Speleo Spiel

Citation
Speleo Spiel

Material Information

Title:
Speleo Spiel
Series Title:
Speleo Spiel
Creator:
Southern Tasmanian Caverneers
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Regional Speleology ( local )
Genre:
Newsletter
serial ( sobekcm )
Location:
Australia

Notes

General Note:
The Tasmanian Caverneering Club was formed on 13 September 1946. Initially, information was provided to members through a circular, copies of which exist back to November 1947. "Speleo Spiel, Circular of the Tasmanian Caverneering Club" was first published December 1960. Eight issues of this are known, up to May 1962. In April 1964 a "Circular" was again issued and seems to have continued, irregularly, until March 1966. Then in April 1966, a "New Series" of Speleo Spiel commenced, as a monthly newsletter. In December 1996 The Tasmanian Caverneering Club amalgamated with the Southern Caving Society and the Tasmanian Cave and Karst Research Group to form the Southern Tasmanian Caverneers. The combined group agreed to continue to publish "Speleo Spiel" as its bi-monthly newsletter, as continues today (2015). Speleo Spiel is a vehicle for recording the cave and karst-related activities, and particularly the achievements, of the Southern Tasmanian Caverneers. It also carriers technical and scientific reports, reprints, reviews and other information likely to be of interest to members from time to time.
Restriction:
Open Access - Permission by Publisher
Original Version:
No. 52 (Nov 1970)
General Note:
See Extended description for more information.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of South Florida Library
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
K26-04121 ( USFLDC DOI )
k26.4121 ( USFLDC Handle )
21731 ( karstportal - original NodeID )
1832­6307

USFLDC Membership

Aggregations:
Added automatically
Karst Information Portal

Postcard Information

Format:
serial

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Full Text

PAGE 1

SPELEO SPIEL. No.52. November, 1970. Published monthly by the Tasmanian Caverneering Club, Box 641 G, G.P.O., Hobart, Tas. 7001. Registered at the G.P.O. Hobart. Annual subscription 60 cents. Single copies 10 cents. Pres: Albert Goede, 8 Bath Street, Battery Point, Hobart, Tas. 7000. Sec: Doug Turner. 79 Riawena Road, Rose Bay, Tas. 7015. FORWARD PROGRAMME. Nov. 8 Sunday. Day trip to JF 5 and Hairygoat Hole. Leaders: Noel White and Philip Robinson. Nov.14,15 Weekend. Mt. Anne trip. Preparatio n for A.S.F. field trip. Leader: Brian Collin. Nov.21,22 Weekend: Combined trip with S.C.S. in Ida Bay area. Saturday: Northern side of Marble Hill. Sunday: Exit Cave. Leader: Albert Goede. Nov.28,29 North-east. St. Marys area. To look at caves in Pe rmian limestone. Leader: Albert Goede. Dec. 2 WEDNESDAY: 8p.m. General meeting at Wes Carpenter's, 20 Wellesley Street, South Hobart. Dec.5 or 6 Sat. or Sun. An attempt at further exploration of JF 10. Leader: Philip Robinson or Brian Collin. Dec. 13 Sunday: Ladder practice. Place to be decided at next general meeting. EDITORIAL. The club has seen another very active month with trips to the Junee area, north-east, Weld River, Hastings, and Ida Bay. It is also very heartening to see so many keen new recruits joining the ranks. At the last general meeting a record number (5) of new members was elected to club membership and meetings have been well attended. The Junee area re mains the focus of our interest. An attempt at digging in Hairygoat Hole has be en unsuccessful and opinions differ on further prospects. Noel believes that only explosives could force a way through, while Bill thinks that the job could be done with a heavy sledge hammer, so it could well be worth another try. A number of other shafts were also investigated without much success although one requ ires further exploration. Philip, Peter, and Mike investigated JF 5 and reported that with the aid of a few bolts it should be possible to ladder the next pitch without coming under the waterfall. The depth is estimated at approx. 100 ft. The club's efforts in this area are now likely to be concentrated on JP 4,5 and JP 10. CONGRATUATIONS S.C.S.! On Saturday, October 31, a team of seven from the Southern Caving Society further explored Tassy Pot in the Florentine Valley and reached a depth of approx. 580 ft., making this pothole the third deepest cave system in Australia. The third shaft in the system, which had previously been estimated to be 100 ft. deep, in fact turned out to be a cool 250 ft. odd, making it the third longest drop in Australia. Unfortunately the party ran out of ladder about 20 ft. from the bottom at a depth of approx. 580' ft. The cave may go on further and another attempt to bottom the system will be made soon. Exploration of the pot is a classic in vertical caving. The events leadin g up to the exploration of the big shaft have been written up in the Southern Caver 2(3). The article is accompanied by a sketch ed cross-section of the system down to the top of the big pitch. Club News. The following new members were elected at the last general meeting: Judy Chambers, Pyengana. Full member. Clive Boulter, Sandy Bay Rd., S.B. Full member. Dot Boulter, Sandy Bay Rd., S.B. Full member. Stuart Nicholas, 7 Rupert Avenue, New Town. Junior member. Tom Forster, 11 Cedar Street, Lindisfarne. Junior member. Three new party leaders were also accepted at th e meeting: they are Simon Stephens, Noel White and Philip Robinson. Congratulations! Members present at the meeting enjoyed Philip's slides of a Nottingham University Caving Expedition to an extensive limestone area in nort h-western Spain. Both th e caves and the surface

PAGE 2

scenery seemed to be equally spectacular. It was al so obvious from his slides that “the rain in Spain" doesn't always “fall mainly on the plain". TRIP REPORTS. Weld River 11/10/1970. Party: Simon Stephens, Noel White, Bill Lehmann, Clive and Dot Boulter, Mieke Vermeulen, Kevin Kiernan and Jon Addison. Halfway through this trip it was discovered that no one would admit to being trip leader and so accept the responsibility for the series of fiascos. As a resu lt, and in order to protect the innocent from vicious slander, I have taken it on myself to write this brief report. On the previous Wednesday night I suggested a trip to continue the track cutting in the Weld River area. Surprisingly many people were interested an d despite bad weather were away about on time. We reached the Scotts Peak Rd. and began to walk alon g the Port Davey track in the rain. After about two hours walking it began to be realised that something was wrong. In the resulting discussions, accusations, and counter accusations, it became apparent that we were on the wrong track. Instead of being on the western side of the Weld River near Mt. Bowes, we were on the eastern side near Mt. Meuller. So much for navigation. Purely by accide nt and good fortune we were on dolomite and a couple of hours surface trogging was done. This only produced a few very small holes and the area does not look promising. As the weather was clearer as we walked out we could easily see where we should have gone. Oh well! It seems that the Weld River track must wait until we can again muster a party of cutters next time with someone who knows the way. Noel White. P.S. Damper Inn still is! Hairygoat Hole, Junee area 18/10/1970. Party: Bill Lehmann, Philip Robinson, Arthur Clarke, Stuart Nicholas, David Cripps (all T.C.C.), Peter Henley (T.C.C., S.C.S.), Kevin Kiernan, Chris Horris (S.C.S.). Party left Hobart at 6.30 a.m. in two vehicles and arrived at the barrier at 8 a.m. Cars were parked on ANM track about one hour’s walk from cave. Cave lies about 800’ above present working area. The party reached the cave at 10.10 a.m. and had a light meal before entering. Forward assault party was made up of Philip, Kevin, Chris, Peter, and Bill, with follow up and gear passing by the rest of the group. Peter entered the cave first and took down to the first pitch about 200 ft. of ladder and rope. A ladder was put over the first 10 ft. and the party then reached the take off point for the 40 ft. drop. Another ladder was attached to the one at the 10 ft. drop and Philip climbed down into the small chamber below. The cave appeared to be formed along a fault zone in the limestone and continued downwards in the same direction in the horizontal plane. From this chamber a passage led off through a few jammed boulders at about 45 for 30 ft. After widening out of the cave the floor was seen to be composed of small rocks and mud, still sloping at 45 and ending in a drop of about 1 seconds. A ladder was put down and some of the rocks cleared to prevent injury. Peter and Philip climbed down to the bottom of about a 45 ft. pitch and reached a chamber of about 20 x 15 ft. A small streamway flow ing and was observed to enter a crack in the floor. On investigation it could be seen that a widening out occurred after about 12 ft. into the crack and a considerable air draught could be felt. About half a cubic ton of rocks and mud block the crack at present and it was decided to leave digging to a later date. The party left the cave and started to arrive at th e surface at 2.10 p,m. Gear was packed and the party returned to the cars by 3.30 p.m. P. Henley.

PAGE 3

North-Eastern Tasmania 24,25/10/1970. Party: Albert Goede (leader), Therese and Diana Goede, Simon and Janet Stephens, Clive and Dot Boulter, Philip Robinson, Noel White, Kevin Kiernan, Bill Lehmann, Wes Carpenter, Judy Chambers, Delia & Anne Maloney, Tom Forster, and (Sunday only) Peter Shaw. This trip was intended for a small party with particul ar interest in cave fauna and minerals but, as it happened, it reached mammoth proportions with a record attendance for the year. The club was fortunate enough to be offered the use of an empty house at Pyengana by the local Brown family through the good offices of Judy. Wes, Simon, and passengers left on Friday night while Albert, Noel, and party left at 7 a.m. on Saturday to meet Bill at Conara. We arrived at Pyengana at 11.45 a.m. and went straight to the Anchor Mine at Lottah after meeting the others. Some fauna was collected in the adits followed by some fossicking for minerals in the open cut. Then back to the cars for lunch. After lunch we headed for the Blue Tier. Several members had a daffodil picking contest at the site of the old Lottah township (who says the age of chivalry is dead?). Next a strenuous climb up the Blue Tier with BillÂ’s car shedding various non-essential parts wh ile Noel, Philip, and Kevin stopped frequently to wage a private war on possum snares. On top we had an interesting visit to an alluvial tin mine where Simon introduced several members to the noble art of panning. Then back to a road junction followed by a walk to another system of mine adits with a small stream flowing through it and excavated in very solid granite. Cave spiders and glow worms were abundant but to Albert's disappointment no crickets could be found. It was close to six when we headed back to our temporary home at Pyengana. An extended cooking session followed in the roomy kitchen.

PAGE 4

The following morning it was easy to distinguish the lilo and mattress owners from the unfortunates who slept (or tried to sleep) on the wooden boards. While we were packing the cars Peter arrived and a convoy of six cars was soon on its way to Gladstone where a happy time was had by all prospecting for smoky quartz and citrine. For lunch we drove to the cliff-like shores of an improbably green man-made lake near the Endurance Tin Mine and then on to th e main objective for the da y the mystery cave near Scottsdale. The approach was through lush fields and a pine plantation with the route clearly marked with yellow tape by one of Bill's friends. Our hopes of a basalt cave faded as we realised the plantation area was underlain by granite. The cave proved to be real, however with 50 ft. of negotiable passage and small chambers in granite boulders. It had a sm all stream running through it and quite & few cave spiders and glow worms. The cave ended in a smal l chamber appropriately decorated by a broken bottle which was the scene of a considerable traffic jam caused by six cavers half trying to get back out the other half equally determined to press on further. Albert found a single immature cave cricket of unknown affinities but a careful search failed to yield additional specimens. Back at the cars we were informed by Janet, who had been making friends with the natives, that one Scottsdale character some fifty years ago used the cav e to hide the body of his wife after murdering the poor woman. The only other claim to fame for the cave is that it is the only one in granite known in Tasmania. Hope it stays that way. Albert Goede. Newdegate Cave, Hastings. 1/11/1970. Party: Albert Goede (leader). Noel White. Bill Lehmann. Surface party: Therese, Diana, and Hila ry Goede (who did a tourist trip). We made a late start at 8.45 a.m. after some debate as to whether we should go at all as the weather was being rather unfriendly. The party of three entered the cave a little before midday with enough gear to descend into Mystery Chamber. After inspecting the formations in the Binney Chambers the party made a quick descent into Mystery Chamber to admire the "mysteries". Then down to the creek but on the way we came across a recent addition to the cave’s attractions in the form of a zoo full of exquisitely modelled clay figures with the legend “S.C.S. W.A.S.G. Zoo". We made a little addition of our own. Then two members of the party got the notion they wanted to see Hell’s Half Acre although the creek was running strongly. They plunged in followed by a rather reluctant leader. One section proved particularly amusing as desperate a ttempts to keep one's stern out of the water only resulted in jamming one's helmet in the roof. We were glad to see Hell’s Half Acre creek – a trickle by comparison with the main stream. Noel received the appropriate puni shment for stating that the cave was not nearly as muddy as he had been led to believe when he slid down the clay slope at the Devil’s Elbow to land in a pool at the bottom amidst great cheers. We then pushed upstream collecting Anaspides on the way. To Albert's surprise they proved to be eyed forms, although ones collected earlier from the Wolf Hole system in the same area are without eyes. Then b ack to the entrance. The party leader nearly made a most undignified dive in to the creek when he came within an ace of being skittled by a well lubricated Noel sliding down the slope at the bottom of Mystery Chamber. This climb is remarkably difficult when you are coated in greasy clay, as Bill also found out a few minutes later. The trip back through the Binney Tunnel was made in record time. It's marvellous what a little lubrication will do. On the way through the tourist cave we net a large party of tourists who were clearly impressed when they saw three animated lu mps of clay approaching. You could hear them. thinking aloud: “Those mad cavers again." Quite an enjoyable day except that we left one of our headers at the top of the Mystery Chamber drop. Will the next party in there please bring it out? Albert Goede. FAMOUS LAST WORDS!!! That's not bush just trees!


Description
The Tasmanian Caverneering Club was formed on 13 September
1946. Initially, information was provided to members through
a circular, copies of which exist back to November 1947.
"Speleo Spiel, Circular of the Tasmanian Caverneering
Club" was first published December 1960. Eight issues of this
are known, up to May 1962. In April 1964 a "Circular" was
again issued and seems to have continued, irregularly, until
March 1966. Then in April 1966, a "New Series" of Speleo
Spiel commenced, as a monthly newsletter.
In December 1996 The Tasmanian Caverneering Club
amalgamated with the Southern Caving Society and the
Tasmanian Cave and Karst Research Group to form the Southern
Tasmanian Caverneers. The combined group agreed to continue
to publish "Speleo Spiel" as its bi-monthly newsletter, as
continues today (2015).
Speleo Spiel is a vehicle for recording the cave and
karst-related activities, and particularly the achievements,
of the Southern Tasmanian Caverneers. It also carriers
technical and scientific reports, reprints, reviews and other
information likely to be of interest to members from time to
time.


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