Alaskan Caver

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Alaskan Caver

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Title:
Alaskan Caver
Series Title:
Alaskan Caver
Alternate Title:
Alaska Caver
Creator:
Pease, Chuck
Publisher:
National Speleological Society (Alaskan Cave Areas Conservation Task Force)
National Speleological Society (Glacier Grotto)
University of Alaska Southeast (School of Arts and Sciences)
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Language:
English

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Regional Speleology ( local )
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United States

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General Note:
Contents: Coronation Island expedition 2002 Log / Kevin Allred -- Apex Pit, Report and Map -- Quittin' Time Cave, Report and Map -- Hidden Fern Pit, Report and Map -- Grouse Cave, Report and Map -- Littoral Caves of Egg Harbor, Report -- First Egg and Lost Soles Cave Map -- Miner Diversion Cave Map -- Camp Cave Map -- Slant Cave, Little Willie Cave, and Drafty Cave Maps -- Cedar Cave, Report and Map -- Flag Cave, Report and Map -- Colander Cave, Report and Map -- Goest Cave, Report and Map -- Whintle Cave, Report and Map -- His and Hers Cave, Report and Map -- Hooting Grouse Cave, Report and Map -- Sure Enough Cave, Report and Map -- Lost Cave, Report and Map -- Hootting Cave, Report and Map -- Passion Pit, Report and Map -- Caves of Egg Harbor, Area Map -- A Trip to Coronation Island, Southeastern Alaska / Fred Grady -- Bibliography of Previously Published Articles on Coronation Island.
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Open Access - Permission by Author(s)
Original Version:
Vol. 24, no. 3 (2004)
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See Extended description for more information.

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University of South Florida
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k26.239 ( USFLDC Handle )
4399 ( karstportal - original NodeID )

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THE AL ASKAN CA VER Volume 24 Number 3, Jul y, 2004 Special CoronationIslandIssue

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Front cover: Vivian L oftin and Kevin Allred sketch in Camp Cave on Coronation Island, photo by Jean Krejca Cam p Ca ve, C orona tion I sland Pho to by Jean Krejc a THE ALASKAN CAVER EDITOR: Carlene Allred 2525 Fourth AveKetchikan, Alaska 99901hm: 907 225-1116carleneallred@kpunet.net PRESIDENT : David Love 6740 MargueriteJuneau, AK 99803 VICE PRESIDENT : David Valentine 11976 N. Tongass HwyKetchikan, AK 99901hm: 907 225-2289 SECRETARY/TREASURER: David Love6740 MargueriteJuneau, AK 99803 CONSERVA TION: Steve Lewis Box 53Tenakee Spr ., AK 99841 tenakeetwo@yahoo.com CAVE RESCUE: Gary SonnenbergTONGASS CAVE PROJECT : Pete Smith PO Box WWP Ketchikan, AK 99950hm: 907 846-5223waleswood@starband.net Steve Lewis Box 53Tenakee Spr AK 99841 tenakeetwo@yahoo.com Kevin Allred 2525 Fourth AveKetchikan, AK 99901hm: 907 225-1116carleneallred@kpunet.net THE ALASKAN CAVER (ISSN 07350481) is the periodic publication of the Glacier Grotto of the National Speleological Society (NSS). Back issues are available from the Glacier Grotto secretary for $2.50 each. Materials not copyrighted by individuals or by other groups may be used by NSS publications provided credit is given to the author and to The Alaskan Caver Opinions are not necessarily that of The ALaskan Caver, the Glacier Grotto or the NSS. The editor welcomes contributions such as letters, trip reports, cave reports, photos, cartoons, stories, cave maps, etc. Annual dues are $15 per individual and $20 per family or organization. The Alaskan Caver is included in the membership fee. For an additional $8, six The Alaskan Cavers will be sent overseas via airmail. Send dues to the treasurer. T ABLE OF CONTENTS Coronation Island Expedition 2002 Log, by Kevin Allred................... page 3 Apex Pit, report and map................................................................... page 6 QuittinÂ’ T ime Cave, report and map................................................... page 6 Hidden Fern Pit, r eport and map........................................................ page 6 Grouse Cave, report and map............................................................ page 6 Littoral Caves of Egg Harbor, r eport................................................... page 7 First Egg and Lost Soles Cave map..................................................... page 9 Miner Diversion Cave map................................................................. page 10 Camp Cave map................................................................................ page 11 Slant Cave, Little Willie Cave and Drafty Cave maps.......................... page 12 Cedar Cave, report and map.............................................................. page 13 Flag Cave, report and map................................................................. page 13 Colander cave, report and map......................................................... page 14 Goest Cave, report and map.............................................................. page 15 Whintle Cave, report and map........................................................... page 15 His and Hers Cave, report and map................................................... page 16 Hooting Grouse Cave, report and map.............................................. page 16 Sure Enough Cave, report and map................................................... page 17 Lost Cave, report and map................................................................. page 17 Hooting Cave, report and map........................................................... page 18 Passion Pit, r eport and map................................................................ page 18 Caves of Egg Harbor, area map.......................................................... page 19 A T rip to Coronation Island, Southeastern Alaska, by Fred Grady ....... page 19 Bibliography of previously published articles on Coronation Island.... Page 19 The Alaskan Caver Volume 24 No. 3 page 2

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The boat that Pete built. Photo by Jean Krejca Amphipod in Colander Cave. Photo by Jean Krejca The Alaskan Caver Volume 24 No. 3 page 3 (continues o n page 4) CORONA TION ISLAND EXPEDITION 2002 LOG by Kevin Allred April 23, 2002 I arrived back at Whale Pass on about April 18th to Finger-like tiny formations hanging down from the underside help Pete prepar e for the expedition and also work on our of breakdown, directional cave popcorn, and some house building project. Things are looking good on the moonmilk ”cotton balls”. T erry found some worms, a fungus house, but it is time consuming. My goal is to put all or nearly gnat, and one small white amphipod (in a small puddle). all of the interior shiplap yellow cedar and get it sealed with Incredible! How did it get to this Island, or did it evolve from polyurethane. Lots more to put up yet, but with long hard ocean ones? I found a surface harvestman of unknown days I think it is possible. Pete finished building his ~25 foot species. boat. It is narrow, very streamlined, and really moves even with a full load. We took off this morning around 7:00AM from El Cap where the Forest Service has their work camp. It is vacant right now. P ete is planning on doing the transfer in on just two trips, and me, Steve Lewis, Kevin Casey, and T erri Brown were on the boat with lots of gear. W e had some waves with whitecaps and wind to 20 MPH, and then big swells on the outside. I started getting a bit woozy, as it was a long haul to do the 55 miles. We went back down to camp and found the others there, their having arrived around midday. On the way here, Pete stopped near Egg Harbor and promptly caught a 50 pound halibut, some of which he served for dinner. I felt a bit sickly at times today, but am better tonight. Maybe a touch of the flu. Steve Carley had to go to the hospital in Ketchikan and get checked. He is very sick. It is hoped he and Deb his We are on Coronation Island at the southeast corner wife can join us on the second week. T omorrow we continue of Windy Bay We set up the camp for the two weeks we the Colander survey and some of the others will check a intend to be here. It is truly an amazing place. Many of the resurgence cave entrance near China Cove. trees are odd-shaped with branching trunks. Steve (who has April 26, 2002 spent some time here) calls them “Coronation trees”. P ete Y esterday was bad. T erry, Creature, and I went up to may not make it back tonight with the rest of the group. I’m Colander Cave and we managed to move in a big boulder feeling a bit under the weather. I’m dozing while writing this. which was blocking a drafty side lead. Inside, we started surveying and were heading up a chimney. T erry had already April 24, 2002 gone up and I was following to sketch the last shot. A flake of T oday we (T erry Brown, Kevin Casey, Steve Lewis, rock I grabbed came loose and I hurriedly moved my hand and I) had breakfast then took off to hike up the mountain downwards for another hold and the flake fell on my little side to the south where some cavers (Steve, P ete, and the finger nearly severing it. I was able to see the end of the last Forest Service and Tim Heaton found some caves last bone sticking out. We washed it the best we could and headed summer. W e used Steve’s GPS to relocate them and found out and to camp. Creature thought she could sew it back, so at some new ones. Surveyed one of these new ones called camp she did. She even had a hypodermic to deaden it. I Hooting Grouse Cave, a 20 foot pit with a slope below. Then hope and pray that all the mud and rock is cleaned out. we went to Colander Cave. It begins with a 35 foot pit and Also yesterday, the other group e xplored and surveyed some opens up into a neat horizontal phreatic level. Last year Tim littoral caves along the south coast. I’m taking at least one or Heaton collected some extinct brown bear bones dating two days off caving to give my finger a chance to knit. Still ~11,000 years as I recall. There were also deer bones, but not bleeding. nearly as old. We surveyed lots of passage and found neat

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The Alaskan Caver Vo lume 24 No 3 page 4 Creature’s patch job. Photo by Jean Krejca Arch at Egg Harbor, Photo by Jean Kr ejca Kevin Allred maneuvers around moonmilk in Slant Cave. Note the glove on his left hand to protect his injured finger. Photo by Jean Kr ejka (continues on page 5) I am on a hike around the north side of Windy Cove. 1949. I now feel s t rongly that Miner Diversion Cave is a much Found one 30 foot long cave with phalangids (harvestman) better candidate for Folklore Cave, as it has many drape r ies and they are hibernating there. Some died and white fungus resembling octopus tentacles, easily visible above the floor of grows on their bodies and leg joints. the large entry chamber. The th i rd cave I let Kevin sketch because my finger was hurting when I did. It has lots of 4:40PM evidence of camping by natives with firepits and bones and A b i g wind came up on my way back t o camp, and chiton shells associated with them. Someone has to go ba c k when I got there, I checked the boat and marked an “X” on and finish the cave. The others found a going c l imbing lead in the ground to sight over and make sure the anchor was one of their caves with another old ladder in it. They need holding. Went to check later and the boat is on the rocks and rope to climb it. We rushed to get back to camp before dark. the tide is to o low to do anything now. Some damage, but it will still float. Pete will be upset. April 28, 2002 Well, yesterday we left P ete in camp and went part w ay up Needle Peak and found the snow too deep for our liking. Swung south and crossed a broad saddle. Then split into two teams. Me, Viv Creature, and T erri went across to a large flat, but heavily karsted area south of camp. Found a couple small caves and leads. One being a blowing dig. A place to return to, but overall disappointing to me. Lots of endless intense karst. One could wander a life t ime on this Island and not see the same place twi c e. It was cold and windy all day. I took the dressing off my poor finger and creature changed dress i ng. It may just heal. T oday Pete is taking the boat the 55 miles to Whale Pass (landing at El Cap) t o repair a crack in the hull. The night before last they got it off the rocks with the high tide. I got up to help, but got there just as it floated free. Stayed awake for a few hours We had to hike up over a pass between Egg Harbor to make sure P e t e would get it beached on the sand OK. I and Windy Bay. T ook around three hours. My finger was guess, t o day we, or at least some of us will go back to the throbbing yesterday and I hope it is not infected. Maybe I caves we found yesterday. W eather is holding dry windy, used it too much. overcast, but cold (lower than the mid 40 ’ s). I have to wear a glove partway on my left bad hand to help it warm so it can heal. April 29 (AM ) Y esterday we slid the boat down logs to the more gradual part of the flats, then waited for the tide to come in. Pete was boating home and dropped the r est of us off at Egg Harbor where we planned on surveying a string of littoral caves there. The boat ride was rough, but we pounded our way there eventually. We split into three teams and Kevin an d I surveyed two caves and started on a third. The second one had an old broken and rotting ladder in it. It once gave access up a flowstone-lined chi m ney which we deemed too delicate to climb up. There were no helictites as once described by Steve Lewis. Flowstone and a bit of cave coral and lots of popcorn. A few soda straws and some draperies an d short stalagmites. I wonder if it is “Folklore Cave” as described by Hackman in CORONA TION ISLAND EXP 2002 LOG continued from page 3

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The Alaskan Caver Volume 24 No. 3, page 5 MinersÂ’ Diversion Cave. Photo by Jean Krejca CORONA TION ISLAND EXP 2002 LOG continued from page 4 Chris Krejca donning SteveÂ’s drysuit. Photo by Jean Krejca April 30 (AM) T oday me, Chris, Viv and Creature surveyed a Y esterday was a day off and we washed clothes and couple tiny caves on the karsted flats south of camp. Steve ourselves. I went on a long hike along the coast cliffs to the Lewis, Steve Carley, Kevin Casey and T erri dug in a 70 foot southwest Found a 15 20 sea cave ? way up (100 feet) pit and hope to continue tomorrow. I may hike tomorrow with abo v e the present ones in the forest. It had an old f i re pit. On some of the others. There are some unexplored caves ther e. my way back I went too far into the wo o ds and got completely turned around for a while. Used shadows on my fingers May 3 (barely any perceptible shadow) to orient myself somewhat. Somewhere I must have lost a day. Y esterday a team Headed for the sound of the wind and sea. I was back on the worked on Flag Cave (the 70 foot pit) which now has another coast. Hugged it tighter this time, and got back OK. Pete had name. An unstable log threatened to slip down and plug a dig returned from Prince of Wales Island bring i ng his sons Jed they were working on. There was a five second clattering drop and Kina and Steve Carley and Deb We are probably going below which turned out to end on l y 40 feet down. They then to Egg Harbor by skiff, but I don Â’t know what I should do went to Lost Cave, one found last year It keeps going in a climbing, hiking, and caving-wise, since my finger is nine second c l attering drop. Meanwhile, Viv Chris, Creature throbbing and still swollen. and I hiked. Steve Lewis loaned Chris his drysuit and I loaned Creature mine. They went into a resurgence cave discovered May 1, (PM) This morning when I awoke, my finger was itching a bit, which is encourag i ng. Also, today I felt much less internal tearing when I accidentally move it. We split into two teams, Pete and his boys staying in camp. Jed and Kina wer e too tired to do anything after a long hike most of the crew took yesterday back around the shoreline from Pin P eak and Egg Harbor. P ete minded the boat during 30 35 knot winds while Creature Viv and I did some more survey in the Egg Harbor littoral caves. There are now a total of seven caves. In Miner Diversion Cave, Viv and Creature did a bolt climb up a huge fissure which had not just the one, but two old pole ladders. Someone long ago had been there. I took it real easy with my bad finger and made a compass and pace survey of the c aves entrances and their relationships. Earlier in the expedition. It looked like it sumped, but they went about 400 feet and it kept going. I wanted to explore the area a little, but the others were anxious about getting to camp and meeting Pete who had decided to take advantage of calmer (20 knot winds) weather and shuttle a group out in the boat. It continues to be unseasonably cold, clear, and windy. T oday (this morning), Pete may come in and pick the rest of us up. IÂ’ve mixed feelings, but I could not do any real hard caving anyway, and probably would not be able to get into the drysuit, let alone have my hand wet and cold for days. Weather has calmed considerably but the forecast is for rain, snow, and w i nds for the weekend anyway. So we need to be ready.

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The Alaskan Caver Volume 24 No. 3 page 6 GROUSE CAVE CORONATION ISLAND, TONGASS NATIONAL FOREST ALASKA CAVE REPORT #332 TONGASS CAVE PROJECT NATIONAL SPELEOLOGICAL SOCIETY November 25, 2002 by Kevin Allred APEX PIT CORONATION ISLAND, TONGASS NATIONAL FOREST ALASKA CAVE REPORT #331 TONGASS CAVE PROJECT NATIONAL SPELEOLOGICAL SOCIETY November 25, 2002 by Kevin Allred Management Recommendations: Apex Pit could be visited by those cautious of the unstable rock and prepared with rope. Description: Apex Pit was discovered about 60 feet west of Hidden F ern Cave by Terry Brown and Kevin Allred, then surveyed on April 26, 2002 by Kevin Casey, Steve Lewis, and T erri Brown. The cave is formed in Heceta Limestone and consists of a sloping pit choked with rubble. It is a total of 50.5 feet (15.4m) long and 40 feet (12.2m) deep. the cave walls are highly fractured, causing unstable, loose rocks. No animal bones or cultural evidence were found. A harvestman was seen near the entrance. e QUITTINÂ’ TIME CAVE CORONATION ISLAND, TONGASS NATIONAL FOREST ALASKA CAVE REPORT #334 TONGASS CAVE PROJECT NATIONAL SPELEOLOGICAL SOCIETY November 25, 2002 by Kevin Allred QuittinÂ’ Time Cave was surveyed May 1, 2002 by Jean Krejca and Chris Krejca. It is a small pit 18 feet (5.5m) long and 14 feet (4.2m) in depth. The cave probably takes a little recharge, but the sinkhole is small and on a hillside. No cultural evidence, invertebrates, or speleothems were noted. Hidden Fern Cave is a small, vertical pit. Its walls are highly fractured; presumably from frost action. The cave is located about 60 to 70 feet due south from Apex Cave and about 1000 feet south of Colander Cave. Although no speleothems, bones, or cultural evidence were noted in Hidden Fern, it is a fun cave to visit, along with the intensely karsted old growth forest. The cave was surveyed on May 1, 2002 by Kevin Casey, T erri Brown, and Steve Lewis. The length and depth is 20.2 feet. .. HIDDEN FERN PIT CORONATION ISLAND, TONGASS NATIONAL FOREST ALASKA CAVE REPORT #335 TONGASS CAVE PROJECT NATIONAL SPELEOLOGICAL SOCIETY November 25, 2002 by Kevin Allred Management Recommendations: No special management is needed for this cave, so long as it remains a wilderness area. Grouse Cave was surveyed on May 1, 2002 by Vivian Loftin, and Chris Krejca. The cave is 21.6 feet (6.6m) long and 17 feet (5.2m) deep. It has a circular mossy entrance in a steep sinkhole. The cave heads steeply down at first, then drops off 12 feet to end in a too tight constriction. It is a possible dig, as it takes water and air. No rope is needed for the cave. No biology, speleothems or bones were noted. Management Recommendations: There is not reason to restrict the location of this cave to the general public. Management Recommendations: No special management is needed for this pit.

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The Alaskan Caver Volume 24 No. 3 page 7 (continues on page 8) INTRODUCTION: In the November 1949 National Speleological Society Bulletin First Egg Cave is the northernmost of seven significant littoral Number 11, Robert J. Hackman reported the following on Coronation caves located on the west side of Egg Harbor. It is somewhat less notable Island: than most of the other caves, being around a corner and screened by “This island belongs to the extreme westerly group, and has vegetation. First Egg Cave is formed along one joint and a secondary one considerable limestone on it. It is high and rocky with sheer cliffs dropping trending northeast. Most walls, ceiling, and floor retain original smoothed off into the sea and besides the folklore cave already mentioned, (see surfaces typical of a littoral cave subject to abrasion. The cave contains below, KA) has many giant sea caves along the coast. One fisherman told some seepage and dripping. Some popcorn speleothems were noted. No me that on a calm day he ran his fishing boat into one of the larger caves. animal bones or insects were noted. Several very old two foot diameter These trolling boats are usually about fifty to sixty feet long and about as stumps in front of the entrance may have been from turn of the century high. A very interesting fact about these large sea caves is the abundance of mining on Pin Peak above the cave. First Egg Cave was surveyed by Kevin bird life in them. Thousands of wild ducks and other types of sea fowl use Allred and Kevin Casey on April 28, 2002. It’s length is 50.6 feet (15.4 them for nesting places. One can fire a gun near the entrance of one of meters), and the depth is 2.6 feet (.8 meter). these caves, and thousands of birds will fly out. In fact, so great is the MANAGEMENT RECOMMENDATIONS: number that by the time the first portion of the flight has completed a halfConsidering the archaeological resources in other nearby caves, mile circle over the water and begins flying back into the cave, some of the this cave should be limited access. rear section of the flight are still coming out of the cave. Lost Soles Cave was named after some shoe soles found on the The folklore of the Tlinket Indians gives the raven as the floor just inside the entrance. This cave is the second from the north, and principal deity and ancestor of their race. The story goes that ‘way back in technically includes a large natural bridge as part of its passage. It has a the days of creation, and before he started his line of descendants, the spectacular view of Kuiu Island through the natural bridge. The cave is raven wished to make the sea safe for his people. Therefore, selecting as a basically one large chamber which has much evidence of past cultural use. meeting place a cave on the island which later was named Coronation It contains boards, burnt wood, fire pits, and a constructed pool near the Island, he invited all the terrible monsters of the deep and when they had all back. The cave may have had some prehistoric use. Speleogenesis appears assembled in this cave, he cast a spell on them that they might never be free to have been phreatic with littoral modification. The only speleothems to molest his people. And today when one visits this cave the monsters are noted was popcorn. Biology includes worms and growths on the ceiling at all there to be seen. the back of the cave. Several small streamlets enter the cave. One of these This story was told to me by Joe Demrit. Joe is part Tlinket and has been dammed up to form the small pool. Lost Soles was surveyed April has visited the cave (of Craig, now dead, K.A.). He states that there are 28, 2002 by Steve Lewis and Terry Brown. T otal survey was 427.5 feet considerable formations in the cave and that it was probably the shape of (130.3 meters) and the vertical extent is 12.6 feet (3.9 meters). some of these that inspired the imagination of the early Indians to associate them with terrible monsters of the deep. The author did not have an MANAGEMENT RECOMMENDATIONS: opportunity to visit this cave since it was a considerable distance from This cave should remain available to visit, but there should not where we were working at the time.” be directed access. A thorough archaeological survey might be worthwhile. In Volume two Number one, page 17 of the Alaskan Caver, William R. Halliday discusses an article (from Alaska Magazine) written by Emery Tobin. Mentioned is a “ row of some six caves and three arched rock bridges in Egg Harbor... the caves are from 10 to 20 feet high at their Little Willie Cave is the third of seven Egg Harbor littoral caves entrances but gradually contract to their ends at distances of from 50 to 400 formed in the Heceta Limestone of Coronation Island (see area map). The feet.” entrance is partially screened by small spruces. No cultural or biological In the Alaskan Caver Volume 9, Number 3, page 12, Steve evidence was found. However, just inside the entrance is a small area of Lewis, who had been doing deer research on the Island stated: phytokarst. These are fingers of rock up to one inch long facing the “Egg Harbor has a number of caves on the west side, none of which went entrance and formed from the surrounding rock being corroded through terribly far. One did have some nice chimneys with some very interesting biological action. Some have caps of popcorn similar to those found in the formations (and a decrepit ladder). One fork had some large helictites, I entrance of Whispering Cave at Wrangell St. Elias Park, Alaska. believe anyway, (these were popcorn and coralloids, KA) quite substantial A small streamlet issues from the back of the cave and disappears into the formations coming out almost perpendicular to the walls. This route was rubble floor. The cave was surveyed on April 28, 2002 by Chris Krejca, impossible to climb without grave damage to formations, but appeared to Vivian Loftin, and Jean Krejca. It has a total of 31.5 feet (9.6 meters) and a squeeze down to nothing forty feet or so above me (this cave is now known vertical extent of 1.6 feet (.5 meter). as Drafty Cave, KA).” So far, the T ongass Cave Project is not aware of exactly where on MANAGEMENT RECOMMENDATIONS: Coronation Island Folklore Cave is. There is some speculation that the This cave is fine to visit by the general public, however, due to its Tlinket natives used Egg Harbor (located on the north side of the Island) as proximity to archaeologically significant caves nearby the public should a staging area while bird egg gathering to the west in the Hazy Islands. not be directed to the cave. Midway along the western side of Egg Harbor are seven good-sized littoral caves which are now raised above the tidal zone from glacial rebound (see location map). Speleothems are found in most of these, but only a few contain significant ones which might qualify them as the cave described by Miner Diversion Cave was surveyed on April 28 and 30, 2002 by Hackman. Foremost amo ng these is Miner Diversion Cave. In the spacious Chris Krejca, Jean Krejca, and Vivian Loftin. It is the author’s opinion that of twilight entrance chamber are numerous clusters of draperies which, with a all the littoral caves of Egg Harbor, Miner Diversion is most likely to qualify as little imagination, resemble octopuses. A description of the individual caves follows. LITTORAL CAVES OF EGG HARBOR FIRST EGG CAVE, LOST SOLES CAVE, LITTLE WILLIE CAVE, MINER DIVERSION CAVE, DRAFTY CAVE, CAMP CAVE, SLANT CAVE CORONATION ISLAND, TONGASS NATIONAL FOREST ALASKA CAVE REPORT #323, TONGASS CAVE PROJECT NATIONAL SPELEOLOGICAL SOCIETY November 25, 2002 by Kevin Allred ‘FOLKLORE CAVE’ FIRST EGG CAVE LOST SOLES CAVE LITTLE WILLIE CAVE MINER DIVERSION CAVE

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The Alaskan Caver Volume 24 No. 3 page 8 Littoral Caves of Egg Harbor continued from page 7 DRAFTY CAVE CAMP CAVE SLANT CAVE V i v i a n L o f t i n a n d C h r i s K r e j c a i n L i t t l e W i l l i e C a v e P h o t o b y J e a n K r e j c a “Folklore Cave” as mentioned in the introduction. The ceiling and walls of was surveyed on April 28 and 30, 2002 by Kevin Casey, Kevin Allred, Vivian the large twilight entrance chamber ar e festooned with displays of draperies, Loftin, and Jean Krejca. It has a total of 353 feet (107.6m) and is 15 feet some of which resemble octopuses. Unfortunately until the actual location of (4.6m) deep. The floor is bedrock in this area with thin, discontinuous silt and Folklore is pinpointed, we can only speculate where it might be. This cave has rubble. Some boulders are rounded. probably been used prehistorically as a camp and shelter, and more recently One can follow the east branch of the entrance chamber 120 feet to store exploratory drill cores (1 1/2 and 2 inch diameter) in the 1970’s to a corner alcove containing a complete mink skeleton. A walking-size according to Steve Lewis. Some chunks of cement are scattered 15 to 20 feet passage heads east to a “back door” entrance. Judging from the fresh tracks, inside the main entrance. Above the cave on Pin Peak, some mining did take deer also use this cave for shelter. The only speleothems noted are scattered place in the early 1900’s, and they even mined out a vertical non-carbonate seam popcorn. for 30 feet within this cave. Two extremely old pole ladders were also found in the western branch of the cave. Using ropes and bolts, Jean Krejca and Vivian Management Recommendations: Loftin climbed up into this section, repeating what the old timers had done with As the cave is significant archaeologically, it should be studied in the pole ladders. depth by qualified archaeologists. It already receives much visitation by Miners Diversion Cave is the most extensive of the Egg Harbor fisherman and recreationists. The public should not be directed to the cave to littoral caves. It has a total of 714.3 feet (242.1 meters) surveyed passage, and has protect what prehistoric cultural evidence remains. a vertical extent of 111.3 feet (33.9 meters). A back entrance can be accessed from the beach up a steep slope, or up a rubble slope within the cave. Speleothems: Near the back entrance is a speleothem-decorated side alcove which Slant Cave is the southern-most cave of the Egg Harbor littoral can be reached by traversing across ledges. Eccentric soda straws, stalactites, and caves. It was surveyed on April 30, 2002 by Vivian Loftin, Jean Krejca, and popcorn were noted here. At the southern most back of the cave, a steeply sloping Kevin Allred. T otal surveyed passage is 206 feet (66.8m) and its depth is 11.6 passage continued but would need technical climbing to get all the way up. feet (3.5m). Its entrance is nearly obscured by a talus slope, forcing one to Extensive flowstone was seen here. Coralloids up to two inches long were seen descend back down in the cave to its original floor level. Parts of the ceiling near the most immense boulder of the main passage. Popcorn is scattered and overhanging walls still have the original smoothed littoral surfaces. The throughout the cave. The overhanging walls and ceiling of the entrance chamber upper recess of the cave is steeply inclined and also smooth in place s when contains stalactites and draperies already discussed. not covered by silt. Some rounded cobbles and boulders were noted in the floor rubble midway to the back. Animal Bones: Once in the cave below the talus debris, one can see that the cave Bones were found in the far north alcove near the entrance. Part of a has been developed along a seam of light brown noncarbonate rock in the wolf-size carnivore skull was discovered in an alcove in the left wall about 15 Heceta Limestone. The seam is tilted at about 40 degrees. A fire pit is located feet west of a small connecting passage which leads to the back entrance. Small in the first level area 40 feet beyond the entrance. Further on there is bones are located in the beginning of the pole ladder passage. abundant fresh and old river otter scat, indicating they are denning there. Biology: Approximately 200 feet from the entrance are some beautiful stalactites and On the floor in an alcove at the beginning of the pole ladder passage is stalagmites high on the wall. Soon the way becomes lower and coated with a small pool fed by drips. In this pool Jean Krejca found white amphipods, brown thick deposits of moonmilk. A crawlway leads to a small sit-up chamber at the flatworms, and aquatic oligochaetes. A spider was seen near the two inch very end. A spot of the light brown noncarbonate seam is visible at the very coralloids mentioned above. end. A few small pools at the back did not contain any notable biota. Speleothems in the cave are soda straws, stalactites, stalagmites up to five Management Recommendations: inches high, popcorn, draperies, bacon rind, moonmilk, and moonmilk This cave has already been impacted by the miners. Since the older coralloids. Some of the soda straws resemble “lion’s tails”. Other than lots of modification and pole ladders are now more than 50 years old, they qualify as dripping water into the pools at the back, the rest of the cave contains only cultural artifacts and should not be disturbed. However, the drill cores and general seepage and minor dripping with no streams. Miscellaneous small associated rotting cardboard and wood supports could be removed from the bones were seen. Besides the otter scat already mentioned, more fish bone cave. Because of the potential for prehistoric artifacts is high and outstanding was found in the last 25 feet of the cave. speleothems are present, the general public should not be directed to visit the cave. Management Recommendations: Because of its delicate moonmilk and other speleothems, the cave should be protected from visitation. Since the entrance is not as noticeable or Drafty Cave was named after the old empty “Miller Draft” beer accessible as many of the other nearby caves, it is more pristine. An can sitting on a ledge in the cave. This cave was mentioned by Steve Lewis in archaeological investigation is needed. the introduction. Steve had noted the old rotten ladder near the back. The lumber used had dimensions of 1 3/4” x 4” and the nails were very rusted and probably round, rather than square. The ladder may date to the early 1900’s when Pin Peak was prospected. Access to the entrance of Drafty Cave is up a talus slope which has partially filled in the entrance. It is an old littoral cave but has been modified by solution and frost action. It was surveyed April 30, 2002 by Kevin Allred and Kevin Casey. The cave has a total of 101 feet (30.8m) of passage with a vertical extent of 28 feet (8.6m). Drafty Cave contains stalagmites up to three inches long, soda straws to two inches, small stalactites, popcorn, draperies (some with serrations on edges), flowstone, and a little one inch long spray of coralloids. A flowstone covered chimney prevented exploration beyond the top of the ladder remains. No biology or bones were found, and the only notable cultural value was the old ladder. Management Recommendations: The chimneys could be climbed using bolts, but it would not be advisable because of the delicate flowstone. Because it is near other archaeologically sensitive caves in the area and has speleothems, the public should not be directed to this cave. The main 70 foot wide and 35 foot high entrance of Camp Cave is highly visible from the entrance of Egg Harbor (see area map). The cave is accessible from sandy beaches adjacent to both of its entrances. Camp cave

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The Alaskan Caver Volume 24 No. 3 page 9 LEG END pas sage wal ll verti cal d rop, dep th in feet brea kdow n cobb le, g rave l and san d fill wate r, w ater flow slop e (sp lays dow nwa rd) 10 dripl ine logboar d gras s bedr ock entrance t o Lost Soles Cave 0 da tu m 0 20 60 40 fe e t 00 4040 feetfeet 2020 00 2020 metersmeters 1010 8080 PRO FILE PLA N FIRS T EG G C A VE AND LO ST S OLE S CA VE CORONA TION ISLA ND, A LASKA Surveyed with compass, clinometer and tape April 28, 2002 by Kevin Allred, T erri Brown, Kevin Casey and Steve Lewis. Map by K and C Allred. A littor al cave for med in He ceta lime stone TONGAS S CA VE PROJE CT ceiling of F irst Egg C ave floor of F irst Egg C ave dig with b ones cobble di g arch north entra nce of arc h entrance t o First Egg C ave PAC IFIC OCE AN small spruce 0 da tu m dig with b ones cobble di g ARCH LOST SOLE S CA VE FIRST EGG C AVE entrance entrance small pen insula approx. mea n high tide l evel approx. mea n high tide l ine 1 15 10 3 16 N Nm 23 2002 1 NOTES: 1. cut, notched log 2. mossy and damp 3. fire pit 4. old shoe sole 5. stump 6. burned wood 7. alder tree 8. cleared gravel area 9. ferns 10.biologic growth on ceiling11.bones12.can hear water13.bottom of wood barrel14.built dam15.moonmilk 2 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 C 2 0 0 2 b y C a rl e n e A ll re d Surveyed length of F irst Egg Ca ve50.6 fe et (15.4 fe et) Vertica l extent of First Egg C ave2.6 fe et (.8 mete rs) Survey len gth of Lost Soles Cav e427.5 fe et (130.3 m eters) Vertica l extent:of Lost Soles Cave12. 6 feet (3.9 meters)

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The Alaskan Caver Volume 24 N o. 3 page 10 N N m 23 2 00 2 MI NE R DI VE RS IO N CA VE COR ONA TION ISLA ND, ALAS KA Surveyed with compass, clinometer and tape April 28 and 30, 2002 by Jean Krejca, Vivian Loftin, Christine Krejca and Kevin Allred. Map by K. and C. Allred. Surve yed le ngth: 794 f eet (2 42 me ters) Ver tical e xtent: 11 1 feet (34 m eters) TONGASS CAVE PROJECT A lit toral c ave fo rmed in He ceta limes tone PACIFIC OCEAN cement chunks 80 60 fe et 20 0 40 12 0 10 0 0 40 fe et 20 0 20 m et er s 10 80 PROFILE PLAN C 2 0 0 2 b y C a rl e n e A ll re d 0 datum 0 datum ENTRANCE ENTRANCE ENTRANCE ENTRANCE ? drill cores drill cores moss tailings pole ladders difficult access pools with white amphipods (Stygobromus quatsemsis), smaller brown amphipods, worms and planarians mined slot deer bones beaches are of cobbles, gravel and sand drill cores tailings difficult access mined slot high climb high climb A B E D C A B E D C LEGEND entrance dripline passage wallunderlying passage walllogvertical dropdepth of drop in feetwater breakdownrock, sand, dirt and cobble fillfine sedimentsslope (splays downward)bedrockflowstone and dripstonechange in ceiling height (higher to right) 6 window window ? 30 15 20 20 20 20 20

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The Alaskan Caver Volume 24 N o. 3 page 11 CAMP CAVE CORONATION ISLAND, ALASKA Surveyed with compass, clinometer and tape April 28 and 30, 2002, by Kevin, Allred, Vivian Loftin, Jean Krejca and Kevin Casey. Map by K. and C. Allred. Surveyed length: 353 feet (107.6 meters) Vertical extent: 15 feet (4.6 meters) TONGASS CAVE PROJECT A littoral cave formed in Heceta limestone 0 2 0 fe e t 1 0 0 1 0 m e te rs 5 4 0 0 4 0 fe e t 2 0 3 0 5 0 1 0 N o rt h Nm 23 2 00 2 C 2 0 0 2 b y C a rl e n e A ll re d 0 datum 0 datum PACIFIC OCEAN LEGEND entrance driplinepassage wallrocks and cobblessilt fillslope (splays downward)bonesbedrock floorgrassvertical drop, depth in feet PLAN PROFIILE MAIN ENTRANCE “BACK DOOR” ENTRANCE MAIN ENTRANCE “BACK DOOR” ENTRANCE window window approximate mean high tide level approximate mean high tide line 7 4 2 1 7 .5 2 2 2 2 NOTES: 1.mink skeleton2.fire pit with bones, shells and chiton shells3.alcove containes deer bones, other bones and chiton shells4.popcorn on walls, some is directional5.floor mostly angular rocks with sparse cobbles6.floor is bedrock with thin, discontinuous silt and rubble, rounded boulders and angular boulders 1 3 4 5 6

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The Alaskan Caver Volume 24 N o. 3 page 12 Vivian LoftinÂ’s bolt climb in Miner Diversion Cave, photo by Jean Krejca P R O F I L E P L A N N m 2 3 2 0 0 2 N 00 4 0 4 0 fe e t fe e t 2 0 2 0 00 2 0 2 0 m e te rs m e te rs 1 0 1 0 8 0 8 0 0 -2 0 4 0 2 0 fee t 0 d a tu m 0 d a tu m ta lu s s lo p e fi re p it o tt e r s c a t o tt e r s c a t a n d o ld b o n e s m a id e n h a ir f e rn g ro w in g i n e n tr a n c e C 2 0 0 2 b y C a r l e n e A l l r e d G ra s s p o o l m o o n m il k b e d ro c k H ig he r c h a n g e i n c e il in g h e ig h t s ta la c ti te s a n d d ra p e ri e s s ta la g m it e s fl o w s to n e e n tr a n c e d ri p li n e p a s s a g e w a ll ro c k a n d c o b b le f il l s il t a n d m u d s lo p e ( s p la y s d o w n w a rd ) L E G E N D E N T R A N C E E N T R A N C E 8 2 6 S L A N T C A V E C O R O N A T IO N I S L A N D A L A S K A S u rv e y e d w it h c o m p a s s c li n o m e te r a n d t a p e A p ri l 3 0 2 0 0 2 b y V iv ia n L o ft in K e v in A ll re d a n d J e a n K re jc a M a p b y K a n d C A ll re d S u rv e y e d l e n g th : 2 0 6 f e e t (6 2 .8 m e te rs ) V e rt ic a l e x te n t: 1 1 .6 f e e t (3 .5 m e te rs ) T O N G A S S C A V E P R O J E C T A l it to ra l c a v e f o rm e d i n H e c e ta l im e s to n e C 2 0 0 2 b y C a r l e n e A l l r e d 0 d a t u m P R O F I L E P L A N L I T T L E W I L L I E C A V E C O R O N A T I O N I S L A N D A L A S K A Surveyed with com pass, clin ometer an d tape April 28, 2 002, by Vivian Loftin, C hristine K rejca, an d Jean Kr ejca. Map by K and C. Allred. S u r v e y e d le n g t h : 3 1 5 f e e t ( 9 6 m e t e r s ) V e r t ic a l e x t e n t : 1 6 f e e t ( 5 m e t e r s ) T O N G A S S C A V E P R O J E C T A li t t o r a l c a v e f o r m e d in H e c e t a li m e s t o n e 0 1 0 f e e t 2 0 5 5 1 0 E N T R A N C E h i g h t i d e l i n e i s a p p r o x i m a t e l y 4 0 f e e t f r o m c a v e e n t r a n c e f in e s e d im e n t f il l s lo p e ( s p la y s d o w n w a r d ) c h a n g e in c e il in g h e ig h t w a t e r f lo w e n t r a n c e o p e n in g in p r o f il e H ig h e r E N T R A N C E 0 d a t u m t o o t i g h t t o o t ig h t p h y t o k a r s t p h y t o k a r s t d r i p p i n g w a t e r d r ip p in g w a t e r 6 f o o t d r o p 1 0 f e e t 5 0 m e t e r s 5 2 0 0 N m 2 3 2 0 0 2 N L E G E N D e n t r a n c e d r ip li n e p a s s a g e w a ll r o c k a n d c o b b le f il l P R O F I L E P L A N 0 2 0 f e e t D R A F T Y C A V E C O R O N A T I O N I S L A N D A L A S K A Surveyed with compass, clino meter and tape April 30, 2002 by Kevin Casey a nd Kevin Allred Map by K. and C. Allred. B e d r o c k is H e c e t a li m e s t o n e 0 d a t u m 0 d a t u m E N T R A N C E E N T R A N C E c l u s t e r o f c a v e c o r a l ? ? ? ? o l d l a d d e r s 2 0 4 0 ? ? ? ? S u r v e y e d le n g t h : 1 0 1 f e e t ( 3 0 8 m e t e r s ) V e r t ic a l e x t e n t : 2 8 f e e t ( 8 6 m e t e r s ) 0 2 0 f e e t 1 0 0 1 0 m e t e r s 5 4 0 1 0 1 2 1 8 4 N N m 2 3 2 0 0 2 1 L E G E N D e n t r a n c e d r ip li n e p a s s a g e w a ll b r e a k d o w n a n g u la r r o c k a n d s il t f il l s lo p e ( s p la y s d o w n w a r d ) C 2 0 0 2 b y C a r l e n e A l l r e d d r ip s t o n e f o r m a t io n s f lo w s t o n e o ld l a d d e r v e r ti c a l d r o p a n d d e p th ( fe e t)

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The Alaskan Caver Volume 24 N o. 3 page 13 “ s h o o t ” d r o p “ o v e r h a n g ” d r o p t o o t ig h t p o s s ib le d ig F L A G C A V E C O R O N A T I O N I S L A N D A L A S K A Surveyed with compa ss, clinom eter and ta pe May 1-2, 2 002, by Stev e Carley, Terri Bro wn, Pete Smit h and Kev in Casey. Map by K. and C. Allre d. S u r v e y e d le n g t h : 1 2 4 f e e t ( 3 8 m e t e r s ) V e r t ic a l e x t e n t : 9 2 f e e t ( 2 0 m e t e r s ) T O N G A S S C A V E P R O J E C T B e d r o c k is H e c e t a li m e s t o n e N o r t h N m 2 3 2 0 0 2 P R O F I L E P L A N 0 2 0 f e e t 1 0 0 1 0 m e t e r s 5 4 0 0 d a t u m 0 d a t u m 4 0 2 0 f e e t 6 0 0 8 0 c e il in g p e n d a n t s c r in o id s t e m s in w a ll s b o n e s p r o b a b ly d e e r ( le g b o n e v e r t e b r a e s k u ll f r a g m e n t s ) jo in t t r e n d s 3 2 5 m n LO G lo g m a i n e n t r a n c e p i t e n t r a n c e p i t L E G E N D p a s s a g e w a ll ro c k f il l s il t fi ll lo w er hi gh er s lo p e ( s p la y s d o w n w a rd ) c h a n g e i n c e il in g h e ig h t v e rt ic a l d ro p “ s h o o t ” d r o p “ o v e r h a n g ” d r o p t o o t ig h t p o s s ib le d ig c e il in g p e n d a n t s c r in o id s t e m s in w a ll s b o n e s p r o b a b ly d e e r ( le g b o n e v e r t e b r a e s k u ll f r a g m e n t s ) m a i n e n t r a n c e p i t e n t r a n c e p i t f is h e a g le a n d o t t e r b o n e s C E D A R C A V E C O R O N A T I O N I S L A N D A L A S K A Surveyed with compass, clinom eter and tape April 25, 2002, by Steve Lewis,Viv ian Loftin, Christine Krejc a, Pete Smith a nd Kevin Case y. Map by K. and C. Allred. S u r v e y e d le n g t h : 1 4 7 f e e t ( 4 4 7 m e t e r s ) V e r t ic a l e x t e n t : 2 0 f e e t ( 6 1 m e t e r s ) f lo o r c o v e r e d in o ld s o f t f lo w s t o n e N o r t h N m 2 3 2 0 0 2 P R O F I L E P L A N C 2 0 0 2 b y C a r le n e A ll r e d p e n d a n t g r a s s y s lo p e cave is appart ently above th e spray and tide level and floor is littere d wall-to-wall with bones of deer, bird, etc. f ir e s c a r s E N T R A N C E E N T R A N C E 0 d a t u m 0 d a t u m F o u r f o o t v e r t ic a l d r o p L E G E N D e n t r a n c e d r ip li n e p a s s a g e w a ll c h a n g e in c e il in g h e ig h t r o c k s s il t a n d g r a v e l f il l s lo p e ( s p la y s d o w n w a r d ) d r ip s t o n e f o r m a t io n s b e d r o c k f lo o r h ig h e r o t t e r t r a il 0 2 0 f e e t 1 0 0 1 0 m e t e r s 5 4 0 T O N G A S S C A V E P R O J E C T B e d r o c k is H e c e t a li m e s t o n e floor is of silt, bones and gravel with scattered breakdown CEDAR CAVE CORONATION ISLAND TONGASS NATIONAL FOREST ALASKA CAVE REPORT #337, TONGASS CAVE PROJECT NATIONAL SPELEOLOGICAL SOCIETY November 25, 2002 by Kevin Allred FLAG CAVE CORONATION ISLAND TONGASS NATIONAL FOREST ALASKA CAVE REPORT #338, TONGASS CAVE PROJECT NATIONAL SPELEOLOGICAL SOCIETY November 25, 2002 by Kevin Allred Cedar Cave is an old littoral cave, no longer reached by the tides because of isostatic rebound. The access to the entrance is either from a steep draw above the cave, or from the ocean. No rope is needed, but calm seas are necessary to access it from the water. Another cave is located to the south in a deep slot containing seawater at mid tide. A waterfall was heard there without an obvious surface connection. This cave is unchecked. The entrance of Cedar Cave is exposed to the swells of the outside unprotected waters. The entrance is always out of salt water, but still may receive some spray. The cave is composed of one single corridor with was surveyed by Kevin Casey, Vivian Loftin, Chris Krejca, and Steve Lewis on April 25, 2002. Total surveyed passage is 147 feet (44.7m) long with a vertical relief of 20 feet (6.1m). The cave contains bones of deer, birds, etc., and apparent fire scars. Other bones of deer, eagle, small birds, etc., were also found in the cave. Speleothems noted in the cave are, nice bacon rinds, draperies, stalagmites, and stalactites, which were very nice up high. The cave has damp walls, but no standing water. No biological survey was done. Management Recommendations: Because of its archaeological and paleontological resources, the cave should have full protection and the location withheld from the general public. It should be studied before the deposits are disturbed. Flag Cave was named after some old flagging on a nearby tree north of the entrance, perhaps left there by a deer hunter. Located on a karsted hillside well away from any landmarks, this cave would be very difficult to ever relocate without a Global Positioning System receiver. Flag Cave consists of two pits below a linearly enlarged double sinkhole. One 50 footer ends at the top of the second pit which is 65 feet deep. The deeper pit is unstable with a dig at the bottom. A team spent a full day stabilizing and rigging the slot and digging out logs and rocks. A five to six second tumbling drop below lured the cavers to use a bow saw to cut a final log away to allow descent of the final pit. Rigging for the cave consisted of a rope tied to the north end of the entrance sinkhole, which then passes around a large log in the entrance. It is a good idea to secure the log from disturbance by passing cavers. A redirectional was also placed on the east side to prevent the rope from touching the potentially dangerous log. Flag Cave is formed in Heceta fossiliferous limestone. The cave walls are heavily fractured and dip to the southwest. The cave is developed on a joint trending 325 degrees. The soil overburden is very thin and subject to disturbance. The only noted speleothems were tiny popcorn. Speleogens of pendants and scallops were reported. No invertebrates were noted, however, animal bones were discover ed. Leg bones, vertebrae, and part of a skull were found. These may be from a deer. Total survey on May 1 and 2, 2002 was 124 feet (38m) with 92 feet (20m) of depth. Surveyors were Terri Brown, Steve Carley Pete Smith, and Kevin Casey. Management Recommendations:Flag Cave has challenging, potential dangerous drops, requiring particular care by cavers. The cave would be good for dissolution and geomorphology studies. As long as the Island remains protected from timber harvest, the cave will be fine. Near Flag Cave is an unsurveyed 25 foot pit called Mossland Cave. It is located at the base of a slope.

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The Alaskan Caver Volum e 24 No. 3 page 14 C O L A N D E R C A V E C O R O N A T IO N I S L A N D A L A S K A Surveyed with compass, clinometer and tape April 24, 25 and 26, 2002, by Steve Lewis, T erri Brown, Kevin Casey, Jean Krejca and Kevin Allred. Map by K. and C. Allred. S u rv e y e d l e n g th : 4 9 3 f e e t (1 5 0 .4 m e te rs ) V e rt ic a l e x te n t: 6 1 f e e t (1 8 .7 m e te rs ) “S a fe ty F ir st ” P a ss a g e P L A N ze ro d a tu m E N T R A N C E P IT ? tt flo o r h o le t t op en s up b ey on d co ns tri ct io n, de lic at e po pc or n an d fin ge rs ch im n e y sl o t tt tt tt -1 7 co n tin u e s, d e lic a te m u d f lo o r, n o t p ro m is in g A B C D E F G H I J K L ? tt tig h t sl o t (l o w e r) N N m 23 2 00 2 pa ss ag e w al l en tra nc e dr ip lin e ve rti ca l d ro p de pt h of d ro p in fe et ch im ne y 44 44 44 4 roc ks mu d a nd co bb le fill slo pe (s pla ys do wn wa rd) too tig ht to en ter tt L E G E N D “S a fe ty F ir st ” P a ss a g e P R O J E C T E D P R O F IL E 0 40 feet 20 0 20 mete rs 10 80 ze ro d a tu m op en s up b ey on d co ns tr ic tio n, de lic at e po pc or n an d fin ge rs ch im n e y sl o t tt tt tt E N T R A N C E P IT tt tt ? ? ? ? tt C o p yr ig h t 2 0 0 2 b y C a rl e n e A llr e d tig h t sl o t 1 0 5 1 0 6 2 4 1 0 5 1 0 5 4 4 4 A B C D E F G H I J K L (u p p e r) 0 20 feet 60 80 40 NOTES: 1. deer and bear bones2. brown bear femur3. manganese4. 3-4 inches of mud over 6-8 inches if clay, overlies black organic material. Stygobromus quatsemsis found here5. clay6. white and brown flowstone/moonmilk7. directional popcorn pointing toward entrance8. popcorn9. gypsum or calcite fingers under breakdown 1 2 3 4 4 5 5 6 7 5 8 9 1 2 3 4 4 5 5 6 7 5 8 9 6 6 A 5 0 f o o t lo n g r o p e i s n e e d e d t o r ig t h is c a v e B e d ro c k i s H e c e ta l im e s to n e T O N G A S S C A V E P R O JE C T S u r v e y i n g P a s s i o n P i t p h o t o b y J e a n K r e j c a COLANDER CAVE CORONATION ISLAND TONGASS NATIONAL FOREST ALASKA CAVE REPORT #341 TONGASS CAVE PROJECT NATIONAL SPELEOLOGICAL SOCIETY November 25, 2002 by Kevin Allred Colander Cave was discovered in the summer of 2001 by Steve Lewis. Deer bones dating 3,300 years and extinct brown bear bones dating 11,630 years were found at this time. Some of the bones were collected by Dr. Timothy Heaton of the University of South Dakota. The cave was revisited on April 24, 25, and 26th for a complete exploration and survey. An accident occurred on the 25th after Kevin Allred, Jean Krejca, and T erri Brown dug out a partially plugged side passage. A rock fell on one of Kevin’s fingers, nearly severing it. The survey was completed on the next day, making Colander a total 493 feet (150.4 m) long, and 61 feet (18.7m) deep. This cave contains significant biological interest besides the fossil bone deposits. Less than 100 feet from the bottom of the 50 foot entrance drop where all the passages converge, Jean Krejca discovered some cave adapted invertebrates. These were two white amphipods one adult diptera (fly), one larval insect, and one white mite (Acari). These were all collected by Jean. Seen were webworms (from Mycetophilid larvae?) and one small spider web. The amphipods were found in tiny pools (two inches in diameter and 1/2 inch deep) and on walls with flowing water over tiny rimstone dams 1/8 inch across and deep, made of dark, squishy organic material (probably manganese oxide). The larval insect was found on the surface of one of the same pools as the amphipods. The Diptera was found on a ceiling. Webworms were on ceilings. The small spider web was between rocks near the amphipod pools. Speleothems found in the cave are flowstone about 20 feet high with microgours, popcorn, and white “fingers” growing from the underside of breakdown at the northern end of the cave. These fingers are either calcite or moonmilk. Management Recommendations: The entrance drop is the only place rope is required in the cave, which limits visitation to those prepared vertically. In order to reach the muddy back of the cave, an area of delicate speleothems must be passed. This part of the cave need not be visited at all, in order to limit damage to the speleothems. The sediment here is layered clay, and organic mud. Ther e may be more fossil bones present in the southern section. Colander Cave should only be visited by those studying the speleothems, fossil bones, or biology, in order to protect these r esources.

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The Alaskan Caver Volum e 24 No. 3 page 15 P L A N 00 4040 fee t fee t 2020 00 2020 me ter s me ter s 1010 8080 N N m 2 3 2 0 0 2 P R O J E C T E D P R O F I L E G O E S T C A V E C O R O N A TI O N IS LA N D A LA S K A Sketch and survey with compass, clinometer and tape May 2, 2002 by Christine Krejca and Jean Krejca Map by K. and C. Allred. S ur ve ye d le ng th : 56 fe et (1 7 m et er s) S ur ve ye d ve rti ca l e xt en t: 1 fo ot (. 3 m et er s) C av e fo rm ed in H ec et a lim es to ne T O N G A S S C A V E P R O JE C T E n tr a n c e E n tr a n c e c o n ti n u e s co n tin u e s 4 f e e t b y 3 f e e t co n tin u e s 4 f e e t b y 2 .5 f e e t LEG END surv eye d pa ssa ge w all ske tche d pa ssa ge w all cha nge in c eilin g he ight brea kdo wn and roc ks wat er surv ey p oint higher C 2 0 0 2 b y C a rl e n e A ll re d GOEST CAVE CORONATION ISLAND TONGASS NATIONAL FOREST ALASKA CAVE REPORT #339, TONGASS CAVE PROJECT NATIONAL SPELEOLOGICAL SOCIETY November 25, 2002 by Kevin Allred Goest Cave was named after Pete SmithÂ’s new boat which was used first access the Island and access the cave. The cave is located at a steephead part way down a precipitous gully. A sizable stream issues from the cave. Access is steep, but most feasible from above. On May 2, 2002, Chris Krejca and Jean Krejca used drysuits to penetrate deeply into this cave and make a quick sketch with only one survey shot before running out of time. The cave keeps going in two directions after about 400 feet. Management Recommendations: Goest should be surveyed and explored. So far, not enough is known of the cave to offer any specific recommendations as to access. As it lies within a wilderness area, it is already receiving protection from surface disturbances. P R O F I L E O d a t u m p it e n tr a n c e s P L A N W H I N T L E C A V E C O R O N A T IO N I S L A N D A L A S K A Surve yed w ith cli nome ter an d tape May 2, 20 02, By Je dedia h Sm ith an d Stev e Lew is. Map by K. and C. Allre d. S u r v e y e d l e n g th : 2 7 f e e t ( 8 .2 m e te r s ) V e r ti c a l e x te n t: 2 5 f e e t ( 7 .7 m e te r s ) T O N G A S S C A V E P R O J E C T B e d r o c k i s H e c e ta l im e s to n e 1 0 fe e t 1 5 5 0 2 0 2 5 d o e s k e le to n L E G E N D p a s s a g e w a ll v e rt ic a l d ro p ro c k f il l s n o w s lo p e s p la y s d o w n w a rd N m 2 3 2 0 0 2 N d o e s k e le to n C 2 0 0 2 b y C a r l e n e A l l r e d WHINTLE CAVE CORONATION ISLAND TONGASS NATIONAL FOREST ALASKA CAVE REPORT #333, TONGASS CAVE PROJECT NATIONAL SPELEOLOGICAL SOCIETY November 25, 2002 by Kevin Allred The double entrance of Whintle Cave was discovered May 2, 2002 by Jed Smith. It is a 35 foot deep pit which is plugged by rock debris. A doe skeleton was found at the bottom. Whintle was surveyed by Jed Smith and Steve Lewis. Total surveyed length is 27.0 feet (8.2m) and the total depth is 25 feet (7.7m). Management Recommendations: There is no reason to limit access to this cave, as it contains no surface fossil deposits, cultural evidence, or invertebrates.

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L E G E N D P A S S A G E W A L L L V E R T IC A L D R O P D R O P D E P T H I N F E E T B R E A K D O W N C O B B L E G R A V E L A N D C L A Y F IL L S L O P E ( S P L A Y S D O W N W A R D ) E N T R A N C E D R IP L IN E L O G P O O L A N D S T R E A M 1 0 A B A B w a te r d ri p o tt e r s c a t d a rk s li m e 0 2 0 6 0 8 0 4 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 1 6 0 1 8 0 1 4 0 0 d a tu m P R O F I L E P L A N 00 4 0 4 0 f e e t f e e t 2 0 2 0 00 2 0 2 0 m e t e r s m e t e r s 1 0 1 0 8 0 8 0 H I S A N D H E R S C A V E C O R O N A T IO N I S L A N D A L A S K A S u rv e y e d w it h c o m p a s s c li n o m e te r a n d t a p e A p ri l 2 5 2 0 0 2 b y V iv ia n L o ft in C h ri s ti n e K re jc a K e v in C a s e y a n d S te v e L e w is M a p b y K a n d C A ll re d S u rv e y e d l e n g th : 4 9 0 f e e t (1 4 9 m e te rs ) V e rt ic a l e x te n t: 8 4 f e e t (2 5 .6 m e te rs ) A l it to ra l c a v e f o rm e d i n H e c e ta l im e s to n e T O N G A S S C A V E P R O J E C T cr a w l s o d a s tr a w s ta la c ti te s fl o w s to n e a n d s ta la c ti te s h a z a rd o u s c li m b H E R S H I S ? ? E n tr a n c e ? 2 t o 6 i n c h c o b b le s 0 d a tu m o tt e r s c a t fl o w s to n e a n d s ta la c ti te s E n t r a n c e fl o w s to n e b o u ld e r fa n s ? ? H E R S H I S fe e t A p p ro x im a te h ig h t id e l e v e l a p p ro x im a te h ig h t id e l in e 3 0 7 0 6 6 8 4 3 3 4 9 0 9 0 N N m 2 3 2 0 0 2 C 2 0 0 2 b y C a rl e n e A llr e d The Alaskan Caver Volum e 24 No. 3 page 16 6 P R O F I L E P L A N C 2 0 0 2 b y C a r le n e A ll r e d 0 d a t u m 0 d a t u m 0 2 0 fe e t 1 0 0 1 0 m e te r s 5 4 0 3 0 1 0 f e e t 0 2 0 4 0 E N T R A N C E E N T R A N C E N m 2 3 2 0 0 2 N s t i c k s s l i m e a n d o r g a n i c d e b r i s d a y l i g h t s e e n u p f i s s u r e w i t h p h r e a t i c s u r f a c e s s t i c k s s l i m e a n d o r g a n i c d e b r i s d r i p p i n g w a t e r 2 5 8 H O O T I N G G R O U S E C A V E C O R O N A T I O N I S L A N D A L A S K A S u rv e ye d w ith c o m pa ss cl in o m e te r a n d ta p e M a y 1 2 0 0 2 b y K e vi n A llr e d a n d Te rr i B ro w n M a p b y K a n d C A llr e d S u r v e y e d l e n g t h : 4 3 f e e t ( 1 3 m e t e r s ) V e r t i c a l e x t e n t : 3 6 f e e t ( 1 1 m e t e r s ) T O N G A S S C A V E P R O J E C T B e d r o c k i s H e c e t a l i m e s t o n e HOOTING GROUSE CAVE CORONATION ISLAND TONGASS NATIONAL FOREST ALASKA CAVE REPORT #336, TONGASS CAVE PROJECT NATIONAL SPELEOLOGICAL SOCIETY November 25, 2002 by Kevin Allred Hooting Grouse Cave was surveyed May 1, 2002 by Terri Brown and Kevin Allred. The cave consists of one large chamber formed at a joint intersection. The chamber grew from dripping water of a dome which has an interesting ledge encircling it on three sides; probably a bedding plane. There are a few minor side passages at the bottom of the initial 20 foot drop. The cave is plugged with angular rocks. Some phreatic surfaces are intact. A rope is needed for the drop. The cave is 43 feet (13m) long and 36 feet (11m) deep. No cultural evidence, speleothems, or bones were seen, but a gnat was noted on a ceiling. Management Recommendations: The recreational potential of Hooting Grouse Cave is good, and there is little loose rock on the pit walls. It would be interesting to correlate this shaft and its size to the general tendency of small surface features resulting from diffuse water flow on such karsted terrain. HIS AND HERS CAVE CORONATION ISLAND TONGASS NATIONAL FOREST ALASKA CAVE REPORT #328 TONGASS CAVE PROJECT NATIONAL SPELEOLOGICAL SOCIETY November 25, 2002 by Kevin Allred Description: His and Hers Cave is an extensive Heceta Limestone littoral Cave, exposed to the open Pacific Ocean on the southwest coast of Coronation Island, Alaska. The cave has two main branches formed along joints or faults. It has been lifted somewhat by isostatic rebound, so that the sea now only reached partway into the cave. Even though this cave is littoral, flowing water indicates a solutional element as well. Small waterfalls emerge from the ceiling and from a lead located midway along the left branch (Hers) of the cave. The left branch is very tall and canyon-like, and the other is more of a classical funnel littoral shape which branches is the back. Calm seas are required for boat access into the entrance The survey team attempted unsuccessfully, in climbing up to the high lead in ‘Hers”. They were able to scramble up a sloping ledge about the way up, but no further. The ledge is coated with extremely soft, wet, flowstone which is very dark and is the consistency of mud. Other speleothems found were draperies, where water emerges high in the ceiling. No cultural evidence or animal remains were found in the cave. Fresh otter scat was noted. His and Hers Cave was surveyed on April 25, 2002 and is 490 feet (149m) long and 84 feet (25.6m) in vertical extent. Surveyors were Vivian Loftin, Chris Krejca, Steve Lewis and Kevin Casey. Management Recommendations: We recommend open access for this cave. However boat access is limited to calmer seas on this outer coast location.

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LOST CAVE CORONATION ISLAND TONGASS NATIONAL FOREST ALASKA CAVE REPORT #340 TONGASS CAVE PROJECT NATIONAL SPELEOLOGICAL SOCIETY November 25, 2002 By Kevin Allred Lost Cave was first discovered in the summer of 2001 by Pete Smith, Steve Lewis, and Tim Heaton. Its entrance is a small, unpromising-looking pit. It was relocated in 2002 on the last day of an expedition and was only partially explored and surveyed for want of rope. The pit corkscrews downwards until at the last survey station a nine second tumbling drop hinted at a significant drop below. T otal survey by Steve Lewis, Jed Smith, and Kina Smith on May 2, 2002 was 60 feet (16.7m) and the depth was 38 feet (11.5m). Management Recommendations: Lost Cave should be more fully explored and surveyed. There is always a possibility that it contains fossil bones like nearby Colander Cave. P R O F I L E C 2 0 0 2 b y C a r l e n e A l l r e d S U R E E N O U G H C A V E C O R O N A T IO N I S L A N D A L A S K A Su rve yed wi th c om pas s, c lino me ter and tap e MAY 1, 200 2, b y J ean Kr ejc a a nd Ke vin Allr ed. Ma p b y K an d C All red S u r v e y e d l e n g th : 6 6 f e e t ( 2 0 m e te r s ) V e r ti c a l e x te n t: 3 8 .6 f e e t ( 1 1 .8 m e te r s ) T O N G A S S C A V E P R O J E C T B e d r o c k i s H e c e t a l im e s to n e 1 0 2 0 fe e t 1 5 5 2 5 0 E N T R A N C E 1 0 f e e t 5 0 m e t e r s 5 2 0 0 0 d a t u m 4 0 3 5 3 0 b u c k s k e le t o n L E G E N D p a s s a g e w a ll ro c k f il l o rg a n ic s o il s lo p e ( s p la y s d o w n w a rd ) 0 d a t u m P L A N N m 2 3 2 0 0 2 N E N T R A N C E c li m b d o w n e n t r a n c e d r o p b u c k s k e le t o n C 2 0 0 2 b y C a r l e n e A l l r e d 0 d a tu m P R O F I L E P L A N E N T R A N C E 0 d a t u m 1 0 f e e t 5 0 m e t e r s 5 2 0 0 L E G E N D p a s s a g e w a ll ro c k f il l m u d f il l s lo p e ( s p la y s d o w n w a rd ) v e rt ic a l d ro p a n d d e p th i n f e e t 3 L O S T C A V E C O R O N A T I O N I S L A N D A L A S K A S u r v e y e d w it h c o m p a s s c li n o m e t e r a n d t a p e M a y 2 2 0 0 2 b y S t e v e L e w is J e d e d ia h S m it h a n d K in a S m it h M a p b y K a n d C A ll r e d S u r v e y e d le n g t h : 6 0 f e e t ( 1 6 7 m e t e r s ) V e r t ic a l e x t e n t : 3 8 f e e t ( 1 1 5 m e t e r s ) B e d r o c k is H e c e t a li m e s t o n e T O N G A S S C A V E P R O J E C T 4 0 2 5 4 5 3 5 3 0 1 5 fe e t 0 2 0 1 0 5 5 0 E N T R A N C E c o n ti n u e s d o w n w a r d 9 s e c tu m b li n g r o c k d r o p c o n ti n u e s d o w n w a r d 9 s e c tu m b li n g r o c k d r o p n o o b v io u s r ig g in g p o in t s o d a s tr a w c o n ti n u e s d o w n w a r d 9 s e c tu m b li n g r o c k d r o p 1 4 7 N m 2 3 2 0 0 2 N The Alaskan Caver Volume 24 No. 3 p age 17 Sure enough Cave is formed in Heceta Limestone along a joint. Some sculpting and fluting shows evidence of flowing water. The good sized sinkhole entrance is 15-20 feet in diameter, and clearly takes water. Sure Enough begins as a small pit 38.6 feet (11.8m) deep, the entrance portion having extensive frost shatter. The cave can be negotiated without a rope. Part way down the pit just below a steep slope is a short alcove. No biology, cultural evidence, or speleothems were noted. A buck skeleton was found at the bottom. One antler was hollow with several holes through it that appeared to have grown that way. T otal mapped passage is 66 feet (20m) long. It was surveyed by Jean Krejca and Kevin Allred on May 1, 2002. SURE ENOUGH CAVE CORONATION ISLAND TONGASS NATIONAL FOREST ALASKA CAVE REPORT #329, TONGASS CAVE PROJECT NATIONAL SPELEOLOGICAL SOCIETY November 25, 2002 By Kevin Allred Chris K rejca a t the re belay in Pa ssion P it. Photo by Jean Krejca

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0 d a t u m E N T R A N C E S b r id g e o f s o il a n d m o s s P R O F I L E P L A N 00 4 0 4 0 f e e t f e e t 2 0 2 0 00 2 0 2 0 m e t e r s m e t e r s 1 0 1 0 8 0 8 0 0 2 0 fe e t 6 0 8 0 4 0 P A S S I O N P I T C O R O N A T IO N I S L A N D A L A S K A Surveyed with c ompass, clino meter and tap e April 26, 2002 b y Vivian Lofti n, Jean Krejca, Christine Krejca and Pete Smith Map by K. and C. Allred. B e d r o c k i s H e c e ta l im e s to n e S u r v e y e d l e n g th : 4 3 7 f e e t ( 1 3 3 m e te r s ) V e r ti c a l e x te n t: 2 2 5 f e e t ( 6 8 .6 m e te r s ) T O N G A S S C A V E P R O J E C T C 2 0 0 2 b y C a r l e n e A l l r e d N N m 2 3 2 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 2 0 1 6 0 1 8 0 1 4 0 2 0 0 2 2 0 2 4 0 L O W E S T L E V E L M I D L E V E L d r ip p y d o m e p it s t o l o w e r r o o m b r e a k d o w n c lo g s m a ll h o le s in b r e a k d o w n L O W E S T L E V E L M I D L E V E L d r ip p y d o m e b r e a k d o w n c lo g L E G E N D p a s s a g e w a ll u n d e rl y in g p a s s a g e w a ll v e rt ic a l d ro p d ro p d e p th i n f e e t b re a k d o w n o rg a n ic s o il f il l g ra v e l fi ll s lo p e ( s p la y s d o w n w a rd ) a ir m o v e m e n t b e d ro c k c h a n g e i n c e il in g h e ig h t 1 0 1 0 2 0 9 1 0 4 4 0 d a t u m P R O F I L E P L A N C 2 0 0 2 b y C a r l e n e A l l r e d S u r v e y e d le n g t h : 5 6 f e e t ( 1 7 m e t e r s ) V e r t ic a l e x t e n t : 2 2 f e e t ( 6 7 m e t e r s ) T O N G A S S C A V E P R O J E C T B e d r o c k is H e c e t a li m e s t o n e H O O T I N G C A V E C O R O N A T IO N I S L A N D A L A S K A Surveyed with compass, clinometer and tape April 25 and 26, 2002, by Vivian Loftin, Christine Krejca, Jean Krejca and Kevin Allred. Map by K. and C. Allred. N m 2 3 2 0 0 2 N 0 1 0 f e e t 2 0 5 5 1 5 1 0 E N T R A N C E s k y l i g h t E N T R A N C E s k y li g h t L E G E N D e n t r a n c e d r ip li n e p a s s a g e w a ll r o c k f il l m u d f il l m o s s s lo p e ( s p la y s d o w n w a r d ) v e r t ic a l d r o p a n d d e p t h i n f e e t 5 1 0 f e e t 5 0 m e t e r s 5 2 0 0 5 3 The Alaskan Caver Volume 24 No. 3 page 18 HOOTING CAVE CORONATION ISLAND TONGASS NATIONAL FOREST ALASKA CAVE REPORT #321, TONGASS CAVE PROJECT NATIONAL SPELEOLOGICAL SOCIETY November 25,2002 By Kevin Allred Hooting Cave was named after a hooting grouse seen just uphill from the cave entrance. This cave has two entrances, both located on a small bench on the side of a thinly soil mantled hillside. The cave probably receives some uphill drainage. Hooting Cave was surveyed May 1, 2002 by Vivian Loftin, Jean Krejca, and Chris Krejca. It is 56 feet (18m) long and 22 feet (6.7m) deep. Hooting Cave is a fun cave to visit, having some nice crystals in the back room. These Crystals are weathered calcite dogtooth spar. Many snail shells were seen in the cave, but no animal bones or cultural evidence was found. Management Recommendations: The location of this cave could be shared with the general public, although its remoteness probably makes it unsuitable to visit by all but the most determined. PASSION PIT CORONATION ISLAND TONGASS NATIONAL FOREST ALASKA CAVE REPORT #330, TONGASS CAVE PROJECT NATIONAL SPELEOLOGICAL SOCIETY November 25, 2002 By Kevin Allred Passion Pit was first discovered by P ete Smith, Steve Lewis, and Timothy Heaton in the summer of 2001. The cave is a series of pits all following one joint that extends north to south. This cave can be rigged on a big yellow cedar at the beautiful sloping entrance. A 220 foot long rope will be adequate for rigging if a rebelay is used at the corner. No cultural evidence or animal bones were found when Passion Pit was explored. Speleothems consist of popcorn here and there, reflecting that this is one of the driest caves found in southeast Alaska. However, evidence of dripping water indicates the cave becomes wetter seasonally. The initial 40 foot drop gains one access to a sloping side chamber which becomes too tight in breakdown. Following the main trend of the cave down to the north, it soon becomes too tight in breakdown. To the south, the canyon ends in a “Drippy Dome” which pinches out at its top about 50 feet up. About 30 feet back towards the entrance is a 40 foot pit ending in breakdown. The cave takes lots of air, but it all seems to flow into fissures choked with breakdown or in too tight passages. The cave was surveyed by Vivian Loftin, Chris Krejca, Jean Krejca, and Pet e Smith on April 26, 2002. It is a total of 437 feet (133m) long and 225 feet (68.6m) deep. Biology: One white mite was collected by Jean Krejca from wet wood about 100 feet from the entrance rebelay corner. Management Recommendations: Passion Pit is an excellent r ecreational cave. It could be a directed access cave for those prepared and trained in single rope techniques.

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P A C I F I C O C E A N C A V E S O F E G G H A R B O R C O R O N A T IO N I S L A N D A L A S K A Compa ss and p ace surv ey Ap ril 30, 20 02 by Kevin Allred Map by K and C Allred TONGA SS CA VE PRO JECT shorelin e depict ed is ap proxima te mean high tid e 00 2 0 0 2 0 0 f e e t f e e t 1 0 0 1 0 0 m e te r s m e te r s 3 0 0 3 0 0 00 8 0 8 0 4 0 4 0 2 0 2 0 L E G E N D c a v e s h o r e li n e c li f f n a tu ra l b ri d g e L IT T L E W IL L IE C A V E L O S T S O L E S C A V E F IR S T E G G C A V E s m a ll c a v e M IN E R D IV E R S IO N C A V E D R A F T Y C A V E C A M P C A V E n a tu ra l b ri d g e li m e s to n e t o w e rs s m a ll c a v e S L A N T C A V E N N m 2 3 2 0 0 2 For about two weeks this summer I joined Tim Heaton, a former Meanwhile, Tim had located another cave nearer the camp that paleo post-doc, for my eighth trip to Southeastern Alaska since 1992. I previously had been found to contain skeletons of a grizzly bear and a deer arrived in Wrangell on June 28th and spent that night in a bed and dated at about 11,000 and 3,000 years respectively Colander Cave had a breakfast, enjoying my last hot shower for two weeks. The next 40-foot drop that we rappelled down on a rope. Tim and I then mapped the morning, I got on a small plane that took off on wheels and landed on bones and wrapped them in paper towels for removal f rom the cave. water. Tim and a crew of seven students, including his daughter In the next few days, the students took turns going in Colander and the Christie, were already there. I brought a load of supplies with me, and a remainder of the two skeletons were collected, but other than a few bird plane left with TimÂ’s wife, Julie, a medical resident. This would prove to bones, nothing else was found. The deep sediments that were collected have interesting consequences a couple of days later The camp was in a proved to be barren of bones. Tim and I located one new cave that I named beautiful bay with abundant wildlife, especially birds and sea otters. I set for Marshall Holmes, who had died a few months before and who had helped up my tent and got to work sorting sediments. me on several bone digs in West Virginia. This cave unfortunately proved The main goal of this trip was to dig for deep sediments from barren, except for one vole skull. three caves discover ed ona previous expedition. Carbon dates of up to In my free time I roamed the beach observing the abundant wildlife, 11.000 years had been obtained from two of the caves from bones close and collecting trash. Finally it came time to leave. The plane had to take three to the surface. The crew was enjoying a rest day so it wasn Â’t until a trips to get all of us out. Tim, Christie and on other went on to further couple of days later that I hiked up to two of the caves where we were adventures and collecting on the Queen Charlotte Islands. The rest of us working. The hike was long and uphill all of the way. As usual for headed home. I was able to see an eye doctor on the day I got home. He Southeastern Alaska, it was also wet and slippery. Just below the caves dilated my eyes and told me that the retina of the one I had injured was fine, was a convenient spring for drinking water and for screening cave but that the vitreous humor was sort of scrambled up, which accounted for the sediments. occasional clouds I see. The situation has gradually improved since then. I brought my gear up to Deer Bone Cave and started working on Tim will submit more samples for Carbon 14 dating and we will the main excavation pit, bagging sediments in five-centimeter levels. identify all the species we collected in the next few months. I hope to return The bags would be brought down to the spring where they would be again next year. screened where they would be screened in buckets using mosquito net screen bags. The concentrate would next be brought down to camp, where it would again be screened and dried in a drying tent. The concentrate would then be divided into fractions and picked for bones, teeth, and other organic remains. On the first day working the cave, I got tired about midafternoon so I decided to hike back to camp by myself. Unfortunately, the trail was flagged with orange and pink flagging tape and I am red-green color blind. I got to about within 100 yards before I realized I had lost the trail and had entered a confusing area of small water courses and blown-down trees. I fell down many times and then I fell once more with a branch hitting my left eye, causing blinding pain. I caught my breath, blinked several times and was relieved to still have sight in that eye. I made it back to camp and found a small mirror, noting that only the lower lid seemed to be lacerated. However that night I started seeing halos on the periphery of my eye and I became concerned that I had retina damage. If only Dr. Julie had been there to give advice. I told Tim if the situation got worse he would have to radio te plane to evacuate me. Fortunately, the situation was much better the next day. We continued to work the two small caves, reaching sediment in one consisting of clay and rock. This was hard to dig out with a trowel and Tim hadnÂ’t brought a rock pick. I had seen a log on the beach with large spikes in it, and so, using a rock, got one free and it worked just great at removing the sediment between the rocks in the cave. Surprisingly, the intact bird bones were found among the rocks and clay Most of the bones were from small rodents, birds and otters-although we got some deer and very rare bear bones as well. Eventually we hit bottom at 80 centimeters in one cave and 60 centimeters in the other. The Alaskan Caver Volum e 24 No. 3 page 19 Krejca, Jean (2003). T ongass Cave Project Expedition to Coronation Island, Alaska. NSS News, Vol. 61, No .4 Krejca, Jean (2003). Biology of Caves on Coronation Island, Alaska. NSS News, V ol. 61 No.4 Hampton, Don (1989). Explorations on Coronation Island. Alaskan Caver Vol. 10, No 3 Lewis, Steve (1989). Caves on Coronation Island. Alaskan Caver Vol. 9, No 1 Halliday, W R. (1975). Caleoseospeleological Abstract. Alaskan Caver Vol. 2, No 1, page 17 Hackman, Robert J. (1949). Speleology in Southeastern Alaska, NSS Bulletin, Vol.11, pages 11-16 BIBLIOGRAPHY OF PREVIOUSL Y PUBLISHED ARTICLES ON CORONATION ISLAND CAVING A TRIP TO CORONA TION ISLAND, SOUTHEASTERN ALASKA By Fred Grady Reprinted from The West Virginia Caver Dec. 2003, Vol. 21, No 6

PAGE 20

The Alaskan Caver 2525 F ourth Ave. Ketchikan, AK 99901 Address Service Requested “Spe cime n” sent to Jean Krejc a from Kevin Allre d af ter the C orona tion expe ditio n, ph oto b y Jea n Kre jca Vivia n Lof tin a t ent ranc e of Goe st Ca ve, p hoto by J ean Krejca


Description
Contents: Coronation
Island expedition 2002 Log / Kevin Allred --
Apex Pit, Report and Map --
Quittin' Time Cave, Report and Map --
Hidden Fern Pit, Report and Map --
Grouse Cave, Report and Map --
Littoral Caves of Egg Harbor, Report --
First Egg and Lost Soles Cave Map --
Miner Diversion Cave Map --
Camp Cave Map --
Slant Cave, Little Willie Cave, and Drafty Cave Maps --
Cedar Cave, Report and Map --
Flag Cave, Report and Map --
Colander Cave, Report and Map --
Goest Cave, Report and Map --
Whintle Cave, Report and Map --
His and Hers Cave, Report and Map --
Hooting Grouse Cave, Report and Map --
Sure Enough Cave, Report and Map --
Lost Cave, Report and Map --
Hootting Cave, Report and Map --
Passion Pit, Report and Map --
Caves of Egg Harbor, Area Map --
A Trip to Coronation Island, Southeastern Alaska / Fred
Grady --
Bibliography of Previously Published Articles on
Coronation Island.


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