Speleo Spiel

Citation
Speleo Spiel

Material Information

Title:
Speleo Spiel
Series Title:
Speleo Spiel
Creator:
Southern Tasmanian Caverneers
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Regional Speleology ( local )
Genre:
Newsletter
serial ( sobekcm )
Location:
Australia

Notes

General Note:
The Tasmanian Caverneering Club was formed on 13 September 1946. Initially, information was provided to members through a circular, copies of which exist back to November 1947. "Speleo Spiel, Circular of the Tasmanian Caverneering Club" was first published December 1960. Eight issues of this are known, up to May 1962. In April 1964 a "Circular" was again issued and seems to have continued, irregularly, until March 1966. Then in April 1966, a "New Series" of Speleo Spiel commenced, as a monthly newsletter. In December 1996 The Tasmanian Caverneering Club amalgamated with the Southern Caving Society and the Tasmanian Cave and Karst Research Group to form the Southern Tasmanian Caverneers. The combined group agreed to continue to publish "Speleo Spiel" as its bi-monthly newsletter, as continues today (2015). Speleo Spiel is a vehicle for recording the cave and karst-related activities, and particularly the achievements, of the Southern Tasmanian Caverneers. It also carriers technical and scientific reports, reprints, reviews and other information likely to be of interest to members from time to time.
Restriction:
Open Access - Permission by Publisher
Original Version:
No. 58 (Jun 1971)
General Note:
See Extended description for more information.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of South Florida Library
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
K26-04128 ( USFLDC DOI )
k26.4128 ( USFLDC Handle )
21738 ( karstportal - original NodeID )
1832­6307

USFLDC Membership

Aggregations:
Added automatically
Karst Information Portal

Postcard Information

Format:
serial

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Full Text

PAGE 1

SPELEO SPIEL. No.58. June, 1971Published by the Tasnanian Cm erneering Club, Box 641 G, G.I.O., Hobart, Tasnania,7001. Registered for i)osting as a periodical Category "Bii. Annual subscri-jtlon ---L$1.00. p Sin:
PAGE 2

Speleo Spiel. (Page 2.) June, 1971. cave. The natives are scared stiff of "denonsis which are sui7posed to be hiding iu there. Anyway we will let you know about further developments if any. F s Their adidress -, .0. Box 339, Madang, T. P. N. G. + Ladcier -iialting. The wire and copper ferrules for the new ladders have been bou;?rt and the material for the rungs is on orler fro~ IVIelbourne 211p should be here any day so we should be able to r?ake a start soon, + LOST. bjr Bill Leh1.1ann a 20 ft. length of nylon webbing(?) on lidventure trhlning trip to Exit Cave on Saturday 24 Ayril. Would new owner please return to Bill. + Your ty is% is taking a break for a while and would like to thank Dot Boulter for offering to take over the job. All you budding authors cone up wit srJl.ie good articles and let's see if we can break the six pages record for the S7iel. SUBSCHIPi'IOi'!S. pA considerable nuuber of club ne!-ibers are still unfinancial. k list of n~mes of offenders follows in order to jog their ;:lenories. Car1 B j orkluxd. Frank Brown. Grahan Brown. Judy Chazbers. Sib Corbett. Col Hocking. Bernard Kowe. Kevin Kiernan. John Plaist er. Edward Todd. Tim Walkden-Brown. A list of financial menbers will be j!ublished in %lie July Spiel. Unless YOU -jay your sub. this montg this is definitely the last copy of the ~~~izi you will receive. If your nane has been wronkly included >lease contact the secretary of i3resident. Subscriptions can be sent to Box 641 G, G.:?.O., Hobart or to the treasurer Ian Farley, 49 Wells IP<.rade, Black~ans Bay, 7152 or can be handed :)ersonall either to Ian or Ulbert. TRIP KEPORTS. Florentine area May lst, 1971. Party: ?Joel hhi-te(leader), Therese and Diana Goede, Stuart Nicholas, David erii>-:,s, Kichard Bloonfield, Ron Kkhurst. This tri I took the form of an easy alternative to the Khazaddum trip of the sane day. i'he fi~st object was to zxarline another of the holes at the Lawrence Creek Swallet, however as the wa,ter had risen and no e of us were equi;>l)ed with gills, this poved inpossible. The nearest hole to the swallet was filled to within about ten feet of the surface with swirling water. This was nunbered JP 23 on the rock-face above the hole. The other previously entered hole about 100 yards away wzs nunbered JP 24, also on a cons~icuous rock face. It was ai~prent that little could be achieved in this area until the water had dropped considerably, so it was decided to withdraw to the area just south of Telcorne Stranger. This area hag been first visited a week before. The smal.1 cave explored then was nw-!bered JP 25 down besi6e the hole, so the number can not be seen frcr.1 any distance away. he surface2 trogged the area around, and made our way towards to east. The snall narrow gully south of JF 25 opened out uy~strean into a huge deyressed area of sinks. Two snall proraisin:; looking 'holes were found but proved to be choked. These were nu;-lbered JF 26 and 27. The depressed area while it looked promising for a good cave did not look ;ronising for an entrance, so we pressed on to the east in the ho;x of finding a major swallet. Eventually a smll swallet was found-with several holes leading down. One of these near where the strean enters the swa,llet was entered. Three pos:;ible ways were found, only one of which was exanined. It led down about sixty feet until it hecarle too wet and narrow to proceed without a wct suit. The hole was entirely within rockfall and rather unstable, We withdrew to the surface and attached the rlunber JP 28 to a large block of linestone besi2.e the hole exslmined. It is in about the lowest part of the swallet, about fifteen feet from where the wk.iJcer enters. About ten entrznces were found in the i~ixediate vicinity ranging from very small to quite large, but all vere in rockfall. Probably soae of the large clefts near the edges of the doline may give access to the stream. 'This area clearly needs nore attention. We 131-csse? on surface trogging in the general direction of the cars, bkt only found a srnall blocked swallet not far froc Pielcome Stranger. Noel White.

PAGE 3

Speleo S2iel. ..--.:-=. (Page 3.) June, 1971. Mole Creek ,21-24 &lay 1971. Party: Noel ',;irite(leader), Bill Lehnann and northern gilirles Bill Tonalin and Des Bobinson. us I was on recreation leave Noel cane frorn Hobart to my parent's place at Carrick on Friday night getting lost about three tines in the fog. On ,JcLtur2ay norning we drove ul> to Devonport to sec Bill Tonalin and then OY!. to see Des Robinson, getting both of th~n out of bed. after coffee and a tdlk we wsre given directions to the club hut and the Black Shawl znd Boneyconb Caves. We then headed to Rlole Creek with the 1-22;, in one hand and written directions in the other. The hut \.]as easy to find but the caves were another matter. They were not where we were told they w3re. Asking one of the locals gaine< us directions to Honeyconb and Wet Caves which were exy~lored in lieu of the otht:rs, with Noel waxing profusely on various geologiual phenonena. Wheri Bill and Des arrived on Sunday norning we found that we had missed a turn in the road and so ended up at the othcr caves. 'de then proceeded to Kubla Khan setting up roljes and pull5y at the old entrance and then working up the valley to the new entrance. Using the ropes we brought along vvs abseiled down a short drol~ 2nd then a 70 footer into a fair sized chamber full of fornation. With c;r!eras clicBing we journeyed on to various sections of the cave sto;)~~ing in the Forbidden City for lunch. After lunch we did a hairy clinb into the Dulciner where there are some ofi the ~3rettiest forsations in the cave. The next stol~ was Khan Hall where Noel discovered a hole in the floor and dived in but it cane to nothing. Des in the man tine chased up another l~ossible lead but had to leave off due to slmrtage of time. We hurried on and after traversing the srdreadedi' 3talictite Shuffle and the high level river passage successfully arrived at the botton of the pitch to the surface. I had an urgent desire to reach the to:) first so tied on to the pulley roije and holding the static line advanced to the wall. After the custonary cal ''clinbingis I had to yell itstopfs as I wa.s about 70' up and lc~okc~. li e lieadir~g for the noon. That ceytainly is the quickest way out of a cave. The others soon followed and after collecting the gear Bill and Des headed for Devonport and Noel and c:yself back to the hut, -.,;e returned home on the Monday. Our sinccrc thanks to Bill ;in6 Des for taking the trouble to show us tl;r:.ui;;h the cave which we thoroughly enjoyed and we will be back soon to s;jend another ei~;ht hours in this fantzstlc cave. Bill Lehnann. Bubs Hill and 3elson River i~~y 28-30. Party: klbert Goede(leader), Phi1 Robinson, Bill Lelirmnn, !\lorn Poult er, Kevin Kiernan, Denis Seynour Delia Maloney Stuar'~ IlTicholas and(Sunday only) Michael Tarburton. The pi~,rty left Hobart in pouring rain on Fridagnigbt in two vehicles: Dcnis9s utility and Norms vlsilentfl rover. On the way up the rover broke its silence and an investigation by Bill and Norn showed the steering box was about to part cornpany with the vehicle., an ailnent quickly cured by tightening uy a nunber of vital nuts and bolts. Kevir? and Delia found travelling in the rover in the back over h!lt.Arrows::lith a little much 2nd an unscheduled sto;:: had to be made. We arrived at the canpsite at 2 a.n. The following i2orning saw a keen party set out for Tinys Watch Hole despite the threatening weather. The 90 ft. ladder pitch proved to be rather awkward and it took s'ome ti-le to get everybody down. l'he cave was a disap;~ointr:lent and probably cgntains no nore than 800 ft. of passage with a single large cha~lbc-r at the base of the ladder drop. The un<~.r~~;round streaci could not be followed far in either direction. It was found to contain one -ides duly collected by nyself. The cave contains sone reasonable rr 6r1:ETTon and the photographers had a busy -time. Although the cave is not as large as we had been led to belicve it is still the most significant find made so far in the area, When we emerged after a cou-i~le of hours underground it hsd started to rzin. Kevin, Delia and nyself nzde a quick visit to Thylacine Lair while the otlners detackled the l~itch. The following day, having besn joined by Michael six of us decided to walk into the Nelson River area visited only once before by club mwlbers. Getting there involved an arduous two hour trek through xountzinous but quite open terrain the vegetation being nostly bracken. Ev~rybody was capfPvated by the area .ilthough it is

PAGE 4

Speleo S:)iel, June, 1971. probably not nuch nore than 30 acres in extent with an even smaller area of lims-tone outcrop~~ing further downstrean. The liilzestone is covered with d-olines and has beautifully developed solution features. It is lanin:!-ted and dips wasterly at about 30'. It is quite unfossiliferous, also unlike any Gordon Linestone I have seen alld ]:lay be Devonian in age. The river Nelson goes underground f~r about 100 yards but despite an inpressive entrance the systen cannot be enteredhere. The outflow point could be entered but a wet suit would be desirable. The most prmising entrance in the centre of the area could not be explored 2s it required a 30' ladder. A nuriber of srlall cavcs were investigated by two separate parties and some cave crickcds collected. The area is a fascinating one and is well worth another visit even if the cave 12otential is rather linited. By skirting som of the higher hills we were back at the road in one and a half hours. Returning to Bubs Hill we found the three who had stayed behind huddled around the fire quite n fire this as it had consuned ?-,lost of one of Korm's boots. de had an uneventful trip back to Hobart arriving at 10 p.13. Albert Goede. Junee area Sat. June 5th. Party: Peter Shaw, Laurel Norbury and Philip Robinson. Ve followed the old Khazad-dun track as far as the dry valley where we left 'che. track and headed east for a hundred yards into the valley conteining Cauldron Pot. Five ninutes later we reached the got and p~~uscd for a photo. Fron here we headed east through patchy horizontal lnto the next dry valley in which was the swallet presumably fount?. by Tin Wlkden-Brown and Jeanette Collin. The strean falls over a twenty foot cliff as a curtain of water into a pilc of talus. Wth two Gi~n torches we clinbed down through the talus for fifteen feet wherc we were stopped by a dry thirty foct plus drop down a sloping rift. '!:he strean is visible at the botton of the rift. Suggested ndne for the cave is Niagara Potu. Pron here WC intended to head east into the proninent valley above Junee Cave. Our y~lans were speedily altered when we encountered dense horizontal 2nd we dropped downwards attej:ii)ting to bypass the heavy scrub, eventually crossing a valley and cocing out onto the new section of the Eihazacl-dun road half way U;). It rlight be worthwhile in the future following a suall stream near the new cave as we did not follow it until it sank. Pet er Shaw. A re2ort on this tri:;~ was also received fron Phili-L.~ Hobinson. However Peter's beiag the shorter it was favoured. THE 'l SAVE COLONG ChVES CAMPAIGN. Noel Vhite. How llany Tasr~anians realise that the largest conservation battle going on in Australia today is over a caves reserbe? Over 70 years ago the Colon,, Caves Bcserve in W.',.lC. was set aside for the preservation of th, caves. Today part of the area is held under qining lease by a British firrL Associated Portland Cenent ~anufnc-turers(~us) Ltd., who pro;:ose to mine the liriestone at Church cre~k and Mt.urmouc This proposal is opi~osed by the Colong Connittee, which was set up in 1968 by 50 sur>l~orting societies and is fighting vigorously with both H.P.~.M. and the N.S.W. Goverment to have the !-lining lease ?evoked. How does the Colong Committee conduct the fight? This conservation can2aign is undoubtedly the best yet conducted in Australia. The N.S. ii.Govirnment is c~ntinually bombarded with petitions and letters to mnisters and nenbers which require much secretarial tine to reply to. Thzy are haraased with questions at public rieetings, letters to newspapers, and evm gpen opposition at elections. A.P.C .AT. is publicly at-kacked for its actions, its products have becn boycotted by supportin2 organizations, and it is under continual pressure at shareholders i~eetings. Many sup;;lorte rs of the Colong Corulittee currently about 900, have boueht shares i~ k.P.C .$h. which allows tha or their p-oxy to question the board and move notions at the shareholders neetings. These must be a nightmare for the board, especially the chairr~~m, but arc a delight to read about in the newspapers or the ffColon; Bulletinff. This annual circus now gets wide ~;~2read coverage in i1c;vsfiai~ers and on television. How is the fight financed? To February 17, 1971, the Cclong Cornnittee had spent $ 7,057 and had a balance of $581. This money had been raised in two ways; (i) donations fron suy jortiny; individ-

PAGE 5

Speleo Spiel. -.-S --..&-= (rage 5). June, 1971. uals and or,.;aliisations and (ii) sale of shares in a.i<.C,Tl';.. and subscriptions 'LO thetiColong Bulletinft. The com:,ittee sells single shares in B.P,C.P~. for $3.00, which also includes a subscription to the "Colong Bulletini' and entitles the shareholder to attend or be represented by .,,roxy at shareholders neetings. What doi:~ all this mean to Tasniznians? This is -.-the i,-!:lj~r conservation battle in Australia today. llajor gains have alrecdg been nzde and full victory is in sight. If we win this fi(yht, the whole conservation r~overierit will be strengthened. This will clearly benifit Tasnania. le are all Australians, a loss to one part of Australia is a loss to us all. In natters as inportant as conservation we cannot afford -to ?se provincial. iilso, it r.my not be long before Tasnanians have a sinilar fight on their hands. For this reason alone we should be :jre:?ared. :'e should learn as much as possible from the N.S.W. fight, so we will be better fitted when we have to fight on our hocie ground. The best way to do this is to buy a share in A.P. C.M. and becone a subscriber to the TsColonc; Bulletinsi. This helps the Colong Coi:i:'iittee as well as keeping you informed of developments. believe me, if only for the a~usenent of hearing about d..t'.C.M. 'S bhairnans ~;yrztions, it is money well spent. How CO you join the 'sColong Shc~reholders Clubi'? Just fill in the forn below. For a thrac dollar($3.00) dondtion to the Colone Colwittee I will receive in return OME free share in ASSOCIATED PORTLAND CULENT UNmACTUd13rlS (hU,,T.) LTD. plus a free subscription to the Colong Bulletin. ................................... PULL SUHNBlVU -(for regi tr:.ti31? pur;?oses) ............................................... FULL CHdI!2'P'IiAr DInl.&S -. =----mI have enclosed. chequz for ....... dollars in order to obtain ....... shizrc(s) in xssociated Portland Ce!-cnt Manufacturers(aust.) Ltd. Pleas? make cheques payable to the COLONG COEiiITTEE. send to: The TreLisurer, The Colong Connittee, 18 hrgyle Etreet, SYDNEY, c l>. 'i. 9 2000.


Description
The Tasmanian Caverneering Club was formed on 13 September
1946. Initially, information was provided to members through
a circular, copies of which exist back to November 1947.
"Speleo Spiel, Circular of the Tasmanian Caverneering
Club" was first published December 1960. Eight issues of this
are known, up to May 1962. In April 1964 a "Circular" was
again issued and seems to have continued, irregularly, until
March 1966. Then in April 1966, a "New Series" of Speleo
Spiel commenced, as a monthly newsletter.
In December 1996 The Tasmanian Caverneering Club
amalgamated with the Southern Caving Society and the
Tasmanian Cave and Karst Research Group to form the Southern
Tasmanian Caverneers. The combined group agreed to continue
to publish "Speleo Spiel" as its bi-monthly newsletter, as
continues today (2015).
Speleo Spiel is a vehicle for recording the cave and
karst-related activities, and particularly the achievements,
of the Southern Tasmanian Caverneers. It also carriers
technical and scientific reports, reprints, reviews and other
information likely to be of interest to members from time to
time.


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