deats, H A. Deer (Emeritus), I. Deer (Emeritus), R. F. Dietrich, F. J. Fabry, S. R. Fiore, W. Garrett (Emeritus), J. S. Hatcher, E. F. Henley, E .W. Hirshberg (Emeritus), J. J. Iorio (Emeritus), D. L. Kaufmann,J. a Moore, W. E. Morris, J. M'. Moxley, G.A. Olson,

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108 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG W D Reader, W. T. Ross, S. J. Rubin W. H. Scheuerte, E. E. Smith D A. Wells ; Associate Professors: R. M Baum A G Bryant, R. M Figg Ill, R. E. Hall, M. C. Harmon, W J Heim R. L. Hewitt, E. A. Hirsh E. A. Metzger p. J. Sipiora, N. J. Tyson, R. D Wyly Jr. G Allen R..L.. Ciresi, P J Collins C J. Heglar, D L. Jacobs, A. J. Kubiak F T Mason, L. L. Runge F. J. Zbar; Instructor : K White ; Lecturers : l.F. Ceco11i (Emeritus) Environmental Science and Policy Director : R. Khator ; Assistant Director. I. Bartsch Geography Chairperson: G Tobin; Professors : R. T. Aangeenbrug G Tobin ; Associate Professors: K Archer R. Brinkmann ; Ass i s tant Professors: J. Althausen, J. E Garcia R. Johns, T Newsome. S. Reader; Adjuncts : H. Aruffo N. Duncan-Tabb L. Essenson Geology Chairperson : M T Stewart ; Professors : R. A. Davis, Jr., M. J. Defant, M. T.Stewart H. L. Vacher; AssociateProfessors:T M Qu i nn L. L. Robbins, J. G Ryan; Assistant Professors : P J. Harries, S E Kruse, E A. Oches C I. Steefel ; Instructors : T C. Juster, E Snow; Courtesy Faculty : R. B Halley, B W. Leyden, M Luo A. Rosenzweig, A. H. Sallenger, T M Scott, R. Stewart, W H Taft S. Upchurch ; Assistant Curators : R. Denicourt, B. R. Marcin, E. J. Marcin. Gerontology Chairperson : W E.Haley; Professors:W. E Haley,$ V Sa xon; Associate Professors: J.L. Garcia, W P Mangum, L.J Polivka J H Skinner; Adjunct Professors: M Brooks M J Etten, S Hoffman, M Kaplan, B. McCulloch, L. Mosby M. Mushel, G. Paveza ; Courtesy Professor: J Mortimer History Chairperson : J M Belohlavek; Professors: R. 0. Arsenault, J M Belohlavek M Conniff C. B Currey R. P. Ingalls G R Morm i no; Associate Professors: G Benadusi, D .R. Carr, P Dosal, G H Kleine W M. Murray, F. Ottanelli K Paul, E. M Silbert G K Tipps ; Assistant Professors : G. Alexopoulos A. delaFuente,K. Fischer,C. Greene, W. Stavig R.J.Van Neste ; Other Faculty : C. W Arnade. Humanities and American Studies Chairperson : S L. Gaggi ; Professors : C B. Cooper S L. Gaggi T B. Hoffman (Emeritus), H. (Emeritus), G S. Kashdin (Emeritus) E M MacKay (Emeritus). J. Moore, D Rutenberg (Emeritus) R. E. Snyder, A. J. Sparks S. A. Zylstra ; Associate Professors: R. A Banes P J Brewer ; AssistantProfessors : D.Belgrad J D'Emilio,N. Yavneh ; Other Faculty : S A Zylstra Interdisciplinary Social Sciences Coordinator: R. J. Gagan ; Professor : S M D Stamps, Jr., R. H Wheeler ; Associate Professor : S E. Cahill ; Assistant Professor : C .R. Kasee ; Lecturer: R. J Gagan International Studies Director : D. Slider; Professors : C W Arnade, A. Hechiche H W Nelsen, M. T. Orr, D. Slider; Associate Professors : M M. Amen, R. Barylski, E. Conteh-Morgan, S.S. Northcutt; Assis tant Professor: D. Peng ; Joint Appointments : Professors : R. Khator M Milani, F U. Ohaegbulam H Vanden; Associate Professors : K R. Glover. Languages & Linguistics Director : R. W. Cole ; Professors: G A Brulotte C W Capsas, C.J. Cargill, R.W.Cole, W R.Hampton, D lerardo A.L. Motto, E J. Neugaard R. C O'Hara (Emeritus), V E Peppard, R. A Preto-Rodas R. A Stel z mann C. E Scruggs ; Associate Professors : J C Caflisch, C J Cano M Esforme s, J Flaitz J. D. Noonan, C. M. Probes J.C. Tatum ; Assi stant Professors: J Thompson ; Instructors: J S Campbell J A. Feliciano Butler E. Palacio I. A Nemchonok, R. Tucker, S Wohlmuth ; Courtesy Faculty : A. G Grognet; Other Faculty : S. Fox K Mukerjee, W M Murray A. Starr J F Strange G K Tipps. Library and Information Science Director : K de la Pena McCook ; Professors: K. McCook ; Associate Professors: V Gregory A. Perrault M Stauffer ; Courtesy Associate Professor : Y. L. Ralston; Assistant Profes sors : J Carey D. Perez ; Professors Emeriti : J K. Gates J.M. Knego, J.A. McCrossan, H M Smith ; Ins t ructors : A. M Smith, D A. Whisenant S R. Wohlmuth ; Visi t ing Instructors : J E. Frederick Marine Science Chairperson: P.'R. Betzer ; Professors : N J Blake K L. Carder, L. J. Doyle, K A. Fanning P Hallock-Muller, A C. Hine, T. L. Hopkins, J. H Paul J. J. Torres, E. S Van Vleet G. A. Vargo R. H. Weisberg ; Distinguished Research Professors : R. H. Byrne, J J. Walsh;Professors Emeriti: J C. Briggs, H J. Humm; Associate Professors : B Galperin M E. Luther, F Muller-Karger, J B. Rose, R. R. Wilson Jr. ; Assistant Profes sors: P G Coble, B. Flower P A Howd G Mitchum D F Naar, S F Tebbens; Courtesy Professors: R. A. Davis, B. Halley, C. W Holmes, G. Litman, W.R. Parker A. Sallenger, S. Schott A C. Smith Y Tardy; R. Wollast; Courtesy Associate Profes sors : R. C. Ba ird, S B. Gallagher G. E. Rodrick, K. A. Steidinger ; Courtesy Assistant Professor : A B Meylan, R. G Muller E C Peters J E Reynolds, S G Tolley ; Courtesy Lecturers : S Gallagher, S. Schott. Mass Communications D i rector: E J. Friedlander; Professors : J. Black, D L. Dickerson E J Friedlander, G.M Killen berg M. Lucoff ; Assoc i ate Profes sors : D.S. Bagley HI, T. M Counts R. Dardenne W G Fudge L. Z. Leslie R. Miller, B. K. Petersenm H Regis; Assistant Professors :K. F Brown, D.R. Holtzhausen S Liu; Instructors : K. Killebrew, G Werner R. Wilber Mathematics Chairperson : M M McWaters ; Distinguished Research Pro fessor : E B. Saff; Professors : W. E. Clark, R. W .R. Dart i ng M Ismail, A.G. Kartsatos, J. J Liang, M. N. Manougian A. Mukherjea, M E. Parrott, A. N V Rao J S Ratti B Shekhtman W R. Stark V. Totik, C P Tsokos C A Williams Y You ; Associate Professors : $ Isaak, G L. McColm M M Mcwaters R. W Oberste-Vorth, J F Pedersen K. L. Pothoven E Rakhmanov, K. M Ramachandran F. J. Zerta ; Assistant Professors : S. V Gomatam, N Jonoska M Sa i to S Suen ; Instructor: M. Krajcevski ; Professors Emeriti : J. R. Britton A. W Goodman, D. C Rose Medical Technology Director: S H. Grossman ; Courtesy Professors : I. L. Browarsky (Tampa General Hospital). N M. Hardy (University Medical Center/Jacksonville) R. F Holcomb (Florida Hospital) M. Patterson (St. Vincent s Medical Center) ; Courtesy Lecturers : L. Chakkaphak (St : Vincent s Medical Center) L. Ferguson (Tampa General Hospital), P Rogers (Florida Hospital). J. Sigler (University Medical Center) Philosophy Chairperson: P A French ; Assistant Chair : J. B Waugh; Professors : J P Anton (Distinguished Professor of Greek Philosophy & Culture). J A. Bell, P.A. French (Cole Chair in Ethics). J. A. Gould, L. L. McAlister B Silver w H. Truitt, R. C. Weatherford, K. Wiredu ; Distingu i shed Research Professors :

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 109 UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 19981911 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG K S. Shrader Frechette S. P T umer; Associate Professors : R. N. Taylor, J B. Waugh; Assistant Professor : M R. Schonfeld; Courtesy Assoc i ate Professor : M Myerson ; Courtesy Professor: D. J Fasching Physics Cha i rperson : R. S F Chang ; Professors: S C Bloch, H R. Brooker, R. S. F Chang S R. Deans N. Djeu R. W Flynn N C Halder, D Johnson W D Jones D K Killinger ; Associate Professors : J L.Aubel M.K. Kim P Mukherjee S Witanachchi ; Lecturer: D. D. Spurg i n ; Courtesy Professors : L. Clarke K. Larsen, D. Morel; V i siting Professo r : S. Sakmar ; Adjunct Professor : R. Oman Political Science Director : L. W Morehouse ; Professors : R. A. Factor W E. Hulbary R. M Khator S MacManus M M Milani, J Merrick F U Ohaegbulam H E Vanden ; Associate Professors : J.E. Benton M T Gibbons, K R. Glover A. E Kelley, L. W. Morehouse D G Paulson, P N Rigos ; Assistant Professors : C Hall, S Tauber K Tenpas ; ProfessorEmeritus : A. E Kelley; Joint Appointments : Professors : C. W. Arnade J.E. Jreisat, D C Menzel H W. Nelsen ; Associate Professors : R. Barylski E. Conteh-Morgan, D. Slider J. B Snook. Public Admi ni stration Director: J E Pynes ; Professors : J.E. Jreisat S. A MacManus ; Associate Professors: J. L. Daly W J Pammer Jr., J E. Pynes ; Assistant Professor: A. Njoh; Joint Appointments: Professors : J.C. Merri c k ; A ssoc iate Professors : J E. Benton R. Khator P N. R igos Psychology Chairperson : E. L. Levine; Distinguished Research Profes sors : M S. Goldman, J J Jenkins D L. Nelson C. D. Spielberger ; Professors : W. C Borman M A. Finkelstein R. Fowler, E. L. Gesten, B N K i nder E L. L evine, D. McGuinness C. E Nelson L.A. Penner W. P Sacco, P E. Spector D E Stenmark J K Thompson T Tighe ; Professor Emeritus : H H. Meyer; Associate Professors: T Brandon, M. T Brannick J. A. Bryant, C.R. Cimino, J.M. Clingman M. D. Coovert D. Diamond P Jacobsen V Phares T Sanocki S Schneider T. Shimizu ; Assistant Professors : T. Allen K Brandon J B Epps C L. Kirstein ; Assistant Research Professor: M de Perczel ; Courtesy Adjunct & Joint Appointments: G Arendash H P Bahrick T Chisolm, H B Clark M. E Clark, D Cohen, J. Darkes,F DelBoca J A. Eison D Goldsmith P Greenbaum W. Haley, K. Jenkins-Hall, W. L. Hartman T Herzog, E B Kimmel M D Knox C L. McEvoy D McKinstry, K McNelis, R. K. Otto R. Plutchik N Poythress J. Robyak A I. Rosenblatt J C. Ruckdeschel D J. Rundus E. Salas P. Sanberg, J Sandler L. Schonfeld D P Schultz D. V Sheehan E. Silliman B. Small M L. Stedman T F. Stokes, W Strange R. Vander ploeg I. B Weiner, S Wei nstein S Zheutlin . Rehabilitation Counseling Chairperson : W G Emener; Dist i nguished Research Professor: W. G Emener; Professors : J. D Rasch; Associate Profes sor: T J Wrig'1t ; Assis tant Professors : C Dixon, S. Kelley ; Clinical Instructor : J Ferrandino Religious Studies Chairperson : J Morreall ; D i stinguished Research Professor : J Neusner ; Professors : D J Fasching D Jorgensen S. Mandell M G Mitchell J Morreau T Sonn J F Strange; Instructor : Dell deChant ; Other Faculty : M Angrossino J S Hatcher E. E. Smith Social Work Interim Director : J Amuso; Assi stant Program Director : C K Bennett ; Associate Professors : J A. Giordano T U Hancock, W S Hutchison Jr., C S Roberts A A Smith, P L Smith ; Assistant Professors: P Ouellette M. Rank, A L. Strozier ; Instructors : C K Bennett S Speer ; Courtesy Faculty : Asso ciate Professors: M. L. Coulter G J Paveza ; Visiting Faculty : D, Bassett,J Callan,J. Carpenter, A Castro D. Ducett J Hall M J Monahan, R. Tilden Sociology Chairperson : D. Loseke ; Professo r s : C. Ellis, D. Stamps ; Associate Professors : G. Brandmeyer S Cahill J Friedman R. Hansen, M. Kleiman ; Assistant Professors : J. Cavendish L. Graham, S Green, C. Ponticelli ; V i sit ing Assistant Profes sor: L. Mayfield-Brown ; Instructor : R. Buenteo ; Courtesy Fac ulty : J. Cochran R. Gagan D Jorgensen W Mangum W Palacios C Sellers S Turner ; Emeriti : R. Francis B Gunter L. Kutcher E Nesman. Women's Studies Chairperson: L. L. McAlister; Professor : L. L. McAlister; Asso ciate Professors: G. Grewal, M Myerson J B Snook, K. Vaz ; Assistant Professors : I. Bartsch C DiPalma, C J. Eichner ; Courtesy Associate Professors : R. A. Banes L. M. Whiteford ARTS AND SCIENCES COURSES Africana Studies AFA2000 INTRODUCTION TO THE BLACK EXPERIENCE [IN AFRICA AND ITS DIASPORA] -6A -AF (3) Fundamental perspectives on the nature and significance of the Black Experience in Africa and the black communi t i es in the Americas AFA 4150 AFRICA AND THE UNITED STATES -6A -SS -HP -AF (3) An examination of the historical and current political, economic, and cultural relations between the United States and Africa (Also listed under International Studies ) AFA 4331 SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS AND THE AFRICAN-AMERICAN COMMUNITY (3) A study of social institutions as they relate to the African American Community with emphasis on social systems operating within and on the African-American community 'AFA 4335 BLACK WOMEN IN AMERICA A XMW (3) An interdisciplinary survey of the contemporary experience of black women in America including the African roots, myths and realities surrounding that experience (Also listed under Women's Studies ) AFA4900DIRECTEDREADINGS (2-3) Independent readings in a particular area of African and Afro-American Studies selected by student and instructor. AFA4931 SELECTED TOPICS INAFRICANASTUDIES (1-3) Topics offered are selected to reflect student needs and faculty interests. In depth study in such areas as the Black Student and the American Educational Process ; the Black Experience in the Americas ; European Expansion in Africa to 19th century; Contemporary Econom i c Problems in Africa AFH 3100 AFRICAN HISTORY TO 1850 -HP-AF (3) An outline survey of pre-colonial African history including a prefatory introduction to the use of primary sources (such as archaeology, oral tradition, cultural anthropology, com parative linguistics, documents) in reconstructing the Af rican past. (Also listed under History.) AFH 3200 AFRICAN HISTORY SINCE 1850 -HP-AF. (3) Survey of the colonial and post-colonial history of Africa Emphasis on the impact of European and other alien influences on the continent emergence of independent African states and post independence problems of nation building and economic development. (Also listed under History ) AFS 2250 CULTURE AND SOCIETY IN AFRICA -6A -AF (3) Topics include: African religion value systems art and the aesthetics family and life-cycle impact of Islam and Christianity and conflict of cultures

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110. COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG AFS 3251 ENVIRONMENTAL-CULTURAL STUDY IN AFRICA -SS Af. FA . (3) PR: 2250 or Cl. Study tour. A study of traditional African society a nd cu!ture, the relationship between life and the and the impact of modernization on the culture and the environment. AMH 3571 AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1865 -HP (3) A survey of African American history, With an emphasis on North Americas to 1865. Topics include Af rica, transatlantic slave trade, slavery, and the Civil War. (Also offered under History.) AMH 3572 AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY SINCE 1865 -HP (3) A survey of African American history, with an emphasis on North America, from 1865 to the present. Topics include reconstruction, World War I, WorldWarll,andtheCivil Right Movement. (Also offered under History.) AML 3604 AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE -6A -XLW (3) A study of black American literature from the nineteenth century to the present, including the works of such writers as W. E. B. DuBois, Jean Toomer, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, LeRoi Jones, and Nikki Giovanni. (Also offered under English Department.) AMS AMERICAN SOCIETY -SS -HP (3) An introduction into the causes and effects of racism in American his tory, literature, art, the media, and folklore. Related concepts of enthocentricism and class conflict will also be studied. (Also offered under American Studies.) ANT 4340 THE CARIBBEAN 6A -XMW (3) PR: ANT 3410 or Cl. Main themes include the depopulation of the aboriginal population and the resettlement of the area via slavery, indenture, and migration; contemporary ethnic heterogeneity; economic problems of Third World microstates; development of a modern social and political consciousness. Religious diversity, music, the graphic arts, and the literature of the contemporary Caribbean will also be surveyed. (Also offered under Anthropology.) CPO 4204 GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS OF AFRICA -SS -AF (3) Designed to provide the information and analytical tools necessary to interpret current Sub-Saharan African poli tics. Survey of political organization in traditional African politics under colonial rule; the struggle for independence, and post-independence politics. CPO 4244 GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS OF EAST, CENTRALANDSOUTHERNAFRICA (3) In depth study of political developments, ideologies and modernization in East, Central and Southern Africa includ ing race relations and white minority rule in Southern Africa. HUM 2420 ARTS AND MUSIC OF THE AFRICAN PEOPLE (3) An examination of the visual arts painting, sculpture, atchitecture and music of Sub-Saharan Africa; their mean ing and impact on the arts and music of the Western World. INR 4254 AFRICA IN WORLD AFFAIRS -XMW (3) An examination of Africa's place and role in world affairs, including an analysis of the impact of external forces, internatio'nal relations in post-colonial Africa, the relations of African states with the major world powers, the U.N. and its agencies : ISS 5934 SELECTED TOPICS (1-3) PR: Cl plus senior standing or graduate status. Interdis ciplinary studies with course content dependent on stu demand and instructor's interest. May be repeated as topics vary. PHI 4073 PHILOSOPH)' -6A -XMW (3) A descnptive and analytical study of African philosophical thought, featuring reflective comparisons of African and Western categories of thought. (Also offered under Philos ophy ) PHM 4120 MA.IOR BLACK THINKERS -XMW . (3) Survey of major themes and issues in African/African intellectual and political thought with an empha sis on theories of nationalism. Works of individuals such as Martin Delany, BookerT Washington, W. E. B. DuBois, Marcus Garvey, Malcolm X, and Angela Davis are consid ered. PUP 3313 BLACKS IN THE AMERICAN POLITICAL PROCESS (3) An examination of the political experience of Blacks in the American political process including their political sociali zation, and struggle to become effective participants in the American political process (Also offered under Political Science.) SPC 3712 COMMUNICATION AND CULTURAL DIVERSITY -SS (3) Examination of communication and cultural diversity witli1n the United States. Cultural groups include racial and ethnic (e.g Africa') American, Latino American, Asian American), social class, age and generational, religious (e.g. Jewish) and gender. (Also offered under Communi cation.) Anthropology ANT1001 THE HUMAN ADVENTURE (2) This course examines the anthropological evidence rel evant to controversial questions concerning human ori gins, social practices, human and animal communica tion, and ancient societies. Not for major credit. ANT 2000 INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY -SS -AF (3) The crosscultural study of the human species in biological and social perspective. Surveys the four major branches of anthropology: physical anthropology (human biology), archaeology (the analysis of the prehistoric and historic remains of human cultures), anthropological linguistics (the analysis of language in its cultural context), and cultural antl
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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 111 UNNERS/TY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 199&119 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG ANT4124ARCHAEOLOGICALFIELDMETHODS (4-12) PR : ANT 3100 or Cl. Offered as all or part of a summer(or other semester) field session. May or may not be com bined with Florida Archaeology and Laboratory Methods in Archaeology. Students learn appropriate methods of ar chaeological survey, excavation data and materials recov ery, recording, and processing. ANT 4148 FANTASTIC ARCHAEOLOGY : MYSTERIES OF THE HUMAN PAST (3) Mysteries of the human past, including the Lost Continent of Atlantis Ancient Astronauts, the 'Myth' of the Moundbuilders, and the Shroud ofTurin will be discussed in detail in this course. The practice of archaeology and how we know the past will also be presented, and skills in critical thinking will be emphasized. ANT 4153 NORTH AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY -6A (3) PR: ANT 3100 or Cl. An examination of the evidence regarding the human settlement of North America from its beginnings through the development of aboriginal culture to the period of European conquest. Emphasis on the comparative study of material culture at selected sites from all time periods No field work is involved ANT 4158 FLORIDA ARCHAEOLOGY (4) PR: ANT 3100 or Cl. Culture history and culture process over 10,000 years from the time of the first people in Florida (Paleo-Indians) through the elaborate Weeden Island and Safety Harbor burial and temple mound cultures to the Spanish entrada and consequences of European con quest. Review of temporal and spatial relationships within the entire eastern U.S. and elsewhere. May be part of a summer (or other semester) field school, combined with Field Methods in Archaeology and Laboratory Methods in Archaeology. ANT 4162 SOUTH AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY (3) PR: ANT 3100 or Cl. Describes and analyzes the sequence of cultural qevelopment in prehistoric South America. Cultures such as the Inca, Chavin, Mochica, Wari, Chimu are included. Emphasis on the environmental setting and the relationship between cultural ecology and the growth of civilization. ANT 4163 MESOAMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY (3) PR: ANT 3100 or Cl. The chronological sequence from its beginnings through Protohistoric development is described and analyzed. Cultures such as the Maya, Aztec, Mixtec, Zapotec, Olmec, and Toltec are included, with EimRhasis on the environmental setting and the relationship between cultural ecology and the growth of civilization. ANT 4172 HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY -6A -XMW (3) PR: ANT 3100 or Cl. A survey and analysis of archaeology focused on the historic period. Laboratory research with data recovered from historic sites in addition to classwork. ANT 4180 LABORATORY METHODS IN ARCHAEOLOGY (2-4) PR: ANT 3100 or Cl. Data and materials recovered from archaeological survey and excavation are processed in the laboratory; includes artifact cleaning cataloguing, identification and analysis ; soil flotation; reconstruction and conservation of artifacts mapmaking, etc. May be offered as part of a summer (or other semester) field session. May be combined with Florida Archaeology and Field Methods in Archaeology. ANT 4181 MUSEUM METHODS (4) PR : ANT 3100 and Cl. Design preparation and installation of exhibits in the Department of Anthropology Teaching Exhibit Gallery. Emphasis 011 theory, research, design, and construction. Discussion of museum-related issues such as administration and curation. ANT 4226 ANTHROPOLOGY OF ART -6A (3) PR: ANT 2410 or Cl. An examination ofthe relationship between the visual arts (sculpture, painting, masks, carv ing etc.) and culture in non-Western societies. Emphasis on formal symbolic and functional comparative analysis of specific art styles based on crosscultural materials Con sideration of diffusion and change of art forms, commer cial and ethnic arts, and role of the artist. ANT 4231 FOLKLORE -6A (3) PR: ANT 2410 or Cl. Focuses on crosscultural methods and techniques regarding the collection classification, and of such materials as myths, jokes, games, and items of material culture. African (or African-derived), Oceanic and Native American societies are surveyed. ANT 4241 MAGIC AND RELIGION -6A -XMW (3) PR: ANT 2410 or Cl. The crosscultural study of the social and cultural aspects of religion. Religious acti vities in traditional and modern societies will be discussed. Ritual behavior, religious practitioners and symbols of belief will be considered in light of their impact on the social, political or economic aspects of peoples' lives . ANT 4302 GENDER IN CROSS-CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES -XMW (3) PR : ANT 2410 or Cl. Focuses on various theories, models and beliefs about male-female behaviors and interactions in human cultures throughout history and in various soci eties in the world today. (Also offered under Women's Studies.) ANT 4305 VISUAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3) PR: ANT 2410 or Cl. The use of photographic techniques for the crosscultural recording and analysis of human activities. The study of ethnographic photography as both art and science, and the production of an anthropological study that expresses the goal of "visual literacy." Review and evaluation of the uses of visual techniques and the evidence they provide to the social scientist. ANT 4312 NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS (3) PR: ANT 2410 or Cl. An examination of the evidence forthe origin and antiquity of human beings in North America and of patterns of regional development until the period of contact with European colonists Emphasis on varieties of ecological adaptatiol'}, social, political and religious sys tems, enculturation and worldview, folklore and visual art ANT 4316 ETHNIC DIVERSITY IN THE UNITED STATES (3) PR: ANT 2410 or Cl. Special concerns include ethnic diversity in American society, historical and contemporary diversity in values, experiences, and lifestyles, and an examination of policies and problems affecting ethnic groups in the United States ANT 4324 MEXICO AND CENTRAL AMERICA -XMW (3) PR : ANT 2410 or Cl. Focuses on the history, contemporary values and interpersonal relationships, and patterns of rural and urban life in Mesoamerica. Guatemala and Mexico are emphasized. ANT 4340 THE CARIBBEAN -6A -XMW (3) PR: ANT 2410 or Cl. Main themes include : the depopula tionofthe aboriginal population and the resettlement of the area via slavery, indenture, and migration; contemporary ethnic heterogeneity; economic problems of Third World microstates ; development of a modern social and political consciousness. Religious diversity, music, the graphic arts, and the literature of the contemporary Car i bbean will also be surveyed. (Also offered under Africana Studies.) ANT 4401 EXPLORING CROSS-CULTURAL DIVERSITY (3) this course will introduce students to anthropologial per spectives which are useful in understanding the implica tions of cultural diversity related to changing demographic patterns within our country as well as to increasing global ization. ANT 4432 THE INDIVIDUAL AND CUL 1'.JRE -6A -XMW (3) PR: ANT 2410 or Cl. The relationship between the individ ual and society is studied crossculturally. Main themes include child-rearing practices, psychosomatic illness and curing Discussion of theories and model s of person ality development with special reference to their applica bility to the emerging field of cross-cultural mental health planning. ANT4442URBANLIFEANDCULTURE (3) PR: ANT 2410 or CL The crosscultural study of urbaniza tion, urbanism and human problems associated with metropolitan environments Emphasis on the ethnogra phy of city life and its relationship to the practical applications of urban research

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112 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG ANT 4462 HEAL TH, ILLNESS, AND CULTURE (3) research and to explore in-depth topics in several areas of PR: ANT 2410 or Cl. The study of health and human anthropology. behavior in crosscultural perspective. Main themes inANT4935RETHINKINGANTHROPOLOGY-6A (3) elude: the impact of disease on the development of human PR: Senror standing with major in anthropology, or equivculture; comparative studies of curing practices; medical alent. Through discussion of readings and student pasystems in their relationship to ideology. Emphasis on pers, students rethink and reevaluate anthropology as a understanding the role of medicine, and the behavior of discipline and the integration of its branches and specialty both practitioners and patients in modem socieJies. fields. Students develop and articulate their current im-ANT 4495 METHODS IN CULTURAL RESEARCH (3) ages of anthropology. PR: Cl . The stages in the development and execution of ANT 4970 HONORS THESIS (3) ethnological research are discussed and practiced. Liter-PR: Admission to the honors program, completion of the ature search, hypothesis formation, selection of data honors seminar and Cl. The student under the supervision collection techniques, elicitation of information, data analyof a faculty member will formalize, conduct, analyze, and sis, and report presentation are stressed. Research dereport in writing a research project in anthropology. (S/U sign models from the case literature are studied and only.) supervised research in the local community is designed ANT5904DIRECTEDREADING (1-4) and carried out. PR: Cl. Individual guidance in concentrated reading on a ANT4520FORENSICANTHROPOLOGY (3) selected topic in anthropology Contract required prior to PR: ANT 3511 or Cl. A detailed overview of forensic anthroregistration. (S/U only.) pology, skeletal variation, techniques of determining sex, ANT59151NDIVIDUALRESEARCH (2-4) age, population affiliation, aspects of osteological indi-1 PR: Cl. Individual guidance in a selected research project. viduality and identification, methods of osteological analyContract required prior to registration (S/U only.) sis. Open to majors/minors only. ANT 5937 SEMINAR IN ANTHROPOLOGY (2-4) ANT 4552 EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY OF THE PRIMATES (3) PR: Graduate standing Topics to be chosen by students PR: ANT 3511 or Cl. A survey of non-human primates and instructor. focusing on biological and evolutionary patterns. Anatomy, genetics, and evolution are stressed; major primate types are surveyed for their biological adaptation. Primate socio biology is discussed. ANT 4583 PREHISTORIC HUMAN EVOLUTION -NS (3) PR: ANT 3511 or Cl. A survey of the fossil record the early primates through the ascent of Homo sapiens sapi ens, focusing on the human lineage. Biosocial patterns and cultures of the past are also covered. ANT 4587 HUMAN VARIATION (3) PR: ANT 3511 or Cl. An overview of evolution and biological variations of human races. Anatomical, morphological, and physiological patterns are surveyed geographically. Cultural influences on racial biology are explored. ANT 4620 LANGUAGE AND CULTURE -6A (3) PR: ANT 3610 or Cl. Examines the relationships between language and culture in crosscultural perspective. Ex plores the extent to which languages shape the world views of their speakers. Emphasis on the nature and degree of fit between linguistics and other cultural sys tems of knowledge. ANT4705APPLIEDANTHROPOLOGY (3) PR: ANT 2410 or Cl. A review of approaches applying the anthropological perspective to contemporary human prob lems. Particular emphasis placed on public policy issues in United States society. Discussion of the historical development of applied anthropology, problems of eco nomic development of the Third World, and the ethics of applied research and intervention. ANT 4750 LANGUAGE AND SOCIAL INTERACTION -6A (3) PR: ANT 3610 or Cl. Examines the role of language and other modes of communication in the social settings of speech communities. Student field projects focus on the crosscultural description and analysis of patterns of com munication in ethnographic contexts. ANT4901 DIRECTEDREADING (1-4) PR: Cl. Individual guidance in concentrated reading on a selected topic in anthropology. Contract required prior to registration (S/U only.) ANT4 907 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (2,..4) PR: Cl. Individual guidance in a selected research project. Contract required prior to registration. (S/U only ) ANT 4930 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY (3) PR: Cl. Topics to be chosen by students and instructor permitting newly developing subdisciplinary special inter ests to be explored. May be repeated as topics vary. ANT 4932 HONORS SEMINAR (4) PR: Admission to the honors program in anthropology and Cl. Seminar designed to provide the honors student with an opportunity to present, discuss and defend his/her own cg Astronomy AST 2005 ASTRONOMY OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM -NS (4) Introduction to the Astronomy of the Solar System No Physics background assumed. Topics covered include properties of light, stellar coordinates, timekeeping, eclipses, formation and dynamics of the solar system, properties of the sun and planets, space exploration of planets and the moon, life on other worlds. This course is complementary to but independent of AST 2006. Either may be taken before the other or taken by itself. AST 2006 STELLAR ASTRONOMY AND COSMOLOGY -NS (4) An introduction to Astrophysics and the structure of the universe. No Physics background assumed. Topics cov ered include properties of light, stellar coordinates, meas urement of the physical properties of stars, formation, structure and evolution of stars, normal and peculiar galaxies, cosmology This course is complementary to but independent of AST 2005. Either may be taken before the other or taken by itself. AST 2032C ILLUSTRATIVE ASTRONOMY (3) Constellations; use of small telescopes, etc., apparent motions of celestial objects, comets and meteors, sea sons, weather. Current events in the space program. Planetarium and open sky demonstrations. Lec.-lab. AST 3033 CONTEMPORARY THINKING IN ASTRONOMY-NS (3) PR: Junior or Senior Standing or Cl. Seminar designed to assist the layman, with no scientific background, in com prehending contemporary developments in Astronomy Necessary background material is provided by the instruc tor and a text. Topics covered in recent years include the space program, pulsars, x-ray astronomy, black holes, extra-terrestrial life, interacting galaxies, cosmology. AST 3044 ARCHAEOASTRONOMY (3) PR: Jr. or Sr. Standing or Cl. Astronomical concepts and observational techniques used by prehistoric/ancient peo ples for detecting change of seasons, constructing calen dars, predicting eclipses, etc. Particular attention is given to Stonehenge, and to works ofN.A. Indians, the Maya and Aztecs, and the Egyptians Lec.-lab AST 3652 NAVIGATION (3) PR: Some knowledge of geometry, algebra, and trigonom etry. Timekeeping, use of sextant, constellations, celestial navigation with minimum equipment, spherical astronomy. AST 3930 SELECTED TOPICS IN ASTRONOMY (1-4) PR: Cl. Course content will depend upon the interest of the faculty member and student demand. May be repeated up to 8 credit hours. AST 5506 INTRODUCTION TO CELESTIAL MECHANICS (3) PR: MAC 2313 or MAC 2283 and some knowledge of

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 113 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG differential equations, or Cl. The two-body problem intro duction to Hamiltonian systems and canonical variables equilibrium solutions and stability, elements of perturba tion theory AST 5932 SELECTED TOPICS IN ASTRONOMY (1 ) PR: Senior or advanced junior standing or Cl. Intensive coverage of special topics to suit needs of advanced students Bachelor of Independent Studies HUM 4909 BIS HUMANITIES, INDEPENDENT STUDY (15) (S/U only) HUM 4939 BIS HUMANITIES, SEMINAR (15) PR: BIS HUM 4909 or Cl (S/U only) IDS4990 BIS INTER-AREA STUDIES (30) PR: ISS 4909, ISS 4939, ISC 4909, ISC 4939, HUM 4909, HUM 4939. (S/U only) ISC4909 BIS NATURAL SCIENCES, INDEPENDENT STUDY (15) (S/U only} ISC 4939 BIS NATURAL SCIENCES, SEMINAR (15) PR: BIS ISC 4909 or Cl (S/U only) ISS 4909 BIS SOCIAL SCIENCES, INDEPENDENT STUDY (15) (S/U only) ISS 4939 BIS SOCIAL SCIENCES, SEMINAR (15) PR : BIS ISS 490 9 or Cl (S/U only) Biology NOTE: Designated levels indicate for whom courses are intended : 2000-Freshmen/Sophomore 3000-Junior, 4000-Senior, 5000 -Advanced Seniors and Graduate Student sta tus. Students who attempt higher-level courses too early may not do well in them. BOT 3373C VASCULAR PLANTS: FORM AND FUNCTION (4) PR: BSC 2010, 201 OL, BSC 2011, 2011 L. Introduction to morphology, physiology, and evolution of vascular plants integrating form and function to understand diversity Lec lab. BOT 3850C MEDICAL BOTANY (3) PR : BSC 2011 2011L CHM 2210 and Junior standing. Study of agents that are produced by plants and that are toxic or psychoactive in human beings or are useful as remedies. Lee. BOT 4143C FIELD BOTANY (3) PR: BOT 3373C. Identificat i on and classification of native and naturalized flowering plants of Florida including his torical, climatic and floristic aspects of plant communities. Conducted largely in the field. Lee-lab. BOT 4223C PLANT ANATOMY (3) PR : BOT 3373C Comparative studies of tissue and organ systems of fossil and present-day vascular plants. Func tional and phylogenetic aspects stressed. Lee-lab BOT 4434C MYCOLOGY (3) PR : BOT 3373C or MCB 3030C. A survey of the fungi with emphasis on their taxonomy, morphology physiology and economic importance. Lee-lab. BOT 4503 PLANT PHYSIOLOGY (3) PR: BOT 3373C, PCB 3023 PCB 3043 or PCB 3063 Fundamental activities of plants : absorption, transloca tion, transpiration, metabolism growth and related phe nomena. Lee BOT 4503L PLANT PHYSIOLOGY LABORATORY (1) CR/PR : BOT 4503. Laboratory portion of Plant Physiology. BOT 4713C PLANT TAXONOMY (4) PR: BOT 3373C Principles of vascular plant systematics and evolution Lee-lab. BOT 4810 ECONOMIC BOTANY (3) PR : BOT 3373C Study of the uses of plants by man for food chemicals, fibers, and med i cines Lee. BOT 5185C MARINE BOTANY (4) PR: BOT 3373C and PCB 3043 or Cl. A field course in marine plants with emphasis on ecology and functional morphology Field work will stress the ecological aspects of plants in a subtropical marine environment in Florida. Lee-lab . BSC 1005 BIOLOGICAL PRINCIPLES FOR NON-MAJORS-NS (3) Lectures and demonstrations of selected biological prin ciples, usually taught by television For non-majors only. NO CREDIT FOR MAJORS. BSC 2010 BIOLOGY I-CELLULAR PROCESSES-NS (3) CR/PR : CHM 2041. An analysis of biological systems at the cellular and subcellular levels : cell structure and function respiration, photosynthesis, mitosis and meio sis, genetics and gene expression Lee. BSC 201 OL BIOLOGY I CELLULAR PROCESSES LABORATORY (1) CR/PR: BSC 2010. Laboratory portion of Biology I Cellular Processes BSC 2011 BIOLOGY II-DIVERSITY-NS (3) PR: BSC 2010 and BSC 2010L. An analysis of biological systems at the organismal and supraorganismal levels: evolution, speciation, history of life, and ecology. Lee. BSC 2011 L BIOLOGY II DIVERSITY LABORATORY (1) CR/PR : BSC 2011. Laboratory portion ofBiology II Diver sity. BSC 2022 BIOLOGY OF AGING-NS (3) An introduction to the basic biology of aging. Emphasis will be placed on understanding basic principles of biology relevant to time and the aging process wh i ch begins at birth. Lee May be taken by majors for free elective credit. BSC 2025 FOOD: PERSONAL AND GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES-NS (3) The application of basic biological principles to human nutritional problems, to learn how various cultures achieve adequate nutrition and how environmental changes im pact both personal and global nutrition. Lee. May be taken by majors for free elective credit. BSC 2030 SAVE THE PLANET-NS (3) An introduction to environmental sciences via television and independent study Emphasis will be placed on understanding basic principles of ecology relevant to problems and topics of the earth's environment. May be taken by majors for free elective credit Credit will be given for either BSC 2030 or BSC 2050, but not both. BSC 2035 SEX & TODAY'S WORLD-NS (3) The application of basic biological principles to female and male sexual behavior and reproduction; current social problems are treated from a biological perspective Lee May be taken by majors for free elective credit BSC 2050 ENVIRONMENT NS (3) The application of basic scientific principles to global environmental problems ; how human activities impact the environment. Lee. May be taken by majors for free elective credit Credit will be given for either BSC 2030 or BSC 2050 but not both BSC 2092 HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY (5) PR : BSC 2010. Structure and functions of the human body. Lee. May be by majors for free elective credit BSC 2932 SELECTED TOPICS IN BIOLOGY (1-4) May be repeated. BSC 3263 MARINE BIOLOGY (3) PR: BSC 2010, 2010L, BSC 2011, 2011L. A survey of marine environment the types of organisms found inhab iting a variety of marine habitats, and the adaptations of the organisms to those habitats. Emphasis is on shallow water Florida environments Lee BSC 4057 ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES-XMW (3) Study of biological, economic ethical, legal, political and social issues relating to current environmental problems. Lee. May be taken by majors for free elective credit only. BSC 4402L BIOLOGICAL RESEARCH METHODS (3) PR: BSC 4931 or BSC 4932 A course to prepare Biology Honors students to work on their Honors theses. Enroll ment is limited to Biology Department Honors students. SIU only. BSC 4850 SOCIOBIOLOGY -XMW (3) An analysis of Animal and human behavior such as sex, territoriality, and aggression in the context of evolution. May be taken by majors for free elective credit only.

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114 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG BSC4905 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3) PR: Cl and CC. Specialized independent study deter mined by the student's niieds and !nterests. The written contract required by the Department of Biology specifies the regulations governing independent study May be repeated. SIU only BSC4910 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (1-4) PR: Cl and CC. Individual investigation with faculty super vision May be repeated; only four credit hours may count for the major. SIU only. BSC 4931 BIOLOGY HONORS SEMINAR I (2) A course linked to the Biology Departmental Seminar in which students read publications related to the seminars, discuss the presentations and write critiques. Enrollment is limited to Biology Department Honors students. BSC 4932 BIOLOGY HONORS SEMINAR II (3) A reading and discussion course involving areas of gen eral interest in biology. Enrollment is limited to Biology Department Honors students. BSC 4933 SELECTED TOPICS IN BIOLOGY (1-3) May be repeated. BSC 4970 BIOLOGY HONORS THESIS (1-3) PR: BSC 4402L. A thesis based on independent research carried out by the student. Enrollment is limited to Biology Department Honors students May be repeated; only four credit hours may count for the major. SIU only BSC 5931 SELECTED TOPICS IN BIOLOGY (1-3) May be repeated. ENY 3004C INTRODUCTION TO ENTOMOLOGY (3) PR: BSC 2010, 2010L, BSC 2011, 2011L. An introduction to general aspects of insect morphology, development, and classification. The identification of local forms will emphasized Lee-lab. ENY 5505C AQUA TIC ENTOMOLOGY (3) PR : ENY 4004C or Cl. Taxonomy, development, and ecology of aquatic insects with emphasis on local forms Lee-lab MCB 3030C GENERAL MICROBIOLOGY (4) PR : BSC 2010, BSC 2011, and 8HM 2210 Genetics is recommended. Introduction to the biology of microorgan isms: structure, physiology, and ecology of bacteria, algae, viruses, protozoa and lowerfungi. The laboratory involves preparation of cul ture media, staining, pure culture meth odology, isolation of microbes from nature, enumeration techniques, resistance to infectious disease. Lee-lab MCB4115C DETERMINATIVE BACTERIOLOGY (5) PR: MCB 3030C. Survey of bacterial classification ; de tailed examinations of bacteria important to man in agricul ture, industry and as pathogens. Lee-lab. MCB 4404 MICROBIAL PHYSIOLOGY AND GENETICS (4) PR: MCB 3030C and CR/PR : BCH 3023 A study of-the physiological, metabolic, and genetic phenomena perti nent to understanding the growth, development, ecology, regulation, and reproduction of microorganisms. The course emphasizes the interdependence of physiological and genetic approaches to microbiology Lee. MCB 4404L MICROBIAL PHYSIOLOGY & GENETICS LABORATORY (1) CR/PR: MCB 4404. Laboratory portion of Microbial Physi ology & Genetics MCB 4502 VIROLOGY (3) PR: MCB 3030C The biology of viruses associated with plants animals and bacteria will be considered; the nature of viruses, mechanisms of viral pathogenes es, and interactions with host cells Lee MCB4910 MICROBIOLOGY UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (1-4) PR: Cl AND CC. Individual investigation with faculty super vision. May be repeated; only four credit hours may count for the major SIU only. MCB 4934 SEMINAR IN MICROBIOLOGY (1) CC. Advanced Junior or Senior standing. May be repeated. SIU only. MCB 5206 PUBLIC HEALTH AND PATHOGENIC MICROBIOLOGY (3) PR: MCB 3030C or Cl A comprehensive survey of pathocg genie microbes responsible for disease in man and other animal.s and the impact of these infectious agents on the public health. These pathogens will be studie d with respect to their morphology, cultivation, mechanisms of pathogenicity, laboratory diagnosis, and epidemiology. Lee. MCB 5815 MEDICAL MYCOLOGY (3) PR: MCB 3030C or Cl. A modern biological survey of.the medically important fungi (yeasts and molds) important to microbiologists and environmental scientists. Lec,;-lab. PCB 3023 CELL BIOLOGY (3) PR : BSC 2010, BSC 2010L BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, and CHM 2046 A discussion of the concept and significance of the cell to biology; biological molecules and metabolic processes within the cell; cellular energy conversion sys tems; and control of cellular metabolism Lee .. PCB 3023L CELL BIOLOGY LABORATORY (1) CR/PR: PCB 3023. Laboratory portion of Cell Biology. PCB 3043 PRINCIPLES OF ECOLOGY (3) PR : BSC 2010, 2010L, BSC 2011 2011L. An introduction to the basic principles and concepts of ecology at the ecosystem, community and population level of organiza tion Lee. PCB 3043L ECOLOGY LABORATORY (1) CR/PR: PCB 3043 Laboratory portion of Principles of Ecology. PCB 3063GENERALGENETICS (3) PR: BSC 2010, 201 OL, BSC 2011, 2011 L. Introduction to genetics including the fundamental concepts of Mende lian, molecular and population genetics Lee. PCB 3063L GENETICS LABORATORY (1) CR/PR: PCB 3063. Laboratory portion of General Genet ics PCB4064C EXPERIMENTAL GENETICS (3) PR: PCB 3063 Experimental analysis of genetic systems. Lee-lab PCB 4253 DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY (3) PR: PCB 3023. Topics in modem developmental biology to gain a working knowledge and understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of cell differentiation in both plants and animals. Lee PCB 4674 ORGANIC: EVOLUTION (3) PR: PCB 3063 An introduction to modem evolutionary theory. Population genetics, adaptations speciation theory, phylogeny, human evolution and related areas Lee. PCB 4723 ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY (3) PR: PCB 3043 or PCB 3063. Advanced presentation of mechanisms employed by animals to interact 'with their environments and to maintain their organization. Lee. PCB 4723L ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY LABORATORY (1) CR/PR : PCB 4723. Laboratory portion of Animal Physiol ogy. PCB 5235 PRINCIPLES OF IMMUNOLOGY (3) PR : PCB 3023 or Cl. Course will emphasize the basic cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the verte brate immune response. Lee PCB 5306 LIMNOLOGY . (3) PR: PCB 3043, CHM 2046 and PHY 2053. An introduction to the physical, chemical, and biological nature of freshwa ter environments Lee. PCB 5306L LIMNOLOGY LABORATORY (1) CR/PR: PCB 5306. Laboratory portion of Limnology. PCB 5415 BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY (3) PR: PCB 467 4. An emphasis on the evolutionary mecha nisms that influence an organism's behavioral responses to environmental events The theoretical framework is presented and analyzed Lee PCB 5525 MOLECULAR GENETICS (3) PR: PCB 3063 or Cl. Detailed examination of DNA, RNA and protein synthesis ; the effects of mutations on proteins, cellular control ; selected aspects of viral bacterial, and fungal genetics. Lee PCB 5845 PRINCIPLES OF NEUROSCIENCE (4) PR: PCB 47"23 or Cl. Study of the mammalian brain's and function with an emphasis on the neu-

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 115 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG roanatomy, neuropharmacology and neurophysiology of the human brain. Lee. ZOO 3205 ADVANCED INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY (3) PR: BSC 2010, 2010L, BSC 2011, 2011L. An introduction to the major invertebrate groups with emphasis on local fo rms. Field work will be required. Lee. ZOO 3205L ADVANCED INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY LABORATORY (1) CR/P.R: ZOO 3205 Laboratory portion of Invertebrate Zoology. Z003303VERTEBRATEZOOLOGY (3) The orogin, diversity, and adaptations of vertebrates. Phy logenetic systematics (clasistics) will be used as the basis for determining evolutionary relationships of organisms. ZOO 3323C ANATOMY OF CHORDATES (4) PR: BSC 2010, 2010L, BSC 2011, 2011L. Anatomy of selected vertebrate types emphasizing evolutionary trends Lee-lab. ZOO 4513C ANIMAL BEHAVIOR (3) PR: PCB 3043 or PCB 3063. An introduction to compara tive animal behavior (Ethology) with emphasis on commu nication, social use of space, and behavioral evolution. Lee. ZOO 4603C ANIMAL EMBRYOLOGY (4) PR: PCB 3023. Structural and functional events involved in differentiation and morphogenesis. Lee-lab. ZOO 4753C HISTOLOGY (4) PR: PCB 3023. Comparative approach to the study of tissues and the relation of their structure and function. Lec lab. ZOO 5235 PARASITOLOGY (3) PR: MCB 3030C, ZOO 3205, ZOO 3323C, or ZOO 4753. Fundamentals of animal parasitology and parasitism, the biology of selected animal parasites, including those of major importance to man . Lee. ZOO 5425C HERPETOLOGY (3) PR: ZOO 3323C Major aspects of amphibian and reptilian biology emphasizing fossil history, evolutionary morphol ogy, physiology, life history and reproductive be havior. Field trip-Lee-lab. ZOO 5456C ICHTHYOLOGY (4) PR: ZOO 3323C and senior standing. PCB 4674 is recommended. Evolution, systematics, structure, behav ior, physiology, and ecology of fishes. Lee lab. ZOO 5555C MARINE ANIMAL ECOLOGY (4) PR: PCB 3043. Investigation of energy flow, biogeochemi cal cycles, and community structure in marine environ ments. lee-lab. Chemistry BCH 30231NTRODUCTORY BIOCHEMISTRY (3) PR: CHM 2200 or CHM 2211 and BSC 2010C. Introduction to the chemistry and intermediary metabolism of biologically important substances. Lee. BCH 3023L BASIC BIOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY (2) CR: BCH 3023 Practical work in determination and char acterization of important biomolecules. Lec.-lab. BCH 4034 ADVANCE!) BIOCHEMISTRY (3) PR: BCH 3023. An advanced undergraduate course emphasizing such topics as metabolic regulation, DNA and RNA structure and function, receptors, channels, antibodies, and contraction. BCH5045BIOCHEMISTRYCORECOURSE (3) PR: EitherCHM2211, CHM2211L,and CHM 3400orCHM 4410 or graduate standing. A one-semester survey course in biochemistry for graduate students in chemistry, biol ogy, and othe r appropriate fields and for particularly well qualified undergraduates. Lee. CHM 2021 CHEMISTRY FOR TODAY -NS (4) PR: High school chemistry and high school mathematics including algebra are recommended. An introduction to the principles and applications of modern chemistry in cluding the properties of matter, structural view of matter and reactions, quantitative relations in chemical reac tions, technological aspects and societal impact. CHM 2030 INTRODUCTION TO GENERAL, ORGANIC ANDBiOCHEMISTRY (4) First half of a two-semester sequence Fundamental concepts of general, organic, and biological chemistry. No credit for science majors. CHM 2045 GENERAL CHEMISTRY I -NS (3) PR: One year of high school chemistry and two years of high school mathematics including algebra; or, comple tion of CHM 2040 with grade of C or better. Principles and applications of chemistry including properties of sub stances and reactions, thermochemistry, atomic-molecu lar structure and bonding, periodic properties of elements and compounds. CHM 2045L GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY (1) CR: CHM 2041. Laboratory portion of General Chemistry I. Introduction to laboratory techniques; study of properties of elements and compounds; synthesis and analysis of natural and commercial materials. CHM 2046 GENERAL CHEMISTRY II -NS (3) PR: CHM 2041or CHM 2045L or equivalent. Continuation of General Chemistry. Lec -dis. CHM 2046L GENERAL CHEMISTRY II LABORATORY (1) PR: CHM 2045L. Laboratory portion of General Chemistry II. Continuation of'chemistry laboratory CHM 2200 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (4) PR : CHM 2046 or equivalent. Fundamental organic chem istry principles. Structure, nomenclature, properties, prep aration, reactions of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols, phenols, ethers, sulfur analogs and other compounds. A one-semester course. CHM 2210 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I (3) PR: CHM 2046, CHM 2046L. Fundamental principles of organic chemistry. Lecture. CHM 2210L ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY I (2) CR: CHM 2200 or CHM 2210 Laboratory portion ofOrganic Chemistry I. Introduction of organic laboratory principles and techniques CHM 2211 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II (3) PR: CHM 2210 or equivalent. Continuation of organic chemistry. Lecture. CHM 2211 L ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY II (2) PR: CHM 221 OL, CR: CHM 2211. Continuation of organic chemistry laboratory CHM 2932 SELECTED TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY (1-3) Topics of interest to students relating to chemistry and other sciences. CHM 3120C ELEMENTARY ANALYTICAL (4) PR: CHM 2046, CHM 2046L. Fundamentals of gravimetric, volumetric, spectrophotometric analysis Lec.-lab. CHM 3400 ELEMENTARY PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I (3) PR: CHM 2046, CHM 2046L MAC2281 orMAC2311, PHY 2054, PHY 2054L. Introduction to thermodynamics. Prop erties of solutions with emphasis on biological applications. CHM 3401 ELEMENTARY PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II (3) PR: CHM 3400. Reaction kinetics, enzyme kinetics, macro molecular systems, radiochemistry, molecular spectros copy, and chemical bonding CHM 3402L ELEMENTARY PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY (1) PR: CHM 3 120C. CR: CHM 3400 and/or CHM 3401. A physical chemistry laboratory with emphasis on modern techniques and instruments. Lab. CHM 3610 INTERMEDIATE INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3) PR: CHM 2046, CHM 2046L. Fundamental principles of inorganic chemistry including atomic structure, bonding theories and structural consequences, transition metal chemistry and illustrative laboratory work. CHM 361 OL INTERMEDIATE INORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY (1) CR: CHM 3610 Illustrative laboratory work concerning the fundamental principles of inorganic chemistry including atomic structure, bonding, transition metal chemistry, structural consequences and spectroscopic methods.

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116 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CA TA LOG CHM 4060 USE OF THE CHEMICAL LITERATURE (1) that are taught under this title: Natural Products, stereDiscussions and assignments using abstracts, bibliogochemistry, Reactive Intermediates, Photochemistry, lnraphies, indices, encyclopedias, journals, patent files, strumental Electronics, Advanced Lab Techniques, Hetelectronic databases, and other information sources to erocyclic Chemistry etc obtain chemical and technical material and including CHS4100C NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY (3) written and oral presentations. Career information and PR: CHM 3120C Theory and application of natural and opportunities also discussed. induced radioactivity. Emphasis on the production, prop-CHM 4070 HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES IN erties, measurement, and uses of radioactive tracers. CHEMISTRY -6A -XMW (3) Lec.-lab. PR: One year of college chemistry; or senior standing and CHS 4300 FUNDAMENTALS OF CLINICAL CHEMISTRY (3) Cl. A study in depth of the historical and philosophical PR: BCH 3033. Theoretical and practical aspects of the aspects of outstanding chemical discoveries and theoanalysis of various body fluids, with emphasis on the ries. Lec.-dis. medical significance Clinical chemistry majors must take CHM 4130C METHODS OF CHEMICAL INVESTIGATION I (4) CHS 4301L concurrently. Lee. PR: CHM 3120C, CHM 2211, CHM 2211 L, CHM 4060, CHM CHS 4301 L CLINICAL LABORATORY (2) 441 O. Theory and applications of instrumental methods in PR: BCH 3033 and Cl, CHM 3120C. Laboratory experience chemical research, chemical synthesis and analysis; in some 'of the most important clinical determinations. electrochemical and calorimetric techniques, separation CHS 4300 must be taken concurrently Lec.-lab. methods, spectroscopy, statistical analysis of data, comCHS 4302 CLINICAL CHEMISTRY PRACTICE (2-12) puter data handling, and individual projects PR: Cl. Laboratory practice in clinical chemistry laboratoCHM 4131C METHODS OF CHEMICAL INVESTIGATION II (4) ries in the Tampa Bay area (S/U only) PR: CHM 4130C. Continuation of CHM 4130C. CHS 4310C INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS (4) CHM 4300 BIOMOLECULES I (3) PR: CHM 4412 or Cl. Theory and practice of instrumental PR: CHM 2211. Nature, structure, elucidation, synthesis methods of chemical analysis. Lec -lab. and (in selected cases) organic chemical mechanisms of biochemical involvement of the major classes of organic compounds found in living systems. Lee. CHM 4410 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I (3) PR: CHM 3120C and MAC 2282 or MAC 2312 and PHY 2054 or PHY2049. Thermodynamics, the states of matter, solutions. Lee. CHM 4411 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II (3) PR: CHM 3120C, and MAC 2282 or MAC 2312, and PHY 2054 or PHY 2049 Introduction to quantum mechanics and molecular spectroscopy. Lee. CHM 4412 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY Ill (3) PR: CHM 4410 Electrochemistry, kinetic theory of gases chemical kinetics, surface and nuclear chemistry. Lee. CHM 4610 ADVANCED INORGANICCHEMISTRY (3) PR: CHM 3610 and CHM 4410 or Cl. An advanced descrip tive and theoretical treatment of inorganic compounds. Lee. CHM49051NDEPENDENTSTUDY (1-3) PR: Cl. Specialized independent study determined by the student's needs and interests. The written contract re quired by the College of Arts and Sciences specifies the regulations governing independent study. May be repeated. (S/U only) CHM 4932 SELECTED TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY (1-3) PR: Cl. The course content will depend on the interes t of faculty members and student demand. CHM 4970 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (1-3) PR: Cl. (S/U only) CHM 5225 INTERMEDIATE ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3) PR: CHM 2211, CHM 2211 L, or equivalent. This course will extend organic chemistry beyond the undergraduate level and will emphasize concepts of stereochemistry and reaction mechanisms. CHM 5226 INTERMEDIATE ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II (3) PR: CHM 5225 or Cl. An introduction to synthetic organic chemistry for graduate students and advanced under graduates. Lee. Semester II. CHM 5425 APPLICATIONS IN PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY (3) PR: CHM 4411, CHM 4412 or equivalent. Applications of chemical theory to chemical systems CHM 5452 POLYMER CHEMISTRY (3) PR: EitherCHM2211, CHM2211L,and CHM3400orCHM 4410 or graduate standing. Fundamentals of polymer synthesis, structure, properties, and characterization. CHM 5621 PRINCIPLES OF INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3) PR: CHM 4411 or Cl. Chemical forces, reactivity, periodic ity, and literature in inorga11ic chemistry; basic core course. Lee. CHM 5931 SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY (1-3) PR: Cl. The following courses are representative of those Classics CLA 3103 GREEK CIVILIZATION -HP (3) Study of Greek Civilization from its beginning to the Roman period, with emphasis on social customs, political institu tions, and daily life. CLA 3123 ROMAN CIVILIZATION -HP (3) Study of Ancient Roman Civilization with emphasis on social customs, political institutions, and daily life Courses in Translation CL T 3040 CLASSICAL WORD ROOTS IN SCIENCE (3) A course in the Greek and Latin word elements used in science and technology. CLT3101 GREEK LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION -6A -XMW (3) Reading and discussion of major works in Grt;iek litera ture. Special emphasis ori the Iliad, the dramatists Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides and Aristophanes. Some attention is given to the social political background of the works. All readings are in English CL T 3102 ROMAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION -6A -XMW (3) Reading and discussion of major work!:) in Roman litera ture. Special emphasis is placed on the Aeneid, comedy and satire. Some attention is given to the political back ground of the works. All readings are in English CL T 3370 CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY -HP (3) Study of Greek and Roman myths embodied in classical literature and of their impact on Western civilization. All readings are in English Greek GRE 1120 BEGINNING CLASSICAL GREEK I (4) An introductory course in classical Greek grammar with appropriate readings GRE1121 BEGINNINGCLASSICALGREEKll (4) PR: ORE 1120 or equivalent. An introductory course in classical Greek grammar with appropriate readings. GRE22001NTERMEDIATECLASSICALGREEK (4) PR: GRE 1121 or equivalent. Readings in Greek at an intermediate level. GRW 4905 DIRECTED READING D epa rtmental approval required. GRW 5905 DIRECTED READING D e;)a rtmental approval required (1-4) (1-4) GRW (4) Study of an author movement or theme May be repeated up to 12 credit hours.

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 117 UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Latin LAT1120BEGINNINGLATINI (4) An introductory course in Latin grammar with appropriate readings LAT 1121 BEGINNING LATIN II (4) PR: LAT 1120 or equivalent. An introductory course in Latin grammar with appropriate readings LAT 2200 INTERMEDIATE LATIN (4) PR: LAT 1121 or equivalent. Readings in Latin at an intermediate level. LNW 2660 VERGIL (4) PR: LAT 1121 or equivalent. Readings in Vergil's Aeneid. Study of the tradition, techniques and artistry of Roman epic poetry. Available to majors and non-majors LNW 4381 LIVY (4) PR: Basic knowledge of Latin. Readings in the ideas and artistry of this Roman historian LNW 4500 CICERO AND ROMAN PHILOSOPHY (4) PR: Basic knowledge of Latin. Readings in the philosophic writings of Cicero, together with a consideration of eclectic thought. LNW4501 SENECA AND ROMAN PHILOSOPHY (4) PR: Basic knowledge of Latin. Readings in the philosophic writings of Lucius Annaeus Seneca, together with an examination of Stoic, Epicurean, and Eclectic thought. LNW 4634 CATULLUS (4) PR: Basic knowledge of Latin. Readings in Catullus. Study of techniques and tradition in Roman lyric poetry. LNW4644CICERO (4) PR: Basic knowledge of Latin Readings in the epistles of Cicero LNW4654HORACE (4) PR: Basic knowledge of Latin. Readings in the Odes and Epodes of Horace; study of the Ode's tradition LNW 4670 OVID (4) PR: LAT 1121 or equivalent. Readings in Ovid's Metamor. phoses. Study of Ovid's technique, style and artistry. LNW4900DIRECTEDREADING (1-4) Departmental approval required LNW 4930 SELECTED TOPICS (4) Study of an author movement or theme LNW 5900 DIRECTED READING (1-4) Departmental approval required. (S/U only.) LNW 5934 SELECTED TOPICS (4) Study of an author, movement or theme. May be repeated up to 12 credit hours. Communication COM 2000 INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION -SS (3) Introduction to the roles ; contexts and issues in contem porary human communication. Required of Communica tion majors. COM 3014 COMMUNICATION, GENDER AND IDENTITY (3) Examines the communicative origins and implications of gender roles. COM 3110 COMMUNICATION FOR BUSINESS AND THE PROFESSIONS (3) Identification of communication situations specific to busi ness and the professions. Analysis of variables related to communication objectives and preparation of oral presen tations in the form of informational reports, conference management, persuasive communications, interviews, and public hearings. Note: For non-majors only COM 3120 INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION THEORY IN ORGANIZATIONS (3) PR : majors, COM 2000 or Cl ; non-majors, COM 3122 or COM 3110 or Cl. A survey of communication concepts which impact upon organizational effectiveness COM 3122 INTERVIEW COMMUNICATION (3) A study of communication theory relative to interview situ ations with emphasis on the employment interview ap praisal interview, and persuas; v e interview Students must sign up for a one-hour lab and the lecture. COM 3122L INTERVIEW COMMUNICATION LAB (0) Interview laboratory for practice and individual consulta tion. Students must take this course in conjunction with the lecture COM 3122 Open to majors and non-majors Not repeatable COM 4027 COMMUNICATING ILLNESS GRIEF, AND LOSS -6A (3) PR: Junior/Senior standing or Cl. Focus on stories of illness, grief, and loss to make sense of these experi ences; to understand the cultural and rhetorical influences on how stories are told; and to explore the context of everyday life, romantic relationship families institutions, and culture in which they occur. COM 4030 WOMEN AND COMMUNICATION -6A -XMW (3) Examines women s patterns of communication in a variety of contexts. Cross-listed with Women's Studies. COM 4124 COMMUNICATION AND ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE (3) PR: COM 3120 or Cl. An advanced course covering current i ssues in organizat i onal transformation (e g ., organiza tional dialogue, learning organizations, reengineering, work teams), and the role communication processes play in such changes COM 4710 WRITING LIVES -6A (3) PR: Junior/Senior standing or Cl. Emphasizes writing stories about our lives and the lives of others as a way to understand cope with and communicate social experi ences. COM 4942 COMMUNICATION INTERN SEMINAR (3) PR: Communication major, minimum GPA 3.0, 75 hours completed 1 o hours of core requirements and 9 elective hours completed and Cl. Seminar provides students with an opportun i ty to put into practice concepts and skills acquired in their study of communication Weekly seminar sessions augment intern experience. Application for semi nar must be submitted one semester prior to seminar offering COM 5930 TOPICS IN COMMUNICATION STUDIES (3) Topical issues in communication Rpt. up to 12 hours as topics vary. ORI 2000 INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION AS PERFORMANCE (3) Designed to develop proficiency in the understanding and oral communicat i on of literary and other written materials ORI 3950 COMMUNICATION AS PERFORMANCE LAB (1 ) PR: ORI 2000 or Cl. The study rehearsal, and performance of literature for Readers Theatre and Chamber Theatre productions. May be repeated (maximum total six hours) ORl4120PERFORMANCEOFPOETRY (3) PR: ORI 2000 or Cl. Critical appreciation of lyric and narrative poetry and communication of that appreciation to audience Study of poetic theory and prosodic techniques ORI 4310 GROUP PERFORMANCE OF LITERATURE (3) PR: ORI 2000 or Cl. Designed to introduce the student to and give experience in various forms of group approaches to performance ORl4931 PERFORMANCEANDVIDEO (3) PR: ORI 2000. CR: ORI 3950 This course features adap tation direction, and performance of literature for video productions. ORI 5930TOPICS IN PERFORMANCE GENRES (3) Variable topics course Rpt. up to 12 hours as topics change. SPC 2600 PUBLIC SPEAKING -SS (3) The nature and basic principles of human communica tion ; emphasis on improving speaking and lister.ting skills common to all forms of oral communication through a variety of experience in public discourse SPC 2541 PERSUASION -SS (3) Examines the role of persuasion in public and social life. Students will be introduced to key concepts and theories of persuasion from a variety of historical and contemporary perspectives Students will use these concepts to create, analyze, and respond to persuasive messages. SPC 3210 COMMUNICATION THEORY (3) PR: Junior standing or Cl. The stu dy of source, message, and receiver variables in human communication; commu nication settings; descriptive and predictive models of communication ; communication as a process.

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118 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG SPC 3230 RHETORICAL THEORY HP (3) This course surveys the foundations and historical evolu tion of major concepts, issues, theorists, and approaches to the study of rhetoric from Plato ,to recent contemporary theorists. SPC 3301 INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION -SS (3) A study of interpersonal communication in informally struc tured settings with emphasis on the understanding, de $Cription, and analysis of human commun i cation. SPC 3441 GROUP COMMUNICATION A (3) PR : Ju,nior standing or Cl A survey of theory and research in group communication Group discussions and com munication exercises to increase awareness of the dy namics of human communication in small group settings SPC 3513 ARGUMENTATION AND DEBATE (3) PR : Junior standing or Cl Study of principles of argumen tation as applied in oral discourse analysis of evidence and modes of reasoning. Practice in debate preparation and delivery. SPC 3601 ADVANCED PUBLIC SPEAKING (3) PR : SPC 2600 or Cl. Study and application of communica tion strategies in speaking extemporaneously and from manuscript. The course includes study of selected public addresses as aids to increased understanding of speak ing skills SPC 3631 RHETORIC OF THE SIXTIES -HP (3) Survey of the rhetorics associated with the civil rights movement, the Great Society, the anti-Vietnam War move ment the counterculture, the black power movement and the women's movement. SPC 3653 POPULAR FORMS OF PUBLIC COMMUNICATION (3) PR: Junior standing or Cl. Analysis of public communica tion with emphasis on various presentational forms. SPC 3681 RHETORICAL ANALYSIS (3) This course introduces students to fundamentals of mes sage analysis Student examines persuasive strategies and language in oral and written discourse (not repeat able) SPC 3712 COMMUNICATION AND CULTURAL DIVERSITY -SS (3) Examination of communication and cultural diversity within the United States Cultural groups include racial and ethnic (e.g., African American, Latino American Asian American), social class age and generational, religious (e .g. Jewish) and gender. (Also offered under Africana Studies.) . SPC 4201 ORAL TRADITION -XMW (3) Study of orality, its forms, functions, and transformations, in traditional and literate societies from folkloric and psy chological traditions and from contemporary communica tion and cultural studies perspectives SPC 4305 COMMUNICATING EMOTIONS A (3) PR: Junior/Senior standing or Cl. Study of emotional experience, what emotions mean to us how we talk about them, and the ways group and cultural memership influ ence them Focus on attachment and loss in romantic, family and group relationships SPC 4310 RELATIONSHIPS ON FILM (3) Examination of the ways in which cinema inscribes con ceptions and meanings of romance, love, intimacy and sexuality. Focus on systems of interpretation fostered by cinema representations of intimacy sexuality emotional ity, subjectivity, and betrayal. SPC 4431 FAMILY COMMUNICATION (3) Examines the processes and functions of communication in the development of families Examination of scholaHy and popular literature on family structure family systems family development, ar:id family stories Analysis of fami lies in fiction and cinema. SPC 4632 RHETORIC OF SOCIAL CHANGE (3) PR : SPC 3230 or SPC 3681. This course examines how social change is symbolized and motivated in the rhetorics of institutions, campaigns, social movements and individuals. SPC 4680 HISTORY AND CRITICISM OF PUBLIC ADDRESS (3) PR: SPC 3601 or Cl. The principles of rhetorical criticism applied to selected great speeches of Western Civiliza tion SPC 4683 RHETORICAL ANALYSIS OF MASS MEDIA (3) PR: SPC 3230 or SPC 3681 ; Open to non-rnajors with Cl. An introduction to the criticism of media forms and effects Contemporary perspectives of the aesthetic and persua sive dimensions of mass media are examined. Students will engage i n critical study of media artifacts. SPC 4714 COMMUNICATION CULTURE AND COMMUNITY -XMW (3) Examines the relationships among culture, communica tion, institutions, and public and private life. Students explore the possibilities and problems of contemporary forms of commun i ty through service in a volunteer organi zation SPC 4900 DIRECTED READINGS (1-3) PR: Senior standing, minimum GPA 2.5, 15 hours of core requirements and 9 elective hours completed, and Cl. Maximum 6 hours SPC4903HONORSREADINGS (3) PR : Admission to Communication Honor5 Program. Fo cused readings directed toward preparation of a proposal for an undergraduate honors thesis May be repeated up to six credits. SPC 4905 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (1-3) PR: Senior standing, minimum GPA 2 .5, 15 hours of core requirements and 9 elective hours completed, and Cl. Maximum 6 hours Individual investigations with faculty supervision SPC 4930 SELECTED TOPICS (1-3) PR: Senior standing, minimum GPA 2.5, 15 hours of core requirements and 9 elective hours completed, and Cl. May be repeated SPC 4932 SENIOR SEMINAR IN COMMUNICATION (3) PR: Senior standing, m i nimum GPA 3 .0, 15 hours of core requirements and 9 elective hours completed, and Cl. Communication major. Exploration of selected topics of current significance to the several areas of communica tion through group discussion and research Course is repeatable to a maximum of 6 hours including first regis tration SPC 4970 HONORS THESIS (3) PR: Admission to Communication Honors Program. In volves individual research and preparation of an under graduate honors thesis. May be repeated up to six credit hours SPC 5930 TOPICS IN DISCOURSE (3) Variable topics course. Rpt. up to 12 hours. Communication Sciences and Disorders SPA3001 INTRODUCTION TO INTERPRETING IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS (3) PR: Admission to ISi Program. CR: SPA3001L.Thiscourse introduces the overview of the roles and responsibilities of interpreters for the deaf working in public school classes grades K 12 and the overview of historical and current public school practices in educational interpreting in the U.S. This course is designed for ISi majors but may be elected by non-majors with the approval of the instructor SPA 3001 L INTRODUCTION TO INTERPRETING IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS LAB (1) PR: Adm i ssion to ISi Program. CR : SPA 3001. The lab assists students in assessing and improving their inter preting and transliterating skills through videotapes of simulated interpreting assignments SPA 3002 INTRODUCTION TO DISORDERS OF SPEECH AND LANGUAGE -SS (3) PR: Junior standing and Cl. The scope of speech-lan guage pathology as a profession and a of study. An introduction to speech and language disorders, etiolo gies major treatment approaches and research findings

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 119 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG SPA 3003 OVERVIEW OF LANGUAGE LEARNING IN DEAF CHILDREN (3) PR: Admission to ISi Program. CR: SPA 3003L. Overview of language development of deaf children from infancy through young adulthood, including various theories of language development in the deaf and communication/ language of the deaf assessment techniques, and inter preting skills relating to learning processes. This course is restricted to majors only. SPA 3003L OVERVIEW OF LANGUAGE LEARNING IN DEAF CHILDREN LAB (1) PR: Admission to ISi Program. CR: SPA 3003. An explora tion and overview of communication modes and language used in public school settigns by deaf children. Includes a study of how systems overlap and a development of flexibility in using different modes and languages, and the implications for interpreters. This cource in restricted to majors only. This course may be repeated for up to 2 credits. SPA 3004 INTRODUCTION TO LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT AND DISORDERS (3) PR: SPA 3002, SPA 3112 or Cl. This course introduces theoretical concepts and research findings concerning the normal developmental processes of language learn ing as a basis for differentiating developmental delay or disorder of language. SPA3011 INTRODUCTIONTOSPEECHSCIENCE (3) PR: SPA 3101 and SPA 3112. Concentrated study of the acoustic, physiological and perceptual aspects of sound as related to normal and pathological speech communi cation. Introduction to instrumentation and measurement procedures. SPA30281NTRODUCTIONTOAUDITORYFUNCTIONS (3) PR: Admission to ISi Program. An overview of hearing science and speech science relating to the educational environment. This course orients the student to the vari ables extent in oral-aural communication among children who have hearing impairment. It addresses techniques and methods of liearing measurement and amplification of sound as well as the interpreter's role in audiological evaluation and speech language therapy. This course is restricted to majors SPA 3030 INTRODUCTION TO HEARING SCIENCE (3) PR: Junior standing and Cl. Introduction to the field of hearing including: physics of sound, auditory anatomy and physiology, and psychophysics of hearing. SPA 3101 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF THE (3) PR: Junior standing and Cl. The neurological and anatom ical basis of communication disorders. Comparisons of normal and pathological organic structures and their functional dynamics. SPA 3112 APPLIED PHONETICS IN COMMUNICATION DISORDERS (3) PR: Junior standing and Cl. Introduction to phonetic anal ysis of normal and disordered speech, including extensive training in transcription using the International Phonetic Alphabet. SPA3310 INTRODUCTION TO DISORDERS OF HEARING (3) PR: SPA 3030 and SPA 31O1. The etiology, pathology, and management of disorders of the outer ear, middle ear, inner ear, retrocochlear, and central auditory systems. SPA 3380 BASIC AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE (4) PR: Cl. Introduction to American Sign Language (ASL) as used in the deaf community. General discussion of ASL structure and introduction to various manual communica tion systems and philosophies. Emphasis on building a basic vocabulary One hour laboratory course work is included. Open to all majors. SPA 4000 COMMUNICATION DISORDERS IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS (3) PR: Cl. An examination of the spee<:;h, language and hearing problems affecting school-age children and the classroom teacher's role in the detection, prevention and amelioration of communication disorders. (Non-major course only). SPA 4050 INTRODUCTION TO THE CLINICAL PROCESS -XMW (3) PR: SPA 4930 and SPA 3310 Observation and participa tion in speech-language pathology and audiology prac ticum in the University clinical laboratory. SPA 4201 PHONOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT AND DISORDERS ( 3) PR: SPA 3011. An examination of normal and deviant articulatory acquisition and behavior. Presentation of major theoretical orientations and the therapeutic principles based upon them SPA4210VOCAL DISORDERS (3) PR: SPA 3011 and SPA 3310 A comprehensive study of the medical and physical aspects of voice disdrders. Primary emphasis is on therapeutic management. SPA4222FLUENCYDISORDERS (3) PR: SPA 4201. A comprehensive study of disfluent speech behavior. Differential diagnosis, principles of therapeutic intervention, procedures for children and adults will be studied. Major theories and models of the development and origin of stuttering are also presented. SPA4331 FUNDAMENTALSOFFINGERSPELLING (2) PR: Cl. A concentrated study oftechnique in fingerspelling emphasizing clarity and rhythm in expression as well as receptive understanding. SPA4332 STRUCTURE OF SIGN LANGUAGE (3) PR: Cl. Semiotic and linguistic consideration of American Sign Language (ASL). Includes aspects of phonology, syntax, semantics, and discourse in ASL. SPA4335SIGN LANGUAGE CODES (3) PR: Cl.Areviewofthesign systems (SEE I, SEE II, L.O.V.E., and Signed English) used to code messages through the use of sign. The student will have the opportunity to practice one of the sign systems . SPA4363 NATURE AND NEEDS OFTHE DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING (3) A study of the effects of auditory disorders upon the organization and expression of behavioral p;:ittems as they relate to motivation, adjustment and personality. SPA 4371 LEGAL, ETHICAL, AND TECHNICAL ISSUES OF WORKING WITH DEAF (3) PR: Ad!llission to ISi Program. This course provides the discussion of ethical, technical, procedural, communica tive, as well as legal issues and activities that apply to practice of interpretir;ig in educational situations. It focuses on the professionalism and integration of interpreter roles in educational settings. This course is restricted to majors SPA4382 INTERMEDIATEAMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE (4) PR: SPA 3380 and Cl. A continuation of the basic course which expands the student's signing skills and introduces American Sign Language (ASL) idioms. Provides a greater opportunity for skill development in ASL structure and idiomatic usage One hour laboratory course work is inc;luded . SPA 4383 ADVANCED AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE (4) PR: SPA 4382 and Cl. A continuation of the study of American Sign Language (ASL) at the advanced skill level. Added emphasis on idioms, body language, and facial expression as an integral part of ASL. One hour laboratory course work is included. Open to all majors. SPA4383LAMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE LABORATORY (1) PR: Cl. Laboratory course designed to offer students added practice with the material presented in the ASL coursework through video and audio tapes. SPA4386 INTERPRETING IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS I (3) PR: Admission to ISi Program. CR: SPA 4386L. This course provides techniques for interpreting instructional/ non-instructionsal activities and the development of com munication modes and languages used by deaf children Includes interpreting practices and understanding teach ing methods. This course is restricted to majors only SPA 4386L INTERPRETING IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS I LAB (1) PR: Admission to ISi Program. CR: SPA4386. This course provides practical application of interpreting the subjects taught in the public school classes. Discussion includes

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120 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG class goals instructional style interpreter roles and eth ics, language or mode choice, and analysis of the class room for accessibility and appropriateness for interpret ing. This course is restricted to majors only May be repeated up to 2 credits. SPA4387 INTERPRETING IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS II (3) PR: SPA 4386 SPA 4386L. CR : SPA 4387L. This course provides advanced techniques for interpreting instruc tional/non-instructionsal activities and the development of communication modes and languages used by deaf children. Includes interpreting practices and understand- ing teaching methods. Th i s course is restricted to majors SPA 4387L INTERPRETING IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS II LAB (1) CR: SPA 4387. This course provides advanced assess ment of interpreting skills and interpreting integratior:i of targeted school classes and activities Selection criteria for using a particular sign system mode, or language will be assessed and discussed in individualized meetings This course is r,estricted to majors only SPA 4503 PRACTICUM : INTERPRETING IN SCHOOLS (4) This course provides practice sessions in school settings under supervision of an experienced interpreter and course instructor. Each precticum student will shadow an inter preter, and participate in discussion about the overall performance This course is restricted to majors SPA 4562 COUNSELING OF COMMUNICATIVELY HANDICAPPED AND FAMILY (3) PR : SPA 3011 and SPA 3310 Discussion of role of counseling in the treatment of commun i cation disorders Based on exploration of theoretical constructs this course demonstrates application of therapeutic methodologies to reduction of communication hand i caps. SPA 4930 SELECTED TOPICS (3) PR : Cl. Intensive study of topics i n Speech-Language Pathology, Audiology, and/or Aural Rehabilitation conducted under the supervision of a faculty member SPA 5132AUDIOLOGY INSTRUMENTATION (2) PR: Cl. Calibration, usage and specific applications of specialized instruments available in deal ing with the iden tification and measurement of hearing d i sorders SPA 5150 ADVANCED SPEECH SCIENCE (3) PR: SPA 3011 or equivalent. Advanced study of the a cous tics, production and perception of normal and disordered speech. SPA 5150L SPEECH SCIENCE INSTRUMENTATION (2) PR : Cl or SPA 3011 or equivalent. This course offers experience in the use of speech recording monitoring and analyzing equipment for the evaluatiori of normal and disordered voice and speech characteristics SPA5303ADVANCEDHEARINGSCIENCE (3) The study of the physiological acoustics of the aud i tory periphery ; the neuroanatomy and electro physiology of the central auditory system ; and psychoacoust i c princ i ples as they relate to clinical audiologic measurement paradigms SPA 5312 PERIPHERAL AND CENTRAL AUDITORY TESTS (4) PR: Cl. The study of behavioral and electrophysiologic clinical tests designed to assess the function of the peripheral and the central auditory system Tests which incorporate nonspeech stimuli and those which utilize speech stimuli will be included SPA 5328 AURAL REHABILITATION: ADULTS (3) Th i s course is designed to prov i de information about and strategies for aural rehab i litation intervent ion with hear ing-impaired adults. Topics covered include: speechreading, auditory training hearing and assistive listening devices. SPA5403 COMMUNICATION DISORDERS: LANGUAGE (3) PR: Cl. Examination of resea rch and clinical literature presenting major theoretical orientations pertaining to the etiology evaluations and treatment of those factors that hinder or interrupt normal language acquis i tion or func tion SPA 5408. LANGUAGE LEARNING IN THE SCHOOL-AGE YEARS (3) Metalinguistic and metacognitive development are linked to the interactional demands of classroom and clinical discourse ; observational tools are applied to evaluation and intervention plann ing. SPA 5506 SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY PRACTICUM (1-8) PR: Cl. Participation in speech language pathology and audiology practicum in the Uni versity Communication Disorders Center and selected field settings SPA 5552 DIAGNOSTIC PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES (2) PR: Cl. The evaluation, interpretation and reporting of d i agnostic tools and their results in the assessment of speech and language disorders Community Experiential Learning IDS 4910 COMMUNITY RESEARCH (1-4) PR: CEL approval. Open to all students approved for CEL. To provide students with community related research experience'. Repeatable up to 8 credit hours. IDS 4942 COMMUNITY INTERNSHIP (1-4) PR: CEL approval. Open to all students approved for CEL. To provide students with community-based internship S/U only. Repeatable up to 8 credit hours. IDS 4955 INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY RESEARCH (1-4) PR: CEL approval. Open to all students approved for CEL. To provide students with an international community re lated research experience. Repeatable up to 8 credit hours. IDS 4956 INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY INTERNSHIP (1-4) PR: CEL approval. Open to all students approve<;j for CEL. Tp provide students with an international community based internship S/U only Repeatable up to 8 credit hours. Criminology CCJ 3003 CRIME AND JUSTICE IN AMERICA SS (4) This course is a non-technical survey of the nature of crime in the United States and the ways our society seeks to deal with criminal offenders and victims of crime May be taken by both majors and non majors for credit, subject to departmental approval for declared majors CCJ 3024 SURVEY OF THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM -SS (3) An introduction to the structure and operation of law en forcement prosecution the courts and corrections. Also included brief coverage of major reported crimes CCJ 3204 SUBSTANTIVE CRIMINAL LAW (3) PR: CCJ 3024. Exam i nes the h i storical basis of the American criminal law system, the substantive elements of crimes, and court procedures. CCJ 3610 THEORIES OF CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR (3) PR: CCJ 3024 Provides a basic of the complex factors related to crime with concentration on princ i pal theoretical approaches to the explanation of crime CCJ 3621 PATTERNS OF CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR (3) Reviews the nature and extent of the crime problem. The course will concentrate on major patterns of offender behavior including crimes against the person, property crimes violent crimes economic/white collar offenses syndic a ted (organized) crimes, consensual crimes fe male crime political crime and will exam ine cri minal career data. CCJ 3701 RESEARCH METHODS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE I (3) PR: CCJ 3024 or CCJ 3610 or Cl. Introduces the student to some of the fundamentals of knowledge generat ing processes in cr i minal justice CCJ 4109 CRITICAL lSSUES IN POLICING (3) PR: CCJ 3024 or CCJ 4110 or Cl Focuses on some of the most critical issues in law enforcement today including: understanding and controlli n g police use of deadly force ;

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 121 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 199&'!19 UNDERGRADUATE.CA TA LOG police deviance; police prejudice and discrimination ; violence-prone police officer ; substance abuse by police officers; and administrative review of alleged police brutal ity. CCJ 4110 AMERICAN LAW ENFORCEMENT SYSTEMS (3) PR: CCJ 3024 or CCJ 3610 or Cl. Provides a comprehensive examination of the American law enforcement system at the federal, state, and local levels and an assessment of career opportunities within the community CCJ 4260 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW AND CRIME (3) PR: CCJ 3024 or Cl The course provides students with an introduction to issues in the area of environmental crime and environmental law NOTE : Credit for this course may also t:>e awarded through a similar course offered in the Environmental Science and Policy Program CCJ 4273 CRIMINAL RIGHTS AND PROCEDURES (3) PR: CCJ 3024 or Cl. Emphasizes the Constitutional issues and rules that are applied and enforced by the courts while processing criminal cases CCJ 4282 CORRECTIONAL LAW (3) PR : CCJ 3024 or Cl The course provides students with an introduction to legalissues in the area of correctional with an emphasis on civil and criminal liability for correctional staff and administrators and on convict's rights. CCJ 4306 AMERICAN CORRECTIONAL SYSTEMS (3) PR : CCJ 3024 or CCJ 36rn or Cl. Analysis of the different treatment philosophies and techniques currently in use in the field, with special attention to experimental and dem onstration programs CCJ 4316 CORRECTIONAL ADMINISTRATION AND LAW (3) PR : CCJ 3024 or Cl Provides students with an introduction to legal and administrative issues in both institutional and community corrections CCJ 4331 ALTERNATIVES TO INCARCERATION (3) PR: CCJ 3024 or CCJ 3610 or Cl. This course explores a variety of alternatives to imprisoning the offender, includ ing probation parole diversion, and other community based intervention and treatment modalities CCJ4341 INTERVENTIONTECHNIQUESANDSTRATEGIES (3) PR: CCJ 3024 or CCJ 3610 or Cl. Introduces the student to theories and methods underlying treatment modalities currently employed in corrections. CCJ 4450 CRIMINAL JUSTICE ADMINISTRATION (3) PR : CCJ 4110 orCJT 4100 or Cl. This course is designed to provide an in-depth examination of both the practical and theoretical aspects of the administration of criminal justice agencies. The major focus will be on law enforcement and correctional agencies CCJ 4501 JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM (3) PR: CCJ 3024orCCJ 3610 or Cl. Provides coverage of the juvenile and family courts, their clientele and the complex of human service agencies and facilities that contribute to efforts at juvenile correctional intervention CCJ 451 :1 POLICE AND JUVENILE DELINQUENCY (3) PR : CCJ 3024 or Cl Focuses on the unique aspects of law enforcement interaction with juveniles and their families. Issues which emerge when working with multi-cultural populations will be discussed Police efforts at early detection, intervention and diver8ion Interaction with status offenders and children-in-need-of-assistance will be a topic of concern. Community based policing efforts will be analyzed. Gang intervention strategies and school programs such as school resource officers will be dis cussed. CCJ 4513JUVENILERIGHTSANDPROCEDURES (3) PR: CCJ 4501 or Cl The course provides students with an introduction to the Juvenile Justice system particularly with the issues on juveniles rights as they relate to the juveniles in trouble who are processed through the begin ning of the system as well as with the rights and subse quent procedures that juveniles will encounter as they are processed further through the juvenile justice system or possibly transferred to ttie adult criminal justice system. CCJ 4540 JUVENILE CORRECTIONAL ALTERNATIVES (3) PR: CCJ 4501 or Cl. Focuses on juvenile correctional responses from diversion to the use of secure facilities How the system attempts to handle status offenders and children-in-need-of-supervision will be covered Diver sion, detention, probation, and community-based non secure facilities will be discussed CCJ 4550 DEVELOPMENTAL ASPECTS OF JUVENILE DELINQUENCY (3) PR : CCJ 3610 and CCJ 4501 or Cl. Provides the student with a developmental/life course perspective of the pro cesses, events and factors which occur during childhood and adolescence and cause juvenile delinquency. This course focuses on the conditions which are critical in shaping the delinquent's behavior during their formative years. CCJ 4604 ABNORMAL BEHAVIOR AND CRIMINALITY (3) PR: CCJ 3610 or Cl. A systematic introduction to the relationship between mental illness and criminality with focus on psychiatric labeling of deviant behavior and its implications for the handling of the criminal offender. CCJ 4652 JUVENILE SUBSTANCE USE (3) PR: CCJ 4501 or Cl. Focuses on youth and drugs. It will cover such topics as the rates and patterns of the use of different drugs by youths with varying socio-demographic characteristics the context and effects of use of various drugs ; the drugs-crime connection prevention, early inter vention and treatment efforts and drug use policy. CCJ 4700 STATISTICAL RESEARCH METHODS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE II (3) PR : CCJ 3024 or CCJ 3610 or Cl. Beginning with the scientific method the tools commonly used to analyze criminal justice data will be emphasized. Recommended for students who intend to continue their education beyond the B.A.. Required of students attending the M.A. in CCJ at USF. This course may not be taken for credit if the student has already successfully completed STA 3122 or GEB 3121 *CCJ 4900 DIRECTED READINGS (1-3) PR : Cl. This course is specifically designed to enable advanced students the opportunity to do in-depth indepen dent work in the area of criminal justice. Each student will be the close supervision of a faculty member of the program. No more than five hours of CCJ 4900 or CCJ 491 O or any combination of the two will be accepted tov,.iard the minimum number of hours required for the major. *CCJ 4910 DIRECTED RESEARCH (1-3) PR: Cl. This course is designed to provide students with a research experience in which they will work closely with faculty on the development and implementation of re search projects in the area of criminal justice No more than five hours of CCJ 4910 or CCJ 4900 or any combina tion of the two will be accepted toward the minimum number of hours required for the major. *NOTE: CCJ 4900 and CCJ 4910 (a) Students wishing to enroll must make with a faculty member during the semester prior to actually taking the course, (b) a minimum of four (4) CCJ courses must have been completed satisfactorily prior to enrollment, (c) first con sideration will be given to Criminology majors, and (d) individual faculty members may add additional require ments at their discretion CCJ 4933 SELECTED TOPICS IN CRIMINOLOGY (3) PR: Junior standing. Lecture course. Topic varies and 1s designed to address a wide variety of issues in criminol ogy and criminal justice. Open to non-majors with Cl. CCJ 4934 SEMINAR IN CRIMINOLOGY -6A -XMW (3) PR: Senior standing and Cl. These variable topic semi nars are used for an in-depth study and discussion of the relationships among culture, gender, ethics age, society, and criminal behavior. Such examinations may include the options the criminal justice does (or does not) have to deal with these interactions, and ethics and efficacy of the system's response. Open to non-majors with Cl. NOTE: CCJ 4933 and CCJ 4934. No more than 6 hours of CCJ 4933, CCJ 4934 or any combination of the two will be

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122 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG accepted toward the minimum number of hours required ECO 4201 ADVANCED MACROECONOMIC THEORY for the major. PR: Grade of"B" or better in ECO 3203. An advanced survey CCJ 4940 IN!ERNSHIP FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE MAJORS (3) -Of special topics in macroeconomics. Develops and con-PR: standing. The internship will consist of placethe neoclassical growth, endogenous growth, real o r more of agencies comprising the business cycle and new Keynesian models. Relevant criminal 1ust1ce system. This course will enable the empirical studies are presented. students to gain meanihgful field experience related to ECO 4303 HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT (3) their future careers. The three-hour block of credit will PR: ECO 3100 or ECO 3101 with a grade of"C" or better. require a minimum often hours of work per week within the Development of economic thought from Plato to Marshall. agencies in to any written work or reading ECO 4323 MARXIST POLITICAL ECONOMY -XMW (3) See requirements for the B.A. degree in PR: ECO 2013 or Cl.The Marxist school of thought in Criminology for the number of hours required. (S/U only). economics. Application of Marxist theory to problems of CJT 4100 CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION (3) advanced capitalist and socialist societies. PR: CCJ 3024 or CCJ 3610 or Cl. Covers the major ECO 4401 INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL of criminal investigation, with special attenECONOMICS (3) t1on to the scientific aspects of criminal investigation and PR: ECO 2023 and MAC 2233 or Cl Mathematical models the management of major cases of optimizing behavior and economic equilibrium. CJT 4801 SYSTEMS (3) EC04421 INTRODUCTIONTOECONOMETRICS (3) PR: Junior standing and CCJ 411 O or Cl. Examines some PR:_ QMB 3200 'A'.ith of "B" or better or Cl. Survey of of the principal methods and techniques currently used to basic econometnc techniques Regression analysis emreduce or prevent losses due to theft and casualty. ployed to estimate consumption, investment, demand, cost, and production functions. Examines problems of autoc;:orre!ation, heteroscedasticity, multicollinearity, and specification errors. Economics ECO 1000 BASIC ECONOMICS -SS (3) Survey of Economic principles and issues. Scarcity choice !11ark_ ets, _Prices,. the monetary system, unempl0oyment, inflation, international trade and finance. (No credit after completing ECO 2013/2023.) ECO 2013 ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES -SS (3) Introduction to the theory of income determination with emphasis on monetary and fiscal policies. Objectives of full employment, price stability, economic growth balance of payments stability. ECO 2023 ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES (MICROECONOMICS) -SS (3) PR: ECO 2013 Introduction to the theory of price determi nation How an economy decides what to produce, how to produce and how to distribute goods and services. ECO 2935 TOPICS IN ECONOMICS (1-3) Topics by department. May be repeated 1ftop1cs vary. Notava1lableforcreditto upper-level students admitted to the College of Business. ECO 3100 MANAGERIAL ECONQMICS (3) PR: ECO 2023 Application of microeconomic theory to problems in business decision making with a special focus on price determination. (No credit after completing ECO 3101 ) EC03101 INTERMEDIATEPRICETHEORY (3) PR: ECO 2023. The price system and allocation of scarce resources between competing uses. (No credit after completing ECO 3100 ) ECO 3203 INTERMEDIATE INCOME & MONETARY ANALYSIS (3) PR: ECO 2013 and ECO 3100 or ECO 3101 with a grade of_ "C" or Determination of income, employment, prices, andinterest rates. Aggregate demand and aggre gate supply ECO 3622 AMERICAN ECONOMIC HISTORY (3) PR: ECO 2023 and evolution of American eco nomic institutions from Colonial times to the present. ECO 3703 INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS -XMW (3) PR: ECO 3100 or ECO 3101 with a grade of "C" or better. Role of international trade in the U.S. economy. Gains from trade, balance of payments, exchange rate determination, balance of payments stability and international commer cial policy. EC04105ADVANCEDPRICETHEORY (3) PR: ECO 3100 or ECO 3101 with a grade of "B" or better. An advanced survey of special topics in microeconomics: borrowing and _saving, decision making under certainty, markets for capital and labor, game theory, prod1,1ction and exchange efficiency, social welfare and efficiency conse quences of market and non-makret allocation ECO 4504 PUBLIC FINANCE (3) PR: ECO 3100 or ECO 3101 with a grade of"C" or better. The public sector and its contribution to economic welfare. Government expenditures and revenues. Resource allo cation, income distribution, stabilization, and economic growth. ECO 4713 INTERNATIONAL MONETARY RELATIONS (3) PR: ECO 3203 Advanced analysis of international macrorelationships Foreign exchange market, international monetary system, balance of payments ECO 4723 INTERNATIONAL POLICIES (3) PR: ECO 3100 or ECO 3101 with a grade of"C" or better. Advanced analysis of international trade theory and com mercial policy, international economic integration multinational enterprise (1-3) PR: Cl. Specialized independent study determined by the student's needs and interests. May be repeated up to 6 credit hours (S/U only.) . (1-3) PR: Cl. lnd1v1dual study contract with instructor and depart ment chairperson required. The research project will be mutually determined by the student and instructor. May be repeated up to 6 hours ECO 4935 TOPICS IN ECONOMICS (1-3) PR: Cl. Topics to be selected by the instructor or instructors on pertinent economic issues ECP 3201 ECONOMICS OF WOMEN AND WORK -XMW (3) PR: ECO 1000 or ECO 2013 and 2023. Survey of research on women, men and work in the labor market and the household Focuses on the economic status of women. Includes l?erspectiye, examination of the family as an economic unit, changing work roles, gender differ ences in occupation and earnings. ECP 3203 LABOR ECONOMICS (3) PR: ECO 3100 or ECO 3101 with a grade of"C" or better. of wage and levels; occupa tion, industnal and geographical wage differentials, union and public policy effects on labor markets; the economics of discrimination; inflation and unemployment. ECP 3302 ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS -XMW (3) PR: ECO 2023 An economic analysis of environmental issues. The economics of resource use and pollution control are examined using the concepts of externalities, cost-benefit analysis, public goods, and property rights. ECP 3413 ECONOMICS OF REGULATION AND ANTITRUST (3) PR: ECO 2023 Economic analysis of the rationale and performance of government regulation and antitrust policy. Examination of antitrust issues or price fixing, mergers and monopolization, and issues of regulating electric

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 123 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG utilities, airlines, trucking, consumer product safety, prod uct quality, and the environment. ECP 3530 ECONOMICS OF HEALTH (3) PR: ECO 3100 or ECO 3101 with a of "C" or better. Application of economic methods to health care topics. Demand for medical care, public and private health insur ance; physican and hospital supply of medical care; gov ernment regulations and national healthcare systems. ECP 3613 ECONOMICS OF THE URBAN ENVIRONMENT (3) PR: ECO 2013 and ECO 2023. Economic analysis of cities and urban social problems. Poverty, discrimination, hous ing, transportation, pollution, crime and fiscal considera tions ECP 4232 COLLECTIVE BARGAINING AND PUBLIC POLICY (3) PR : ECO 2023 or Cl. Administration of labor management agreements Impact of the government role in collective bargaining and labor relations. ECP 4451 LAW AND ECONOMICS (3) PR: ECO 2023. Advanced analysis of the economic impact of tort, criminal, property and contract law as well as in the formation and adjudication of law ECP 4506 ECONOMICS QF CRIME (3) PR: ECO 2323. Application of economic theory to the analyses of criminal behavior, crime prevention, law en forcement, sanctions and corrections. ECS 3013 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (3) PR: ECO 2013 or Cl. Economic development in emerging nations. ECS 4003 COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS -XMW (3) PR: ECO 2013 or Cl. The major economic systems : traditional, capitalism, democratic socialism, commu nism and fascism English AML 3031 AMERICAN LITERATURE FROM THE BEGINNINGST01860 (3) A study of representative works from the period of early settlement through American Romanticism, with empha sis on such writers as Cooper, Irving, Bryant, Hawthorne, Emerson, Melville, Thoreau ; and Poe, among others AML 3032 AMERICAN LITERATURE FROM 1860TO1912 (3) A study of representative works of selected American Realists and early Naturalists among them Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, James, Howells, Crane ; Dreiser, Wharton, Robinson, Dunbar and Johnson AML 3051 AMERICAN LITERATURE FROM 1912-1945 (3) A study of poetry, drama, and fiction by such writers as Pound, Stein, Fitzgerald Hemingway, Faulkner, Porter, Toomer, Cummings, Williams Anderson Steinbeck, Wright, West, Stevens, Henry Miller, and others. AML 3453 HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES IN EARLY AMERICAN LITERATURE-HP (3) Examines American Literature from the Colonial Period to the Civil War as a manefestation of geographical, political, social, and intellectual forces. Will not be counted toward the English major. AML 3604 AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE -6A -XLW (3) A study of literature from the nineteenth century to the present, including the works of such writers as W E .B. Dubois, Jean Toomer, Langston Hughes Rich ard Wright, Ralph Ellison, LeRoi Jones, and Nikki Giovanni. (Also offered in Africana Studies.) AML4111 NINETEENTH-CENTURY AMERICAN NOVEL (3) A study of the American novel from its beginnings through 1900, including such novelists as Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, James, Twain, Crane, and Dreiser, among others. AML4121 TWENTIETH-CENTURY AMERICAN NOVEL (3) A study of major trends and influences in American prose fiction from 1900 to the present. Includes works by such writers as Hemingway, London, Wharton, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, West, Mailer, Bellow ; Ellison, Dor:ileavy Updike, Vonnegut, and others. AML4261 LITERATURE OF THE SOUTH (3) A study of the majorwriters of the "Southern Renaissance including writers such as Faulkner, Wolfe, Caldwell, Hellman, McCullers, O'Connor, Warren, Styron, Tate, Davidson, and Dickey. AML 4330 SELECTED AMERICAN AUTHORS (3) The study of two or three related major authors in American literature; the course may include such writers as Melville and Hawthorne, Hemingway and Faulkner, James and Twain, Pound and Eliot, Stevens and Lowell, etc. Specific topics will vary. May be taken twice for credit with different topics. CRW 2100 NARRATION AND PESCRIPTION -6A (3) A study of narrative and descriptive techniques in prose By making the student sensitive to language usage, it is designed to bridge the gap between expository writing and imaginative writing. CRW 3111 FORM AND TECHNIQUE OF FICTION -6A (3) A study of short narrative forms such as the anecdote, tale, character sketch, incident, monologue, epistolary story, and short story as they have been used in the development of fiction and as they exist today. CRW 3112 FICTION l-6A (3) PR: CRW 3111. An introduction to fiction writing, beginning with a practical study of the various elements of fiction and proceeding through the many processes of revision to arrive at a completed work of art. CRW 3121 FICTION II -6A (3) PR: CRW 3111, CRW 3112. A fiction workshop which provides individual and peer guidance and direction for student writing and which also attempts to encourage the developme11t of critical skills. CRW3311 FORMANDTECHNIQUEOFPOETRY (3) An examination of the techniques employed in fixed forms from the couplet through the sonnet to such various forms as the rondel, ballad, villanelle, sestina, etc Principles in the narrative, dramatic, and lyric modes are also explored. CRW 3312 POETRY I (3) PR: CRW 3311. An introduction to poetry writing utilizing writing exercises employing poetic language and devices; the exercises progress to the writing of both rhymed and unrhymed metrical and non-metrical forms. CRW 3321 POETRY II (3) PR: CRW 3311, CRW 3312. A poetry workshop which provides individual and peer guidance and direction for the student's writing and which also attempts to encourage the development of critical skills. CRW 4120 FICTION Ill (3) PR: CRW 3111, CRW 3112, CRW 3121. An advanced fiction workshop wherein works may be carried over from CRW 3121 or longer forms such as the novel may be begun. May be taken twice for credit. CRW 4320 POETRY Ill (3) PR: CRW 3311, CRW 3312, CRW 3321. An advanced poetry workshop wherein students are expected to create works exhibiting a firm knowledge of the principles ex plored in the preceding courses. May be taken twice for credit. CRW4930 SELECTED TOPICS IN CREATIVE WRITING (1-4) PR: 12hoursofCRWcoursesorCI. Thefocusofthecourse will be governed by student demand and instructor inter est. Topics to be covered may include writing the literary essay, writing in mixed genres, and utilizing popular con ventions in serious works May be repeated up to 8 credit hours. ENC 1101, 1102 FRESHMAN ENGLISH-6A-EC (3,3) Instruction and practice in the skills of writing and reading. Courses must be taken in numerical sequence . ENC 1121 FRESHMAN ENGLISH : HONORS -6A-EC (3) Honors Section of ENC 1101. Reserved for students in the University's Honors Program. ENC 1122 FRESHMAN ENGLISH II: HONORS-6A-EC (3) PR: ENC 1121. Honors Section of ENC 1102. Reserved for students in the University's Honors Program. ENC 2210 TECHNICAL WRITING -6A (3) Effective presentation of technical and semi-technical information.

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124 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CA TA LOG ENC 3213 PROFESSIONAL WRITING (3) Introduction to the techniques and types of professional writing, including correspondence and reports most often found in business, technical and scientific communities ENC 3310 EXPOSITORY WRITING -6A (3) A course teaching the te c hniques for writing effective prose excluding fiction, in which student essays are extensively criticized, edi ted and discussed in ind i v i dual sess i ons with the instructor. ENC 4260 ADVANCED TECHNICAL WRITING (3) PR: ENC 2210 or ENC 3310 or Cl. Advanced Technical Writing is a course designed to develop writing skills of a high order : technical exposition; technical narration de scription and argumentation; graphics; proposals; progress reports; physical resear c h reports ; and feas i bil ity reports. ENC4311 ADVANCED COMPOSITION (3) PR: ENC 3310 or Cl. Instruct ion and practice i n writing effective lucid, and compelling prose with special em phasis on style, logical argumentation, and critical think ing. ENC 4931 SELECTED TOPICS IN PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL WRITING (3) PR: ENC3213, ENC2210, orENC3310orCI. Focus of the course will be determined by student demand and instruc tor interest. Topics to be covered may include legal writing, the conventions of business writing and writing for the social sciences. ENG 4013 LITERARY CRITICISM (3) A study of the works of major literary critics from Aristotle to the present, with emphasis on their meaning, their implied world view and their significance for our own time and literature Required for Literature majors. ENG4060 HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE (3) The evolution of language from Anglo-Saxon through Middle English to Modern English Development of the English lexicon. Changes in the pronunciation syntactic, and semantic systems; discussion of the forms which influenced them. ENG49061NDIVIDUALRESEARCH (1-4) Directed study in special projects. Spec ial permission of chairperson required ENG4907DIRECTEDREADING (3) Readings in special topics ENL 3015 BRITISH LITERATURE TO 1616 (3) A survey of representative prose, poetry and drama from its beginnings through the Renaissance including such poems and figures as Beowulf Chaucer, Malory, More Hooker, Skelton Wyatt, S i dney, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, and Jonson. ENL3230 BRITISH LITERATURE 1616-1780 (3) A survey of 17th Century and Neoclassical Literature, including such figures as Donne, Herbert Crashaw, Vaughan, Marvell, Milton, Pope, Swift Johnson Boswell, and Goldsmith. ENL 3251 BRITISH LITERATl,JRE 1780-1900 (3) The poetry and poetics of the Romantic figures, with attention to the continuing importance of romantic thi nking in contemporary affairs and letters ; a survey of represen tative figures of the Victorian and Edwardian periods, ineluding poetry prose and d r ama ENL 3273 BRITISH LITERATURE 1900-1945 (3) Survey of poetry, drama and fiction of such writers as Eliot, Yeats, Thomas, Conrad, Shaw Joyce, Lawrence, Huxley, Woolf Forster, Waugh Owen, Auden O'Casey and oth ers ENL 3323 SHAKESPEARE FROM AN HISTORICAL PERSPEC TIVE -HP (3) An examination of the plays of Shakespeare from Romeo and Juliet to Othello as mainfestations fo teh social political and intellectual forces of the time Lectures wili be available on audio tape. Will not be counted toward the English major ENL3331 EARLYSHAKESPEARE (3) A study of from six to eight of Shakespeare's comedies, histories, and early tragedies ending with Hamlet. Special attention to developing the student's ability to read and interpret the text ENL3332LATESHAKESPEARE (3) A study of from six to eight of Shakespeare's problem plays, major tragedies, and late romances. Special attention to developing the student's ability to read and interpret the text ENL4122BRITISHNOVEL THROUGH HARDY (3) A study of early and later British novels such as Fielding, Smollett, Sterne, Austen, Scott, Dickens Eliot and Hardy, among others. ENL4132 BRITISH NOVEL: CONRAD TO THE PRESENT (3) A cr i tical study of British fiction from 1900 to the present, with emphasis on such writers as Conrad, Lawrence, Joyce, Woolf, Huxley, Orwell Burgess Murdoch, Golding,, and others. ENL 4171 HISTORY OF BRITISH DRAMA TO 1912 (3) A study of the history of British Drama from its liturgical origins to the beginning of the twentieth century, exclusive of Shakespeare. Included are the mystery and morality plays and representative works by Marlowe, Jonson, Middleton, Dryden, Congreve, Sheridan, and Wilde ; and others ENL4303SELECTEDAUTHORS (3) The study of two or three related major figures in English American, or World Literature The course may include such writers as Fielding and Austen, Keats and Yeats, Joyce and Flaubert, etc. Specific topics will vary. May be taken twice for credit with different topics. ENL4311 CHAUCER (3) An intensive study of The Canterbury Tales and major critical concerns ENL4338ADVANCEDSTUDIESINSHAKESPEARE (3) PR: ENL 3331 or ENL 3332 or Cl. Intensive study of selected plays of Shakespeare, with special attention to significant critical issues and to the Elizabethan and Jacobean cultural setting. ENL 4341 MILTON (3) Study of the poetry and major prose of John Milton, with special emphasis on Paradise Lost. LIN 3670 ENGLISH GRAMMAR AND USAGE (3) A course in the basics of traditional English grammar designed as a complement to our composition and crea tive writing courses, as a review for those students who will take preprofessional exams, and as a basic course for students interested in improving their knowledge of En glish. Will not be counted toward the English major LIN 4671 TRADITIONAL ENGLISH GRAMMAR (3) A course primarily us ing the sentence diagram to present a detailed analysis of the parts of speech, verb tenses, sentence functions and other basic grammatical classi fications of traditional English grammar. LIN 4680 STRUCTURE OF AMERICAN ENGLISH (3) An introductory survey of traditional, structural, and gener ative transformational grammars and their techniques for the analysis and description of linguistic structure in general and contemporary American English, in particu lar. LIT 2000 INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE -6A -HP (3) The nature and significance of literature in its various forms : fiction drama, poetry; emphasis on the techniques of reading literature for informed enjoyment. Will not be counted toward the English major. LIT 2010 INTRODUCTION TO FICTION -6A -HP (3) A study of the short story and novel as literary forms ; approached from an historical perspective though not restricted to any historical period Will not be counted toward the English major. LIT 2021 CURRENT SHORT FICTION (3) Traditional and experimental short stories of this genera. tion : such w fi ters as Updike Malamud, O'Connor Roth, Barth, Ionesco, and Barthelme Will not be counted toward the English major

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 125 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CA TA LOG LIT 2030 INTRODUCTION TO POETRY -6A -HP (3) A study of the poem as lite r ary form; approached from an historical perspective though not restricted to any histori cal period. Will not be counted toward the English major. LIT 2040 INTRODUCTION TO DRAMA -6A -HP (3) A study of the major forms of drama as literature and theatre; approached from an historical perspective though not restricted to any h i storical period Will not be counted toward the English major LIT 2046 DRAMA : TEXTS AND FILMS (3) A study of the great works of drama with emphas i s on recent forms and themes Films will demonstrate the possibilities of visualization Will not be counted toward the English major. LIT 2091 CURRENT NOVELS (3) A study of major British and Amer i can novels since WW II; attention will be given to the cultural influences and recent literary trends Will not be counted toward the English major. LIT 2310 FANTASY AND SCIENCE FICTION (3) A survey of fantasy and science fiction in England and America from Mary Shelley to the present; includes such writers as Poe Melville, Ray Bradbury Arthur C Clarke among others. Will not be counted toward the English major. LIT 2931 SELECTED TOPICS IN ENGLISH STUDIES (1-4) Varying from semester to semester, the course examines in depth a predominant literary theme or the work of a select group of writers Will not be counted toward the English major. LIT 3022 MODERN SHORT NOVEL -HP (3) A study of the novella from the nineteenth century to the present. Writers include : James Dostoevsky Camus, Styron, Nabokov, Gardner Roth Vonnegut among others. LIT 3043 MODERN DRAMA (3) A study of such modem and contemporary dramatists as Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekhov Pirandello, Shaw, O'Neill Pinter, Stoppard, Brecht Beckett, and lonesto. LIT 3073 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE -6A -XLW (3) An introduction to the fict ion, poetry and drama written since 1945-American, British, Continental, or Multicultural. Focus may be on one two or all three genres or on works from any combination of nationalities LIT 3101 LITERATURE OF THE WESTERN WORLD THROUGHTHERENAISSANCE-6A (3) A study in English of the great works of Western Literature from its beg i nnings through the Renaissance, including the Bible, Homer, Sophocles, Plato, Euripides, Virgil Cicero Dante, Petrarch Machiavelli and Rabelais, among others LIT 3102 LITERATURE OF THE WESTERN WORLD SINCETHERENAISSANCE-6A (3) A study in English of the great works of Western Literature from the Neoclassic to the Modem Period including such writers as Moliere, Racine, Volta ire, Dostoevsky Chekhov, Ibsen Kafka Gide Sartre, and Camus, among others. LIT3103GREATLITERATUREOFTHE WORLD -6A -XMW-XLW (3) PR : Junior/Senior standing A survey of world literature including samples from the ancient and modem era, western and eastern traditions, male and female writers, and various ethnic Focus on values/ethics race ethnicity, and gender; thinking and writing skills Will not be counted toward the English major. LIT 3144 MODERN EUROPEAN NOVEL -6A -HP (3) A study of the Modem European novel in translation as it developed from the nineteenth century to the present, including such writers as Dostoevsky Flaubert Kafka Hesse, Camus, and Solzhenitsyn. LIT 3155 TWENTIETH CENTURY LITERAJURE -HP (3) Examines major literary works of the 20th Century written in English and explores ways authors have expressed the age, its great issues and conflicts i n order to gain an historical perspective that will help relate the present to the recent past. Designed for non-majors but majors may take it by special arrangement. LIT 3301 CULTURAL STUDIES AND THE POPULAR ARTS -6A -XMW -XLW (3) A study of twentieth century culture as it is represented in film, fiction, and other cultural artifacts . LIT 3374 THE BIBLE AS LITERATURE -XMW (3) Major emphasis on literary types, literary personalities of the Old and New Testaments, and Biblical archetypes of British and American literary classics. Fall Semester, Old Testament; Spring Semester, New Testament. .Course may be repeated for credit with change of content; may be counted only once toward the English major LIT 3383 THE IMAGE OF WOMEN IN LITERATURE -6A -XMW -XLW (3) A survey of feminism antifeminism, sexual identity, the feminine mystique, stereotyped anq liberated female im ages from Sappho to the present, with special emphasis on women writers and on the emergence of the women's movement. Will not be counted toward the English major (Also offered under Women's Studies.) LIT3411>'RELIGIOUSANDEXISTENTIAL THEMES (3) Theological and philosophical ideas, allusions, and sym bols in the writings ofDostoevsky, Nietzsche, Mann, Joyce, Eliot Camus, Sartre, ar:nong others LIT 3451 LITERATURE AND THE OCCULT -6A -XMW-XLW (3) An introduction to the occult tradition as a major ingredient in English, Continental American and Multicultural litera ture; analysis of the origins, classifications, and areas of the various magic arts from classical times through the present. Will not be counted toward the English major LIT 3700 SURVEY OF POETRY (3) A chronological sampl i ng of the major poems written in from the Middle Ages to the present. Recom mended as the first course in the poetry option. LIT 4011THEORY OF FICTION (3) Intensive study of the genres and varieties of fiction to ascertain the theoretical and technical problems involved in the work of fiction. LIT 4386 BRITISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE BY WOMEN -6A -XLW-XMW (3) Survey of women's literary tradition in England and America from the seventeenth century to the present. Thematic focus includes self, marriage, sexuality, madness race, and generations Open to majors and non-majors. Writing intensive. Will not be counted toward the English major. LIT 4804 LITERATURE AS CULTURAL STUDY -XMW (3) The study of literary text as cultural artifacts and the problematics of that Literary texts as historical, social, political, psychological, philosophical religious, etc docu ments (or as any one of those). Topics and wo rks vary. Will not be counted toward the English major. LIT 4930 SELECTED TOPICS IN ENGLISH STUDIES (1-4) The content of the course will be governed by student demand and instructor interest. It will examine in depth a literary theme or the work of a small group of writers Special courses in writing may also be offered under this title. May be repeated with different topics. REA 1105 ADVANCED READING (3) Designed to help students develop maximum reading efficiency The course includes extensive instruction and laboratory practice in the improvement of adequate rates of reading, vocabulary and comprehensive skills An independent study approach is also available for students who prefer to assume responsibility for their own progress Will not be counted toward the English major REA 1605 LEARNING STRATEGIES WITHIN ACADEMIC DISCIPLINES(2) To provide within any academic discipline the necessary learning strategies needed for success related to aca demic coursework Practice of learning strategies will be within the framework of the student's coursework, provid ing direct transfer t6 academic area material. Will not be counted toward the English major REA2405 SPEED READING DEVELOPMENT (2) A course designed to develop speed reading techniques on vario:.is levels of difficulty Emphasis is placed on

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126 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CA TA LOG comprehension via numerous practice drills : Will not be counted toward the English major. (S/U only.) REA 2505 VOCABULARY (3) A practical course in rapid vocabulary improvement for students in all areas. Stress is on words in context. Will not be counted toward the English major. Excellent prepara tion forttie GRE and LSAT. WST 4262 LITERATURE BY AMERICAN WOMEN OF COLOR 6A -XLW (3) An introduction to contemporary women writers of color in the U.S.: Native Americans, African Americans Asian Americans, and Chicanas/U .S. Latinas Readings will include literature and contextual articles on historical and cultural issues. Will not be counted toward the English major. (May also be taken for credit in Women's Studies.) WST 4263 THIRD WORLD WOMEN WRITERS -6A -XLW (3) Introduces the literature of women from various anglophone countries in Africa, the Caribbean, and South Asia; some U.S. writers will be included to represent a third world diasporic consciousness. Will not be counted toward the English major. (May also be taken for credit in Women's Studies.) Environmental Science and Policy EVR2001 INTRODUCTIONTOENVIRONMENTALSCIENCE (3) CR: EVR 2001 L. An introductory lecture course linking the human and physical/chemical world. The course will develop an understanding of population and res ource interactions EVR2001LENVIRONMENTALSCIENCELAB (1) CR: EVR 2001 A laboratory course linking the human and physical/chemical world. The lab will develop an under standing of population and resource interactions and complement the lecture course Field trips. EVR 2861 INTRODUCTIONTOENVIRONMENTALPOLICY (3) An introduction to e,nvironmental policy using class lec tures, student projects, an<,l independent readings Em phasis will be placed on understanding basic policy mechanisms and major policy acti ons relating to environ mental issues at the national and international level. EVR 4027 WETLAND ENVIRONMENTS -XMW (3) PR : PCB 3043 or Cl. Study of the general properties and ecology of wetlands, examination of the distribution and functions of wetlands, and consideration of wetland conservation and policies. EVR 4910 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLICY PROJECT (3) Environmental science project consisting of research in a field related to environmental science/environmental policy Supervised by a faculty member. Open to senior majors only. (S/U only.) EVR 4921 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLICY SEMINAR (1) A reading and discussion seminar focusing on the inter disciplinary nature of environmental science and environ mental policx. Restricted to senior majors. Repeatable up to 3 er hrs. {S/U only.) EVR4930SELECTEDTOPICS (1-4) Each topic is a course under the direction of a faculty member with the contentdepending on the interests of the students and faculty involved. All areas of Environmental Science, Policy, Ethics, Economics and Law included. EVR4940 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE INTERNSHIP (3Y The purpose of this course is to promote the student's understanding and application of environmental science within a practical organizational context. Contract and project report required. Open to senior majors only. (S/U only.) Geography GEA 2000 GLOBAL GEOGRAPHY -SS -HP -AF ( 4) Comparative and analytical analysis of representative regions of the world with emphasis on cultural, political, economic ; environmental, and physical diversity. GEA3009GENERALGEOGRAPHY (4) Selected topics in regional and topical geography offered as survey courses. Open to all students. GEA3194REGIONALGEOGRAPHY (4) Variable title course to study and compare special regions identified by the instructor. : GEA 3360 GEOGRAPHY OFGULF OF MEXICO 4 GEA 3405 GEOGRAPHY OF LATIN AMERICA -6A 4 GEA 3500 GEOGRAPHY OF EUROPE -6A 4 GEA3554GEOGRAPHYOFTHEUSSR GEA 3600 GEOGRAPHY OF AFRICA 4 GEO 1930 GEOGRAPHY OF CURRENT EVENTS -SS 4 Application of basic geographic principles of the analysis of contemporary events in various parts of the world. GEO 2041C MAP INTERPRETATION (4) Analysis and synthesis of various types of maps and map projections. GEO 2371 INTRODUCTION TO EARTH SYSTEMS SCIENCE-NS (3) The application of basic earth system science analysis to environmental problems. Review of impact of human activities on the surface of the earth at local and global scales. For non-majors only. GEO 3013 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY (4) Principles and concepts of the discipline; maps, earth-sun relationships, weather climate, soil, water, and land forms . GE03402HUMANGEOGRAPHY (4) Systematic treatment of humans' activities and relation ships on earth; population, settlement, agriculture, indus try, trade, transportation, and political aspects are among those considered GE03602URBANGEOGRAPHY (4) PR: GEO 3402 or Cl. Geographic analysis of urban areas; development, site situation, internal structure, and hinter land are considered. GE03901 ELl!MENTSOFGEOGRAPHY (1) Independent study; various topics in physical and cultural geography (S/U only.) GE03931CSELECTEDTOPICS (4) GE04100C CARTOGRAPHY (4) PR: GEO 3013 . Map compilation and graphic presenta tion. GE04114CGEOGRAPHICTECHNIQUESAND METHODOLOGY (4) PR: 12 credit hours in Geography or Cl. Selected topics in various geographic techniques and methodologies and their application GE04124C AIR PHOTO INTERPRETATION (4) PR: GEO 3013 or Cl. Detection, identification, and analysis of objects on the earth's surface. Techniques other than photographic are also considered. GE04164C QUANTITATIVE METHODS (4) PR: 12 credit hours in Geography or Cl. Statistical analysis in geographic research. GE04201CADVANCEDPHYSICALGEOGRAPHY (4) PR: GEO 30.13 or Cl. Intensive study of a topic sele cted from physical geography. GE04210PROCESSGEOMORPHOLOGY (4) PR: GEO 3013 or GL Y 201 O or Cl. Origin, evolution, and distribution of the landforms of North America. GE04280C HYDROLOGY (4) PR: GEO 3013 or Cl. Hydrologic cycle; precipitation, evapotranspiration water budget, streamflow, and prob ability analysis. GE04340 HUMAN RESPONSE TO NATURAL HAZARDS (4) The impact of hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, sink holes, fire, freezes, and droughts on people; attempts tcr overcome or avoid these hazards. GEO 4372 GLOBAL CONSERVATION 6A -XMW (4) The distribution, exploitation, and conservation of physical and human resources, ecology. GE04421 CULTURALGEOGRAPHY (4) PR: GEO 3402 or Cl. The interrelationships of culture and environment, from earlier times to the present.

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 127 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA-1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG GEO 4460 HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY (4) PR: GE03402 orCI. Survey of evolving landscapes through time; analysis is made by means of systematic and regional methods in order to reconstruct the changing culture-environment equation. \ GEO 4470 POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY -XMW (4) PR : GEO 3402 or Cl. The factors underlying geo-political decisions and influencing their outcome ; the geographic consequences of these decisions. GE04502ECONOMICGEOGRAPHY (4) PR: GEO 3402 or Cl. The spatial organization of economic production, consumption, and exchange systems. GEO 4604 ADVANCED URBAN GEOGRAPHY -XMW (4) PR: GEO 3402, GEO 3602, or Cl. lntens)ve examination of issues such as economic restructuring and inner-city decline, ghetto formation, gentrification transportation, and policy-making. GEO 4700 TRANSPORTATION GEOGRAPHY (4) PR : GEO 3402 or Cl. Interrelationships between freight and passenger transportation and land use in terms of site, traffic generation, and circulation. GE04900 DIRECTED READING (1-4) PR : 20 hours in geography and Cl prior to registration May be repeated. GE049101NDIVIDUALRESEARCH (1-4) PR : 20 hours in geography and Cl prior to registration May be repeated GE04933GEOGRAPHYCOLLOQUIM (1) PR : Senior standing in Geography. Weekly topical lectures by faculty and outside speakers Students will develop a plan for their professional or graduate careers. GEO 5058 GEOGRAPHIC LITERA TUREAND HISTORY PR: Senior or graduate standing in geography, or Cl. The origins and development of the discipline as revealed through an examination of the principal written sources. Special attention paid to leading personalities and mod em periodicals. MET 4002 CLIMATOLOGY (4) PR: GEO 3013orCI. An introductory course which includes an examination of climatic classification systems, prob lem climates and the application of climate to selected topics such as world vegetation patterns, agriculture, housing and health MET 4010C METEOROLOGY (4) PR: GEO 3013 or Cl. The earth's atmosphere and its processes; weather forecasting and analysis; instrumen tation URP4052URBANANDREGIONALPLANNING (4) The geographic foundations of the modem city, metropol itan development and the trend toward megalopolis. Examined are the political problems of conflicting jurisdic tions at the local, county, state, national, and international levels Geology GL Y 2010 DYNAMIC EARTH: INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL GEOLOGY -NS (3) Study of minerals, rocks, and processes of the earth's crust. Introduction to origin and classification of earth's materials and landforms GL Y 201 OL DYNAMIC EARTH LABORATORY (1) PR: GL Y 2010 or concurrent registration. Laboratory study of earth materials, landforms, geologic structures, topo graphic and geologic maps Lee-lab-field trips. Required for Geology majors; open to non-majors. GLY2030 ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY -NS (3) A first course in geology emphasizing environmental as pects of the earth's crust such as earthquakes depletion of the earth s resources, water supply problems and geologic land use and planning. No credit for students with 2010 May substitute for 2010 for geology majors. GL Y 2040 ORIGINS : FROM THE BIG BANG TO THE ICE AGE -NS (3) The history of the cosmos, origin of the universe, galaxies the solar system, and earth evolution of life, great extinc tions including the dinosaurs, evolution of the primates, and the environmental future of the planet. (For both non science and science majors ) GL Y 2050 SCIENCE, EARTH, AND LIFE (3) The nature, history, and philosophy of science intended primarily for non-science majors. Consideration of sci ence as a way of knowing through examples taken prima rily from historical geology and b i ology (e. g., extinction of the dinosaurs, continental drift evolution) but also from physics and astronomy. Consideration of social rel evance of science. Does not count towards geology major GLY 2100 HISTORY OF THE EARTH AND LIFE -NS (3) PR: A course in geology Study of the physical and biologi cal history of the earth including evolution of the major groups of organisms, continental drift, and interpretation of ancient environments. GL Y 21 OOL EARTH HISTORY LABORATORY (1) Laboratory study of the history of the earth and life. Re quired for Geology majors; open to non-majors. GL Y 2930 SELECTED TOPICS IN GEOLOGY (1-3) Topical courses in geology of general interest. Does not count toward the geology major GL Y 3038 EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS (3) This course examines the geology of the earth and the environment, using an earth systems approach that looks at interact i ons between the lithosphere hydrospnere atmosphere, and biosphere Students will learn general principles of geology travel world-wide on the internet, and participate in discussions on topics ranging from the scientific method to the latest geologic discoveries. Open University course. GLY 3200 MINERALOGY (4) PR: GL Y 2010, one year of chemistry or Cl. Principles of crystal chemistry crystallography and mineralogy with emphasis on common rock-forming minerals. Lec.-lab. GLY3400CSTRUCTURALGEOLOGY (4) PR: 12 hours of geology, MAC 2132 or equivalent or Cl. Study of the origin and development of structural features of the earth's crust. Applications of principles of geology, physics, and mathematics to understanding relationships of strata and interpreting structural features. Study of regional tectonics and major structural provinces. Lee. lab. GL Y 3610C INTRODUCTION TO INVERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOOY (4) PR: GL Y 2100 BSC 201 OC or equivalent strongly encour aged as background. Lectures cover principles and applications of paleontology, including biostratigraphy, taphonomy, paleoecology, and microand macroevolu tionary patterns and processes Labs survey the inverte brate phyla comprising the bulk of the fossil record. GLY3850GEOLOGYFORENGINEERS (3) PR: Junior standing in College of Engineering or Cl. An examination of geologic materials and processes de signed for engineering students; classification and prop erties of earth materials surface processes site investi gation techniques, applications of geology to the solution of engineering problems (No credit toward the geology major, or for those with credit for GLY 2010 ) GL Y 4045 MOONS, PLANETS AND METEORS: AN INTRODUCTION TO PLANETARY SCIENCE -XMW (3) PR: Junior standing. Solar System exploration from Aristotle to NASA Modem views on the origins of meteor ites, the Moon, Mars Venus, and other planetary bQdies, ana the methods of planetary study. Meteor impacts, their effects, future hazard. Space science as a tool in the study of the Earth. Field trips, lectures, Internet exercises. GL Y 4154 GEOLOGY AND DEVELOPMENT OF MODERN AFRICA (3) An in-depth look at how geology has affected the politics, history and culture of Africa. Units include the Nile and hydropolitics deserts, and climate, rifting and hominid. evolution, and mining and politics No science prerequi sites. Cross listed as AFA 4154.

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128 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998191/ UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG GLY 4310 PETROLOGY (4) geology, structure and l i thogenesis of QeC?logically com-PR: GL Y 3200, Cl. The formation of igneous and metamorplex terrain. Mapping and outcrop description phic rocks in varying tectonic environments Emphasis s are emphasized Destinat ion of t rip varies Trip requires placed on the of metamorphic camping and vigorous physical activity. Lec -field trip rocks in hand specimens and thin sections. Lec.-lab., GLY 5865 STATISTICAL MODELS IN GEOLOGY (3) GL y 4550 DEPOSITIONAL SYSTEMS (4) PR: STA 2023 or equivalent or Cl. Applicati?n of PR: GL y 4552C. Study of modern sedimenta!Y environmethods to geological problems. Emphasis on san:iphng ments and their relationships to one another in order to plans nature of geologic d i str i butions .. and application of understand environments preserved in the rock reco_rd. analyses of variance to solving geological problems. Lee. Physical chemical and biological of terres trial GLY 5932 SELECTED TOPICS IN GEOLOGY (1-4) transitional and marine sedimentary environments w ill be PR: Senioror advanced junior standing and CC. Each topic examined in light of their eventual preservation in the is a course in d i rected study under supervision of a faculty stratigraphic record. member All areas of geology included. Departmental GLY 4552C SEDIMENTARY GEOLOGY AND permission requ ired prior to registration GEOCHEMISTRY (4) OCE2001 INTRODUCTIONTOOCEANOGRAPHY-NS (3) PR: GLY 2010, GLY 3200 and one year of chemistry. A Overview of biological, chemical geological, and physical lecture and laboratory class that i ntegrates knowledge of oceanography. Maysubstitutefor2010forgeology majors the lithosphere atmosphere, biosphere hydrosphere, (Also listed under Marine Science.) and cyrosphere to study the sedimentary rock Examination of the rock record to solve problems in sedi mentary geology GLY4700GEOMORPHOLOGY (4) PR: Senior or advanced junior standing and. Cl. Origin, evolution and distribution of land forms and soils Dynam ics of the earth's surface Lec -lab-field trips GLY 4730 MARINE GEOLOGY (3) PR: 12 hours of geology or Cl. General survey of the geology of the ocean floor from beaches t? including sediments, processes tectonics and history GLY 4734 BEACHES AND COASTAL ENVIRONMENTS -XMW (3) PR: Junior standing. A comprehensive introduction to the nature of all coastal environments including beaches, dunes tidal inlets, estuaries, reefs and river deltas. Em phasis will be on the natural state of these environments and how human activities have and will i mpact them Consideration of coastal management policies involv ing economics ethics policy, and environmental law GL Y 4780 GEOLOGICAL FIELD STUDIES (1-3) PR: 1 geology c9urse Lectures and to study modem geologic and/or geolO!;JIC. origins spe cific regions. Mapping and field description techniques introduced. Topic/destination of trip varies. Trip requires camping and vigorous physical activity May be repeated up to 9 hours as destinations vary. Lee. Field trip. GLY48221NTRODUCTIONTOHYDROGEOLOGY (4) PR: GLY 2010, advanced junior or senior standing one year each physics and calculus or Cl. Ground flow systems, ground water geology introduction to numerical and analytical models of ground water flow Lec.-lab.-field trips. GLY49051NDEPENDENTSTUDY (1-3) PR: Cl. Specialized independent study determined by the student's needs and interests. May be repeated (S/U only) GLY4915UNDERGRADUATERESEARCH (1-3) PR: Senior or advanced junior standing and written per mission of department prior to registration Individual experimental investigations with faculty supervision. (S/U GL Y 4920 GEOLOGY COLLOQUIUM (1) PR: Senior standing in Geology. Weekly topical lectures by faculty, graduate students and invited speakers (S/U only) GL Y 4930 SELECTED TOPICS IN GEOLOGY (1-4) Each topic is a course under of a faculty member with the content depending on the interests of students and faculty involved. All areas of geology in cluded. Departmental permission required prior to regis tration GL Y 4970 UNDERGRADUATE HONORS THESIS (3) Open to seniors admitted to the Geology undergraduate honors program Students will complete an independent research project under supervision of a faculty member, and present results in a senior thesis and a public presentation . GL Y 5752 GEOLOGICAL FIELD EXCURSION (2) Lectures and 2-3 week field excursion to study regional USE' Gerontology GEY 3000 INTRODUCTION TO GERONTOLOGY -SS (3) This course is designed to be an introduction to the study ofaging The is a multi d i sciplinary perspective including the b1olog1cal, psychologi cal and sociological aspects of GEY3601 BEHAVIORCHANGESINLATERLIFE (3) A survey of physical and psychological aspects of from middle age through older age will be on basic age-related c hanges and their implications for behav i or in older age. GEY 3625 SOCIOCULTURAL ASPECTS OF AGING -6A -SS -AF (3) Considerat ion of human aging in a broad sociocultural context. Course emphas i s will be on historical philo sophic and demographic aspects of theories of social gerontology, attitudes aging and aged, cross-cultural perspectives on aging the sociology of retirement and aging and the community GEY 4327 LONG-TERM CARE ADMINISTRATION I (3) PR: GEY 3000 A survey of Long Term C are (L TC) environ ments. Explored are such issues as ?f physiological condi ti ons of L TC uses the institutional setting, the sociopsychological context and methods of evaluation and i ntervention GEY 4328 LONG-TERM CARE ADMINISTRATION II . (3) PR: GEY 4327. Administrat ion of long-term care insti t u tions from a group dynamics perspect ive. Emphasis on informed problem solv ing and decision-making via analy sis of the psychosocial and sociocultural environment in the nursing home community i ncluding and actual visits to nursing homes Course objective 1s to create efficient and humane l i ving and working conditions in nursing homes GEY 4329 LONG-TERM CARE ADMINISTRATION Ill ,(3) PR: GEY 4328 This course will fam i l i arize t he student with the basic aspects of nurs ing home adm i nistration through the practical application of management theory and con cepts GEY 4360 GERONTOLOGICAL COUNSELING (3) An introduction to the study of the major mental health problems of the elderly to co. unseling the elderly in community and institu ti onal settings are discussed GEY 4401 RESEARCH METHODS IN GERONTOLOGY (3) PR: STA 2122 or equivalent. Restricted to Gerontology majors others by departmental. permission. Method s and techniques of social research .in gerontology., Design of gerontological studies collection analysis of data interpretation of results, and preparation of reports GEY4612PSYCHOLOGYOFAGING (3) A comprehensive overview of psychological of aging. Top ics will include age-related cha nges in sensa tion/perception, cognition and personality as well as application to late-life psychopathology (Also offered un der Psychology )

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 129 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CA TA LOG GEY4640DEATHANDDYING (3) .PR: GEY 3000. A broad overview of the basic concepts and psychosocial issues relating to the meaning of loss and death, the process of death, and the experience of grieving. Health care practices are considered along with commu nity resources. GEY4900DIRECTEDREADINGS (1) PR: Cl. A reading program with topics in gerontology conducted under the supervision of a faculty member. GEY 4935 SPECIAL TOPICS IN GERONTOLOGY (3) Courses on topics such as preretirement, mental health, human services organization, nursing home administra tion, the older woman, and elder abuse will be offered GEY 4945 FIELD PLACEMENT (3-9) PR : Cl. Internship in an agency or community setting. An assignment to an agency or organization, engaged in planning or administering programs for older people if in the BA program (3-6 hours). A full-time assignmeot to a nursing home in the BS program (9 hours) subject to availability of internship sites approved by the Department of Gerontology GEY 5620 SOCIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF AGING (3) Examines, within a sociological frame of reference, the interrelationships between the aged (or aging) and the structure and function of the social systems and its major institutionalized subsystems. GEY 5630 ECONOMICS AND AGING (3) Examines basic economic systems as they impact the aged. Emphasis is on applied aspects of economic plan ning, pensions, insurance, social security, and other support systems GEY 5642 PERSPECTIVES ON DEA TH AND DYING (3) Study of the various psychological, medical, legal, and religious problems caused by dying and death, and of how individuals and groups have responded in the past and present. HUS 3001 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN SERVICES (3) An introduction to the field of human services. Study of-the professions and agencies involved in providing human services. Analysis of the values and ethics of various professional associations HUS 4020 THE LIFE CYCLE (4) An examination of individuals and the physiological and psychosocial c;:hanges which occur during infancy, child hood, adolescence, young adulthood, middle age and old age. History AFH 3100 AFRICAN HISTORY TO 1850 -HP-AF (3) An outline survey of pre-colonial African history including a prefatory introduction to the use of primary sources (such as archaeology, oral tradition cultural anthropology, com parative linguistics, documents) in reconstructing the Af rican past. (Also offered under Africana Studies ) AFH 3200 AFRICAN HISTORY SINCE 1850 -HP-AF (3) Survey of the Colonial and post-colonial history of Africa. Emphasis on the impact of European and other alien influences on the continent, emergence of independent African states, and postindependence problems of nation building and economic development. (Also offered under Africana Studies.) AMH 2010, 2020 AMERICAN HISTORY I, II -HP (3,3) A history ofthe United States with attention given to relevant developments in the Western Hemisphere AMH 2010: European origins to 1877 ; AMH 2020: 1877 to present. AMH 3110 AMERICAN COLONIAL HISTORY TO 1750 (4) A study of the evolution of American society from the Age of to 1750 Attention is given to the transformation from colonies to provinces with emphasis on ethnocultural conflict, religion, labor systems and political culture. AMH 3130 THE AMERICAN REVOLUTIONARY ERA (4) Emphasis on the causes of the American revolution, the nature of Constitution-making, and the establishment of the federal system. Also examines the significance of loyalism violence, and slavery in American society from 1750-1789. AMH3140THEAGEOFJEFFERSON (4) A comprehensive study of American society and political culture from 1789-1828. Focuses on demographic trends, party systems, expansionism, Indian policy, labor, and ethno-cultural conflicts AMH 3160 THEAGE OF JACKSON (4) The United States from 1828-1850 with emphasis on social and political conflict. Consideration of evangelicalism, reform, labor movements, urbanization and political activity i n the antebellum era. AMH 3170 THE CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION (4) An examination of political, social, and economic climate of the 1850's t hat led to the American Civil War. The course does focus upon the war itself in its military, diplomatic, and political consequences through the end of the Recon struction (1877) AMH 3201 THE UNITED STATES, 1877-1914 (4) A studyofthe United States from the end ofReconstruction to World War I. Ranging over political social and interna tional developments the course covers industrialization, immigration, unions reform, feminism, race relations, and imperialism AMH 3231 THE UNITED STATES, 1914-1945 (4) A study of the United States from World War I to the end of Workd War II. Covering political, social, and international developments, the course examines the lives of Ameri cans, including minorities and women, during prosperity, war, and the Great Depression AMH 3270 THE UNITED STATES, SINCE 1945 (4) A study of the U S role in the Cold War, i m VietNam, and in the post-Cold War era. It also examines domestic devel opments such as the consumer culture protest move ments, and the abuses of political power AMH 3403 THE SOUTH SINCE 1865 (4) Southern history since the surrender at Appomattox Top ics covered include Reconstruction, the Populist revolt race relations, demogoguery and disfranchisement, South ern women, and the Civil Rights Movement AMH3421 EARLY FLORIDA (4) A history of colonial Florida under the Spanish and English Florida as an area of discovery, colonization and imperial conflict; the emergence of Florida within the regional setting. AMH 3423 MODERN FLORIDA (4) An historical survey of. Florida from the territorial period to the modern era. An examination of the social political, and economic changes occurring in Florida 1821 and the 1 980s AMH 3500 AMERICAN LABOR HISTORY (4) A study of American workers from the colonial period to the present. Examines the changing nature of work, its effects on workers (including minorities and women), and their responses as expressed in strikes unions, and political action AMH 3510 U.S. DIPLOMATIC HISTORY 'TO 1898 -6A (4) The development of American Foreign Relations in the Agricultural era AMH 3511 U.S. DIPLOMATIC HISTORY IN THE 20THCENTURY (4) A history of American Foreign Relations in the Industrial era AMH 3530 IMMIGRATION HISTORY (4) A study of the composition and character of the" American" people with emphasis on the period from 1840s to the 1920s. Examines old world backgrounds of immigrants and their responses to the new world's social, economic and political conditions. AMH 3540 UNITED STATES MILITARY HISTORY (4) A study of American military policy and practices from colonial days to the present. Attention is given both to tactics and to strategy in the unfolding formulation and development of American armed might.

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130 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG AMH3545WARANDAMERICANEMPIRE (4) EUH3185VIKINGHISTORY (4) The U.S. evolved in 200 years from 13 colonies to the The role of the Vikings in the shaping of Western history. number one power in the world. To achieve this goal we A comprehensive survey of their institutions, outlook and utilized war to achieve empire. This course will examine daily life. Viking expansion into Europe and North America. the link between American War and empire from the EUH3188MEDIEVALSOCIETY (4) Revolution through Viet Nam. A study of the daily life and attitudes of the medieval AMH 3561 AMERICAN WOMEN I (4) nobleman, peasant townsmen, and the agrarian-urban A study of women in the evolution of American society from economy and society which affected their lives. European to 1877. Women's roles in the family, EYH 3189 MEDIEVAL POLITICS (4) economy, poht1cs, wars, and reform movements will be An inquiry into the nature, distribution, and use of political examined : (May also be taken for credit in Women's power during the Middle Ages, in such institutions as Studies.) / feudalism, monarchy, cities, and the church. AMH 3562AMERICAN WOMEN II (4) EUH3202HISTORYOF17THAND18THCENTURYEUROPE (4) A study of women in the evolution of American society from A history of Europe from the beginning of the Thirty Years' 1877 to the present. Women's roles in the family, economy, War to the of the French Revolution. Political and politics, immigration, wars, religion and reform moveintellectual developments will be assessed in the light of ments will be examined. (May also be taken for credit in society and the economy. Women's Studies.) EUH3205HISTORYOFNINETEENTHCENTURYEUROPE (4) AMH 3571 AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1865 -HP (3) A comparative study of economic, political, social, and A survey of African American history, with an emphasis on intellectual developments in nineteenth century Europe. North Americas to 1865. Topics include pre-colonial AfEUH3206HISTORYOFTWENTIETHCENTURYEUROPE (4) rica, transatlantic slave trade, slavery, and the Civil War. A comparative study of economic, political, social, and (May also be taken for credit in Africana Studies ) intellectual developments in twentieth century Europe. AMH AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY SINCE 1865 -HP (3) EUH 3401 CLASSICAL GREECE (4) A survey of African Ameri9an history, with an emphasis on A study of ancient Greece focusing on the brilliant period North America, from 1865 to the present. Topics include following the Persian Wars, but embracing as well the reconstruction, World War I, World War II, and the Civil Right formative Bronze, Middle and Archaic ages, and the deMovement. (May also be taken for credit in Africana Studcline culminating in the conquest of Greece by Philip II of ies.) Macedon in 338 B .C. AMH 3800 HISTORY OF CANADA (4) EUH3402AGEOFALEXANDER (4) A study of Canadian experience from its French origins A study focusing on the career of Alexander the Great and through the British conquest to its present multi-racial on the Greek and Macedonian conquest of Imperial Percharacter. Attention will also be given to the forces of sia. Also treated are the great hellenistic kingdoms prior nationalism, and regionalism. to Rome's conquest of the eastern Mediterranean. ASH 3404 CHINA -SSHP-AF (4) EUH3412ROMAN REPUBLIC (4) Political, economic, and social history of China from the A study of the Roman Republic from 509 B .C. to the time of the first major Western contacts (17th-18th Centuassassination of Julius Caesar in 44 B. C., with a prelude ries) through the consolidation of socialism in the late treating Rome's early development under royal rule Politi1950's, and the Great Leap Forward. cal growth and change provide the framework for the ASH 3501 HISTORY OF INDIA (4) treatment. A study of the major themes of Indian history from the Indus EUH 3413 ROMAN EMPIRE (4) culture to the present. Emphasis will be given to the A study of Imperial Roman from the assassination of Classical, Mogul and British periods as well as the modJulius Caesar in. 44 B.C. to the death of the emperor em independent sub-continent. Constantine in A.O. 337. Emphasized is Rome's govemEUH 2011 ANCIENT HISTORY I -HP (3,3) ment of a vast Mediterranean empire including much of the An introductory survey of ancient history. EUH 2011 treats near East and Europe. Near East and Greece from the origins of (4) c1v1hzat1on to the full development of the Hellenistic king-A political, social, and cultural approach to the history ofthe doms prior to conflict with Rome. Germanies from 1500 through 1870, with emphasis on EUH 2012 ANCIENT HISTORY II -HP (3,3) the Protestant Reformation, the rise of Brandenburg-An introductory survey of ancient history. EUH2012 deals Prussia, and the unification under Bismarck. with Rome through the Regal, Republican, and Imperial EUH3462GERMANHISTORY1870TOPRESENT (4) periods, from the beginnings of civilization in Italy to the Apolitical,social,andculturalapproachtothehistoryofthe division of the Roman Empire A.O. 395. German Empire from 1870 through the 1970's. The nation's EUH 2021, 2022 MEDIEVAL HISTORY 1, 11 -HP (3,3) two attempts to try for world power status are highlighted, A thematic survey of the Middle Ages. EUH 2021 deals with as well as the Weimar Republic, prototype of the embattled the nascent, Christian civilization of European,' circa 300. democracy ; 1050 A.O.; EUH 2022 treats the mature medieval civiliza-EUH 3501 BRITISH HISTORY TO 1688 (4) tion of Europe, circa 1050-1500. A study of major developments in British history from the EUH 2030, 2031 MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY I, II -HP (3,3) 15th century to 1688. A thematic survey of Europe in the modern age. EUH 2030 EUH 3502 BRITISH HISTORY 1688 TO PRESENT (4) treats the period from the Renaissance to the French A study of the major themes of British history since the Revolution; EUH 2031, from the French Revolution to the Glorious Revolution, including social, political, and ecopresent. nomic leading to the creation of the modem EUH3142RENAISSANCEANDREFORMATION (4) demographic welfare state. A history of Europe from the Renaissance to the Thirty EUH3530BRITISHEMPIREANDCOMMONWEALTti (4) Years' War (1400-1618). The cultural, social, and ecoA study of the development of the British Empire from the nomic characteristics will provide the framework for artis-age of initial expansion overseas to the creation of the tic, philosophical, religious and political developments. multinational commonwealth Included are examinations EUH3181 MEDIEVAL CULTURE (4) of theory and myth of colonialism as well as the literature A survey of thought culture, and art in the Middle Ages. of imperialism. Medieval attitudes as manifested in literature, art, philos-EUH 3571 HISTORY OF IMPERIAL RUSSIA, 1689-1917 (4) ophy, education, 'and religion; with emphasis upon MediA survey of social, political, economic and cultural develeval man's perceptjon of himself and his world opment in the Russian Empire from Peter the Great to Nicholas II. Topics include expansion and modernization

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 131 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG of the Empire, the culture of the Imperial court peasant rebellions, social and legal reform, the rple of the West, and the collapse of the Romanov dynasty. EUH 3572 HISTORY OF THE SOVIET UNION, 1917 -1991 (4) A study of Soviet society under communism from the Revolution to the collapse of the USSR. Topics include the origins and development of revolutionary socialism, the Bolshevik seizure of power, Stalinism and the Great Terror, popular dissent and resistance the treatment and expe rience of ethnic minorities, Gorbachev an. d the dissolution of the Soviet Union. HIS 2931 SPECIAL TOPICS (2-4) This course emphasizes a selected historical problem or issue. A variety of instructional approaches will be taken, and topics may vary HIS 3308 WAR AND SOCIETY -XMW (3) An examination of the ways in which societies have orga nized themselves for war and how societies are changed by war. Also explores gendered expectations in war and the changing conduct of war. HIS 3474 SCIENCE AND CIVILIZATION (4) A thematic study of the interrelationship of science and society in modem history emphasizing the institutional forms, valu e structures, and social relations in science as they have developed from the scientific revolution to the present. HIS 3938 ISSUES IN HISTORY (3) This course provides an introduction to the discipline of history by examining a specific historical issue and its relation to at least one of the following dimensions: gen der, race and ethnicity, international perspectives, enviommental perspectives. HIS 3930 SPECIAL TOPICS (2-4) This course is designed to emphasize a selected histori cal problem or issue that is meaningful and challenging to the student. A variety of instructional approaches will be taken to the material. Topics will be changed each semes ter. HIS4104THEORYOFHISTORY (4) Recommended to be taken during the senior year. Re quired of all history majors. An analysis of the foundations of historical knowledge and historical methodology In cludes a survey of historical thinking, writing and film making HIS4900 DIRECTED READ!NG (1-4) PR: Cl. Arrangement with instructor prior to registration. Readings in special topics HIS 4920 COLLOQUIUM IN HISTORY (2-4) Reading and discussion of selected topics in the various fields of history. The subject and scope of inquiry will be determined by the instructor for each section. May be repeated for credit. HIS 4936 PRO-SEMINAR IN HISTORY -6A -XMW (4) PR: Cl. Advanced topics in the various fields of history Emphasis on discussion of assigned readings and on research and writing of a major paper. Required of all history majors. May be repeated up to 12 credit hours. HIS 5215 HISTORICAL WRITING (2) A course for graduate and advanced undergraduates to combine library, archival and research skills with an ex amination of various writing styles Analytic and synthetic skills are stressed in articles reviews and essays LAH 2020 LATIN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION (3) An introduction to selected issues, events and people in Latin America from 1492 to the present. Focus on Argen tina, Brazil, Chile, Cuba, and Mexico. LAH 2734 LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY IN FILM -HP AF (3) Through the use of films and readings, the course intro duces the broad sweep of Latin American history from the pre-Columbian period to today Emphasis is placed on the social-cultural context to understand the peoples and events that have shaped Latin America LAH 3130 COLONIAL LATIN AMERICA (4) A study of the Spanish and Portuguese Colonial empires in the New World from 1492-1830 LAH .3200 MODERN LATIN AMERICA (4) A study of the emergence of the Latin American states. The course will examine developments in Latin America dur ing the nineteenth and twen tieth centuries. Special atten tion is given to the Third World character of the region. LAH 3430 HISTORY OF MEXICO (4) Mexican history from pre-Columbian cultures to the twen tieth century. Emphasis falls on the colonial political econ omy, social development, the wars of independence, development of the 19th century Mexican state and the Mexican revolution. LAH3470 HISTORY OF THE CARIBBEAN (4) A thematic study of the circum-Caribbean from pre Columbian cultures to the twentieth century emphasizing the development of the Caribbean political economy with emphasis on monoculture plantation society, and colo nial/neo-colonial relationships. LAH 3480 HISTORY OF CUBA (4) Cuban history from pre-Columbian cultures to the Cuban Revolution Emphasis on colonization, the sugar economy, the struggles for independence, the political economy of the Republic, and the 20th century revolutionary process. WST 3210 WOMEN IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION I -6A -HP (3) Survey of women in the ancient Near East, ancient Greece, ancient Rome, early Middle Ages. Origins of Western attitudes toward sex roles, female sexuality, relation of power to gender. (May also be taken for credit in Women's Studies.) WST 3220 WOMEN IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION II -HP (3) Survey of European women from the late Middle Ages to the twentieth century: differing consequences of historical change for women and men. (May also be taken for credit in Women's Studies.) Humanities and American Studies AMS 2030 INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN STUDIES -SS -HP (3) An overview of American Studies, the interdisciplinary study of American culture. Analysis of the arts and litera ture, including music; social issues ; popular culture ; ma terial culture; cultural diversity; and social change. These approaches will be applied to a spec i fic cultural era. AMS 2201 COLONIAL AMERICAN CULTURE -HP (4) An examination of cultural patterns in America as they developed between 1600 and 1780 with an emphasis on the texture of everyday life AMS 2212 NINETEENTH.CENTURY AMERICAN CULTURE -HP (3) An examination of cultural patterns in America from 1776 to 1900 with an emphasis on the texture of everyday life. AMS 2270 TWENTIETH.CENTURY AMERICAN CULTURE -HP (3) An examination of cultural patterns in America from 1900 to the present with an emphasis on the texture of everyday life. AMS 2363 ISSUES IN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION (1-4) An examination of selected top ics such as natural environ ment and the quality of life, sports and American society popular music, American communities, vigilante tradition, jazz music, role of the family, American success myth youth in America. Topic varies AMS 3001 AMERICAN CULTURE 1880-1915 -6A -HP (4) Integration of major aspects of American life between the 1880s and World War I. AMS 3210 REGIONS OF AMERICA -HP (4) The pattern of American culture as revealed through an examination of selected writings and other pertinent ma terials dealing with selected American regions Topic varies. Repeatable up to eight credit hours. AMS 3230 AMERICA DURING THE TWENTIES AND THIRTIES (4) Selected interdisciplinary materials are used to examine the relationships among regionalism, nationalism and internationalism during the twenties and thirties. Empha sis is placed on the measure of cultural nat i onalism attained by the United States during this period.

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132 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CA TA LOG AMS 3260 AMERICAN CULTURE 1830-1860 A -HP (4) Examines the patterns of American culture in the years leading up to the C i vil War Topics include religion and social reform race relatior:is. and the impact of industrial ization AMS 3302 ARCHITECTURE AND THE AMERICAN El\IVIRONMENT (3) By means of slides lectures and discussion the course examines 350 years of American architectural history Architectural styles aesthetics and the relation between a building and it s social environment are stress ed. AMS 3370 SOUTHERN WOMEN: MYTH AND REALITY A -HP I (3) This course will identify the myths surrounding Southern Women, discern their sources and purposes, and con trast them with history (Also offered under Women's Studies ) AMS 3601 MATERIAL CULTURE AND AMERICAN SOCIETY -SS -HP (3) By means of slides, lectures and student projects exam ines connections between artifacts and American cultural attituc;les from 17th century to present. Topics include : architecture, furniture gravestones toys, and the rnaterial subcultures of women African-Americans and communal societies. AMS 3700 RACISM IN AMERICAN SOCIETY SS HP (3) An introduction into the causes and effects of racism m American history lite r ature art the media, and folklore Related concepts of ethnocentrism and class conflict will also be studied. (Also offered under Africana Studies ) AMS 3930 SELECTED TOPICS IN AMERICAN STUDIES (1-4) Offerings include Cultural Darwin i sm in America America Through Foreign Eyes and The Female Hero in American Culture. AMS 4152 FILM IN AMERICAN CULTURE (3) Surveys the contributions to American culture of major films, studios, directors stars theaters and controver sies from the perspectives of genres and styles critical methodologies and theories Var i able topics such as : series on a region di r ector, performer subject, or period oftime . AMS 4804 MAJOR IDEAS IN AMERICA -XMW (3) Investigates the role of one or more infl\lential ideas m American culture for example : individualism identity, com munity dissent reform utopianism democracy Empha sizes the critical analys i s of a var i ety of primary texts Topic varies. May be repeated up to 6 credit hours AMS49101NDIVIDUALRESEARCH (1-4) The content of the course will be governed by student demand and instructor interest. Instructor approval re quired prior to r egistration AMS 4930 SELECTED TOPICS IN AMERICAN STUDIES (1-4) Offerings include social implications of American Paint ing,, Technology i n Twentieth Century America, American Environmental Problems, Popular Culture in America American Military Experien .ce, and Labor j n America. AMS 4935 SENIOR SEMINAR IN AMERICAN STUDIES (4) PR: Senior in American Studies or Cl. AMS 4936 SENIOR SEMINAR IN AMERICAN STUDIES (4) PR: Senior in American Studies or Cl. AMS 4940 INTERNSHIP IN AMERICAN STUDIES (1-4) A structured out of-class learning exper i ence providing firsthand, prac!ical training in American Studies.related profess i onal careers in the community May be repeated up to 8 credit hours HUM 2024 THE ARTS FA (3) Analysis of selected works of literature, music film, and v i sual art representing artists of diverse periods cultures, genders, and races. Especially recommended for stu dents who later take 4000-level Humanities courses. HUM 2211 STUDIES IN CULTURE : THE ANCIENT THROUGH MEDIEVAL PERIODS -HP (3) A survey of literature and thf:) arts of ancient Greece, Rome and medieval Europe Issues to be examined may include the dialogue between local trad i tions and cosmopolitan cultures the relationsh i p of the individual to society and the bases for moral values HUM 2243 STUDIES IN CULTURE: THE RENAISSANCE THROUGHTHETWENTIETHCENTURY-HP (3) A historical survey of the v i sua l arts literature music and thought of Europe from the Renaissance through the twentieth century. Issues to be examined may include the relationship between sc i ence and the arts and the conse quences of the growing contacts among world civilizations and the impact of technological change l;IUM 2930 SELECTED TORICS (1-4) An introductory course dealing with a recurrent theme in the arts or focus ing on a particular art i stic center (a nation or City at a particular time). May be repeated up to 8 credit hours with change of content. HUM 3251 STUDIES IN CULTURE : THE TWENTIETH CENTURY -HP (3) Analysis of selected works of twentieth century art, includ ing films paintings music, and literature, in the context of major poli tical social and economic events such as war, depress ion, total i tarianism and technological change. HUM 3271 EASTERN AND WESTERN CULTURE FROM ANTIQUITY TO 1400 -AF (3) A comparative treatment of music v i sual arts, theatre, literature, and philosophy i n the East and West, proceed ing chronolog i cally from Anc i ent times through the Middle Ages, emphasizing Europe and India HUM 3273 EASTERN AND WESTERN CULTURE SINCE 1400 AF (3) A comparative treatment of music v i sual arts theatre, literature and philosophy in the East and West proceed ing chronologically from the Renaissance through the present, emphasiz ing Europe, the United States, and India. HUM 3930 SELECTED TOPICS IN HUMANITIES (1-4) This intermed i ate-leve l course will deal with a recurrent theme i n the arts or focus on particular cultural centers Topic$ will vary ; course may be repeated for credit with change of content up to 8 credit hours HUM 4402 HUMANITIES IN INDIA (4) PR: Sophomore standing or Cl. Examples from the arts and letters of India and the relationship of these arts to the Hindu and Buddhist philosophy-religions HUM 4404 HUMANITIES IN CHINA (4) PR: Sophomore standing or Cl. Examples from the arts and l etters of Chi na ; their relationship to Taoism, Confu cianism and other Chinese philosophies ; Western influ ences on twentieth century Chinese arts and letters HUM 4405 HUMANITIES IN JAPAN (4) PR: Sophomore standing or Cl. Examples from the arts and letters of J apan the i r relationship to Zen Buddhism and other Japanese philosophy-relig i ons ; Western influ ences on twentieth cen t ury Japanese arts and letters HUM4433ANCIENTGREEKCULTURE (4) PR: Sophomore standing or Cl. A study of the poetry, drama philosophy h i s t orical writing painting sculpture and arch i tecture of ancient Greece including such authors as Homer Sophocles and Plato and monuments such as the Parthenon HUM 4434 THE CULTURE OF ANCIENT ROME (4) PR: Sophomore standing or C l. A study of the poetry drama, philosophy historical writ ing, painting, sculpture and architecture of ancient Rome including such authors as Virgil, Livy and C i cero, the monuments of Rome, Pompe ii, and 'Herculaneum. HUM 4435 EARLY MEDIEVAL CULTURE (4) PR: Sophomore stand ing or Cl. A study of the culture of Europe and the Mediterranean wor l d from the 4th to 11th centuries through read i ngs of early Medieval historians poets, and the0logians a s well as the study of illuminated manuscripts, mosaics painting and architecture HUM 4436 HIGH MEDIEVAL CULTURE (4) PR: Sophomore stand ing or Cl. A study of the culture of Western Europe from the 11th t o 14th centuries. Readings

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 133 UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG will include poetry and religious works ; examples of paint ing architecture sculpture and music will be studied. HUM 4437 ITALIAN RENAISSANCE CULTURE (4) PR: Sophomore standing or Cl. A study of the painting, literature music sculpture and architecture of early mod ern Italy (1300-1600) emphasizing humanism, the revival of antiquity, the tension between sacred and secular, and artists such as Michelangelo Titian and Raphael. HUM 4438 NORTHERN RENAISSANCE CULTURE (4) PR: Sophomore standing or Cl. A study of the Northern Renaissance 1400 1580 as exemplified in Germany, France the Netherlands England and Spain. The course includes pa i nting a rchi tecture, literature and music with special study of Durer Van Eyck, El Greco and Bosch. HUM 4440 ARTS AND LETTERS IN THE 17TH AND 18THCENTURIES (4) PR: Sophomore standing or Cl. A study of the visual arts, literature and music from the mysticism and ornament of the Baroque to the rati onalism and classicism of the Enlightenment, including such artists, authors and com posers as Rembrandt ; Gentilleschi, Voltaire, Bach and Mozart HUM 4442 ARTS AND LETTERS OF THE ROMANTIC PERIOD ( 4) PR: Sophomore standing or Cl. Continental masterworks of fiction painting, and music in the context of European cultural history from the French Revolution to the Revolu tions of 1848 HUM 4444 NINETEENTH CENTURY EUROPEAN ARTS AND LETTERS (4) PR : Sophomore standing or Cl. A study of continental literary, musical and art i stic masterworks from the Revo lutions of 1848 until the outbreak of World War I HUM 4445 lWENTIETH CENTURY ARTS AND LETTERS I (4) PR : Sophomore standing or Cl. Analysis of selected works of twentieth century art. The course will focus on a particu lar phase in the development of modernism, a set of themes or certain stylistic aspects of vc;irious arts of the twentieth century HUM 4446 lWENTIETH CENTURY ARTS AND LETTERS II (4) PR: Sophomore standing or Cl. Analysis of selected works of twentieth century art The course will focus on a partic;:ular phase in the development of modernism a set of themes or certain stylistic aspects of var i ous arts of the twentieth century. HUM 4452 NINETEENTH CENTURY AMERICAN CULTURE (4) PR: Sophomore standing or Cl. Study of selected works of art, tracing the course of American expansionism in civili zation, and the interaction between the arts and the sci ences in American ways of l i fe and work, 1790-1890. HUM 4455 lWENTIETH CENTURY AMERICAN CULTURE (4) PR : Sophomore standing or Cl. Study of selected works, tracing the course of expansion in the production and enjoyment of works of art, and interaction between the idealistic and pragmatic concerns for development of the arts in the 20th cen t ury HUM 4462 ANCIENT LA TIN AMERICAN CULTURE (4) PR : Sophomore stand ing or Cl Analysis of selected Latin American works of art in their cultural context with empha sis on major art forms selected from the Pre-Columbian period. HUM 4464 LATIN AMERICAN CULTURE SINCE 1492 (4) PR: Sophomore stand ing or Cl. Analysis of selected Latin American works of art in their cultur,al context, with empha sis on major art forms selected from the colonial through contemporary periods. HUM 4905 DIRECTED STUDY (1-4) PR: Cl. Specialized individual study determined by the student's needs and i nterests HUM 4930 SELECTED TOPICS IN HUMANITIES (1-4) PR : Sophomore standing or Cl. Th i s course will deal with a recurrent theme in the arts as for example, love or death, or will focus on artistic centers such as Renaissance Florence or Paris in the 1920s Topics will vary; cou rse may be repeated for credit with change of content. HUM 4931 SEMINAR IN HUMANITIES -6A (4) PR: Humanities major or Cl; Senior standing. Discussion of interdisciplinary humanities Includes essay HUM 4938 MAJOR ISSUES IN THE HUMANITIES -XMW (3) The study of an important topical issue in the Humanities Materials representing diverse views relating to that issue will be read, and works of art in different media that have relevance to the debate will be studied. Available to majors and hon-majors May be repeated up to 6 credit hours with change in content. HUM 4940 INTERNSHIP IN HUMANITIES (1-4) A structured, out-of-class learning providing firsthand, practical training in Humanities-related profes sional careers in the community May be repeated up to 8 credit hours. HUM 4941 STUDY QN LOCATION (1-4) The art of a culture will be examined during travel in groups, led by an instructor, to important cities or sites Monu ments, museums, architecture plays, and/or concerts will be studied. Reading assignments and lectures. PGY 3000 PHOTOGRAPHY IN AMERICAN CULTURE (3) A survey of photography as an art and a craft in America since the mid-nineteenth century. Attention devoted to technological innovations leading personalities, major movements, and memorable icons. Open to majors and non-majors Interdisciplinary Social Sciences ISS 3010 INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES (3) Views social institutions and issues from perspectives of changing paradigms. Integrates the range of social sci ence fields into a global interdisciplinary vantage. ISS 3930 SELECTED TOPICS IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES (1-4) Interdisciplinary studies with course content dependent on student demand and instructor's interest. May be repeated as topics vary. ISS 4162 THE CITY AND URBANIZATION (3) An interdisciplinary perspective will be used to analyze the emergence of the city urban revolution and metropolis Urban planning and governance will be examined in looking at how urban areas deal with social and physical problem ISS 4164 URBAN SOCIAL ISSUES: AN INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH (3) This course is designed to examine current metropolitan issues from an interdisciplinary perspective. Topic selec tion will be within the broad framework of ecology, techno logical changes, economic conditions, political ideolo gies, and their impact on changing social patterns. ISS 4900 DIRECTED READINGS (1-3) PR : Cl. A supervised program of intensive reading of interdisciplinary materials in areas of specific interest. May be repeated ISS4910 DIRECTED RESEARCH (1-3) PR: Cl A supervised program of interdisciplinary research in areas of specific interest. May be repeated. ISS 4935 SEMINAR IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES -XMW (3) PR: Senior standing and ISS 3010 or Cl. The seminar which caps the interdisciplinary major. Weds personal curiosity with the application of models to research on salient social issues ISS 5934 SELECTED TOPICS (1-3) PR: Cl plus senior standing or graduate status. Interdis ciplinary studies with course content dependent on stu dent demand and instructor's interest. May be repeated as topics vary STA 2122 SOCIAL SCIENCE STATISTICS -6A -QM (3) The course presents statistics with the view that numbers are a limited but important aspect of understanding the world. Draws concepts and hypothesis from a wide range of disciplines. Covers topics through bivariate analysis parametric and non-parametric.

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134 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 19911199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG International Studies AREA STUDIES Area sti.idy courses are multi disciplinary in natu r e and deal with one or more countries of a region Each course combines some measure of political, economic, histori cal .religious, geographic anthropological and sociologi cal analys i s in dealing with salient features and current problems The same course may be repeated, but only when the countrie s of concentrat ion d i ffer -The regularly offered area study courses are : AFA4150 AFRICA AND THE UNITED STATES -SS-HP-AF (3 3 ) ASN 3012 JAPAN TODAY ( ) ASN 3014 CHINA TODAY -AF (3) ASN 3030 THE MIDDLE EAST -AF (3 3 ) EUS3000EUROPE-SS ( ) EUS 3022 RUSSIA -SS -AF (3! LAS 3002 LATIN AMERICA (3 ASN 3105 THE PACIFIC CENTURY -SS -HP -AF (3 Explores the themes and trends which have affec ted the entire Asia Pacific region. Textual material and videos trace the emergence of the modern nations of Northeast and Southeast As i a focus ing on the political and eco nomic development of the past 150 years. (Open Unive r sity televised course.) INR 1015 WORLD PERSPECTIVE SS -AF (3) An interdisciplinary study of the international system major world regions and proqlems INR2930SELECTEDTOPICS (1-4) lnternatiqnal studies with course content dependent on student demand and instructor's interest For non-majors only. May be repeated as topics vary INR 3003 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (3) An interdisciplinary study which stresses methods and analysis A major portion will focus .on the roles which different disciplines play in interpreting the international scene INR 3018 WORLD IDEOLOGIES -XMW (3) A course which details and examines the i deologies of today's independent countries ; analyzing them in their political social cultural and histor i cal context. INR 3033 INTERNATIONAL POLITCAL CULTURES -XMW (3) This course will explore the ways i n which culture i nflu ences the nature of government economic success or failure, and constructive and destructive modes of self and social identification. INR 3038 IN, TERNATIONALWEAL TH AND POWER -SS (3) Introduction to the relationship between politics and eco nomics, emphasizing the analysis of government policies in response to both domest i c and international economic problems INR 3054 INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS (3) This courses explores the evo l ution of international rights from the Greeks to the present. It e x amines human rights iss1,.1es in major regions of the world INR3081 INTERNATIONALISSUESANDACTORS (3) An examination of t M most important issues in interna tional affa irs. The course analyzes the behavior of major foreign policy actors in the international arena including nation states, non-governmental and i nternationa L organi-1 zations Departmental approval required INR30841NTERNATIONAL TERRORISM -SS-AF (3) A study of contemporary international terrorism and its causes, ranging from natio nal liberat i on movements to networks of philosoph i cal anar c h i sts INR 3141" GLOBAL SECURITY POLICY (3) A study of secur i ty issues regional and global (such as proliferation, arms control, arms transfer) as they relate to contemporary international polit ics. INR3336 INTELLIGENCEAND U .S. FOREIGN POLICY (3) An examination of the role of intelligence and the intelli gence community in U S foreign policy with emphasis on the period since World War II. INR 3770 COMPARATIVE MILITARY SYSTEMS (3) A comparative study of ways in which t he mil i tary i nstitu tions of var i ous nations are or g anized and int eract with politics societies and e c ono mies . INR39550VERSEASSTUDY (1-6) A program of individual or group research in a foreign country. INR 4089 CO"(FLICT IN THE WORLD -XMW (3) PR: Junior/Senior standing An interdisciplinary course examining theories of conflict conflict resolution pro cesses and strategies theories and peacemaking strat egies, and the concept of Early Warning Systems related to the outburst of conflict. INR 4250 THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF THE SOUTHERN NATIONS -SS-AF (3) Amultidisciplinary study of the efforts of the nations in the South (Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East) to improve their status through political and economic devel opment. INR4900DIRECTEDREADINGS (1-3) PR: Cl. A supervised program of intensive reading of interdisciplinary materials in areas of specific interest. May be repeated. INR4910DIRECTEDRESEARCH (1-3) PR: Cl A supervised program of interdisciplinary research in areas of specific interest. May be repeated. INR4931 SELECTED TOPICS (1-4) Interdisciplinary studies with course content dependent on student demand and instructor's interest. May be re peated as topics vary. INR 4936 SENIOR SEMINAR -XMW (3) PR : International Studies major and senior standing A variable topics seminar integrating concepts and analy ses relating to the academic background of INT majors. Should be taken in the student's final semester INR4943 INTERNSHIP IN INTERNATIONAL STUDIES PR: Senior status. The purpose of the course is to promote the student's understanding of global i nternational issues within a local and practical context. (S/U only ) (For majors only ) -LAS 3004 THE AMERICAS LATIN AND CARIBBEAN (3) Th i s is a telecourse that is designed to introduce the complexities of Latin America and the Caribbean to stu dents in the U.S. (Open Unive rsity televised course.) LAS 3116 LATIN AMERICA THROUGH FILM -AF (3) This course will use film, video, selected readings, and lectures to teach the interested student about Latin America WST 3275 WOMEN IN THE DEVELOPING WORLD (3) A comparative study of woman's status in various develop ing nations with that in various industrialized states. (Also offered unde r Women's Studies Program ) Languages and Linguistics General Foreign Languages FOL 3100 GENERAL FOREIGN LANGUAGE I (1-4) A general purpose course that may be used for transfer of credit, credit by examination, and similar matters; may also be used for formal courses in less commonly taught languages or in professional translation FOL4101 GENERAL FOREIGN LANGUAGE II (1-3) A general purpose course that may be used for transfer of credit, credit by examination, and similar matters; may also be used for fcirmal courses in less commonly taught languages or for workshops in professional interpreting FOL4905DIRECTEDSTUDY (1-3) Departmental approval required FOL 5906 DIRECTED STUDY (1-3) PR: FOL 4191 or equivalent. Arabic ARA 1120 MODERN ARABIC I (4) CR: ARA 1120L. An intensive study of basic skills: pronun ciation, listening comprehension, speaking and some composition. ARA, 1120L MODERN ARABIC I LABORATORY (1) CR: ARA 1120. Laboratory designed to offer additional practice using various instructional technologies and me dia. Concurrent enrollment with lecture session required, and, if dropped, then dropped simultaneously (S/U only.)

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 135 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CA TA LOG ARA 1121 MODERN ARABIC II (4) PR: ARA 1120 or its equivalent. CR: ARA 1120L. A contin uation of ARA 1120 More sophisticated oral/aural skills are attained. Basic reading skills are acquired. ARA 1121 L MODERN ARABIC II LABORATORY (1) CR: ARA 1121 A laboratory designed to offer additional practice usi ng various instructional technologies and me dia. Concurrent enrollment with a lecture session is required, and, if dropped, then dropped simultaneously. (S/U only.) ARA 2200 MODERN ARABIC Ill (4) PR: ARA 1121 or the equivalent. For language students who intend to attain basic proficiency. ARA 2201 MODERN ARABIC IV (4) PR: ARA 2200 or the equivalent. Continuation of ARA 2200. Practice of writing, speaking and listening skills for lan guage students who intend to attain basic proficiency ARA4905DIRECTEDSTUDY (1-5) Permits study options in Arabic not available in regularly scheduled curriculum at departmental discretion.,Depart mental approval required. May be repeated up to 10 credit hours. (S/U only ) ARA 4930 SELECTED TOPICS (1-5) Course permits classes in Arabic not available in the regularly scheduled curriculum at departmental discre tion Departmental approval required. May be repeated up to 10 credit hours. Chinese CHI 1120 MODERN I (4) CR : CHI 1120L. Mandarin. An intensive study of basic skills: pronunciation, listening, comprehension, speak ing, and some composition. CHl1120L MODERN CHINESE I LABORATORY (1) CR: CHI 1120. A laboratory designed to offer additional practice using various instructional technologies and me dia Concurrent enrollment with a lecture session is required, and, if dropped, then dropped simultaneously. (S/U only.) CHI 1121 MODERN CHINESE II (4) CR: CHI 1121L. Mandarin. PR: CHI 1120orequivalent.A continuation of CHI 1120. More sophisticated oral/aural skills are attained. Basic reading skills are acquired. CHl1121L MODERNCHINESEllLABORATORY (1) CR: CHI 1121. A laboratory designed to offer additional practice using various instructional technologies and me dia Concurrent enrollment with a lecture session is required, and, if dropped, then dropped simultaneously. (S/U only.) CHl2200MODERNCHINESElll (4) PR: CHI 1121 or the equivalent. For language students who intend to attain basic proficiency. CHl2201 MODERN CHINESE IV (4) PR: CHI 2200 or the equivalent. Continuation of CHI 2200 Practice of writing, speaking and listening skills for lan guage students who intend to attain basic proficiency. CHl4905DIRECTEDSTUDY (1-5) Permits study options in Modem Chinese not ava ilable in the regularly scheduled curriculum at departmental dis cretion. Departmental approval required. May be repeated upto 10 hours (S/U only ) CHI 4930 SELECTED TOPICS (1-5) Course permits classes in Modem Chinese not available in the regularly scheduled curriculum at departmental discretion Departmental approval required May be re peated up to 10 credit hours. French FRE 1040 FRENCH FOR READING (3) Designed to provide a reading ability in French that .will support research in other disciplines. Primarily for gradu ate students. FRE 1120 BEGINNING FRENCH I (4) CR: FRE 1120L.The first course in the study of elementary French. Emphasis on the development of basic skills in comprehension, speaking and reading. FRE 1120L BEGINNING FRENCH I LABORATORY (1) CR: FRE 1120. A laboratory designed to offer additional practice using various technologies and me dia Concurrent enrollment with a lecture session is required and, if dropped, then dropped simultaneously (S/U only.) FRE 1121 BEGINNING FRENCH II (4) PR: FRE 1120 or equivalent. CR: FRE 1121L. A continua tion of FRE 1120 FRE 1121 L BEGINNING FRENCH II LABORATORY (1) CR: FRE 1121. A laboratory designed to offer additional practice using various instructional technologies and me dia. Concurrent enrollment with a lecture session is required, and, if dropped, then dropped simultaneously. (S/U only ) FRE11700VERSEASSTUDY-ELEM.FRENCH (4) Elementa ry-level French taught in France In lieu of FRE 1120and FRE 1121. Departmental approval required. be repeated up to 8 credit hours. FRE 2 ,200 FRENCl:l 111 (3) PR: FRE 1121 or equivalent. A review of the basic structure of French FRE2201 FRENCH IV (3) PR : FRE 2200 or equivalent. Readings in French on the intermediate level. FRE2240CONVERSATIONll (3) PR: FRE 2241 or equivalent proficiency Conversation practice with concentration on current idiomatic usage. FRE2241 CONVERSATION I (3) PR: FRE 1121. For development of basic conversational skills. FRE22700VERSEASSTUDY-INTR.FRENCH (1-6) PR: Two semesters of university-level French or equiva lent proficiency. Departmental approval required. May be repeated up to 12 credit hours FRE 3230 READING IN FRENCH LITERA TUREAND CULTURE (3) PR : FRE 2201 or equivalent. This course is designed to build reading skills while giving students a broad back ground in French culture. FRE 3420 COMPOSITION I (3) A fundamental composition course for students who have completed FRE 2200 and/or 2201. FRE3440FRENCHFORBUSINESS (3) PR: FRE 2200 or equivalent. An introduction to the French language in ordinary business transactions. FRE 3470 OVERSEAS STUDY (1-6) An intensive study-travel project in France. Departmental approval required. May be repeated up to 12 credit hours FRE 3500 FRENCH CIVILIZATION (3) Readings and discussion on the cultural history ofFrance. FRE 4421 COMPOSITION II (3) Continuation of French composition. This course is de signed to follow FRE 3420. FRE4471 ADVANCED OVERSEAS STUDY (1-6) PR : FRE 3470 or Cl. Intensive language study in France. Departmental approval required. May be repeated up to 12 credit hours FRE4700 FRENCH LINGUISTICS (3) PR: LIN 3010 and FRE 2201 or eqivalent. An introduction to the phono l ogical, morphological and syntactic structure ofFrench FRE4905DIRECTEDSTUDY (1-3) Departmental approval required. FRE4930 SELECTED TOPICS (1-3) Study of an author movement or theme. FRE5425ADVANCEDWRITIENEXPRESSION (3) PR: FRE 4421, or equivalent. Course is designed to give advanced training in free composition in French. FRE 5566 CONTEMPORARY FRANCE (3) PR: FRE 3500 or equivalent or standing. An advanced course in French civilization and culture includ ing a study of recent social, artistic and political trends as well as various current intellectual movements. Text and discuss i ons in French. FRW 4100 INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH NOVEL (3) PR : FRE 3230, FRE 3420. A study of the history ofthe novel

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136 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG from its early appearance to present times with emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries. Authors to be studied include Chretien de Troyes Rabelais, Balzac Flaubert, Proust Camus, Sartre Robbe:.Grillet, and others Specific content may vary from year to year FRW4101 INTRODUCTIONTOFRENCHDRAMA AND POETRY (3) PR: FRE 3230 A study of the h i story of drama and poetry Will include medieva l drama Racine Corneille Moliere Anouilh Sartre Ionesco and others. Will also i nclude Villon, Ronsard, DuBellay ; Lamart ine, Hugo V i gny Musset Baudelaire Mallarme Rimbaud Valery Peguy Eluard Apollina ire, Char, and others. Course content may vary from year to yea r . FRW 5222 CLASSICAL PROSE AND POETRY (3) PR: FRW 4101. Emphasis on Malherbe La Fontaine Boileau Descartes and Pascal. FRW522620THCENTURYPOETRYANDTHEATRE (3) PR: FRW 4101. Valery Claudel Anouilh Montherland, Sartre, Ionesco. FRW 5286 THE 20TH CENTURY NOVEL (3) PR : FRW 4 too. Proust Gide Maur i ac Malraux Camus Robbe-Grillet. FRW5314 CLASSICAL DRAMA (3) PR: FRW 4101. Corneille Moliere and Rac ine. FRW 5415 LITERATURE OF THE MIDDLE AGES (3) PR: FRW 4100 or FRW 4101. Major genres inc l uding epics, Arthurian romances drama and lyric poetry. Read ing in modem French translation FRW 5425 LITERATURE OFTHE RENAISSANCE (3) PR: FRW 4100 or FRW 4101. A study of Rena i ssance French humanism including Rabelais Monta i gne, and Pleiade poets . FRW 544518TH CENTURY LITERATURE (3) PR: FRW 4100. The classical tradition and the new cur rents of thought in the Age of Enl i ghtenment. FRW 5528 PRE-ROMANTICISM (3) PR : FRW 4100 or FRW 4101. The precursors of romanti cism Emphasis on Rousseau Bernardin de St. Pierre Chenier and Chateaubriand FRW 5535 ROMANTICISM (3) PR : FRW 4101. A study of the romantic and early realistic movements with emphasis on Lamart i ne, Vigny Musset Hugo and Balzac FRW 5556 REALISM AND NATURALISM (3) PR: FRW 4100 or FRW 4101. A detailed study of realism and naturalism with emphas i s on Flaubert Zola les Goncourt Maupassant and Daudet. FRW SELECTED TOPICS (1-3) PR: Upper-level or graduate standing Study of an author movement or theme German GER 1120 BEGINNING GERMAN I (4) CR : GER 1 120L. Development of basic sk ill s in l i stening and reading comprehension speaking and writing of German. GER 1120L BEGINNING GERMAN I LABORATORY (1) CR: GER 1120. A laboratory desi gned to offer additionalpractice using various instruct i onal technolo gies and med i a Concurrent enrollment with a lec t ure session is required and if dropped t hen dropped simul taneously (S/U only.) GER1121 BEGINNING GERMAN II (4) PR: GER 1120 or equ i valent. CR : GER 1121L. Continued development of basic skills in listen ing and reading com prehension speaking and writing German GER 1121 L BEGINNING GERMAN II LABORATORY (1) CR: GER 1121. A laboratory des i gned to offer additional practice using various instructional technolog i es and me dia Concurrent enrollment with a lecture session i s reqllired and, if dropped, then dropped simultaneously. (S/U only ) GER 2200 GERMAN Ill (3) PR: GER 1121 o r equival e nt.A r ev i ewofthebasicstr ucture of spoken and written German. May be taken concurrently with GER 2201. GER 2201 GERMAN IV (3) PR: GER 1121 or equivalent. Readings in German on the intermediate level. May be taken concurrently with GER 2200 . GER 2240 CONVERSATION I (3) PR: GER 1121. For development of basic conversational skills. GER 3420 COMPOSITION I (3) A fundamental course for student$ who have completed GER 2200 or GER 2201. GER 3500 GERMAtil CIVILIZATION (3) PR : GER 2200 or GER 2201. Read i ngs in German on the cultural history of Germany GER4410 CONVERSATION II (3) Free conversation based on the current German idiom. GER 4421 COMPOSITION II (3) Practical training in modem German usage and differ ences of style. GER OF THE GERMAN LANGUAGE (3) A d1achron1c approach to the study of the German lan guage The course traces the history and development of the language from lndoEuropean through Germanic, Old Middle, and New High German. GET 3100 GERMAN LITERATURE IN ENGLISH TRANSLATION -XMW (3) Analysis and interpretation of major works of German literature to be read in English, with regard to their thought content and relevance to our thoughts and actions GEW4100SURVEYOFGERMANLITERATUREI (4) Old High German and Middle High German literature in modem German translation; the literature of Humanism and Baroque, the classical period. GEW4101 SURVEYOFGERMANLITERATUREll (4) The romantic period, 19th and 20th centuries. GEW 4900 DIRECTED STUDY (1 ) Departmental approval required. GEW 4930 SELECTED TOPICS (1-3) Study of an author movement or theme GEW 5475 20TH CENTURY LITERATURE TO 1945 (3) A study of major styles in German literature from 1,900 to WW II with emphasis on Hauptmann, Schnitzler, Hofmannsthal, George Rilke Kaiser Heym Trakl Tho mas Mann, Hesse Kafka Benn, Brecht. GEW 5489 20TH CENTURY LITERATURE: 1945 TO PRESENT (3) Study of major trends in German literature since WWII with emphasis on Borchert Frisch Durrenmatt Boll Uwe Johnson, Grass, Aichinger, Eich Enzensberger, Bachmann. GEW5515THEENLIGHTENMENT (3) Se lected dramas and critical writings by Lessing, Wieland, Kant. GEW 5545 ROMANTICISM (3) Jenaer circle and Heidelberger circle ; the late romantic period the writers between Classicism and Romanti cism. GEW 5555 REALISM (3) Selected works by Grillparzer, Grabbe Buchner, Hebbtll Heine Immerman, Stifter Keller Meyer Storm, Raabe Hulshoff and Morike. GEW5605GOETHE (3) Selected novels poems: Werther, Wahlverwandtschaf ten Wilhelm Me i ster, Westostlicher Divan. GEW 5606 FAUST (3) Sources form content and literary significance ofUrfaust and Faust. GEW 5615 SCHILLER (3) Selected dramas philosophical and aesthetical writings GEW5934SELECTEDTOPICS (1-3) PR: Upper-level or graduate stand i ng. Study of an author, movement or theme

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 137 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Greek GRK1120BEGINNINGMODERNGREEKI (4) CR: GRK 1120L. An intensive study of basic skills; pronun ciation, listening comprehension, speaking and some composition. GRK 1120L BEGINNING MODERN GREEK I LABORATORY (1) CR: GRK 1120 A laboratory designed to offer additional practice using various instructional technologies and me dia Concurrent enrollment with a lecture session is required, and, if dropped, then dropped simultaneously (S/U only.) GRK1121 MODERN GREEK II (4) PR: GRK 1120 or its equivalent; CR: GRK 1121 L. A continu ation of GRK 1120. An intensive study of basic skills; pronunciation, listening comprehension, speaking and some composition. GRK 1121 L MODERN GREEK II LABORATORY (1) CR: GRK 1121. A laboratory designed to offer additional practice using various instructional technologies and me dia. Concurrent enrollment with a lecture session is required, and, if dropped, then dropped simultaneously. (S/U only.) GRK2200MODERNGREEKlll (4) PR: GRK 1121 or the equivalent. For language students who intend to attain basic proficiency. GRK2201 MODERN GREEK IV (4) PR: GRK 2200 or its equivalent. Continuation of GRK 2200 Practice of writing, speaking and listening skills for lan guage students who intend to attain basic proficiency GRK4905DIRECTEDSTUDY. (1-5) Permits study options in Modem Greek not available in the regularly scheduled curriculm at departmental discre tion. Departmental approval required. May be repeated up to 10 credit hours. (S/U only.) (1-5) Course permits classes in Modem Greek not available in the regularly scheduled curriculum at departmental dis cretion. Departmental approval required. May be repeated up to 1 O credit hours. Hebrew HBR1120MODERNHEBREWI (4) CR: HBR 1120L. An intensive study of basic skills; pronun ciation, listening comprehension, speaking and some composition. HBR 1120LMODERN HEBREW I LABORATORY (1) CR: HBR1120 A laboratory designed to offer additional practice using various instructional technologies and me dia. Concurrent enrollment with a lecture session is required, and, if dropped, then dropped simultaneously. (S/U only ) HBR1121 MODERN HEBREW II (4) PR: HBR 1120 or its equivalent; CR: HBR1121L. A contin uation of HBR 1120. An intensive study of basic skills; pronunciation, listening comprehension, speaking and some composition. More sophisticated oral/aural skills are attained Basic reading skills are acquired HBR 1121LMODERN HEBREW II LABORATORY (1) CR: HBR 1121. A laboratory designed to offer additional practice using various instructional technologies and me dia. Concurrent enrollment with a lecture session is required, and, if dropped, then dropped simultaneously. (S/U only ) HBR 2200 MODERN HEBREW Ill (4) PR: HBR 1121 or the equivalent. For language students who intend to attain basic proficiency. HBR2201 MODERN HEBREW IV (4) PR: HBR 2200 or its equivalent. ofHBR 2200. Practice of writing, speaking and listening skills for lan guage students who intend to attain basic proficiency. HBR4905DIRECTEDSTUDY (1-5) Permits study options in Modem Hebrew not available in the regularly scheduled curriculum at departmental dis cretion. Departmental approval required. May be repeated up to 10 credit hours (S/U only ) HBR4930SELECTEDTOPICS (1-5) Course permits classes in Modem Hebrew not available in the regularly scheduled curriculum at departmental discretion. Departmental approval required. May be up to 10 credit hours Italian ITA 1120 BEGINNING ITALIAN I (4) CR: IT A 1120L. The first course in the study of elementary Italian. Emphasis is on the development of basic skills in comprehension, speaking, and reading. ITA 1120L BEGINNING ITALIAN LABORATORY (1) CR: ITA 1120. A laboratory designed to offer additional practice using various instructional technologies and meITA BEGlNNING ITALIAN II (4) CR: ITA 1121L. The second course in the study of elemen tary ltalfan Emphasis is on the development of basic skills in comprehension, and reading ITA1121LBEGINNINGITALIANllLABORATORY (1) CR: IT A 1121. A laboratory designed to offer additional practice using various instructional technologies and me dia Concurrent enrollment with a lecture session is re quired, and, if dropped then dropped simultaneously. (S/ U only.) ITA 2200 INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I (3) PR: ITA 1121 or equivalent. Readings in Italian on the elementary level. A review of the basic structure of spoken and written Italian. ITA 2240 ITALIAN CONVERSATION I (4) To develop fluency and correctness in spoken Italian. Intensive study for conversational skill based particularly upon the current Italian idiom. Syntax is intensified and the vocabulary and idiomatic expressions expanded. ITA 2241 ITALIAN CONVERSATION II (4) To assist students who have already made a start in speaking Italian, who have not had the advantages of travel or who have non-Italian speaking parents, to improve their skill in speaking Ital ian. Current events; literary discus sions ; free conversation; prepared speeches. Differences of media syntactical signal. ITA 3420 COMPOSITION (3) A fundamental composition course for students who have completed ITA 2200. ITA 3470 OVERSEAS STUDY (1-6) An intensive study-travel project in Italy. Prior approval and early registration required. May be repeated up to 12 credit hours. -ITW 4100 SURVEY OF ITALIAN LITERATURE I (4) A survey of Italian literature from the earliest monuments through the classicism of the 18th century. ITW 4101 SURVEY OF ITALIAN LITERATURE.II (4) A survey of Italian literature beginning with the Classicism of the 18th century and continuing to present. ITW 4905.DIRECTED STUDY (1-3) Departmental approval required. Japanese . JPN1120MODERNJAPANESEI (4) CR: JPN 1120L. An intensive study of basic skills: pronun ciation, listening comprehension, speaking, 'and some composition. JPN 1120L MODERN JAPANESE I LABORATORY ( 1) CR: JPN 1120. A laboratory designed to offer additional practice using various instructional technologies and me dia. Concurrent enrollment with a lecture session is required and, if dropped then dropped simultaneously. (S/U only.) JPN 1121 MODERN JAPANESE II (4) PR: JPN 1120 or equivalent. CR: JPN 1121 L. A continua tion of JPN 1120 More sophisticated oral/aural skills are attained. Basic reading skills are acquired. JPN 1121 L MODERN JAPANESE II LABORATORY (1) CR: JPN 1121. A laboratory designed to offer additional

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138 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 19118199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG practice using various instructional technologies and me dia. Concurrent enrollment with a lecture session is required, and, if dropped, then dropped simultaneously. (S/U only.) JPN 2200 MODERN JAPANESE Ill (3) PR: JP N 1121 or equivalent. Continuing study to attain basic proficiency in Japanese. JPN 2201 MODER"'JAPANESE IV (3) PR: JPN 2200 or equivalent. Continuation of JPN 2200. Practice of writing, speaking, and listening skills to attain basic proficiency. . JPN 4905 DIRECTED STUDY (1-5) Permits study options in Japanese not available in regu larly scheduled curriculum at departmental discretion. Departmental approval required May be repeated up to 1 O credit hours. (SIU only.) JPN 4930 SELECTED TOPICS (1-5) Course permits study options in Japanese not available in the regularly scheduled curriculum at departmental discretion. Departmental approval required. May be re peated up to 10 credit hours Polish POL1120BEGINNINGPOLISHI (4) CR: POL 1120L. This course features all four major skills: listenil')g, reading, speaking, and writing Grammar exer cises, dietation, readings and vocabulary-building are central in this first course. Knowledge of Russian can help POL 1120LBEGINNINGPOLISHILABORATORY (1) CR: POL 1120. A laboratory designed to offer additional practice using various instructional technologies and me dia. Concurrent enrollment with a lecture session is required, and, if dropped, then dropped simultaneously . (S/U only ) .. POL1121BEGINNINGPOLISHll (4) PR: POL 1120 or equivalent. CR: POL 1121L. This course continues the four basic skills of POL 1120, with continued emphasis on structures, dialogues readings dictation and vocabulary-building. Knowledge of Russian can help POL 1121 L BEGINNING POLISH II LABORATORY ( 1) CR: POL 1121. A laboratory designed to offer additional practice using various instructional technologies and me dia. Concurrent enrollment with a l ecture session is re quired, and, if dropped, then dropped simultaneously (S/ U only ) POL 2200 POLISH Ill (4) PR: POL 1121 or the equivalent. For language students who intend to attain basic proficiency . POL 2201 POLISH IV (4) PR: POL 2200orthe equivalent. Continuation of POL 2200. Practice of wrting, speaking and listening skills for lan guage students who intend to attain basic proficiency POL4905DIRECTEDSTUDY (1-5) Permits study options in Polish not available in regularly scheduled curriculum at departmental discretion (S/U only.) Departmental approval required. May be repeated up to 10 credit hours. POL 4930 SELECTED TOPICS (1-5) Course permits classes in Polish not available in the regularly scheduled curriculum at departmental discre tion. Departmental approval required. May be repeated up to 10 credit hours Portuguese POR1120BEGINNINGPORTUGUESEI (4) CR: POR 1120L. Development of basic skills in listen i ng and reading comprehension, speaking and writing of Brazilian Portuguese POR 1120L BEGINNING PORTUGUESE I LABORATORY (1) CR: POR 1120. A laboratory designed to offer additional practice using various instructional technologies and me dia Concurrent enrollment with a lecture session is re quired, and, if dropped, then dropped simul taneously (S/ U only.) POR1121 BEGINNING PORTUGUESE II (4) PR : POR 1120 or equivalent. CR: POR 1121L. Continued development of basic skills in listening and reading com prehension, speaking and writing of Brazilian Portuguese. POR 1121 L BEGINNING PORTUGUESE II LABORATORY (1) CR: POR 1121. A laboratory designed to offer additional practice using various instructional technologies and me dia Concurrent enrollment with a lecture session is re quired, and, if dropped, then dropped simultaneously. (S/ U only.) POR22001NTERMEDIATEPORTUGUESEI (3) POR 2200 builds upon the four language skills (speaking comprehension, reading and writing) introduced in POR 1120 and POR 1121. POR2201 INTERMEDIATEPORTUGUESEll (3) For language students who intend to attain basic profi ciency. Russian RUS 1120 BEGINNING RUSSIAN I (4) CR: RUS 1120L. The first course in the study of elementary Russian Emphasis on the development of basic skills in compr,ehension, speaking and reading RUS 1120L BEGINNING RUSSIAN I LABORATORY (1) CR: RUS 1120. A laboratory designed to offer additional practice using various instructional technologies and me dia. Concurrent enrollment with a lecture session is re quired, and, if dropped, then dropped simultaneously (S/ U only.) RUS1121 BEGINNINGRUSSIANll (4) PR: RUS 1120 or Cl. CR : RUS 1121 L. The second course in the study of elementary Russian Emphasis on the development of basic skills in comprehension, speaking and reading. RUS 1121 L BEGINNING RUSSIAN II LABORATORY (1) CR: RUS 1121. A laboratory designed to offer additional practice using various instructional technologies and me dia. Concurrent enrollment with a lecture session is re quired, and, if dropped, then dropped simultaneously. (S/ U only.) RUS 2200 RUSSIAN Ill ( 4) PR: First year Russian or equivalent. Review and devel opment of basic skills in conversation, composition, and reading. RUS 2201 RUSSIAN IV (4) PR: RUS 2200 or equivalent. Review and development of basic skills in conversation composition and reading. RUS 2270 OVERSEAS STUDY (1-6) Intensive study of the Russian language in Russia involv ing at least 20 hours per week of classroom instruction and cultural excursions conducted in Russian around Moscow and other parts of Russia May be repeated up to 12 credit hours. RUS 3240 CONVERSATl()N I (4) PR : Second year Russian or equivalent. Development of basic conversational skills RUS34700VERSEASSTUDY (1-6) Intensive Russian at Moscow Linguistic University with excursions in Moscow and Russ ia. Must be enrolled in the USF Summer Study in Moscow program. Two years Rus sian required. Students from other institutions eligible RUS 3500 RUSSIAN CIVILIZATION -6A (3) A survey of the cultural history of Russia. RUS4241 <;:ONVERSATION II (4) PR: Previous course in series or equivalent. Development of conversational skills. May be repeated RUS 4402 ADVANCED RUSSIAN CONVERSATION & COMPOSITION I (4) PR: RUS 4241 or Cl. Third year Russian RUS 4403 ADVANCED RUSSIAN CONVERSATION & COMPOSITION II (4) PR : RUS 4241 or Cl. third year Russian RUS4471 ADVANCED OVERSEAS STUDY (1-6) Intensive Russian at Moscow Linguistic University with excursions in Moscow and Russia. Must be enrolled in the

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 139 UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG USF Summer Study in Moscow program. Three years Russian required Students from other institutions eli gible RUS4700 RUSSIAN LINGUISTICS (3) PR LIN 3010 or equivalent or Cl. An introduction to Russian Linguistics content: Phonology, Morphology, Word-forma tion, Syntax. RUS 4900 SELECTED TOPICS Study of an author, movement or theme. RUS4905 DIRECTED STUDY Departmental approval required (1-3) (1-3) RUT 3110 RUSSIAN CLASSICS IN ENGLISH -6A -XLW (3) Masterpieces of 19th century Russian literature in English. The major works of Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Chekhov Elective fora II students in .all departments. RUT 3111 TWENTIETH-CENTURY RUSSIAN LITERATURE IN ENGLISH -6A-XLW (3) Masterpieces of 20th century Russian literature in Englis_h. The major works of Bely, Olesha, Babel, Zamyatm, Bulgakov, Pasternak, and Solzhenitzyn. Elective for all students in all departments. Spanish SPN1120BEGINNINGSPANISHI (4) CR: SPN 1120L. Development of basic skills in listening and reading comprehension, speaking and writing of Spanish. Not open to native or near-native speakers of Spanish. SPN 1120L BEGINNING SPANISH I LABORATORY (1) CR: SPN 1120. A laboratory designed to offer additional practice using various instructional technologies and me dia. Concurrent enrollment with a lecture session is required, and, if dropped, then dropped simultaneously Not open to native or near-native speakers of Spanish. (S/ U only.) SPN1121 BEGINNINGSPANISHll (4) PR: SPN 1120 or equivalent. CR: SPN 1121 L. Continued development of basic skills in listening and reading com prehension, speaking and writing of Spanish Not open to native or near-native speakers of Spanish. SPN 1121 L BEGINNING SPANISH II LABORATORY (1) CR: SPN 1121. A laboratory designed to offer additional practice using various instructional technologies and me dia Concurrent enrollment with a lecture session is required, and, if dropped, then dropped simultaneously. Not open to native or near-native speakers of Spanish. (S/ U only.) SPN 1130 ACCELERATED SPANISH FOR NEAR-NATIVE SPEAKERS AND OTHERS (1-6) PR: Cl. Accelerated course for near-native speakers and others with some knowledge of Spanish capable of making rapid progress SPN 2200 SPANISH Ill (3) PR: SPN 1121 or equivalent. Continued development of basic skills in and reading comprehension, speaking and writing of Spanish. May NOT be taken concurrently with SPN 2201. Not open to native or near native speakers of Spanish. SPN 2201 SPANISH IV (3) PR: SPN 2200 or equivalent. Continued development of basic skills in listening and reading comprehension, speaking and writing of Spanish. May NOT be taken concurrently with SPN 2200. Not open to native or near native speakers of Spanish SPN 2240 CONVERSATION I (3) PR: SPN 1121. For development of basic conversational skills. Not open to native or near-native speakers of Spanish. SPN 2241 CONVERSATION II (3) PR: SPN 2240 or equivalent. To improve fluency in spoken Spanish Not open to native or near-native speakers of Spanish. SPN 2270 OVERSEAS STUDY (1-6) PR: SPN 1121. An intensive study-travel program in a Spanish-speaking country Prior departmental approval and early registration are required SPN 3300 COMPOSITION (3) PR: SPN 2200-2201. A study of syntax, grar,nmar and writing. Not open to native or near-native speakers of Spanish SPN 3340ADVANCEDSPANISH FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS I (3) PR: Native or near native oral/aural proficiency. course for native and near-native speakers of Spanish due to home environment and/or residence in a Spanish speaking country, but without formal training in the language. Em phasis on grammatical problems affecting such speak ers. Texts and discussions in Spanish This is primarily a discussion course. May not count as Spanish major elective. SPN 3341 ADVANCED SPANISH FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS II (3) PR: SPN 3340. Continuation of SPN 3340. course for native and near-riative speakers of Spanish due to home environment and/or residence in a Spanish speaking country but without formal training in a language. Empha sis on those aspects of written expression such as style and syntax which are problematic for such speakers. Texts and discussions in Spanish. This is primarily a discus sion course. May not count as Spanish major elective. SPN3440SPANISHFORBUSINESS (3) PR: SPN 2201 or equivalent. An introduction to the Spanish language as used in undertaking ordinary business trans actions SPN 3441 ADVANCED SPANISH FOR BUSINESS WRITING (3) PR: SPN 3440 or equivalent. Continuation of SPN 3440. Advanced business communication in Spanish through discussion, reading, and writing of representative texts from the Spanish speaking world. Emphasis on business forms and composition of proposals, reports, records, and the language of advertisement. Texts and discus sions in Spanish This is a discussion course, open to Spanish and Business majors and minors. SPN 3500 SPANISH CIVILIZATION (3) PR: SPN 1121. The culture and civilization of Spain. SPN 3520 SPANISH AMERICAN CIVILIZATION (3) Readings and discussions on the culture and civilization of Spanish America. For majors and non-majors. SPN4301 EXPOSITORYWRITING (3) PR: SPN 3300. Practical training in contemporary Spanish structure, usage and stylistic devices. Not open to native or near-native speakers of Spanish. SPN4410ADVANCEDCONVERSATION (3) PR: SPN 3241 or equivalent. Intensive practice in the formulation and expression of ideas in standard Spanish Not open to native or near-native speakers of Spanish. SPN 4470 ADVANCED OVERSEAS STUDY (1-6) PR: SPN 3270. Intensive language study in Spain. Depart mental approval required SPN 4700 SPANISH LINGUISTICS (3) PR: LIN 301 O orequivalent(may be taken concurrently with Cl) anct SPN 2201 or equivalent. An introduction to His panic linguistics : Phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicography. SPN 5525 MODERN SPANISH AMERICAN CIVILIZATION (3) PR: SPN 3520 or equivalent or graduate standing Ad vanced readings and discussions dealing with Spanish American civilization and culture, including a study of social, artisitic and political trends, from Colonial Times to the present. Texts and discussions in Spanish. SPN 5567 MODERN SPANISH CIVILIZATION (3) PR: SPN 3500 or equivalent or graduate standing Ad vanced read i ngs and discussions dealing with contem porary Spanish civilization and culture including a study of recent social artistic and political trends. Texts and discussions in Spanish SPT 2524 WOMEN WRITERS OF LATIN AMERICA -AF (3) Literature of Latin-American women (in translation). Top ics related to race and ethnicity, values and ethics, social, economic, and political issues. Readings will include oral histories interviews, diaries and memoirs, poetry, short

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140 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLOR/QA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG stories, and novels. (May also be taken in Women's Studies ) SPW 3030 INTRODUCTION TO HISPANIC LITERATURE (3) PR: SPN 2201 or equivalent. Prose fiction, drama, poetry, and essay; techniques of literary analysis. SPW 4100 SURVEY OF SPANISH LITERATURE I (3) PR: SPW 3030 or equivalent. A study of Spanish literature from its origins through the 17th century. SPW4101 SURVEYOFSPANISHLITERATUREll (3) PR: SPW 3030 or equivalent. A study of the later periods ot Spanish literature. SPW4131 SURVEYOFSPANISHAMERICANLITERATURE (3) PR : SPW 3030 or equivalent. An introduction to the study of Spanish-American literature from the Modernism pe riod to the present Emphasis on modem writers since Dario SPW 4900 DIRECTED STUDY Departmental approval require .a. SPW 4930 SELECTED TOPICS Study of an author, movement or theme. (1-3) (1-3) SPW 5135 COLONIAL SPANISH AMERICAN LITERATURE (3) PR: SPW 4131 An introduction to Colonial Spanish Amer ican Literature from the Discovery through the Romantic Period SPW 5355 SPANISH AMERICAN DRAMA & POETRY (3) PR: SPW 4131 Major writers of all genres. Emphasis on modem writers. SPW 5387 SPANISH AMERICAN PROSE (3) PR : SPW 4131. Emphasis on the gaucho theme and contemporary prose fiction : SPW 5388 GOLDEN AGE POETRY AND DRAMA (3) PR: SPW 4100 Lope de Vega, Alarcon, Tirso, Calderon, and others. SPW5405MEDIEVALLITERATURE (3) PR: SPW 4100 or equivalent. Course gives an in-depth study of principal works and authors of the period such as El Poema de Mio Cid, Libro de Buen Amor and La Celestina. SPW546519THCENTURYLITERATURE (3) PR: SPW 4101 An appreciation of the romantic and realist periods in Spanish literature SPW 5605 CERVANTES (3) Cervantes' masterpiece Don Quijote de la Mancha SPW5725GENERATIONOF1898 (3) PR: SPW410 '1. Themajorfiguresoftheperiodandtheir main followers. SPW 5726 VANGUARD LITERATURE OF 1918AND1936 (3) PR: SPW 4101. A study of Vanguard literature in Spain between 1918 and 1936. SPW 5934 SELECTED TOPICS (3) PR: Upper-level or graduate standing. Study of an author, movement or theme. Yoruba YOR1120YORUBAI (4) This course is designed to familiarize students with mod em orthography and to develop skills in reading, writing, speaking, and understanding spoken Yoruba. Pronuncia tion in Yoruba and achieving basic communicative compe tence in the language are among the skills to be attained in the course. YOR 1121 YORUBA II (4) A' continuation ofYOR 1120, this course delves further into the structure of Yoruba and its grammatical Also covered is practice in reading elementary texts with em phasis on grammar, vocabulary, and an appreciation for style. Also included is composition and drills in oral work. May be repeated up to 8 credit hours. LINGUISTICS ENS 1483 ENGLISH FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS I (3) A special course for students learning English as a sec ond language Intensive study and drill in American En glish pronunciation and listening comprehension ENS 1484 ENGLISH FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS II (3) PR: ENS 1483 or Cl. A continuation of ENS 1483 Empha sis on reading and composition. LIN 3010 INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS (3) Introduction to the basic principles of linguistic science; phonological and grammatical analysis and description; language change and genetic relationships LIN 3801 LANGUAGE AND MEANING A (3) A survey introduction for non-specialists to the basic principles of semantics and the way language conveys ideas. This course is also available on WUSFfTV Channel 16 by the O.U. Program . LIN 4040 DESCRIPTIVE LINGUISTICS (3) PR: LIN 301 O or Cl. Introduction to the basic techniques of formalizing linguistic descriptions through elementary phonological, morphological, and syntactic data solution problems drawn from a variety of languages Both taxo nomic and generative analysis and descriptions will be developed and compared. LIN4575 LANGUAGETYPESOFTHEWORLD (3) An introduction to linguistic typology consisting in a sys tematic comparison of characteristic representatives of the various language types, such as Vietnamese, Malay, Hungarian, Swahili Sanskrit, Hebrew aQd others : No knowledge of any of these languages on the part of the student is presumed LIN 4600 LANGUAGE AND SOCIETY (3) PR: LIN 3010. An analysis of the interrelation of a language and the structure of the society using it. The linguistic behavior patterns characteristic of particular social, polit ical, economic, educational and racial groups. Problems in communication between strata LIN 4710 LANGUAGE ANO COMMUNICATION : ACQUISITION AND DEVELOPMENT (3) PR: LIN 3010 A survey of current research and theory inthe processes of normal acquisition and development of language and communication in children. The ar,id development of phonology, syntax semantics, prag matics and nonverbal communication and the role of language in general cognitive development. LIN4903DIRECTEDREADING (1) PR : Cl. Readings in special topics. Departmental approval required. LIN 4930 SELECTED TOPICS (1 ) PR: Cl. Course content depends upon students' needs and instructor's interest and may range over the entire field of linguistics LIN 5700 APPLIED LINGUISTICS (3) Analysis of the phono logical, morphono!ogic:al: and tactic features of English as a basis for linguistic applica tion to problems of English language acquisition by non native speakers TSL 4374 METHODOLOGY OF TEACHING ENGLISH OVERSEAS (3) PR: Upper-level standing Designed to introduce and prepare the en r ollee in the various facets of teaching English as a foreign language in the setting. It will include aspects of teaching verbal skills and compre hension as well as writing It i nvolves a practicum at the English Language Institute on campus TSL 5321 ESOL STRATEGIES FOR CONTENT AREA TEACHERS (3) This course is designed fo r public school teachers work ing with limited English proficient (fore i gn) students in the classroom The new ESOL requirements specify that this course be offered to content area teachers and to ESOL teachers. May not be repeated for additional credit hours TSL 5371 METHODS OF TEACHING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (3) Analysis of the methods of teaching English pronunciation and structure to speakers of other languages. TSL 5372 ESOL CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION (3) Analysis of the methods of teaching English pronunciation and structure to speakers of other languages TSL 5471 LANGUAGE TESTING (3) PR: TSL 5371. This is a lecture course on the methodology of testing English as a second/foreign language. May not be repeated for additional cred it hours.

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 141 UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CA TA LOG TSL 5525 CROSS-CULTURAL ISSUES IN ESL (3) PR: LIN 5700. This is a lecture course on cultural issues in teaching English as a second/foreign language. May not be repeated for additional credit hours. Liberal Studies IDS 3300 STRUCTURES OF KNOWLEDGE AND KNOWING (4) Distinguishing the modalities of human knowledge and awareness as reflected in the classic distinctions: sen sory/motor/emotive; normative/descriptive/non-rational; logical/mathematical; ethical/physical/moral; qualitative/ quantitative; mind/will/body; substance and function. IDS3310PROGRESSANDUTOPIA (4) Examination of the modem backgrounds of contemporary awareness: particularly the development of historical awareness of ourselves as scientifically, technologically, and socially progressive in relation to both utopic and non utopic futures. IDS3320FREEDOM ANDTHESELF (4) Analysis of the idea of freedom in relation to the idea of self, involving comparative treatment of the variety of stand points of conceiving the individual personality in relation to the social context. IDS 4344 SEMINAR: MAN AND NATURE (3) PR: Senior standing or Cl. Examination of aspects of contemporary theories of nature and man deriving in the liberal arts, to the purpose of developing a general as sessment of contemporary knowledge and methods of knowing. IDS 4930 SELECTED TOPICS (1-4) Course content determined by students' and instructor's interests and needs. Library and Information Science LIS 2001 LIBRARY AND SKILLS (3) An introduction to various types of information sources (print and electronic) and search techniques. The course is designed to instruct students how to locate, evaluate, and effectively use information LIS 2002 INTRODUCTION TO THE INTERNET (3) Covers the history, structure, and use of the Internet, with an emphasis on using the Internet to answer educational, research, and other information-based needs. LIS 2937 SELECTED TOPICS IN LIBRARY/INFORMATION SCIENCE (1 ) Covers a variety of topics in the field of library/information science such as emerging technologies, administration and service, and current professional issues May be repeated up to 9 credit hours total when topic varies. LIS 5262 MICROCOMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN LIBRARY AND INFORMATION CENTERS (3) Microcomputer hardware and software for libraries and their application in library/information settings. Projects using major application for budgets, databases, and telecommunications are undertaken. LIS 5315 INSTRUCTIONAL GRAPHICS (3) PR: Cl. Theoretical aspects, planning and production of instructional graphic material. The Theory of graphic com munications. Interpreting needs for instructional materi als appropriate for given behavioral objectives. LIS 5333 TV IN SCHOOL AND LIBRARIES (3) Small format video tape recordings and the utilization of open and closed broadcasts in schools and libraries. LIS 5404 FOUNDATIONS OF LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCE (3) Introduction to the study oflibrary and information science, history; organization; specialized literature; outstanding leaders; current trends, issues, and problems; the place of the information agency in society with its contributions to that society. LIS 5937 SELECTED TOPICS IN LIBRARY STUDIES (1-4) PR: Cl. Covers a variety of topics in such areas as collection development, reference services, technical services and administration. Marine Science OCE2001 INTRODUCTIONTOOCEANOGRAPHY -NS (3) overview of biological, chemical, geological, and physical oceanography. {Also listed under Geology.) OCE4930 SELECTED TOPICS IN MARINE SCIENCE (1-4) Selected topics in the marine sciences including marine biology, marine chemistry, marine geology, physical ocean ography, and interdisciplinary topics relating to marine environments Mass Communications ADV 3000 INTRODUCTION TO ADVERTISING (3) PR: MMC 2100 and MMC 3602 A study of the structures, functions, and persuasive language of advertising in mass media with attention to social, political, economic, and legal aspects. ADV 3002ADVERTISING DESIGN (3) PR: ADV 3000 for advertising sequence majors; VIC 3000 for other Mass Comm majors. Application of graphic design principles to various areas of advertising. Combin ing visual and verbal elements effectively. 1 ADV 3101 ADVERTISING COPYWRITING (3) PR: ADV 3000 and ECO 1000. Study of laboratory experi ence in preparation of advertising copy for newspapers, magazines, radio, television, direct mail, outdoor displays, specialty items, and interactive electronic media. ADV 3103 RADIO-TELEVISION ADVERTISING (3) PR: ADV 3000. An intensive study and analysis of radio and television for advertising purposes, including copywriting, script and storyboard preparation, time buying and selling techniques, audience research methods, and basic production concepts. ADV 3300 ADVERTISING MEDIA STRATEGY (3) PR: ACG 3074, ADV 3000, and ECO 1000. Problems, techniques, strategy of media research, planning, budget ing and effective utilization in advertising. ADV 3700 RETAIL ADVERTISING PLANNING AND EXECUTION (3) PR: ADV 3000 and ADV 3101. A study ofretail advertising, including management decisions, processes, proce dures, media planning, production techniques, and prob lems affecting the development of advertising to fulfill retail objectives. ADV 4800 ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS (3) PR: ADV 3101, ADV 3300, ECO 1000, MAR 3023, and MMC 4420. Advanced advertising course requiring planning and production of complete general advertising cam paign, including research, production methods, budget ing, and media schedules. ADV 4940 ADVERTISING PRACTICUM (1) PR: Cl. For advertising sequence majors. Practical expe rience outside the classroom where the student works for academic c;:redit under -the supervision of a professional practitioner Periodic written and oral reports to the faculty member coordinating the study (S/U only ) FIL 2200 THE FILM AS MASS COMMUNICATION II: RHETORIC AND STYLISTICS (3) PR: FIL 3004 A continuation of FIL 3004 to include the effeetive arrangements of scenes and sequences in mo tion picture and television films FIL 3004 THE FILM AS MASS COMMUNICATION I: SYNTAX (3) PR : MMC 2100 and MMC 3602. The language, conven tions, elements, and patterns of the film medium as related to current models of effective mass communica tion and new theories of nonverbal communication. FIL 4404 SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE FILM, 1945 TO THE PRESENT (3) PR: MMC 2100 and MMC 3602 The development of the film from 1945 to the present. JOU2100BEGINNINGREPORTING (3) PR: MMC 2100 and MMC 3602. Basic instruction in news judgment, sources of news, newsgathering, and newswriting techniques. Typing ability is required. JOU 3101 ADVANCED REPORTING (3) PR: JOU2100 or RTV 3304 (RTV majors only), JOU 4200

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142 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG (may be taken PHI 1103 and POS 2041. the rl\ass riiedia in the States and their relationship Getting informat ion and writing the more complex and to the other major i nstitutions of American society specialized story techniques of investigative and analyt i MMC 4123 MEDIA SCRIPT WRITING (3) cal reporting including ethical and legal considerations. PR: MMC 2100 and MMC 3602 An introduction to the JOU 3300 MAGAZINE ARTICLE AND FEATURE WRITING (3) techniques of writing scripts for photographic and multiPR: CRW 2100 and JOU 2100. Planning researching media presentation electronic media, and industrial and writing and marketing articles for general and special documentary film interest magazines and newspaper magazine suppleMMC 4200 HISTORY AND PRINCIPLES OF . d I rt' I 'd d t' COMMUNICATIONS LAW (3) men t s ; experiences in eve oping a ice 1 ea; in uc ive PR: MMC 2100 and MMC 3602. Historical and constituanalysis of contemporary magazine art i cles JOU 3306 CRITICAL WRITING: EDITORIALS, REVIEWS, tional backgrounds of freedom and control of expression, COLUMNS (3) statutory enactments major court decisions and admin-PR: JOU 3101, JOU 4200. Interpretive and opinion writing i strative rulings which affect print media, telecommunicafor the mass media Analysis and discussion of current tions advertising, and public relations events as a basis for critical thinking and editorial writing; MMC 4203 COMMUNICATION ETHICS (3) evaluation of editorial pages of leading newspapers PR: MMC 2100 and MMC 3602 or Cl. A study of the Study of journalistic techniques involved in personal fundamental principles and philosophies of ethics and columns thei r application to the dec i s i on-making process in the JOU 3940 REPORTING PRACTICUM (1) various professions of mass communications. PR: JOU 3101 and Cl. For news-editorial sequence ma-MMC 4420 RESEARCH METHODS IN MASS I t d th I h COMMUNICATIONS (3) jors Practica experience ou SI e e cassroom w ere PR:MMC2100andMMC3602 .Ani ntroductiontothetheory the student works for academic credit under the supervision of a professional practitioner Periodic written and and practice of quantitative and histor i cal research meth-f b d' r th t d ods as applicable to the study of media and mass commuoral reports to the acuity mem er coor ma mg es u y nications Emphasis on survey research, evaluation of (SIU only.) JOU4104PUBLICAFFAIRSREPORTING (3) data, and report writing. PR: JOU 3101orRTV3304 (RTV majors only), POS 2041 MMC4900 DIRECTED READING IN MASS and POS 2112 or POS 3142 Covering city c0uncil meetCOMMUNICATIONS (1-3) ings, courthouse, city hall courts society and other spe -PR: Junior standing and Cl. Reading and directed study in . f special topics cial ass i gnments. Emphasis IS on coverage ? MMC 4910 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH IN MASS governmental units of all levels of government including COMMUNICATIONS (1-3) examination and i nterpretation of public documents and PR: Junior standing and Cl. The course provides means records for a student to do independent study in an area not covered JOU4200NEWSEDITINGI (3) by a numbered course PR: ECO 1000, JOU 2100, and SYG 2010 Evaluating news MMC 4936 SELECTED TOPICS IN MASS and its display; editing and rewriting copy for the mass COMMUNICATIONSSTUDIES (1-3) media w ith emphasis on the daily newspaper; news PR: MMC 2100 MMC 3602 and Cl. Courses designed to judgment headl i nes, makeup ; ethical problems. meet current or specific topics of interest to instructors and JOU 4206 NEWSPAPER DESIGN AND TYPOGRAPHY (3) students PR: JOU 4200 or Cl. Theoretical and practical applications MMC 4945 MEDIA INTERNSHIP-SEMINAR (3) of newspaper design; prQblems in newspaper layout; the PR: C l and 15 hours in Mass Comm courses and compleresearch of newspaper typography and design and its tion of an 8-12 week paid media internship with newspaapplication ; redesign of contemporary newspapers per broadcast station, or othe r media related agency JOU 4941 EDITING PRACTICUM (1) approved by the School. Reports on experiences for dis-PR: Senior standing JOU 4200 and Cl. Fo. r news-editorial cussion and evaluation (S/U only.) sequence majors. Practical experience outside the classPGY 211oc COLOR PHOTOGRAPHY (3) room where the student works for academic credit under PR: PGY 3620 or Cl. Labo r atory required. Development of the supervision of a professional practitioner. Periodic knowledge and skills of color photography for publication written and oral reports to the faculty member coordinating and presentation. Emphasis is on the use of transparency the study. (S/U only ) and negative color materials in their application to the JOU 4944 MAGAZINE PRACTICUM (1) media. PR: Senior standing and Cl. For magaz i ne sequence PGY 3610 PHOTOJOURNALISM 1 (3) majors Practical experience outside the classroom where PR: MMC 2100 and MMC 3602. Laboratory required Camthe student works for academic credit under the superviera operation darkroom techniques picture composition; sion of a professiona l practitioner. Periodic written and editing, ethics, history, and laws in connection wi_th photooral reports to the faculty member coordinating the study journalism (S/U only.) PGY 3620 PHOTOJOURNALISM II (3) JOU5116EXPLORATIONSINNEWSWRITING (3) PR: PGY 3610. Laboratory required Advanced process PR: CC. Students work to develop writing styles, reporting and practice of photography for publication. Content in-on and creat ing stories about significant issues, events, eludes advanced camera and laboratory techniques pub-and ideas The course explores the notion that narrativelication requirements and theory of photochemic a l color style journalism can be accurate, thorough, fair, and comseparation used in magazine and newspaper Emphasis pelling, effectively bringing readers into stories and giving is placed on student production. them a bigger stake in the news. The focus i s on going PUR3000PRINCIPLESOFPUBLICRELATIONS (3) beyond traditiona l practices of reporting and writing news PR: MMC 2100 and MMC 3602. The underlying theory and stories . professional practice of publ i c relations within corporate MMC 21 oo WRITING FOR THE MASS MEDIA (3) and institutional structures a11d its vital role in society; PR: Sophomore standing ; 2 7 overall grade point average; ethical standa rds of practice ; and relationships of the grade of "C" in ENC 1101, ENC 1102, and passing score practice to the publ i c media; public relations problemon English Diagnostic Test. An introduction to the basic solving process skills of writing for the mass media with practice in library PUR4001 ADVANCED PUBLIC RELATIONS (3) research, persuasive writing and informational writing. PR: MMC 4420 PUR 4100 and PUR 4401. As the final MMC 3602 MASS COMMUNICATIONS AND SOCIETY (3) course in the public rel ations sequence it involves inten-PR: Sophomore standing A survey of the history theory sive study of counsel ing and problem-solving techniques processes and philosophy of mass communications and

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 143 UNNERSITYOF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998/99 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG used in professional practice. Analysis of case studies the student works for academic credit under the superviand preparation of complete public relations program. sion of a professional practitioner Periodic written and Extensive reading in the literature of contemporary pracoral reports to the faculty member coordinating the study. tice. (S/U only.) PUR4100WRITINGFORPUBLICRELATIONS (3) VIC 3000 INTRODUCTION TO VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS (3) PR: JOU 2100 and PUR 3000. Techniques for creating PR: MMC 2100 and MMC 3602. The survey of visual effective written public relatipns communications to achieve communication theory, techniques, and their contempoorganizational goals, including news releases, proposal rary application and social influences as applied to the letters, broadcast scripts, and memos. Exercises based visual media with emphasis on still photography, motion on case study scenarios. pictures, video tape, and graphics PUR4401 PUBLIC RELATIONS: ISSUES, PRACTICES VIC 3943 VISUAL COMMUNICATION PRACTICUM (1) AND PROBLEMS (3) PR: Senior standing and Cl. For visual communications PR: PUR 3000. The theory of public relations practice and sequence majors. Practical experience outside the classits application in the real world. The role of the pub .lie room where the student works for academic credit under relations practitioner in business, government, and social the supervision of a professional practitioner. Periodic institutions, and the nature of specialized areas of the written and oral reports to the faculty member coordinating practice. Identification of public issues, analysis of potenthe study. (S/U only ) tial impact on organizations and development of strate gies to deal with them succ;essfully and responsibly. Communication techniques and trends. PUR4700 PUBLIC RELATIONS PRACTICUM (1) PR: Senior standing and Cl. For public relations sequence majors. Practical experience outside the classroom where the student works for academic credit under the supervi sion of a professional practitioner. Periodic written and oral reports to the faculty member coordinating the study (S/U only.) RTV 2100 WRITING FOR RADIO AND TV (3) PR: CRW 2100 or ENC 3310 and RTV 3001. The art and practice of script writing for radio and television. RTV 3001 INTRODUCTION TO TELECOMMUNICATIONS (3) PR: MMC 2100 and MMC 3602. A survey of the organization, structure, and function of the broadcasting industry. RTV 3210 RADIO PRODUCTION AND DIRECTION (3) PR: RTV 3001. Radio production and direction; laboratory and broadcast experiences. RTV3225VIDEOWORKSHOP (1) PR: MMC 2100 and MMC 3602. An introduction to the techniques and applications of field television production and electronic editing. RTV 3304 BROADCAST NEWS (4) PR: MMC 2100 and MMC 3602. Methods in gathering, writing, and editing newscasts for radio and television. RTV 3941 RADIO PRACTICUM (1) PR: RTV 3001 and Cl. For telecommunications sequence majors. Practical experience outside the classroom where the student works for academic credit under the supervi sion of a professional practitioner. Periodic written and oral reports to the faculty member coordinating the study. (S/U only.) RTV 4220 TV PRODUCTION AND DIRECTION (3) PR : RTV 3001 and RTV 3304. A basic course in the techniques of producing and directing TV programs. RTV 4301 TV NEWS (3) PR: RTV 3001 and RTV 3304. Techniques in writing and video taping for television news. RTV 4320 ELECTRONIC FIELD PRODUCTION (3) PR: RTV 3001 and RTV 3304 Advanced producing, scripting, lighting, camera, and editing for video production on location Introduction to computer editing and graphics. RTV 4500 TELECOMMUNICATIONS PROGRAMMING (3) PR: RTV 3001. Program concepts, resources, costs, se lection and scheduling. Analysis of programming in terms of structures, appeals and strengths. RTV 4700 TELECOMMUNICATIONS LAW AND POLICY (3) PR: for broadcast news option : MMC 4200, POS 2112 or POS 3142, RTV 3001, RTV 3304; for programming option: RTV 2100 or RTV 3304, RTV 3001, RTV 4500, and Senior standing A study of the electronicmediafrom the perspec tive of governmental regulation and the political process with special emphasis on how regulatory policy is determined. RTV 4942 TV PRACTICUM (1) PR: RTV 4220 and Cl. For telecommunications sequence majors. Practical experience outside the classroom where Mathematics CGS 3414 PROBLEM SOLVING USING PASCAL OR C -6A (3) CR: MAS 3105 Introduction to Pascal or C With special emphasis on its applications to mathematics. COP 4313 SYMBOLIC COMPUTATIONS IN MATHEMATICS -6A (3)' PR: MAP 2302 and MAS 3105 Students will write programs to solve problems in various areas of mathematics includ ing calculus and linear algebra with symbolic program ming systems such as Maple, Mathematica, or Macsyma. MAA4211 INTERMEDIATEANALYSISl-6A (4) PR: MAS 4301. Sequences, series, metric spaces conti nuity, differentiation MAA 4212 INTERMEDIATE ANALYSIS II -6A (3) PR: MAA 4211. Riemann-Stieltjes integration, uniform convergence, and related topics MAA 4402 COMPLEX VARIABLES -6A (3) PR: MAS 4301 or Cl. Complex numbers, Cauchy-Riemann equations, analytic and conformal functions power se ries, Cauchy lntegralTheorem, Cauchy Integral Formula, residue theory. (No credit for students with credit in MAA 5405.) MAA 5306 REAL ANALYSIS I (3) PR: MAA 4211. Sets and functions, measure theory, mea surable functions, Lebesque integrations and limit theorems MAA 5307 REAL ANALYSIS II (3) PR: MAA 5306 Continuation of MAA 5306, including func tions of bonded variation, product measures and Fubibi's theorem, differentiation, LP spaces. MAA 5405 APPLIED COMPLEX ANALYSIS (3) PR: Cl. Complex numbers, analytic and harmonic func tions. Series. Contour integrals, residue theory. Confor mal mappings (A survey course emphasizing techniques and applications ) MAC 2102 COLLEGE ALGEBRA -6A -QM (3) PR: Two years of high school algebra. Concepts of the real number system, functions, graphs, and complex num bers. Analytic skills for solving linear, quadratic, polyno mial, exponential, and logarithmic equations. Mathemati cal modeling of real life applications. MAC 2114 COLLEGE TRIGONOMETRY -6A (2) PR: Two years of high school algebra Angles, Trigono metric functions, properties and graphs of trigonometric functions, right triangles laws of sines and cosines, polar coordinates. (No credit for students with credit in MAC 2132.) MAC 2132 COLLEGE ALGEBRA AND TRIGONOMETRY -6A -QM (4) PR: Two years of high school algebra. Real numbers and their properties, algebraic expression, equations and inequalities, functions, polynominals, exponential and logarithmic functions Angles, trigonometric functions, properties and graphs of trigonometric functions, right triangles, laws of sines and. cosines, P?lar (No credit for MAC 2132 for students with credit in MAC 2233 or MAC 2102 )

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144 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG MAC 2230 BUSINESS CALCULUS -6A -QM (4) PR : Three years of high school mathematics i ncluding two years of algebra or MAC 2102 Linear equations and functions mathematics of finance different i ation and in tegration of algebraic functions with appl i cations to busi ness finance and econom ics. (No credit for mathematics majors or students with credit in MAC 2233, MAC 2281, or MAC2311.) MAC 2233 ELEMENTARY CALCULUS I -6A -QM (4) PR : Three years of high school mathematics including two years of algebra or MAC 2102 Differentiation and i ntegra tion of algebraic functions with applications exponent ial and logarithmic functions MAC 2233-MAC 2234 are primari l y for students from biological and soc ial sciences (No credit fo r mathemat i cs majors or students w i th credit in MAC 2230, MAC 2281, or MAC 2311 ) MAC 2234 ELEMENTARY CALCULUS II A -QM (3) PR : MAC 2230 or MAC 2233. Techniques of integration, differential equations, functions of several variables se ries and Taylor polynomials (No credit for mathematics majors or students with credit in MAC 2282 or MAC 2312.) MAC 2281 ENGINEERING CALCULUS I -6A -QM (3) PR : Two years of high school algebra, and a semester of trigonometry or MAC 2132 A yea r of h i gh school geometry is recommended. Limits differentiation differentials ex trema indefinite integral. (No credit for students with credit in MAC 2230 MAC 2233 or MAC 2311.) MAC 2282 ENGINEERING CALCULUS II -6A -QM (3) PR : MAC 2281 or CC. Techniques of integration trigono metric log and exponential functions series polar coor dinates applications. (No credi t for students with credit in MAC 2234 or MAC 2312 ) MAC 2283 ENGINEERING CALCULUS Ill -6A (3) PR: MAC 2282 or CC. Functions of several variables, partial derivatives vecto r algebra, applications. (No credit for students with credit in MAC 2313.) MAC 2311 CALCULUS I -6A -QM (4) PR:Two years of high school algebra and a semester of trigonometry or MAC 2132 A year of h i gh school geometry is recommended Limits derivatives appl i cations. (No credit for students with cred i t i n MAC 2230 MAC 2233 or MAC2281.) MAC 2312 CALCULUS II -6A -QM (4) PR: MAC 2311 with agrade of C orbetterorCC Antideriva tives the definite integral applications series log expo nential and trig functions (No credit for students with credit in MAC 2234 or MAC 2282.) MAC 2313 CALCULUS Ill -6A (4) PR : MAC 2312 with a grade of" C or better or CC. Integra tion polar coordinates, conic sections, vectors indetermi nate forms and improper integrals. (No credit for students with credit in MAC 2283 ) MAD 3100 DISCRETE MATHEMATICS -6A (3) PR : MAC 2281 or MAC 2311 An int r oduct ion to some ofthe aspects of discrete mathematics that are fundamental to digital computing Topics i nclude sets numbers algo rithms, 'Boolean algebra computer arithmetic elementary combinatorics and an introduction to graph theory. MAD 4401 NUMERICAL ANALYSIS -6A (4) PR: MAS 3105; ability to program a digital computer Interpolation and quadrature, finite differences, numerical solution of algebraic and transcendental equations, nu merical solution of differer:itial equations, computer tech niques. MAD 4504 THEORY OF COMPUTATION -6A (3) PR : MGF 3301 or MAD 3100 Mathemati cal aspects of alphabets and l anguages Chomsky s hierarchy. Gram mars. Regular languages grammars and finite states machines Context-free languages and grammars. Tur ing machines and languages. Decidability Inductive definition of functions and basic computab l e functions Introduction to computational complexity. MAD 5101 LISP: PROGRAMMING WITH ALGEBRAIC APPLICATIONS (3) PR : MHF 5306orMAD 6510orMAS 5311 or Cl. Programming in LISP, functional languages, foundations of Lambda Calculus and algebraic applications (theorem proving and game playing). MAD 5305 INTRODUCTION TO GRAPH THEORY (3) PR : Cl Brief introduction to classical graph theory ( 4 color theorem, etc .), directed graphs connected d i graphs, con densations, incidence matrices Polya's Theorem net works MAE 5875 ABSTRACT ALGEBRA FOR TEACHERS (3) PR: MAS 4301 and bachelor's degree or CC. Groups, fields, vectpr spaces as they relate to high school algebra and geometry (No credit for mathematics majors.) MAE 5877 MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS FOR TEACHERS (3) PR : MAC 2313 and bachelor's degree or CC Advanced consideration of limits continuity, derivatives, differentials (No credit for Mathematics majors.) MAP 2302 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS -6A (3) PR : MAC 2283 or MAC 2313 First order linear and nonlin ear differential equations higher order linear equations, appl i cations MAP 53160RDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS I (3) PR : MAP 2302 or Cl. Existence and uniqueness theory, properties of solutions linear systems stability theory, Sturm-Liouville theory . MAP 5317 ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS II (3) PR: MAP 5316 and MAA 5307 or Cl. Topics selected from fixed po i nt theory comparison theory, oscillation theory Poincare-Bendixson Theory, Lyapunov functions, eigenfunction expansions. MAP 5345 APPLIED PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS (3) PR : MAP 5407 or Cl. Separation of variables, the heat equation wave equation, Laplace's equation, classifica tion, Green's functions, with emphasis on applications. MAP 5407 METHODS OF APPLIED MATHEMATICS (3) PR: MAP 2302 or Cl Sturm-Liouville theory, Fourier series Green s functions, matrix methods for linear systems of ordinary differential equations, and topics from calculus of variations, control theory numerical solutions of differen tial equations MAS 3105 LINEAR ALGEBRA -6A (3) PR: MGF 3301. CR: MAC 2283 or 2313. Linear systems, matrix algebra vector spaces linear independence i nner product spaces, Gram-Schmidt algorithm linear transfor mations and matrix representations, determinants, eigen values, diagonalization quadrat i c fontls. MAS4124NUMERICAL LINEARALGEBRA-6A (3) PR : MAS 3105 This course will consider efficient and stable numerical methods for dealing with matrix compu tations such as the solution of systems, calculation eigen values and vectors least squares, and so on MAS 4156 VECTOR CALCULUS -6A (3) PR : MAS 3105, and MAC 2313 or MAC 2283 Implicit and inverse function theorems, parametrized surfaces, submanifolds of Euclidean space exterior calculus of differential forms differentiation of vector fields, line and surface integrals Stokes Theorem, elementary continu ous groups MAS 4214 ELEMENTARY NUMBER THEORY -6A (3) PR: MAC 2312 Divisibility prime numbers Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic Diophantine equations, the alge braof congruences number functions and other selected topics. MAS 4301 ELEMENTARY ABSTRACT ALGEBRA -6A (3) PR : MAS 3105 An i ntroduction to the basic algebraic structures: groups rings integral domains, and fields ; homomorphisms and isomorphisms . MAS 5107 ADVANCED LINEAR ALGEBRA (3) PR: MAS 4301 or Cl. CR: MAS 5311 The study of finite dimens i onal vector spaces over arbit r ary fields Topics covered include dual spaces, canonical forms for linear transformations inner product spaces, orthogonal uni tary and se l f-adjoint operators and quadratic forms. MAS 5215 NUMBER THEORY (3) PR : MAS 4301 or Cl. Fundamental theorem of arithmetic, modular arithmetic, Chinese remainder theorem,

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 145 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Mersenne primes, perfect numbers Euler-Fermat theo rem pseudoprimes primitive roots, law of quadratic reprocity, factorization and primality testing algorithms. MAS 5311 ALGEBRA I (3) PR: MAS 4301 or Cl. Group theory: Sylow theorems, classification of groups of small order Ring theory: ideals quotient rings, polynom ial rings Euclidean domains, quo tient rings, polynom ial rings Euclidean domains princ i pal ideal domains and unique factorizat ion. MAS 5312 ALGEBRA II (3) PR: MAS 5311 or Cl. Continuation of MAS 5311. Finitely generated modules over a princ ipal i deal domain, basic field theory, finite fields Galois theory. MAT 2930 SELECTED TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS (1-4) PR : Cl. The course content will depend on the interest of faculty members and student demand MAT 2936 TECHNOLOGY SEMINAR -6A (1) A two contact hour/week technology sem i nar to acquaint students majoring in mathematics, physics, and other sciences with the computer tools necessary in scientific communication and document preparation (S/U only May not be r epeated ) MAT 4906 INDEPENDENT STUDY -6A (1-4) PR : Cl. Specialized independent study determined by the student's needs and interests The written contract re quired by the College of Arts and Science specifies the regulations governing independent study. May be (S/U only ) MAT 4930 SELECTED TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS -6A (1-4) PR: Cl. The course cohtent will depend on the interest of faculty members and student demand. MAT 4937 MATHEMATICS MAJORS SEMINAR -6A (1) PR: MAS 4301. Directed discussions on a variety of topics of interest to mathematics majors, including carreer op portunities in mathematics. (S/U only. May not be re peated.) MAT 4970 MATHEMAT ICS SENIOR THESIS -6A (3) PR: Admission to Mathematics Honors Program and CC. Course restricted to mathematics majors. (S/U only ) MAT 5932 SELECTED TOPICS -6A (1-4) PR: Cl. Each course covers a single topic outside the usual curriculum. MGF 2131 CHAOS AND FRACTALS -6A -QM (3) PR: High school algebra and trigonometry. Compute r experiments in the behavio r of functions under iteration : periodicio/. attractors stability complex numbers Cantor set fractional dimension, sensitive dependence MGF 2202 FINITE MATHEMATICS -6A -QM (3) PR: Two years of high school algebra. Concepts and analytical skills in areas of logic, linear equations, linear programming mathematics of finance, permutations and combinations probability, and descriptive statist ics. MGF 3301 BRIDGE TO ABSTRACT MATHEMATICS -6A -QM (3) PR : MAC 2311 or MAC 2281. An introduction to the axiomatic nature of mathematics through topics in areas such as set theory algebra, and calculus The rigor of precise definitions theorems and proofS will be empha sized MHF 4403 THE EARLY HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS -6A -XMW (3) PR: MAC 2312 and upper-level stand ing. A study of the h i story and development of mathematics and its cultural impact from the formation of number systems to the Renaissance. MHF 5306 MATHEMATICAL LOGIC AND FOUNDATIONS I (3) PR: MAS 4301 or Cl. Two course sequence covering : predicate calculus and classical model theory ; t ransfinite set theory and the system ZFC ; recurs ion theory and decidability MHF 5405 HISTORY OF MODERN MATHEMATICS (3) PR: MAC 2313 Traces the development of mathematical ideas in Western culture Special emphasis is p l aced on those concepts which led to the Calculus. Th i s course is open to majors and non-majors alike MTG 4212 GEOMETRY -6A (4) PR: MGF 3301 or Cl. Emphasis on axiomatics, advanced Euclidean geometry, elements of projective geometry, non-Euclidean geometries MTG 4302 INTRODUCTION TO TOPOLOGY -6A (3) PR: MAS 4301. Metric spaces, completeness, topological spaces, subspaces product spaces, continuity, homeo morphisms, connectedness, compactness, separation axioms, countability axioms. MTG5256DIFFERENTIALGEOMETRY (3) PR: MAA 4211, MAS 3105. Exterior calculus differentiable manifolds integration of differential forms surfaces in 3space covariant derivative curvature, matrix groups MTG 5316 TOPOLOGY I (3) PR: MAA 4211. Topological spaces continuity, homeo morphisms, connectedness, compact spaces separa tion axioms product spaces. MTG 5317 TOPOLOGY II (3) PR: MTG 5316. The fundamental group; elements of homotopy theory and homology theory STA 2022 BASIC STATISTICS -6A QM (3) Basic philosophy of statistical thinking Acquisition of data. Techniques for organizing and presenting statistical data. Sample mean variance and standard deviation Statisti cal decisions-estimation and hypothesis testing. De sign of experiments, linear association and prediction Statistical software (No credit for mathematics majors.) STA 2023 INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS I A -QM (4) PR: Two years of high school algebra Descriptive statis tics, basic probability principles, discrete and continuous probability distr i butions: binomial, normal, t, and chi square ; point estir;nation confidence limits, and hypoth esis testing. Emphasis on applications to social sci ences life sciences, physical sciences, engineering, and business Students who successfully complete thi s course may not also receive creditfor QMB 2150 or ST A 2122 (No credit for Mathematics Majors.) STA 3024 INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS II A (3) PR: STA 2023 or CC. Factorials, ANCOV; multiple curvilin ear regression; response surfaces ; Latin squares, Split Plots incomplete designs ; distribution free methods. STA 4321 INTRODUC TION TO STATISTICS -6A (3) PR: STA 4442. Basic statistical methods. Estimation, hypothesis testing, regression ANOVA, and nonparamet ric theory and methods. STA 4442 INTRODUCTION TO PROBABILITY -6A (3) PR: MAC 2313 or MAC 2283. Introduction to probability theory using calculus. Basic ideas of probability and random variables, discrete probability functions, continu ous probability densities, joint distributions,, transforma tions of random variables, moments and generating func tions of random variables, and limit theorems. STA 516. 6 COMPUTATIONAL (3) PR: STA4321, CGS3422orCC Statistical analysis of data by means of statistics package programs Regression, ANOVA, discriminant analysis, and analysis of categorical data. Emphasis is on inter-relation between statistical theory, numerical methods, and analysis of real life data. STA 5228 SAMPLING TECHNIQUES (3) PR: STA 4321 or Cl. Sampling versus total enumeration. Planning of a survey. Statistical sampling methods and their analysis ; simple, stratified, systematic cluster, and double and multistage sampling Use of auxiliary informa tion in sampling. Ratio and regression estimates Case study STA 5326 MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS (3) PR: STA 5446 Sample distribution theory, point and interval estimation, optimality theory, statistical decision theory and hypothesis testing. STA 5446 PROBABILITY THEORY I (3) PR: STA4442 and MAA4211 or Cl. Axioms of probability, random variables in Euclidean spaces, moments and moment generating functions, modes of convergence, limit theory for sums of independent random variables

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146. COLLEGE OF ARTS AND S CIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG STA 5526 NON-PARAMETRIC STATISTICS (3) PR: ST A 5326, CC. Topics may include: classical nonpara metric statistical theory, nonparametric density estima tion, nonparametric regression, generalized additive models, nonparametric pattern recognition, classification and regression trees. Medical Technology MLS 4031 INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY (1) PR: Senior standing and acceptance into an approved affiliated hospital. A hospital clinical course on principles and methods of medical technology, including profes sional ethics, safety regulations, quality control, phle botomy, medical terminology, laboratory math and com puter applications. MLS 4860 CLINICAL URINALYSIS AND BODY FLUIDS (2) PR: Senior standing and acceptance into an approved affiliated hospital. A hospital clinical course on laboratory methodology and diagnosis using urine and other fluids such as semen, spinal, pleural, peritoneal and joint fluids. MLS 4861 CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY (2) PR: Senior standing and acceptance into an approved affiliated hospital. A hospital clinical course on the tissues, cells, and molecules of the human immune system, emphasizing the detection of serum antibodies and dis ease states. MLS 4862 CLINICAL HEMATOLOGY (6) PR: Senior standing and acceptance into an approved affiliated hospital. A hospital clinical course on cellular components of the blood as related to laboratory diagno sis and disease, including blood coagulation and mor phological and biochemical aspects of blood cells. MLS 4863 CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY (6) PR: Senior standing and acceptance into an approved affiliated hospital. A hospital clinical course emphasizing pathogens responsible for disease in man, including morphology, physiology, and laboratory diagnosis of bac teria, fungi, parasites and viruses. MLS 4864 CLINICAL CHEMISTRY (6) PR: Senior standing and acceptance into an approved affiliated hospital. A hospital clinical course on the analy sis of chemical substances found ifl the body as related to the diagnosis of human disease, including topics such as instrumentation, electrophoresis, therapeutic drug monitoring assays, tumor markers, and toxicology. MLS 4865 CLINICAL IMMUNOHEMATOLOGY (6) PR: Senior standing and acceptance into an approved affiliated hospital. A hospital clinical course on blood and tissue typing, including blood group systems, transfusion associated disease, HLA testing, and preparation of blood and blood components for transfusion therapy. MLS 4866 CLINICAL LABORATORY MANAGEMENT AND EDUCATION (1) PR: Senior standing and acceptance into an approved affiliated hospital. A hospital clinical course on concepts of laboratory management, including personnel staffing, reimbursements, quality assurance, and regulatory is sues, and clinieal education techniques, including writing, lecture presentation, and evaluation. Philosophy PHH 2000 INTRODUCTION TO PHIL:OSOPHY-6A-HP (3) An introduction to selected philosophical problems and traditions. PHH 3062 HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY: ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL (3) A survey of Western philosophy from the pre-Socratics to the end of the Middle Ages. PHH3420HISTORYOFPHILOSOPHY:MODERN (3) A survey of Western philosophy from the end of the Middle Ages to the nineteenth century. PHH4440CONTINENTALPHILOSOPHY (3) A study of developments in post-Kantian European philos ophy. PHH 4600 CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHY -6A -XMW (3} Selected schools of twentieth century thought such as idealism, positivism, pragmatism, realism, and existen tialism. PHH 4700 AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY -6A -XMW (3) Major traditions in American thought, Puritanism, the En lightenment, Transcendentalism, Idealism, Pragmatism, and Analytic Philosophy in relation to American culture. PHI 1103 CRITICAL THINKING -SS (3) Methods of thinking that lead to reliable conclusions, with emphasis on concrete cases in ordinary thinking and the sciences PHI 2100 INTRODUCTION TO FORMAL LOGIC -6A -QM (3) An elementary study of propositional, predicate, class and syllogistic logic with some attention to basic problems of logical theory. PHI 2600 ETHICAL THEORY (3) A study of ethical theories, concepts, problems and meth ods. PHl2631 ETHICS AND BUSINESS (3) An application of traditional ethical theories to contempo rary problems in business. PHI 3404 SCIENTIFIC METHOD (3) Probability, inductive inference, the hypothetico-deductive method, experimentation, and selected topics in the phi losophy of science. PHI 3601 CONTEMPORARY MORAL ISSUES -6A -SS (3) to all students A study of contemporary moral issues concerning racism, sex, sexism, abortion, poverty, crime, war, suicide, and human rights in general. PHI 3633 BIOMEDICAL ETHICS (3) This course will focus on the ethical issues arising from advances in medical practice, delivery of health care, and scientific research PHI 3636 PROFESSIONAL ETHICS (3) PR: Junior standing. An examination of the ethical prob lems that professionals will face in the complex, global society of the next few decades: confidentiality, divided loyalty, racism/sexism, etc. PHI 3640 ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS -SS (3) A study of alternative theories of environmental ethics, including the application of these theories to contempo rary environmental problems, such as pollution, resource depletion, species extinction, and land use. PHI 3700 PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION -6A -SS (3) Analysis of religious experience and activity and examina tion of principal religious ideas in light of modem philoso phy. (1-4) PR: Cl. Individual study directed by a faculty member. Approval slip from instructor required. PHI 3930 SELECTED TOPICS (1-4) PR: C.I. Selected topics according to the needs of the student. PHI 4073 PHILOSOPHY -XMW (3) A descriptive and analytical study of African philosophical thought, featuring reflective comparisons of African and Western categories of thought. (May also be taken for credit in Africana Studies.) PHI 4300 THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE -6A -XMW (3) An examination of human knowledge; its scope and limits, and an evaluation of evidence, criteria of truth, the nature of belief, conditions for meaningfulness, theories of per ception, and a study of memory and sense perception in the four major fields of nature, history, personal experi ence, and ttie a priori. PHI 4320 PHILOSOPHY OF MIND -6A -XMW (3) A study of historical and current iss4es in philosophy of mind, including the nature and status of mind, mind/body dualism, the relationship of mind and body, the problems of other minds, the physical basis for intelligence, etc. PHI 4632 FEMINIST ETHICS -XMW (3) A study of the varied approaches to moral reasoning taken by feminist ethical writers such as Wollstonecraft, Mill, Gilligan, Daly, Hoagland and others. (May also be taken for credit in Women's Studies.)

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 147 UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 TE CATALOG PHl4760CHINESEPHILOSOPHY (3) A survey of confucianism, taoism and other aspects of Chinese thought. The course is available to both 91ajor's and non-majors and does not have laboratory sections associated with it. PHI 4800 AESTHETICS -6A -XMW (3) A study of traditional and contemporary aesthetic theories with emphasis on creative process, the nature of the art work, the aesthetic response, expressiveness, form and content, as well as art and morality. PHI 4905 DIRECTED STUDY (1-4) PR: Cl. Individual study directed by a faculty member. Approval slip from instructor required. PHI 4930 SELECTED TOPICS (1-3) PR: Cl. Selected topics according to the needs of the senior students. Approval slip from instructor required. PHI 5135 SYMBOLIC LOGIC (3) PR: PHI 2100 or Cl. Study of topics such as the following: Metatheory of propositional and predicate logic, related metatheoretic results, alternative logics. PHI 5225 PHILOSOPHY OF LANGUAGE (3) PR: Eight hours of philosophy, major in linguistics, or Cl. An examination of semantical syntactical, and functional theories of language with special attention given to the problems of meaning, linguistic reference syntactical form, and the relations between scientific languages and ordinary linguistic usage. Seminar format. PHl5913RESEARCH (1-4) PR : Cl. Individual research supervised by a faculty mem ber. Approval slip from instructor required. PHI 5934 SELECTED TOPICS (1-3) PR: Cl. Selected topics according to the needs of the student. Approval slip from instructor required. PHM 3021 PHILOSOPHIES OFLOVE (3) Discussion of Philosophies of Love/Sex of Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Aquinas, Hume, Kant, Schopenhauer, Russell, Sartre, Marx, etc. PHM 3100 SOCIAL PHILOSOPHY -6A (3) An analysis of rival theories of social order and their philosophical foundations. PHM 3400 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY OF LAW (3) A study of the fundamental concepts of law from a philo sophic standpoint including crime, justice, punishment, free speech, insanity, etc. PHM 4322 ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY -6A -XMW (3) A survey of political philosophy from 6 B.C. until 1600 A.O., including an examina"don of the ethical, metaphysical, and epistemological bases of these philosophies. PHM 4331 MODERN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY -XMW (3) A survey of political philosophy from 1600 A .O. until 1900 A.D., including an examination of the ethical, metaphysi cal, and epistemological bases of these philosophies. PHM 4340 CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY -6A -XMW (3) A survey of political philosophy in the twentieth century, including an examination of the ethical, metaphysical and epistemological bases of these philosophies. PHM 5125 TOPICS IN FEMINIST PHILOSOPHY (3) A study of recent feminist philosophical approaches to epistemology, aesthetics or political philosophy. (May also be taken for credit in Women's Studies.) PHP 3786 EXISTENTIALISM -6A -HP (3) A study of the religious and atheistic existentialists and the bearing of their views on religion, ethics, metaphysics, and of knowledge. PHP 4000 PLATO -6A -XMW (3) The examination of Plato will include the dialogues Protagoras, Georgias, Meno, Republic, etc PHP 4010 ARISTOTLE -6A -XMW (3) Study of Aristotle's philosophy. PHP4410 KANT (3) Lecture and discussion of Kant's philosophy, especially The Critique of Pure Reason. PHP 4740 THE RATIONALISTS -6A (3) A careful study of the epistemologies of Descartes, Spi noza, Leibniz, and Malebranche PHP 4745 THE EMPIRICISTS -6A (3) A careful study of epistemologies of Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Thomas Reid . PHP 4784 YTIFAL PHILOSOPHY -6A (3) A study of the method devoted to clarifying philosophical problems through analysis of the language in which the$e problems are stated . PHP 4788 PHILOSOPHY OF MARXISM -6A -XMW (3) A critical Sl1rveyof Marxist philosophy from Marx and Engels to Mao Tse-Tung and Herbert Marcuse Hegelia::i founda tions of Marxist philosophy analyzed in detail. WST 4342 CLASSICS IN FEMINIST THEORY -XMW (3) A study of classic contributions to the elaboration of femi nist thought from the 18th century to the present in an attempt to discover the roots of the contemporary feminist movement. (May also be taken for credit in Women's Studies.) Physics PHY 2020 CONCEPTUAL PHYSICS -NS (3) A qualitative, non-mathematical investigation of physics, emphasizing its influence on life today. (No credit for Physics or Mathematics majors ) PHY 2038 ENERGY AND HUMANITY -NS (3) Social, economic and political aspects of energy In cludes energy conservation, environmental impact, en ergy-source alternatives, changing lifestyles, and per sonal use of solar energy The relevant basic laws of physics and the scientific method are emphasized. Field trips and audiovisual presentations play important roles. PHY 2048, 2048L GENERAL PHYSICS & LABORATORY (3, 1) PR: MAC 2281 or MAC 2311. First semester of a semester sequence of general physics (mechanics, wave motion, sound, thermodynamics g eometr ical and physi cal optics, electricity and magnetism) and laboratory for physics majors and engineering students Must be taken concurrently and, if dropped then dropped simultaneously. May not receive creditfor both the PHY 2053 and PHY 2048 courses. PHY 2049, 2049L GENERAL PHYSICS & LABORATORY (3, 1) PR: MAC 2282 or MAC 2312 PHY 2048, PHY 2048L. Second semester of general physics and laboratory for physics majors and engineering students. Must be taken concurrently and, if dropped, then dropped simultaneously. May not receive credit for both the PHY 2054 and PHY 2049 courses. PHY 2053, 2053L GENERAL PHYSICS & LABORATORY (3, 1) PR: MAC 2102 and MAC 2114 or MAC 2132. First semester of a two semester sequence of general physics (mechan ics, heat, wave motion sound, electricity, magnetism, optics, modem physics) and laboratory for science stu dents Must be taken concur rently and, if dropped, then dropped simultaneously. May not receive creditfor bom the PHY 2053 and PHY 2048 courses. PHY 2054, 20541:. GENERAL PHYSICS & LABORATORY (3, 1} PR: PHY 2053, PHY 2053L. Second semester of general physics and lab for science students. Must be taken concurrently and if dropped, then dropped simultaneously. May not receive creditfor both the PHY 2054 and P HY 2049 courses. PHY3101 MODERN PHYSICS (3) PR: PHY 2049 or CR : PHZ 3101; PR: MAC 2283 or MAC 2313. Special relativ ity. Interaction and duality of particles and radiation. Atomic and x-ray spectra and Bohr model of atom. Schrodinger wave equation Introduction to solid state physics. PHY 3221 MECHANICS I (3) CR: MAC 2283 or MAC 2313 and either PR: PHY 2048 or PHZ 3101. First semester of a two semester sequef1ce. Review of vector algebra and vector calculus. Dynamics of single particles and systems of particles; centr
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148 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG PHY 3323C ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM I (4) PR: PHY 2049, MAC 2283 OR MAC 2313. Electrostatic fields and potentials, dielectrics, classical conductivity, RC circuits, Fourier and finite element methods. Labora tory. First semester of sequence PHY 3323C, PHY 4324C. PHY 3424 OPTICS . (4) PR: PHZ3101 orPHY2049; CR: MAC 2283orMAC2313. Reflection, refraction, dispersion, interference, diffraction, polarization, and laboratory. PHY 3822L INTERMEDIATE LABORATORY (2) PR: PHZ 3101 or PHY 2049 or equivalent; CR : PHY 3101 Experiments in modern physics, including the area of atomic, nuclear, solid state and wave phenomena. PHY 4031 GREAT THEMES IN PHYSICS -6A -XMW (3) Origins/early history of physics, and quantum physics. Conservation of energy. Second Law ofThermodynamics. Special Relativity. Exponential dynamics. Outside read ing, writing; maintenance of a logbook/journal. PHY 4222 MECHANICS II (3) PR: PHY 3221; CR: MAP 2302. Continuation of PHY 3221. Coupled oscillators and normal modes; moving coordi nate systems; Lagrange's and Hamilton's equations; inertia tensor; general rotation of rigid bodies. PHY 4324C ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM II (4) PR: PHY 3323C; CR: MAP 2302. Introduction to special relativity, magnetic fields and potentials, magnetic mate rials, RL and RLC circuits, Maxwell's equations and appli cations. Laboratory. Second semester of sequence PHY 3323C, PHY 4324C. PHY 4523 STATISTICAL PHYSICS (3) PR: PHY 3101 or Cl. A statistical approach to thermody namics and kinetic theory and introduction to statistical mechanics PHY 4604 INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM MECHANICS (3) PR: PHY 3101, or Cl. Basic concepts of quantum mechan ics with applications in atomic, nuclear, and condensed matter Physics. PHY 4744C INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRONICS AND TEST INSTRUMENTATION (4) PR: General Physics or Cl. Introduces the fundamentals of analog and digital electronics used in measurements and instrumentation. Weekly labs give hands-on experi ence in breadboarding electronic circuits and using test instrumentation (oscilloscopes, digital multimeters, computers, etc.) PHY 4823L ADVANCED LABORATORY (2) PR: PHY 3822L. Experimental work primarily related to nuclear physics Emphasis on modern physical experi mental techniques employing some of the new types of equipment. PHY49051NDEPENDENTSTUDY (1) PR: Cl. Specialized, independent study determined by the student's need and interest. The written contract required by the College of Arts & Sciences specifies the regulations governing independent study. May be repeated. (S/U only.) PHY 4910 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (1-4) PR: Senior or advanced junior standing and CC. An indi vidual investigation in the laboratory or library or both, under the supervision of the instructor Credit hours and other contractual terms, are to be determined by student/ instructor agree mant. (S/U only.) PHY 4930 PHYSICS SEMINAR (1) PR: Senior or advanced junior standing or CC. All under graduate physics majors must enroll in this course at least once and are expected to attend all Physics Colloquia (S/ U only.) PHY 4936 SELECTED TOPICS IN PHYSICS (1-4) PR: Senior or advanced junior standing and CC. Each topic is a course in directed study and under the supervision of a faculty member. PHY 5720C ELECTRONICS FOR RESEARCH (3) PR: Cl. A rigorous introduction to the fundamentals pf analog and digital electronics. Theoretical circuit analysis and weekly labs introduce practical diodes, transistors, analog and digital ICs breadboarding techniques and electronic test instrumentation PHY 5937 SELECTED TOPICS IN PHYSICS (1-4) PR: Senior or advanced standing and CC. Each topic is a course in directed study under the supervision of a faculty member. PHZ 3101 MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS OF PROBLEMS IN MECHANICS AND ELECTRICITY (2) PR: One year of non-calculus general physics CR : MAC 2283 or MAC 2313. Designed for students who have not had the general physics sequence using calculus Review of mechanics and electricity emphasizing problems which involve the use of calculus. PHZ 3102 PROBLEMS IN GENERAL PHYSICS I (1) CR: PHY 2048. First semester of two semester sequence of general physics problems. A course designed to allow those interested stu dents to investigate problems not covered in the general physics course. PHZ 3103 PROBLEMS IN GENERAL PHYSICS II (1) CR: PHY 2049 Second semester of sequence PHZ 3102, PHZ 3103. PHZ 5115 METHODS OF THEORETICAL PHYSICS I (3) PR: MAP 2302 or Cl. Applications of mathematical tech niques to classical and modern physics Vector spaces including Hilbert space, orthogonal functions generalized functions, Fourier analysis, transform calculus, and vari ational calculus PHZ 5116 METHODS OF THEORETICAL PHYSICS II (3) PR: MAP 2302 or Cl. Applications of mathematical tech niques to classical and modern physies. Selected topics in complex analysis, differential and integral equations, numerical methods, and probability theory PHZ 5304 NUCLEAR PHYSICS (3) PR: PHY 4604 or Cl. Nuclear forces, nuclear models, nuclear structure, decay, nuclear reaction, and high energy physics PHZ 5405 SOLID STATE PHYSICS I (3) PR: PHY 3101, MAP 2302 Crystal structure, x-ray and electron diffraction, mechanical and thermal properties of solids, electrical and magnetic properties of metals, band theory of metals, insulators and semiconductors. First semester of sequence PHZ 5405, PHZ 6426. Political Science CPO 2002 INTRODUCTION TO COMPARATIVE POLITICS -SS (3) Introduction to politics in different states; comparison and analysis of representative European and non-Western political systems CPO 4034 POLITICS OF THE DEVELOPING AREAS (3) An analysis of the ideologies, governmental structures, and political processes of selected nations of the non Western world. CPO 4930 COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS OFSELECTEDCOUNTRIESORAREAS (3) Studies political systems with common elements. Struc ture, process, domestic and foreign politics, and regional roles are considered. May be repeated up to 9 credit hours as topics vary. CPO 5934 SELECTED TOPICS IN COMPARATIVE POLITICS (3) Studies specific substantive areas in comparative politics such as political economy or the politics of specific coun tries or regions May be repeated for credit as topics vary. INR2002 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (3) Concepts and analytical tools applied to events such as politir.i:; among nations, control of foreign policies, types of acto(s, war and peace. INR3102AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY (3) AnAh/sis of the development and scope of United States for.,: gn policy, emphasizing goals and objectives, policy formulation and implementation themes and issues. INR 4035 INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY (3) Analysis of the development and politics of the interna tional economic system,. focusing on questions of coop-

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 149 UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG eration and conflict in trade, aid and investment relationships. INR 4254 AFRICA IN WORLD AFFAIRS (3) An examination of Africa's place and role in world affairs including an analysis cf the impact of external forces international relations in post-colonial Africa, the relations of African states with the major World Powers, the UN and its agencies. INR4334DEFENSEPOLICY (3) Analytic institutional factors contributing to formulation of defense policy and the impact of such policy on interna tional relations. INR4403 INTERNATIONAL LAW (3) Examines essential components of the international legal system; recognition; succes sion; sea, air and space law, treaties, diplomats, International Court of Justice ; laws of war, etc. Introduces the student to legal reasoning as employed in the international context. INR 4502 INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS -SS-AF (3) Study of the operations and structure of international organizations and effects on world politics; background and achievement of the UN; regional organizations and multi-national corporations INR 5086 ISSUES IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (3) Explore specific topics and provides the student with an opportunity for in-depth study of historical and contempo rary problems in international politics. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. POS 2041 AMERICAN NATIONAL GOVERNMENT (3) Analysis of basic principles and procedures of the Ameri can governmental system with emphasis on current is sues and trends. POS 2080 THE AMERICAN POLITICAL TRADITION -SS-HP (3) This course is an introductory survey of the historical developments and changes in American political institu tions processes, and thought. POS 2112 STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS (3) Analysis of the structure and function of state and local governments, of the social and political influences that shape them, and of the dynamics of their administrative processes. POS 3142 INTRODUCTION TO URBAN POLITICS AND GOVERNMENT (3) Governmental and political st'ructures and processes as they function in urban areas, with special focus on munic ipalities and locally based public services POS 3145 GOVERNING METROPOLITAN AREAS (3) Examines governmental units and interactions in metro politan areas, proposals for changes in governance, and policy areas of area-wide concern such as human services. POS 3173 SOUTHERN POLITICS (3) Examines changes in electoral politics in the South, and the role of interest groups and the state and federal government in facilitating change POS 3182 FLORIDA POLITICS AND GOVERNMENT (3) A study of Florida political culture, political parties and elections, the legislative executive and judicial systems, and policy patterns POS 3273 PRACTICAL POLITICS (3) PR: POS 2041 or POS 3453 or Cl. Coordinated scholarly and practical activity through class lecture and supervised field work in local political parties and election campaigns. POS 3283 JUDICIAL PROCESS AND POLITICS (3) The organization, development, and functioning of Amer ican court systems and the causes and consequences of judicial behavior from an empirical perspective. POS 3453 POLITICAL PARTIES AND INTEREST GROUPS (3) Analysis and understanding of role functions, structure and composition of such, and their impact on American governmental institutions. POS 3691 INTRODUCTION TO LAW AND POLITICS (3) Nature of law, legal process, relationship to political life of constitutional law, administrative law the judicial process, and private law. POS 3697 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW (3) This course examines some of the major issues involving environmental law. Specially, the course provides a survey and analysis of statutes, both state and federal, regulating water, air, soil pollution, and resource conservation and recovery. The course will also address questions pertain ing to problems of implementation, interpretation, en forcement, and development of environmental laws. POS 3713 EMPIRICAL POLITICAL ANALYSIS (3) Fundamentals of empirical political inquiry: systematic data collection and quantitative analysis techniques. Labo ratory exercises using the computer are required. POS 3931 SELECTED TOPICS (3) Selected topics in political science with course content based upon student demand and instructor's interest. May be repeated for up to 6 credits as topics vary. POS 4165 COMMUNITY LEADERS AND POLITICS (3) Analysis ofthe roles and powers of mayors, city managers, council members, and interest and ethnic groups; distri bution of community power. POS 4204 POLITICAL BEHAVIOR, PUBLIC OPINION, AND ELECTIONS (3) Analysis of economic and socio-psychological factors influencing mass and elite political behavior; voting behav ior, public opinion, and political activism POS4413 THE AMERICAN PRESIDENCY-6A (3) The presidency as a political institution; analysis of pow ers; legislative, administrative, political and foreign policy leadership; crisis management and decision making; White House staffing; limits on power. POS 4424 THE AMERICAN CONGRESS (3) Organization, procedures, committee system, party lead ership, relations with governmental and nongovernmen tal organizations and agencies, oversight, decision-mak ing processes, House/Senate comparisons. POS 4614 CONSTITUTIONAL LAW I (3) PR: POS 2041. Leading social problems, principle insti tutions and the scope of powers. Analysis of Supreme Court decisions, scholarly commentaries, and the writ ings of leading public figures POS 4624 CONSTITUTIONAL LAW II (3) PR: POS 2041 Analysis of Supreme Court decisions and scholarly commentaries on the constitutional rights of individuals. POS 4693 WOMEN AND LAW I (3) Introduction to issues concerning the legal aspects of sex and sex-based discrimination as embodied in statutory and case law, focusing on constitutional and family law and reproductive freedom issues. (May also be taken for credit in Women's Studies.) POS 4694 WOMEN AND LAW II -6A -XMW (3) PR : POS 4693 or Cl. Legal position of women in American society and remedies available to challenge current laws and practices, with specific emphasis on employment and education issues as they relate to both women and men (May also be taken for credit in Women's Studies.) POS49051NDEPENDENTSTUDY (1-3) PR : 3.0 average in Political Science and Cl. Specialized study determined by the student's needs and interests (S/ U only ) POS4910 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (1-3) PR: 3 0 average in Political Science and Cl. Investigation of some aspect of political science culminating in the preparation of an original research paper. POS4936SENIORSEMINAR (3) PR : Senior standing and Cl. An opportunity to work with others in a seminar format, exploring specialized topics. POS4941 FIELDWORK (3) PR: 3.0 average in Political Science and Cl. Opportunity for students to obtain practical experience as aides to agen cies of government and political parties POS4970HONORTHESIS (3) PR: Admission to Honor option. Writing of honor thesis under direction of faculty members

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150 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CA TA LOG POS 5094 ISSUES IN AMERICAN NATIONAL AND STATE GOVERNMENT (3) Selected topics of study in American government. May be repeated for credit as topics vary . POS 5155 ISSUES IN URBAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS (3) Selected issues and topics in Urban Government and politics May be repeated for credit as topics vary. POS 5736 POLITICAL RESEARCH METHODS (3) A survey of methods, problems, and issues in political research and analysis for the advanced student. POT 3003 INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL THEORY (3) Examines various kinds of theory used in political science for understanding political life : normative theory, empirical' theory, historicist theory analytical theory and critical theory. POT 3013 CLASSICAL POLITICAL THEORY (3) Analysis of basic ideas of Plato Aristotle Cicero, St. and other leading pre-modem political philosophers. POT 4054 MODERN POLITICAL THEORY (3) Analysis of basic political ideas of Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Burke and other modern philosophers. POT 4064 CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL THOUGHT (3) Examines various political views and political phenomena in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries Diverse theoreti cal types and salient political phenomena will be pre sented POT 4109 POLITICS AND LITERATURE -6A -XLW (3) Critical examination of the connections between politics and literature. POT 4204 AMERICAN POLITICAL THOUGHT (3) Examines political writings in the U.S. and responses to critical periods in history, beginning with the Founding Fathers, and culminating in recent contributions and un derstanding contemporary political problems and solutions POT 4661 THE POLITICS OF IDENTITY DIFFERENCE AND INEQUALITY -XMW (3) PR: POT 3003. An analysis of how relationships of social identity and difference become the basis of social, political and economic inequality in modem society It incorporates both contemporary and "classical discussions of in equality. POT 4936 SELECTED TOPICS IN POLITICAL THEORY (3) Selected topics or thinkers in political theory POT 5626 ISSUES IN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY AND LAW (3) PR : Graduate or senior standing and Cl. Selected topics in political philosophy and law. May be repeated as topics vary. PUP 3313 BLACKS IN THE AMERICAN POLITICAL PROCESS (3) An of the political experience of Blacks in the American political process including their political sociali zation, and struggle to become effective participants in the American political process. (May also be taken for credit in Africana Studies ) PUP 4002 PUBLIC POLICY (3) Examines the formation and implementation of public policy in areas such as the economy health, etc. PUP 4203 ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POLICY (3) Examines the politics of environmental issues formation and implementation of environmental policy. PUP 4323 WOMEN AND POLITICS -6A -XMW (3) An analysis of the impact of gender on power and influence in American society, and women : s changing role in the political process (May also be taken for credit in Women's Studies ) PUP 5607 PUBLIC POLICY AND HEALTH CARE (3) The study of health care policy as it relates to the policy process in the American setting. URP 4050 CITY PLANNING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT (3) An introduction to the development, role, and components of city planning, and the political and actual policies of government in attempting to regulate or control urbaniza tion Psychology CBH 4004 COMPARATIVE PSYCHOLOGY (3) PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of C or better psychology major or Cl. The study of the evolution of behavior, similarities, and differences in capacities for environmental adjust ment and for behavioral organization among important types of living beings CLP 3003 PSYCHOLOGY OF ADJUSTMENT -SS (3) Genetic organic and learned factors involved in the pro cesses of personal adjustment: applications of mental health principles to everyday living Not for major credit. CLP 4143 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY (3) PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of C or better psychology major or Cl. Descriptions, theoretical explanations, research evidence, and treatment of maladaptive behavior CLP 4414 BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION (3) PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of C or better, psychology major or Cl. Introduction to behavior analysis and application of learning principles behavioral measurement research designs and interventions in treatment settings CLP 4433 PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTS AND MEASUREMENT (3) PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of C or better psychology major or Cl A consideration of the instruments for intellectual and personality assessment including their applications, de velopment, and potent ial abuses Students may not re ceive credit for both CLP 4433 and EDF 4430. DEP 3103 CHILD PSYCHOLOGY -SS (3) Developmental and psychosocial aspects of childhood including hereditary maturational, psychological, and so cial determinants of child behavior. Not for major credit. DEP4005 DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (3) PR: PSY 3213 w i th a grade of C or better psychology major or Cl. Survey of methods empirical findings, and theoreti cal interpretations in the study of human development. DEP 4135 PSYCHOLOGY OFLANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT (3) PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of C or better, psychology major or Cl. Available both to majors and non-majors. Surveys the course of and processes underlying normal language development. Presents data and theory on phonological, semantic syntactic and pragmatic development. EXP4104SENSORYPROCESSES (3) PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of C or better, psychology major or Cl. Available to both majors and non-majors. Psycho physical and neurophysiological data and theory underly ing sensory processes Visual, aud i tory, chemical, and somatosensory systems with particular emphasis on visual processes EXP4204C PERCEPTION (3) PR : PSY 3213 with a grade of C or better, psychology major or Cl. Topics include sensory and physiological bases of perception and how people process relevant information in their environments EXP 4304 MOTIVATION (3) PR: PSY 3213 w i th a grade of C or better psychology major or Cl. A survey of motivational processes and mecha nisms from physiological and psychological viewpoints EXP4404PSYCHOLOGYOFLEARNING (3) PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of C or better, psychology major or Cl. Survey of methods emp irical findings, and theoreti cal interpretations in conditioning and instrumental learning. EXP 4523C COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY (3) PR : PSY 3213 with a grade of C or better, psychology major or Cl. Survey of methods empirical findings and theoreti cal interpreta ti ons of human learning information pro cessing, verbal learning and judgment and decision making EXP 4640 PSYCHOLOGY OF LANGUAGE (3) Historical survey of rel at ions between psychology and linguistics leading to the emergence of psycholinguistics as a field of study Current status of theory and research in the field

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 151 UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CA TALQG GEY 4610 PSYCHOLOGY OF AGING (3) A comprehensive overview of psychological aspects of aging. Topics will include age-related changes in sensa tion/perception, cognition, and personality, as well as application to late-life psychopathology. (Also offered under Gerontology.) INP 2101 APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY -SS (3) The application of psychological principles and the func tions of psychologist in education, government, industry, and clinical practice. INP 4004 INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY (3) PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of C or better psychology major or Cl. Applications of psychological principles to industry. Topics include: selection, training, motivation, job satis faction, supervision, decision-making. PPE4004PERSONALITY (3) PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of C or better, psychology major or Cl. Methods and findings of personality theories and an evaluation of constitutional, biosocial, and psychological determinants of personality. PSB 4013C PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY (3) PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of C or better, psychology major or Cl. Gross neural and physiological components of behavior Structure and function of the central nervous system and theory of brain functions. PSY 2012 AN INTRODUCTION TO CONTEMPORARY PSYCHOLOGY-SS (3) A broad survey of psychology for both majors and non majors with special emphasis on the more applied areas of psychology (e.g., social psychology, abnormal psychol ogy, personality, and developmental psychology.) PSY 3022 CONTEMPORARY PROBLEMS IN PSYCHOLOGY-SS (3) The content of this course varies depending on the needs and interest of students faculty. Offerings include in depth coverage of specialized aspects of psychology applied to contemporary problems not studied in general introductory courses. PSY 3044 EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY SS (3) PR: PSY 2012, psychology major or Cl. Designed as an in depth examination of the basic principles and concepts of psychological science. Extensive coverage will be given to the areas of learning, perception, physiological psychol ogy, and cognition. PSY 3213 RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY (4) PR: PSY 3044, psychology major or Cl. This course considers the logic of experimental design concept of control and the analysis of experimentally obtained data. The laboratory section provides experience applying the concepts discussed in lecture. Two lectures plus two-hour lab. May be taken concurrently with PSY 3044. PSY 4205 EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN AND ANALYSIS (3) PR: PSY 3213 with grade of C or better, psychology major, or Cl. Detailed coverage of those research designs and statistical techniques having the greatest utility for re search problems in psychology. Emphasis on topics from analysis of variance. PSY 4604 HISTORY AND SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY (3) PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of C or better, psychology major or Cl. The historical roots of modem psychological theo ries, investigation of the various schools of psychology such as behaviorism, Gestalt psychology, psychoanaly sis, and phenomenological psychology. PSY 4913 DIRECTED STUDY (1 ) PR: Upper-level standing, psychology major and Cl. The student plans and conducts an individual research project or program of directed readings under the supervision of a faculty member (S/U Only ) PSY 4931 SELECTED TOPICS: SEMINAR (3) PR: Upper-level standing, psychology major and Cl. Grad uate-type seminar designed to provide the advanced undergraduate student with an in-depth understanding of a selected sub-area within psychology. May be repeated with a maximum of six (6) hours credit for the major. PSY 4932 HONORS SEMINAR (3) PR: Admission to honors program in psychology and Cl. The student, under supervision of a faculty member, will formalize, conduct, analyze, and report in writing a research project in psychology May be repeated with a maximum of 6 hours credit. May not count for major credit. PSY 4970 HONORS THESIS (1 ) PR: Admission to honors program in psychology and Cl. The student under supervision of a faculty member will formalize, conduct, analyze, and report in writing a re search project in psychology. May be repeated with a maximum of 6 credit hours SOP 3742 PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN -SS (3) An examination of theories offemale personality in histori cal perspective Current research on sex differences socialization, sexuality, psychologyofreproduction. Emerg ing roles of women as related to social change and developmental tasks of the life cycle. (Also offered under Women s Studies.) SOP 4004 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (3) PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of C or better psychology major or Cl. Survey of methods, empirical findings, and theoreti cal interpretations in the study of an individual's behavior as it is affected by others SOP4714C ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (3) PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of C or better psychology major or Cl. Explores the influences of environment on behavior. Topics considered include crowding, privacy, territorial behavior, environmental design, and pollution effects. Designed for both psychology majors and non-majors. Public Administration PAD 3003 INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION -SS (3) Examination of organizational behavior and change policy process, public management financial administration and personnel management from the perspective of pub lic and social delivery. PAD 4204 PUBLIC FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION (3) Analysis of problems in the growth and development of public budgetary theory and Federal budgetary innova tions. PAD 5035 ISSUES IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION AND PUBLIC POLICY (3) Selected issues and topics in Public Administration and Public Policy. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. PAD 5333 CONCEPTS AND ISSUES IN PUBLIC PLANNING (3) PR: URP 4050 or URP 6056. Analysis of basic concepts, issues, and strategies of planning; policy determination, collection of information, and decision-making. PAD 5605 ADMINISTRATIVE LAW (3) An examination of the constitutional and statutory bases and limitations of the administrative process, administra tive adjudication, rule making, and the judicial review of such actions. PAD 5612ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATION (3) Analys i s of the regulatory functions and processes in the American political system: regulatory commissions, their functions, powers, management, reforms, and relation ship with other branches of government. PAD 5700 RESEARCH METHODS IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (3) This course provides the student with the fundamental skills and knowledge of how research is designed, imple mented, analyzed, and utilized in public sector agencies. Available to majors and non-majors. PAD 5807 ADMINISTRATION OF URBAN AFFAIRS (3) .Analysis of the role of i the administrator at the municipal level; the division of functions; policy formation; alternative governmental structures; effects on the administrative process. PAD 5836 COMPARATIVE PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (3) How organizations and managers perform within a partic ular environment, potential impact of innovation, and how

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152 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998190 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG service is accomplished in a variety of socio-economic sical (Biblical} Hebrew and to introduce them to the Biblical environments. literature in the original language. Rehabilitation counseling RCS 5035 REHABILITATION COUNSELING: CONCEPTS AND (3) PR: CC. Introduction to the profession of Rehabilitation issues i.n field. Coverage includes rehab11itat1on. history, leg1slat1on, case management and related services for Americans with disabilities. RCS 5080 MEDICAL ASPECTS OF DISABILITY (3) PR or CR: RCS 5700 A survey of medical conditions and disabilities encountered by rehabilitation and mental health counselors Examines the relationship of client handi caps, physical and mental, to rehabilitation and mental health programming RCS 5404 FOUNDATIONS OF MENTAL HEAL TH COUNSELING (3) A skill-building course on the utilization of one's self in mental health counseling relationships. Includes the study of the origin, history, professional functions, and current issues in the discipline of mental health counseling. RCS 5406 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT (3) Human development theory as applied in psychotherapy and case management rehabilitation, mental health and addiction settings. RCS5450SUBSTANCEABUSE .. (3) PR: Cl. An overview of alcohol and other drug abuse. Explores the extent and rate of abuse in the United States causes, biology, psychological aspects, legal aspects: and treatment. RCS 5700 LEGAL, ETHICAL, PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS (3) o"'.erv1e. w of all aspects of professional functioning including history, roles, organizational structures ethics credentialing Contemporary and devel: oping issues in the field of professional counseling will also be addressed RCS5905DIRECTEDSTUDIES (1-4) PR: Cl. Supervised rehabilitation studies under the direc tion of a faculty member. Rpt. to 8 hours. Religious Studies CLA 3000 ANCIENT CIVILIZATIONS (4) Study of the character, ideas, and cultural achievements of the peoples of the Ancient Middle East and Mediterranean and their relevance for modern Western civilization. CLA 3801 l:ilSTORY OF THE (2) Study, in reasonable detail, of the evolution ofour "Roman" alphabet as well as of other ancient and modem alpha bets, from the writing system of ancient Egypt. CLA 4171 MESOPOTAMIAN (3) o.fthe .Anc1e.nt Mesopotamian (Sumero-Babylonian) c1v11izat1on, including customs, religi on, art and architec ture, languages and literatures, science and the calendar and an introduction to cuneiform writing CLA 4930 SELECTED TOPICS (1-4) Course contents depend on student demand and instruc tor's interest and may range over the whole field of Ancient languages, literatures, and civilizations. Offerings on a semi-regular basis include Tongues of the Bible (2) and The Bible as History (3). Note: In any of the numbers CLA 4900 CLA 4930 enroll ment is repeatable for different subject matters. (4) An introduction to an intensive study ofthe koine Greek of the New Testament, for beginners; New Testament read ings composition analysis o f the structure of Greek of the New Testament. GRE2041 NEWTESTAMENTGREEKll (4) PR: GRE 2040. Intermediate readings and grammar of the Greek New Testament. HEB 1120, 1121 BASIC HEBREW I, II (4 4) Designed to give students a working knowledge of ClasREL22.10 (4) An to the cnt1cal study of the Hebrew Scriptures aga1. nst the background of the ancient Near East with attention to the history and religion of the Hebrew people. REL 2240 INTRODUCTION TO THE NEW TESTAMENT (3) An introduction to the critical study of the New Testament in context of Christian beginnings in the first century A.O REL 2300 INTRODUCTION TO WORLD RELIGIONS -6A -HP (4) A cross-cultural exploration of the major religions of the through films, the reading of key religious texts. Religions covered include Judaism Chris tianity, Islam Taoism, Confudanism, Hinduism and Buddhism. RELIGIONS -HP (4) This course explores the unity and diversity of religious traditions in a global context in order to understand the mutual interactions between religions and cultures Em phasis is placed on ,the role of religions in shaping human values which can either create or resolve social conflicts and the impact these values can have on issues of race' ethnicity and religious diversity in a multicultural world REL OF CHRISTIANITY-BA -HP (4) The h1stoncal development of Christianity, its ideas and institutions, from the first century to the rise of religious modernism in the 19th century (3) This course examines the phenomenon of religion to answer the question: Religion what is it? Religious thought (mythology and theology) and religious behavior (ritual and morality) are closely examined. REL 3114 COMEDY, TRAGEDY, AND RELIGION -6A -XMW (3) Examines the visions of life in comedy and tragedy, and relates both to the major world religions. REL3120 RE.LIGION IN AMERICA (3) To examine the movement from state church to pluralism in American religious institutions, the religious results of non-Protestant immigration ; the Jewish factor ; the effect of home missions and social concern programs upon Ameri can life; political entanglements and the concept of church/ state separation. REL3131 NEWRl?LIGIONSINAMERICA (3) A course designed to allow the student to survey the wide spectrum of contemporary sects arid cults and learn what motivates their development. REL 3132 WITCHCRAFT AND PAGANISM IN AMERICA (3) A study of contemporary witchcraft and paganism, includ methods, history myths and symbols, be liefs, ntuals and practices, believers, recruitment, socialization, and organizations. REL3145WOMENANDRELIGION-6A (3) Analysis of the status and roles of women as compared to men in the Judeo-Christian tradition. Contemporary is sues of feminist theology, and the controversies surround ing them. (May also be taken for credit in Women's Stud ies.) REL 3146 THE RELIGIOUS QUESTIN CONTEMPORARY FIL:MS -6A -55_-HP (4) This course wlll use contemporary films such as Gandhi, Malcolm X, The Long Walk Home, The Color Purple The Leap of Faith, The Chosen, and Grand Canyon, to explore the personal and social dimensions of religion in modem secular societies, with an emphasis on issues of racism, sexism and human liberation and reconciliation. REL 3147 NA TIVE AMERICAN RELIGIONS (3) Introduction to and survey of Native American Religions. A variety of multiplicity of perspectives, including anthropo logical, historical, social psychological, sociological, and philosophical. REL 3150 RELIGION AND THE MEANING OF LIFE -6A -XMW (3) What is the meaning of life? An exploration of answers to this question in Eastern and Western religions, and in humanistic philosophies of life

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 153 UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CA TA LOG REL3155LIFEAFTERDEATH (3) An exploration of ideas about life after death and its relations to this life, in Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hindu ism, and Buddhism REL 3170 RELIGION, ETHICS AND SOCIETY THROUGH FILM -6A -HP -SS (4) An ethical analysis of contemporary social issues through contemporary films, drawing on religious narrative tradi tions from Eastern and Western cultures which have contributed to the development of an ethic of human dignity, human rights and human liberation after Auschwitz and Hiroshima. REL 3280 BIBLICAL ARCHAEOLOGY -XMW (3) An in depth examination of the archaeological data relating to the background and content of the Bible, including ancient customs, Biblical sites and cities, Biblical history, and material C,Ulture of the Biblical period. Special attention will also be given to excavation methods and interpretation of archaeological evidence. REL3310WORLDRELIGIONS (3) An introduction to and a comparison of the ideas, the literature and institutions of the major religions of the world including Judaism, Christianity, Islam from the Near East and Hinduism, Taoism, Confucianism, and Buddhism from the Far East. General comparison of Western and Eastern beliefs-. REL 3330 THE RELIGIONS OF INDIA -AF-SS (3) All religions of the world came to India and all became Indian. What is t)1is "lndianness" which stems from Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism and Sikhism, but extended itself to include Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Zoroastrian ism and Baha'i. Readings from classical texts and modem literature. REL 3367 ISLAM IN THE MODERN WORLD (3) Examines the major developments in Islamic thought since the 13th century with emphasis on the 19th and 20th century Islamic resurgence. Issues of diversity, gender, and social values will be stressed. REL3420 CONTEMPORARY RELIGIOUS THOUGHT (3) An examination of the central ideas of recent theological thinkers; such men as Barth Brunner, Bultmann, Bo nohoeffer, Rahner, Tillich, Cox, Altizer, Buber, Niebuhr REL 3550 ROMAN CATHOLICISM -6A -XMW (3) An examination of the history, doctrine, and ethics of the Roman Catholic Church. REL 3600 INTRODUCTION TO JUDAISM -6A -AF (3) An introduction to Judaism : its religious tenets; its codes of ethics; its rites and customs. This course is intended as a description of what it means to be a Jew REL 3602 CLASSICS OF JUDAISM -6A (3) PR: One course in Religious Studies. How to read the principal documents of Judaism beyond the Old Testa ment, particularly the Mishnah, Talmuds, and Midrash. REL 3611 HISTORY OF JUDAISM (3) A study of the evolution of the religion of ancient Israel from the Exodus to the end of the second century ofourera, seen against the background of its historical, geographical ; political, social and spiritual setting. REL 3613 MODERN JUDAISM (3) A study of Jewish life in the West since 1789, emphasizing Jewish beliefs, practices, and institutions. REL 3700 INTRODUCTION TO ISLAM -6A -HP -AF (3) This course introduces the basic elements of Islamic belief and practice, placing the rise of Islam in its historical context in the Middle East, and stressing issues of diversity (including ethnicity and gender). REL 3900 DIRECTED READINGS (1-4) PR: Cl. Individual guidance in concentrated reading on a selected topic. REL 3921 COLLOQUIUM (1) This colloquium will be held in order to bring all religious studies faculty and undergraduate majors together to discuss research of a particular faculty member, student, or guest scholar. May be repeated up to 3 semester hours. (S/U only.) REL 3936 SELECTED TOPICS (1-4) PR: Cl .. Course contents depend on students' needs. REL4113THEHEROAND RELIGION -XMW (3) A study of the way in which embedded religious models help to fashion the representation of an heroic protagonist. The focus of the course will be on the relationship between the hero and the "other," as differentiated by race, gender, ethnicity, or merely inner being. REL 4133 MORMONISM IN AMERICA (3) A study of Mormonism in America 1 as an example of a new religion. Includes the study of history, myths and symbols, texts, beliefs, rituals and practices, believers, recruitment, socialization, and organizations REL4161 RELIGION, TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY (3) An exploration of the way in which religion and technology have interacted in Western civilization so as to both ex press and transform human values and identity. Special emphasis will be given to the value questions raised by modem technology REL4171 CONTEMPORARY CHRISTIAN ETHICS-6A (4) PR: Jr. standing or Cl. This course will survey several major approaches to contemporary Christian ethics and their application to a number of ethical issues peculiar to personal and social life in contemporary society REL 4193 COMPARATIVE MYSTICISM (4) A course designed to acquaint the student with the nature of mystical experience, and some of the varieties of mys tical experience recorded in the writings of the mystics. REL4221 WHO WROTE THE BIBLE (GENESIS-KINGS) -6A -XMW -XLW (4) A critical examination of Genesis through 2 Kings. This course focuses on the history of the formation of the text and the development of the religious traditions repre sented therein. Special attention will be paid to Israelite Law, CovenantTheology, and the history of the religion(s) of Israel in their Ancient Near Eastern context. REL4224 HEBREW BIBLE IVPROPHETSANDWRITINGS (4) PR: REL 3210 or REL 4221 or Cl. An investigation of the prophetic movement and the historical and cultic writings in Israel from the point of view of theological developments, history presupposed, and the religious institutions de picted Special attention is given to a theme such as Job and the problem of evil. REL 4244 NEW TESTAMENT I: GOSPELS, ACTS (4) An exploration of the Gospels and Acts, including their backgrounds in Judaism and pagan religion, literary and form criticism, historical Jesus research, and the social history of Christianity REL 4250 JESUS' LIFE AND TEACHINGS (4) PR: Cl. An examination of the v;:irious historical studies made in the quest of identifying Jesus as an historical figure. The concern is to make a reasonable assessment of who Jesus was and what he was saying to the Jews in at the beginning of the common era. REL 4252 NEW TESTAMENT II: THE LETTERS OF PAUL ANDOTHERNEWTESTAMENTWRITINGS (4) PR: REL 4244 or REL 3240 or Cl. An investigation of the phenomenon of earliest Christianity in its Pauline and non-Pauline forms, particularly as reflected in Paul's let ters and in other writings of the New Testament. Special attention is given to the program of Apocalyptic, as in the book of Revelation REL4333HINDUISM (4) The philosophy of the saints ; the complex rituals of the Brahmins; the art of its temples; the psychology and physiology of yoga; the social rigidity of the caste system; the esoteric science of meditation; the ascetic activism of Mahatma Gandhi-all of these are Hinduism, and more. Close readings of classical texts, philosophic systems and medieval poems REL 4343 BUDDHISM IN INDIA, SRI LANKA, AND SOUTH EAST ASIA (4) The life and teachings of the Buddha; the order of monks and nuns; the Buddhist Emperor Ashoka; schisms; the rise of the Great Vehicle and the philosophy of emptiness;

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154 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Buddhist missions; Buddhist art and culture; Buddhism and national liberation; contemporary social and political issues. REL 4344 BUDDHISM IN CHINA, JAPAN, AND TIBET (4) Mahayana Buddhism followed the silk routes to China and Japan, and later it crossed the Himalayas into Tibet. An overview of the variety of schools and practices of Bud dhism and its adaptation by these ancient cultures. REL 4508 FROM MYTH TO CHRISTIANITY (4) Study of the religions/mythologies of the ancient Middle East and Eastern Mediterranean and how their influences shaped the theology and practices of Christianity up to the end of the fourth century; influences many of which con tinue to be evident in the traditional Roman and Eastern Orthodox churches. REL4626 REASON IN RELIGION: TALMUDIC LOGIC -XMW (3) Analyzes the modes of thought and of logical analysis of the Talmud of Babaylonia; the way in which applied logic and practical reason work in a religious definition of the social order; the dialectical argument. REL 4670 JUDAISM AND CHRISTIANITY AFTER THE HOLOCAUST -6A -XMW -XLW (4) This course will explore the impact of the Holocaust on Jewish and Christian thought and identity in the light of the history of religious and cultural anti-semitism in Western civilization REL4910 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (1-4) PR: Junior standing and Cl. Individual investigations with faculty supervision REL4931 SEMINAR IN RELIGION (3) A course designed for students, especially Religious Studies majors, whose prior religious studies have pre pared them for a cooperative creative and/or research effort in the area of religion. REL 4936 SELECTED TOPICS (1-4) PR: Junior standing and Cl. Individual investigations with faculty supervision. REL4939 THE DEVELOPMENT OF RELIGIOUS STUDIES (3) Course designed for senior majors (and minors) in reli gious studies to complement REL 4931 (Senior Seminar). Discussion of key figures and methodological advances in the development of the field from the 18th : century to present, with readings of classics in the development. WST 5318 FEMINIST SPIRITUALITY (3) This course focuses on the many voices of contemporary feminist spirituality, emerging from women's experiences in diverse religious, ethnic and cultural traditions, and representing a range of theoretical perspectives from biblical feminism to goddess worship and wicca. May not be repeated (May be taken through Women's Studies ) Social Work SOW 3101 HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT I (4) PR: All pre-core and foundation courses. CR: SOW 4522 and SOW 4341. Restricted to Social Work majors, others by School permission An integrating human behavior social environment course emphasizing dynamics of be havior and environmental factors as they relate to social work practice with individuals. SOW 3102 HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENTll (4) PR: SOW 3101, SOW 4341 and SOW 4522. CR: SOW 4343 and SOW 3401. Restricted to Social Work majors; others by School permission. An integrating course emphasizing dynamics of behavior and environmental factors as they relate to social work practice with families, groups, orga nizations and communities. SOW 3203 THE AMERICAN SOCIAL WELFARE SYSTEM -SS (3) A general education introductory course which prqvides students with a framework for understanding the historical development of American social welfare, its value base, and its response to minorities, women, children, the elderly, and the disabled. SOW 3302 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK (3) An introductory course tracing the development of social work as a profession including an examination of the knowledge skill and attitudinal base of the profession and professional roles and functions. SOW 3401 RESEARCH AND STATISTICS FOR SOCIAL WORK (4) PR: SOW 3101, SOW4341 and SOW4522. CR: SOW 3102 and SOW 4343. Restricted to Social Work majors, others by School permission. The purpose of this course is two fold: to familiarize the student with research as it is prac ticed in the profession of Social Work; and to equip the student with those theoretical understandings necessary to be a critical consumer of social work research SOW 4233 SOCIAL WELFARE: POLICY & PROGRAM (4) PR: SOW3101, SOW4341, SOW 4522, SOW3102, SOW 4343 and SOW 3401. CR : SOW 4510 and SOW 4510L. Restricted to Social Work majors, others by School per mission. An advanced policy course taking an analytical approach to contemporary social welfare policy issues and current social welfare programs. SOW 4341 MUL Tl-METHODS OF SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE I: MICRO-SYSTEM INTERVENTION (5) CR: SOW 3101; SOW 4522. Restricted to Social Work majors; others by School permission First practice course emphasizing development of skills and interventive meth ods with individt1als, families and small groups. Course includes both didactic and experiential learning components. SOW 4343 MUL Tl-METHODS OF SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE II: MACRO-SYSTEM INTERVENTION (5) PR: All pre-core courses, SOW 4341, SOW 4522 and SOW 3101. CR: SOW 3401 and SOW 3102. Restricted to Social Work majors, others by School permission. Second prac tice course emphasizing intervention at the community and organizational level. Builds upon theoretical and prac tical content of SOW 4341. Course includes both didactic and experiential learning components. SOW 4510 INTEGRATIVE SEMINAR (3) PR: Completion of all social work core courses except SOW 4233. CR: SOW 4510L. Restricted to social work majors in Senior year. An integrated practice seminar which constitutes the third and final course in the practice sequence. SOW 4510L FIELD PLACEMENT (6) PR: Completion of all social work core courses except SOW 4233. CR : SOW 4510. Restricted to social work majors in Senior year. Supervised field placement in a social welfare organization consisting of 32 hours per week in the field (S/U only ) SOW 4522 MULTICULTURAL AMERICA (3) PR: SOW 3203, SOW 3302. CR: SOW 3101, SOW 4341. The course focuses on the students' understanding of multicultural and intergenerational issues. SOW 4900 DIRECTED READINGS (1-9) PR: Completion of four social work courses including SOW 3401, upper level standing, and School permission. Content dependent upon student interest and ability. A contract will be jointly developed by student and instructor specifying nature of work to be completed May be repeated up to 6 credit hours. SOW 4910 DIRECTED RESEARCH (1-6) PR: Completion of four social work courses including SOW 3401, upperlevel standing and school permission Directed Research is intended to provide students with research expe,rience in areas of specific interest in social work. A contract will be developed between student and instructor specifying the nature of work to be completed. Majors only. SOW 4930 VARIABLE TOPICS IN SOCIAL WORK (1-3) Restricted to Social Work majors; others by School per mission. Variable title courses to expand on the four sequence areas in the Social Work core curriculum. Al lows focus on areas relevant to student's educational interest.

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 155 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG SOW 5930C SELECTED TOPICS IN SOCIAL WORK (1-4) Restricted to Social Work majors, both graduate and undergraduate; others by School is taken as an elective. Variable title courses will selectively expand specific social work content areas May be repeated in varying topic areas Sociology SYA 3010 CLASSICAL THEORY (3) PR : SYG 2000 or Cl. The analysis of the philosophical foundations central principles and histori.cal devel_op ment of sociological theory Required for Sociology maiors and minors. SYA3015CONTEMPORARYTHEORY (3) PR SYA 3010 and SYG 2000 or Cl. An examination of recent trends in sociological theory. Emphasis is theories examining symbolic interactions lived expen ence popular culture, and social structures. SYA3300RESEARCHMETHODS .(3) PR : SYG2000 and ST A 2122 or its equivalent. to the scientific method and its application to social sci ence research Research design sampling techniques, and critical evaluation of social research Required for Sociology majors. SYA 3310 QUALITATIVE INQUIRY -6A -XLW (3) PR : SYG2000 or Cl. Exploration of human relationships and behaviors organizations and the larger culture through research techniques such as interviews ob servation, life histories, and narratives Permit required. SYA 3503 VISUAL SOCIOLOGY (3) PR: SYG2000 or Cl. An investigation of the relationship between visual representation (especially photography) and our understand jng of the social world. SYA 4430 COMPUTERS IN THE SOCIAL SCIENC .ES . (3) Introduction to the uses of computers in soc1olog1cal research Major emphasis is upon the use of statistical packages (principally SPSS) in data analysis. SYA4910 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (1 ) Four courses in sociology, including SYA3300 upper level standing, at least a 3 0 overall GPA or Cl. Content depends on the interest of the student. A contract between tt:ie student and the sponsor ing faculty member must be signed before class registration. May be for credit. Up to 3 credits may the min!mum requirements for sociology credits for maiors or minors Permit required SYA 4930 TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY (3) PR SYG2000 or Cl. Selected specialized topics in sociol ogy. Topics such as AIDS in society? drugs in problems in education, .of pubhc family violence sexuaht1es, soc10-b1otogy. Content will vary by semester and by section class for specific contents each semester This course, in different content areas may be repeatep for credit. SYA 4935 SENIOR SEMINAR -XMW (3) PR: Senior standing, SYG2000, SYA3010 SYA3300 pl.us 6 hours of sociology electives. The opportunity for senior Sociology majors to to a se lected topic of relevance in today s society. Topic changes by instructor Majors only Permit required SYA4949SOCIOLOGICALINTERNSHIP (1) PR : Senior or graduate .standing in. Sociology Cl. Supervised placement in community organization or agency for a minimum of 10 hours of volunteer work per week, and a weekly seminar on applying sociological skills and methods in the placement setting May be repeated for up to 6 credit hours. (S/U only) SYD 3441 PEASANT PERSPECTIVES -AF (3) PR: SYG2000 or 6 hours of other Social Science Gen Ed. coursework or Cl. Examines the appl i cability of sociologi cal concepts to peasant life around the world and explores the roles played by western in and sustaining the conditions under which peasants hve. SYD3700RACIALANDETHNICRELATIONS (3) PR: SYG2000 or Cl. Comparative study of interracial rela tions, social tensions attitudes and mocles of adjustment in various areas of the world SYD 4020 GLOBAL POPULATION (3) PR: SYG2000 or Cl. Upper level standing determinants of fertility mortality and migration; theories of population change. SYD4410URBANSOCIOLOGY (3) PR: SYG2000 or Cl. Upper-level standing. The social structure of the community in modem industrial societies. Analysis of community change. SYD4800GENDERANDSOCIETY (3) PR : SYG2000 or WST2010 or WST 2011 or Cl. Historical and contemporary exploration current issues to sex roles in America. 'Emphasis on sex role differences, interpersonal relationships and inst i tutional participation (Also offered under Women's Studies). SYG 2000 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY -SS (3) An introduction to sociological perspectives and methods and the basic areas of seciological interests such as socialization gender race and ethnic social control and social stratification Required for Sociology majors and minors . SYG 2010 CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL PROBLEMS -SS (3) The analys i s of social and of public issues such as cnme, the environment, inequality, gender, employment and substance abuse. SYG 2412 MARRIAGE (3) Study of pre-marital relations Social cultural, and per sonal factors related to success and failure in mate selection and marriage. Does not count for Sociology major credit. SYG 3120 SOCIOLOGY OF FAMILIES !3) PR: SYG2000 or Cl. Examination of the family as a social institution, principles of family in American family types by social class, race ethnicity Social changes and problems in American families. SY03200SOCIOLOGYOFRELIGION (3) PR: SYG2000 or Cl. An examination of the meanings of religion in lived experiences in tre United States. Includes the construction and maintenance of religious meanings and the impact of those meanings and hves, and impact of religious discourse in daily hves, social movements motivated by religious beli!'lfS. SYO 3500 SOCIAL ORGANIZATION / (3) PR: SYG2000 or Cl. Social organ i zation in the broadest sense, including institutions and associations, as well as variations in role and status. SYO 3530 SOCIAL STRATIFICATION (3) PR: SYG2000 or Cl. Social status and social stratification, social class as a factor in behavior, social mobility. SYO 4300 POLITICAL SOCIOLOGY (3) PR: SYG2000 or Cl. An examination of the social factors that affect government politics and political behavior. SY04370 OCCUPATIONS AND PROFESSIONS (3) PR: SYG2000 or Cl. A comparative analysis of profes sions, particularly medicine, law teaching alJied health professions, engineering on .the of professionalizing service hkE'. pohce wor:f<, business management, pubhc admin1strat1on and social work. SYO 4400 MEDICAL SOCIOLOGY (3) PR: SYG ,2000 or Cl. The stljdy of disease and the sick person including the analJ'.sis of health beliefs and practitioners the hospital as an organization the cost financing,' and politics of health care. SYO 4430 DISABILITY & SOCIETY -XMW (3) PR: SYG2000 or Cl. Examination of the applicabilitv of sociological concepts to the experience of and of disability as a means to a better understanding of the nature of social experience. SYP 3000 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY-SS (3) PR: PSY2012 or SYG2000 or Cl. An exploration of the social

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156 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1998199 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG forces that help shape individual perceptions, behaviors, and personality. The study of ways individuals develop identity and self-worth. SYP 3562 FAMILY VIOLENCE (3) An exploration of the complexity of the causes and conse quences of physical and emotional violence among family members. Topics include the meaings and behaviors of violence, the process of help-seeking, and social interven tions for offenders and victims. Open tO nonmajors SYP 4300 COLLECTIVE BEHAVIOR (3) PR: SYG2000 or Cl. Study of the development of group and mass behavior crowds, social movements. SYP4420CONSUMERCULTURE (3) PR:SYG2000 or Cl. The exploration of how Americans' purchasing behavior connects to larger historical shifts in our economy, including disenchantment, alienation, in equality, and the rise of the credit card society SYP 4510 SOCIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF DEVIANCE (3) The examination of the social construction of deviance : How deviance is defined implications of deviance desig nations Applications of theories of deviance to questions such as motivations of deviants and implications of crimi nal justice processing of deviants. SYP 4530 SOCIOLOGY OF JUVENILE DELINQUENCY (3) PR: SYG2000 or Cl. Sociological issues in defining delin quency; the nature of adolescence and delinquency; so ciological theories of the causes of delinquency; types and consequences of social control applied to delinquents. SYP 4640 LEISURE IN SOCIETY (3) PR: SYG2000 or Cl. Sociological examination of leisure in the United States and other countries. Topics include changing leisure time patterns, relationships between leisure and work, personality, family, community, subcul tures, religion, and social class SYP 4650 SPORT IN SOCIETY (3) PR: SYG2000 or Cl. An examination of the broad issues concerning sport in both a historical and contemporary perspective. Sport will be viewed in relation to social institutions, economic considerations, mass media, and the sport group as a micro-social system. Women's Studies AFA 4335 BLACK WOMEN IN AMERICA -6A -XMW (3) An interdisciplinary survey of the contemporary experience of black women in America, including the African roots, myths, and realities surrounding that experience. (May also be taken for credit in Africana Studies.) AMH 3561 AMERICAN I (4) A study of women in the evolution of American society from European origins to 1877 Women's roles in the family, economy ; politics, wars, religion and reform movements will be examined. (May also be takeh for credit in History.) AMH 3562 AMERICAN WOMEN II (4) A study of women in the evolution of American society from 1877 to the present. Women's roles in the family, economy, politics, wars, religion and reform movements will be examined. (May also be taken for credit in History.) AMS 3370 SOUTHERN WOMEN: MYTH AND REALITY -6A (3) An analysis of the myths surrounding Southern Women, this course will identify these myths, discern their sources and purposes, and contrast them with history (May also be taken for credit in American Studies.) ANT 4302 SEX ROLES IN CROSSCUL TURAL PERSPECTIVE (:S) PR : ANT 3410 or Cl. Focuses on various theories, models and beliefs about male-female behaviors and interactions in human cultures throughout history and in various socie ties in the world today. (May also be taken for credit in Anthropology.) COM 4030 WOMEN AND COMMUNICATION (3) Examines women's patterns of communication in a variety of contexts. (May also be taken for credit in Communica tion ) PHI 4632 FEMINIST ETHICS -XMW (3) A study of the varied approaches to moral reasoning taken by feminist ethical writers such as Wollstonecraft, Mill, Gilligan, Daly, Hoagland and others. (May also be taken for credit in Philosophy.) PHM 5125 TOPICS IN FEMINIST PHILOSOPHY (3) A study of recent feminist philosophical approaches to epistemology, aesthetics or political philosophy. (May also be taken for credit in Philosophy.) POS 4693 WOMEN AND LAW I (3) Introduction to issues concerning the legal aspects of sex and sex-based discrimination as embodied in statutory and case law, focusing on constitutional and family law and reproductive freedom issues. Open to majors and non-majors (May also be taken for credit in Government and International Affairs.) POS 4694 WOMEN AND LAW II -6A -XMW (3) PR: POS 4693 or Cl. Legal position of women in American society and remedies available to challenge current laws anp practices with specific emphasis on employment and education issues as they relate to both women and men. (May also be taken for credit in Government and Interna tional Affairs.) PUP 4323 WOMEN AND POLITICS -6A -XMW (3) An analysis of the impact of gender on power and influence in American society, and women's changing role in the political process. Open to majors and non-majors. (May also be taken for credit in Government and International Affairs.) REL3145WOMENANDRELIGION -6A (3) Status and roles of women as compared to meh in the Judeo-Christian tradition. Contemporary issues of femi nist theology, and the controversies surrounding them. (May also be taken for credit in Religious Studies ) SOP 37 42 PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN -SS (3) Theories of female personality. Current research on so cialization, sexuality, reproduction. Emerging lifestyles and developmental tasks of the life cycle (May also be taken for credit in Psychology.) SPT 2524 WOMEN WRITERS OF LATIN AMERICA (3) Literature of Latin-American women (in translation). Top ics related to race and ethnicity, values and ethics, social, economic, and political issues. Readings will include oral histories, interviews, diaries and memoirs, poetry, short stories, and novels. (May also be taken for credit in Modem Languages and Linguistics). SYD4800GENDERANDSOCIETY (3) PR: SYG 2000, WST 3010 or 3011; or Cl. Historical and contemporary exploration of current issues relevant to sex roles in America. Emphasis on sex role differences, inter personal relationships and institutional participation. (May also be taken for credit in Sociology.) WST 2309 THE FEMALE EXPERIENCE IN AMERICA -HP (3) The experience in America, in historical context, with an emphasis on women in families of various classes, races, and ethnic groups from colonial times to 1870 WST 2380 HUMAN SEXUAL BEHAVIOR-SS (3) The dynamics of human sexuality: biological, constitu tional, cultural.and psychological aspects. The range of sexual behavior acrciss groups. Sources of beliefs and attitudes about sex, including sex roles and especially female sexuality. WST 3010 INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN'S STUDIES -SS-NW (3) Survey of major issues relevant to the female experience. The women's movei;nent: historical, psychological, socio logical, anthropological perspectives. WST 3011 ISSUES IN FEMINISM -SS (3) Survey of major issues relevant to the female experience: marriage and the family, sexuality, work, creativity. WST 3210 WOMEN IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION 1-6A -HP (3) Survey of women in the ancient Ne