Citation
Speleo Spiel

Material Information

Title:
Speleo Spiel
Series Title:
Speleo Spiel
Creator:
Southern Tasmanian Caverneers
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Regional Speleology ( local )
Genre:
Newsletter
serial ( sobekcm )
Location:
Australia

Notes

General Note:
The Tasmanian Caverneering Club was formed on 13 September 1946. Initially, information was provided to members through a circular, copies of which exist back to November 1947. "Speleo Spiel, Circular of the Tasmanian Caverneering Club" was first published December 1960. Eight issues of this are known, up to May 1962. In April 1964 a "Circular" was again issued and seems to have continued, irregularly, until March 1966. Then in April 1966, a "New Series" of Speleo Spiel commenced, as a monthly newsletter. In December 1996 The Tasmanian Caverneering Club amalgamated with the Southern Caving Society and the Tasmanian Cave and Karst Research Group to form the Southern Tasmanian Caverneers. The combined group agreed to continue to publish "Speleo Spiel" as its bi-monthly newsletter, as continues today (2015). Speleo Spiel is a vehicle for recording the cave and karst-related activities, and particularly the achievements, of the Southern Tasmanian Caverneers. It also carriers technical and scientific reports, reprints, reviews and other information likely to be of interest to members from time to time.
Restriction:
Open Access - Permission by Publisher
Original Version:
No. 274 (Apr 1992)
General Note:
See Extended description for more information.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of South Florida Library
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
K26-03974 ( USFLDC DOI )
k26.3974 ( USFLDC Handle )
21582 ( karstportal - original NodeID )
1832­6307

USFLDC Membership

Aggregations:
Karst Information Portal

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Serial

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Full Text

PAGE 4

Page 3 SPKLEO SPIEL 274 SUBSCRIPTIONS WE ... AGAIN! April 1992 this pitch a side passage with pitches of 9m and 21m leads back to the active streamway again. There are, however, two alternative possibilities from the base of Dry Ninety. Off to one side a waterfall may be observed. This ia the second pitch in the Wet Way (see below). It is possible to join up with the latter route via a pitch of around 25m, and in fact this route was taken on early exploration triw prior to the discovery of the two pitch aide passage way dm to the streamway. A second alternative is to traverse out over talus perched in the rift at the base of the Dry Ninety. Somewhere in the deep void below is the start of the streamway. This shaft would appear to offer the most direct route down, involving an abseil of some 4Qn. The only recorded descent of this pitch was in 1971 during the ASP Conference field trips. IDklzab-Lha sections JP4 and JP5 entrances to start of st-. Diagrzrratic Bhetch only, not to scale.

PAGE 5

SPELEO SPIEL 274 April 1992 SUBSCRIPTIONS WE ... AGAIN Page 4 A further variation to the no-1 mute would involve dropping down the rift that ia crossed after The Flattener, txlt before the bolts at the head of the hy Ninety are reached. This pitch of around 2% in length would appear to land in the Wet Ww between the first and second pitches. It was descended on a recent trip down KD, having been mistaken for the Dry Ninety. (2) Wet Way: This is the most direct route down KD. In the early 70's cavera didn't like the look of all that water, and the racy waterfalls of the Wet Way were neglected in favour of the Scaling Pole Flattener route. Interest in this part of the cave was recently revived and some enjoyable tripe had in investigating the poesibilities. Heading downstream from the JF4 entrance, a 3pl climb dawn lea& to the top of the first pitch. It is around 25m in length with a broad ledge 1b down. A section of etremay below precedes the next shaft (circa 30m). This very wet second pitch pay be avoided by climbing up to a small chamber on the left near the base of the firet pitch. From here a 4m drop lands on chockstones wedged above a deep shaft. An abseil of some 4% drops into the same chamber as the waterfall pitch. This is actually a lower level of the Dry Ninety chamber. 'Iko passages lead off from the chamber. The dry one reaches a 2% shaft down to the start of the streamway section. This pitch was descended in the early days of KD'a exploration and again on a recent trip from the JF5 entrance. A terrier bolt was placed beside an old eyebolt anchor (minus eyebolt) on the right wall at the edge of the drop. A second passage that carries the stream from the base of the previouls pitch also leads to a shaft. It is a rather intimidating drop that was only partially descended on a recent trip before the force of water made a retreat necessary. This waterfall is the one cascading down from above at the start of the streamway. Its length is at least 30m. (3) JF5 Entrance: Eight metres higher and 50m away from the main mallet entrance is JF5. When first descended the upper entrance was mooted as a possible way of avoiding the water of the first pitch in Wet Way. As it turned out, cavers lost interest in JF5 when the Scaling Pole route was found. JF5 consists of a mud slope followed by a slippery climb down to the top of vertical drop. A 1% abseil lands on a broad ledge part-way down the firet pitch (25m) in the Wet Way. A further drop of 15m brings one to the base of the pitch proper. Continue as per Wet Way. (4) Serpentine Route: With its five pitches (23m, 15m, Eh, Sm, 5m) and winding sculpted canyons, the Serpentine Passage offere good sporty caving. It has been traversed several times in recent years. Two leads in the passage may be worth a look. One is a low horizontal atreamway shown on the 1973 KD survey to intersect the Serpentine Passage from a north westerly direction at a point roughly halfway between the start of the passage and the first pitch in it. It is possible that a mall cave located just uphill of the JF4 entrance but within the same doline, is the source of water in this tributary. The cave contains a small stream in a passage that becomes progressively low as one proceeds downstream. Another lead much lower down in the Serpentine Passage is reported by Wailes (1982). It is a dry passage at the base of the fourth pitch (gm). (5) JF40 Connection?: JF40 is the grotty-looking rift beside the track just before it dim down to the entrance of KD. The 1973 survey indicates a complex of rising passages and avens leading off in the directicn of JF40 from the start of the etreamway in KD. Stefan had a look in JF40 in 1981 and seemed to think that a rock

PAGE 6

Page 5 SUBSCRIPTIONS WE ... AGAIN! SPELJfO SPIEL 274 April 1992 blockage at the end of the cave could be plshed with some work. A JF4O/KD connection would deepen the system by only 4 to 5 metres. There are no particularly good leads in the aection of streamay between the base of the entrance series and the pitch down to the basal chamber. However, thne features are worthy of note. (1) I seem to remember that one or more small streams no more than a trickle when water levels are low enter from upper levels somewhere along the length of the streamway. It is not impossible that this represents water from Splash Pot. This cave is no great distance away and was pushed to a new depth of circa 160 metree in 1987. The extension has not been accurately surveyed and its lower reaches were only cursorily explored. More surveying would indicate whether Splash Pot is likely to connect with RD. (2) The 1973 survey shows an ascending lead in the ceiling between the last two short streamway pitches. It is possible that Dribblespit Swallet, a cave that is almost certainly connected to KD, joins somewhere in the vicinity. Exploration in Dribblespit in 1988 revealed a constricted draughting rift through which the sound of water could be heard. Dribblespit's location close to Dwarrowdelf, and its depth of 166 metres, make the lower end of the KD streamway a likely point for the cormection. A more accurate prediction is not possible in the absence of a surface survey linking the KD and Dribblespit underground surveys. In any event, the very constricted rift at the end of Dribblespit means that physically linking the two caves would be no easy matter. (3) There ia an alternative to the usual way (ie the 42 metre pitch from the Brew Chamber) down to the final chamber. Instead, it is possible to continue down beside the water, and this was the mute initially followed during the original exploration. From the Brew Chamber two pitches are involved. A 21 metre pitch followed by a short cascade leads to the edge of the final waterfall. It has never been completely descended, though a part-descent in 1971 set a new depth record of -290 metres. This record was later broken when the drier Brew Chamber pitch was descended. All subsequent descents have taken the latter route. Following the original route down the last two waterfalls remains a novel poseibility. Of additional interest is the fact that Kiernanas 1971 sketch map indicates an unexplored passage entering near the top of the final waterfall. No further details of this lead are known. It is in the massive final chamber where scope is greatest for finding major continuations. None of the possibilities listed below seem particularly promising, but further leads are likely to exist. (1) Depths of Moria: This is the area downstream of the first sump. A high-level crawl on the left of Sump 1 leads to active streamway again, terminating in a further sump after no great distance. The sketch survey by King (1976) indicates a number of question marks, as do more accurate surveys by Martin and Worthington (1979a) and Bunton and Martin (1981). There is a good draught in the initial crawl, but this is "lost" further in and 'little extra passage has been added since the extension was discovered in 1976. Sump I1 has been dived without success.

PAGE 7

Page 5 SPELEO SPIEL 274 SUBSCRIPTIONS WE ... AGAIN! April 1992 blockage at the end of the cave could be pushed with some work. A JF4O/KD connection would deepen the system by only 4 to 5 metres. There are no particularly good leads in the section of streamway between the base of the entrance series and the pitch down to the baaal chamber. However, three features are worthy of note. (1) I seem to remember that one or more small streams no more than a trickle when water levels are low enter from upper levels somewhere along the length of the streamway. It is not impossible that this represents water from Splash Pot. This cave is no great distance away and waa plshed to a new depth of circa 160 metres in 1987. The extension has not been accurately surveyed and its lower reaches were only cursorily explored. More aurveying would indicate whether Splash Pot is likely to connect with KD. (2) The 1973 survey shows an ascending lead in the ceiling between the last two short streamway pitches. It is possible that Dribblespit Swallet, a cave that is almost certainly connected to KD, joins somewhere in the vicinity. Exploration in Dribblespit in 1988 revealed a constricted draughting rift through which the stxlnd of water could be heard. Dribblespit's location close to Dwarrowdelf, and its depth of 166 metres, make the lower end of the KD streamway a likely point for the connection. A more accurate prediction is not possible in the absence of a surface survey linking the KD and Dribblespit underground surveys. In any event, the very constricted rift at the end of Dribblespit means that physically linking the two caves would be no easy matter. (3) There is an alternative to the usual way (ie the 42 metre pitch from the Brew Chamber) down to the final chamber. Instead, it is possible to continue down beside the water, and this was the route initially followed during the original exploration. From the Brew Chamber two pitches are involved. A 21 metre pitch followed by a short cascade leads to the edge of the final waterfall. It has never been completely descended, though a part-descent in 1971 set a new depth record of -290 metres. This record was later broken when the drier Brew Chamber pitch was descended. All subsequent descents have taken the latter route. Following the original route down the last two waterfalls remains a novel possibility. Of additional interest is the fact that Kiernan's 1971 sketch map indicates an unexplored passage entering near the top of the final waterfall. No further details of this lead are known. Basal Chamber It is in the massive final chamber where scope is greatest for finding major continuations. None of the possibilities listed below seem particularly promising, but further leads are likely to exist. (1) Depths of Moria: This is the area downstream of the first sump. A high-level crawl on the left of Sump 1 leads to active streamway again, terminating in a further sump after no great distance. The sketch survey by King (1976) indicates a number of question marks, as do more accurate surveys by Martin and Worthington (1979a) and Bunton and Martin ( 1981 ) There is a good draught in the initial crawl, but this is "lost" further in and little extra passage has been added since the extension was discovered in 1976. Sump I1 has been dived without success.

PAGE 8

Page 7 SPELBO SPIEL 274 SUBSCRIPTIONS WE ... AGAIN! April 1992 explored on a n=C trip in 1986. Further back towarda [Xrarroudelf a huge aven soars up into darkness on the eastern side of the chamber. This rather intriguing feature perhaps indicates another Dwarrowdelf-type aystem above. (3) Off to the right (if facing towards KD) in the section where the ceiling ie lowest between the base of Dwarrowdelf and the main KD chamber, is a well-concealed crawl leading into the ceiling of an active stream canyon. Traversing along horizontally brings one to an aven where a small stream enters. The source of this water remains obscure, though there is at least one amall stream ainking on the surface between the entrances of barrowdelf and Dribblespit Swallet. In the downstream direction the passage descends steeply in extremely friable rock. I wae stopped at the brink of a short drop here in 1986. It is feasible that this stream is one of the tributaries in the Depths of Moria. The straightforward shafts of Dwarrowdelf would seem an unlikely place for leads. However, the 1972 survey of fkrarrowdelf by Montgomery et a1 shawa two descending continuations that may be worth investigation. These are located at the bases of the first and second pitches, perhaps leading to parallel shafts that Join back lower down. A number of avens are shown at the top of the sixth pitch. A couple of other leads are also marked on the Dwarrowdelf survey, these being located in the chamber at the base of the final pitch. A short section of fossil stream passage is indicated near the base of the pitch, while a rift at the southeastern end of the chamber is described as "continuing unexplored". It has been suggested that the water coming down Dwarrowdelf ends up in the Depths of Moria (Wmton & Martin, 1981). References Ackroyd, P-, (1988j, "A brief note on Khazad IXlm (JF4)", Australjnn 117:7-8. Bunton, S. and D-Martin, (1981), "No More Metres in the Hire of Moria", hamahf V Speleoloeical, 25(5):87-91. Goede, A., (19731, "Hydrological Observations at the Junee Resurgence and a Brief Regional Description of the Junee Area, Tasmania.", Helictite, 11(1):3-24. Kiernan, K., (1971), "Khazad-chum Expedition", Southerm, 3(1):6-9. King, R., (1976), "A New Australian Depth Record Down the Big he", m letter, 7313-5. Martin, D. and S. Worthington, (1979a), "Depths of Moria Swey", journal of The S~eleikgid Society, 23(7):167-8. Martin, D. and S. Warthington, (1979b), "Tackle Notes for Khazad-I)um (JF4), JuneeFlorentine, Tasmania", S-l Socie-? 23(9):213-216. Wailes, T., (1982), "Circulating in Khazad h", hleo S&, 180:2-3. Warild, A., (1981), "harrowdelf, A Cavers Guide", Journal of The &he? -, 25(2):27-29. Warild, A., (19861, "Bolting in Caves", Buatralian &v-, 110117-18. Rolan lwerhard

PAGE 9

April 1992 SPELEO SPIEL 274 SUBSCRIETIONS WE ... AGAIN TCC NOTES (alias, the President's report) Some very sketchy 8 brief notes re the past year of KZ, Inc. Firetly I would like to pay tribute to Rev (alias MZ Wailea) for his hehsmmhip of ow esteemed group the the very vigorous 80's certainly one of TCC's more active times ... Some hard tripa were done, mme big discoveries mde ... This last year Ems been fairly quiet almost in line with the rececrsion ue were raeant to have, I guess! Still, things am not all what they wm~. A feu Niggly little things like big shaft jobs and politics (maybe they go hand in W...) eeea to be in vogue, and for better or worse, will continue to be.. We lslst however avoid becoming too political for taxation reasons, if nothing else! For the first time we are involved in a major conservation isme. I hope & trust that sanity will prevail in resolution of this and other future issues ... We are a mall club but with a great collection of skills & expertie, both practical and theoretical; we are recognised as such by some piblic authorities ht not by others.. Relations with the Police are excellent and certainly rapidly improving with FWH. However some others are not so keen ...-. Ewugh of that. Some other random notes ... This was I understand the 45th year of 'KC and in fact of organised caving in Australia, as TCC was the first club forred in this country quite something for a club involved in such an esoteric eport. There have been m flood entramnts this (calendar) year! The Speleo Spiel lumbers on its still the top underground mag in the country wen if I do say so myself! Past years have seen entire issues written be such notables as Nick Hulas, the Eberhards, Rev and so on. Now we have Dean (the machine) doing it! Who will be next? Everyone seems to be buying PC's so maybe we can have an WfL Spiel aoon think of the trees we'll save then Trev will be out of a job as well as m! Nick tlume used his (and everyone else's) skills and expertise to write a thesis about underground Florentine things in order to avoid work for a while when's the movie due out? Will there be a sequel? Various expeditions / trips / junkets have been organised and done by a few people. There are more on the way I understand. We he had quite a number of keen people try to join our group some have even succeeded! A bit more effort by our older (ie established) members on this front muld be good value. SCS are helping people to join their group, so why shouldn't we do something to help them join ours instead? Some thoughts for the future we must consider the value of the information we have in the form of cave maps, and so on is it sellable, should it be sellable and if so under what conditions, should any of it be published at all, and M, on. A thorny but important issue to consider. Conservation of, and perhaps comrersely, ease of access to cave and karst features is becoming an issue of mounting importance (perhaps not consideration, jwt importance...) to public authorities ae well as clubs rmch as ours. Public interest in outdoor sport8 is increasing this could make the legal madhe dle, with litigation being an increasingly popllar paatiae. He lst

PAGE 10

Page 9 SPBLBO SPIEL 274 SUBSCRIETIONS WE... AGAIN! April 1992 establish ourselves ae the source of technical and leadership information relating to our sport and not allow others to do it for us. Not much more to be said or should be said thank you to everyone for your augport of Australia's best caving club! Keep those caves going down! Stuart Nicholaa hesident 1991/92 PAETr Stuart Nicholas (m), plue lots of other people ran Flitxiera University Speleo Society Inc. Adelaide (FUSSI ) A holiday! Bliss and other utterances ... The plane hke i.n Melbourne, my pack was impounded in Adelaide, Karen and Guy were in hot water (their hot water cylinder burst! ). That's the holiday spirit, I guesa. A day or two veg'ing at one of Adelaide's beach side suburbs, then off to the Flinders Ranges in no less than the ASF Editor's Morris 1100. The Clare Valley wineries and plbs were all shut on Good Friday when we gassed through and the last bottle fell out of the fridge the night befo re... All that implied a definite lack of holiday spirit! A few hundred kilometres later (a hundred or so more than it needed to be ... ) the Morry stopped beside a non-descript little hill and it was announced that we were about to go caving. I spent a minute or two wondering if flies could see in the darkDeciding they couldn't persuaded me to go underground. The cave was Clara St. bra Cave, F4 to its friends. Immediate impressions were different a mine adit for an entrance, a very short walk from the car and the underwear that local cavers do not wear under their cotton overalls -... My bushwalking thermale (only one layer ) running shorte and neoprene lmee pads looked a little out of place, if not risquk. In we went, past the dead kangaroo, down a wooden ladder to a cross passage, replete with more carcasses. The very dry nature of the cave was in contrast to Taasie experiences dust in the eyes wae a major h&! Rulling left, a daylight hole above illuminated the passage a little, juat before a steel gate. The gate lock clasp wan broken and the lock jammed obsolete one key. Apparently the cave, lilte a number of others in the area, had been mined at some time for bat guano hence the adit entrance and timbers littering the entrance section of the cave proper. The aim of the trip waa to look for some minute cave spiders as they had been noted in this cave on a previous trip. Pushing on through some small wriggles, we peered intently at the dry and dead formation looking for something that f Wassured that I would recognise when I saw one... Emerging into a mediuan sized chamber (around 10 metres diameter) waa a revelation decoration was good, albeit mainly dead and somewhat wed. A further couple of similar chambers existed beyond here. Water is, like in Tassie, the gold prize to cavers. Only the scale is different cavers in the Flinders look for drops on the ends of straws, not roaring atreanways. A couple of hours of eweating in the humid and hot (approx 20C) atmosphere and dry cave environment had us locate a few little animals plus a couple of single strand webs. Enough we still had an hour or so of outback roads to negotiate before cfirk to reach our campsite and the other FUSSI people beside a river course no water, just a few trees and lots of rocks in the bottom.


Description
The Tasmanian Caverneering Club was formed on 13 September
1946. Initially, information was provided to members through
a circular, copies of which exist back to November 1947.
"Speleo Spiel, Circular of the Tasmanian Caverneering
Club" was first published December 1960. Eight issues of this
are known, up to May 1962. In April 1964 a "Circular" was
again issued and seems to have continued, irregularly, until
March 1966. Then in April 1966, a "New Series" of Speleo
Spiel commenced, as a monthly newsletter.
In December 1996 The Tasmanian Caverneering Club
amalgamated with the Southern Caving Society and the
Tasmanian Cave and Karst Research Group to form the Southern
Tasmanian Caverneers. The combined group agreed to continue
to publish "Speleo Spiel" as its bi-monthly newsletter, as
continues today (2015).
Speleo Spiel is a vehicle for recording the cave and
karst-related activities, and particularly the achievements,
of the Southern Tasmanian Caverneers. It also carriers
technical and scientific reports, reprints, reviews and other
information likely to be of interest to members from time to
time.