Citation
The Texas Caver

Material Information

Title:
The Texas Caver
Series Title:
The Texas Caver
Creator:
Texas Speleological Association
Publisher:
Texas Speleological Association
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Regional Speleology ( local )
Technical Speleology ( local )
Genre:
Newsletter
serial ( sobekcm )
Location:
United States

Notes

General Note:
Contents: Letters to the Ediger: proofreading fails to an all-low -- Letter about suuntos: forestry suppleirs tells why tritium suuntos are available / Wayne Russell -- The rescue that never was: folks and facts on the fringe of some frantic fone calls / Tom Byrd -- Caves: Deadman's Hole: an historic report from the files of the TSS / Bob Hudson -- Map: Deadman's Hole -- Cave: Grosser's Sink: more from the files of the TSS -- Stonewall Cave: even more from the files -- Map: Grosser's Sink -- A storage pillow for your winter sleeping bag: useful and protective summer storage / Gandalf -- Map: Stonewall Cave -- Poetry: an untitle work submitted in response to the editor's plea for material / Jim Solimine -- The cave resources of Texas: revamping the TSS files and making them more useful / James Reddell -- Did you say cave rescue? new rescue cards now available from the safety committee / Tom Mills -- Safety: escape from Langtry Lead Cave: sharing our foolish past with others / Carl Kunath -- Poetry: it's all in your mind, y' know: a new expression of an old idea / Kathryn Kerr -- Fear and loathing at the '76 NSS convention / a not too detailed report of activities / Ediger -- Garbage: more announcements and doubtful quotations to strike fear in the heart of many a mortal / Staff -- Surveying: trilateration: pulling chains and striking area are not all that physical / Charlie Yates.
Restriction:
Open Access - Permission by Publisher
Original Version:
Vol. 21, no. 07 (1976)
General Note:
See Extended description for more information.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of South Florida Library
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
K26-04607 ( USFLDC DOI )
k26.4607 ( USFLDC Handle )
11341 ( karstportal - original NodeID )
0040-4233 ( ISSN )

USFLDC Membership

Aggregations:
Karst Information Portal

Postcard Information

Format:
Serial

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 2

caUER Volume 21. Number 7 July 1976 COVER PHOTO: The Big Room in Fern Cave, Texas taken by Bill Helmer around 1955 on a camera with 2 1/4 x 3 1/4 inch format. Tn this issue .... 119 LETTERS TO THE EDIGER Proofreading falls to an all-low .... ....... .. ,," ." ... ........ .. ".,,"" ""." 119 LETTER ABOUT SUUNTOS Forestry Suppliers tells why tritium Suuntos aren't available . WAYNE RUSSELL 120 THE RESCUE THAT NEVER WAS Folks and facts on the fringe of some frantic fone calls .. TOM BYRD 122 CAVES: DEADMAN'S HOLE An historic report from the file& of the of the TSS ........... BOB HUDSON 123 MAP: DEADM"I.N'S HOLE .... 124 CAVE: GROSSER'S SINK More from the files of the TSS . STONEWALL CAVE Even more from the files .. 125 MAP: GROSSER'S SINK ....... DICK SMITH 126 A STORAGE PILLOW FOR YOUR WINTER SLEEPING BAG Useful and protectiv e summer st.orage GANDALF 127 MAP: STONEWALL CAVE .......... 128 POETRY: An untitled work submitfed in reaponse to the editor's plea for material ... JIM SOLIMINE 130 THE CAVE RESOURCES OF TEXAS Revamping the TSS files and making them more useful. . JAMES REDDELL 131 DID YOU SAY CAVE RESCUE? New rescue cards now a vailable able from the safety committee, TOM MILLS 132 SAFETY: ESCAPE FROM LANGTRY LEAD GAVE Sharing our foolish past with othe;rs .. ,. G:ARL KUNATH 133 POETRY: IT'S ALL IN YOUR MIND, Y' KNOW" A new expression o f an old idea.; KATHRYN KERR 134 FEAR AND LOATHING AT THE '76 NSS CONVENTION A not too detailed report of activities .. EDIGER 136 GARBAGE More announcements and doubtful quotations to strike fear in the heart of many a mortal .. ST AFF 138 SURVEYING: TRILATERATION Pulling and striking arcs are not all that physical . CHARLIE YATES EDITOR: Gill Ediger Rt 2 Box 98 Falls City, TX 78113 tsa officers SUBSCRIPTIONS: James 5315 Laurel Lake Waco, TX 76710 CHAIRMAN: VICE-CHAIRMAN SECRETARY: Wayne Russell limmy Clements Ruth Darilek PO Box 848 Box 7438 11919 Grapevine Rockport, TX 7838Z Corpus Christi, TX 78415 San Antonio, TX 78188

PAGE 3

JULY 1976 L ETTERS Edigc r To usc some of your o w n words [rom )'ou r J une editorial, II". it's a sorry for s p e lco-journalism ... II when t h e editor of the Texas Caver doesn't prooircad an issue before c ranking it thro u g h the press. To use some more of y ou r own \\!or d s 'IAnd, if you think con s L"lcncious!y (sic) about it, the re's no real ('xcusc fo r i t II I am referring t o the r c pCIC', in th" production of a singl e issue, 1 0 tt',Il b an assistant all o f them, there tort', mistakC's creep in, It is not their Idull. SOm e t inleS, due t o budget ary, time. or personnell reasons I must decide whether or not t o allow minor mistakes t o stand. The TC is a part of a learning process for me and mus t neces sari 1 y c o ntain some imperfections. Indeed, if) were requi red t o produce a perfect news letter, you would probabl y see i t onl y sevF!ral months late and a t a cost of SID to $1 5 p e r yea r Redundant par a graphs a r e fairly easy to explai n away, B y the time an article has been read and proofed 4 limes ( a v e r y time conswning and boring process ) the whole article seems t o be repeating itself. Except for the fact that we usual I)' don't type a paragr aph twice, I'm surprised that thi s has been the only incident. Final lay out proofing consists only of a brief scan t o m ake sure articles are complete. continued on page ... and c:>nt inued from, et cetera a r e included Typos, however, are anothe r thing, I m really down on typos a n d have lon g felt that the r e if; little o r n o excuse for allowing them in the fi nat \'ersion 1 0 say (in your personal note) that t ypos in 119 m y edihont:l 01 the TC are worse than Moody's were is the unkindest cut of all. But the cruel fact is that in certain instances you may b e correct. I try to proofread every article myself--some_ times oth e;:-s-(iO it At any rate, your article W af" proofread and at least 17 "cutin" correct:ions made. Other "white out" corrections were made in the typewriter. I cannot find all 15 typos in the finished product (at least one was a stripping mistake ) and would welcome itemized corrections so I can see if a trend i s developing and can correct it. Concerning the little and marks in Fig. 1 of your article in the June issue, I h a v e hut one possible explanation: M y typewriter does not c ontain such symbols and i t was necessary to lift them from your manuscr ipt to hav e them included. I did the wor k with m y own two hands, and t though I thought I exercised all due care, mus t have :ransposed the twosymbols, I do recall thinking about their relationship on the paper. In any e vent I am sorry w hen such thIngs happen. that they affect the author s and I'm sorry that they affect the qualit y ot the CAVER. J w ill attempt to do a better proofing job i n the futur e So far, despite the inconsistancies, I feel that I've given you the best CAVE R that's ever been produced Best from a content stand-poi n t ( which is due to the effo rts of c o n tributors such as yourself), Best from a layo\:.t standpoint, and best from a presen tation standpoint (the t ypos and poor halftones not necessarily withstan ding) If others feel differently I'd like to hear about it, with specific suggestions for o vercoming the problem --ed. )

PAGE 4

120 'The Rescue Thai Neuer, Was by Tom B yrd E:cry ca,'cr knows about the fc; and both of whom assured the moth e r that the cavers were okay -encountered a jurisdictional problem. The deputy said that the cave was not in his jurisdic tio, because the entrance is in the city o f Austin. The police said that the cave was not in their jurisdiction because only the first 1 5 feet of the cave is within the cit)' limits and the r est of the cave is in the county. With this legal impasse for an excuse the peace officers were f reed from having to search some awful hol e in the ground. "Malna call the Librarian!" the daughters probably said. So, the mother called Martin again, this til1'1e it was after midnight. She wanted Martin to go down to the library and get the Airman'S Cav e map. In addition to this she wanted to know what kind of equipm ent she would need to go into the cave. W ell, Martin was familiar with the Airman's Cave l1'1ap as it had appeared in the TEXAS CAVER issue on Airman's Cave. H e was particularly familiar with it because h e had noted, onl y a week earlier, that it had been

PAGE 5

JUL Y 1976 ,tolen fro111 the l ibrary So, he tc,ld the n10ther it ",as stolen. Y ou "an't g o into that ca\'e by \ o\l r5L'li" 111\' boss told h er. So, j ", rl'icr red h el' to r n e Ton1 r \ rei W"ll b\' that time I was dri\'ill" throuQh Burne t or Llano or suc'h place, and si111ultan "",,51\, Mark Loeffler, Nancy 13\ rei: ;)r,d Nor a B yrd (Illy two sis t,.",. s) \\,, 're breaking into In)' house '"t" J t nibht ior lack of an)'thing lwliL' r to Ln The Inother some ho" l!ot my phone nUl11be r but it '.\,15 ;n\ p a rents phone number, S o she \\'oke my fathe r up and skeel to speak to TOln. He re i,'rr,'d her to Illy o\\' n phone num :"1"1', WhL'n she called m y house 31 )Sth stl'l"et, 1'ny sister ans\\'er "ci th e phone, '(anc\', Nora, and Mark began 0 LJr),!anize a ca\'e rescue, Mark ':"d b c'n to Airl11an's before and I:l' !S a "son1 E'ti mes ca\"er" him 'vli, The\' found UTG phone [ 5 and called Logan McNatt. (ait el' dri\'ing all day from \\c"ico) and Gary J\appel' (from :11e!i;)na) agr eed to go find out h d \\<15 \\"rong. J'\ancy, Nora, ,'co \!ark picked u p Logan and <11"'\" t o the H o i ida)' House Ham il St;)n d on Barton Springs 1 l"q to lllC'et the distraught InothI r. I"h,,\, d ro\'C' to the mother's h,,,:s(' and dropped h e r off. Logan ':c', I e ke! th,lt the fi r st thing to do I'. J, 10 s('c if the ca\'er S car ",as 1h"r" bC'cause, as Logan late r ,JId (\\ ith a grin), "I was gonna IHJke dan1' ) sure the y were there 'causL'l \\ 'asn't gonna go into that ,'J\" un less I had to, Shit, TOIn, \'e! ne\ e r e\'en been t h e r e b efore. So, Loeffler and McNatt were t.llking as they looked for the car. They had never m e t before and Logan recognizing Loeffler's German n anle (of such fam e as Loeffler Bat Cave in Mason Count\' ) asked Mark "Are you any r e l ation to the Loefflers in Mason County?" Of course the answer was yes. In t h e long c h ain of ('\('nts tha t happened that night, Loeffler and McNatt discovered that they wer e long lost cousins f r o m Mason County r eunited in the cause to save fellow cavers, Not onl y did McNatt meet Loeffl er, but h e m e t m y sister, Nancy it was love at first sight-121 m 'oj A @lA"" .:I.e d.u. .... 4u."" sett.\o\' i", J ;-s .(' 00. 0\\ [; lit I\
PAGE 6

122 Deadman's Hole An Hi storical Report by Bob Hudson Located about 200 yards to the right o f US 281 and about 4 m i les southwest of Marble F alls, Due to some recent highway construc tion in that vicinity I cannot be too sure of th", eX.lct location nearer than 1 / 4 mile but anyone in the immediate an'a should. be able to help you locate the cave, T h", cave gd:; its namt' from a kgt'n.d a rancher who n1Llrdered a nt'gro and t h rew his body into t h t c.tve, No one knows if the story is t rue or not, R epeat ed below is a s t'dion of a letter from r NSS member, A sho rt time ago we made a survt'v v i sit to this c ave and our interest roS e from that point, Using a stop watch for timing a falling object, and allowing fo r the spe e d of sound in air, we cal culated that the depth o f the h0le was approximatel y 350 W e were able to land some rocks on the ledge m entioned in the article in your bulletin, and it is our belief that it is a sheer per pendicular drop from the nearsurface ledge to this one, Photoflash pictures made with flash equipment calculated to g i v e som e definition at a range of 200' show what we considered to be this l e dge with a gaping black spot off the edge of this ledge going farthe r on down, Unfortunately we did not drop anything onto this ledg e which would give an indication of r elative size, and there is no depth effect on the prints; the r e are two or three smaller ledges between this principal one and the top of the hole, .... The owner of the property is a Mr. Burnham . .. ;: Taken from a letter dated 30 June 1951 from Leslie Baker Jr. In April 1951 John Riggs and Carrcll Slemaker of the UniverCAVES sity of Texas decided to explore the cave after reading the account in Bulletin 10. That neither of them had been in an unexplored cav e except Austin Caverns did not deter them An article in the school paper brought fifty phone calls of who wanted to go. Riggs got the idea of a caving club, and the University of Texas Spe leological Society was born. Oh yes, the cav e was explored ,too. At the tUne of our exp edition, the cav e had a big log o ver the entrance to tie rope or pulley s to. Ri ggs and Slemaker had al so placed a log across the deep drop o n the b road ledge about twenty feet down. The cave is located (or was) in a brushy pastur e and was only a few feet from the road and fence. The entrance is verticle, dropping to a led g e about t wenty feet down. This l edge was very slick with mud and sloped into a drop-off falling sheer for 1 8 5 feet to the floor of the cave. About ten to twenty feet down fronl the first the cave widened from about twent y to eighty feet b y about 160 feet long. Slemaker described it as an enlarged fissure. The r e were nurnerous ledges near the bottom, but onl y one o r t w o of thelTI wide enoug h to stand o n and "et too narrow to pern1it a n1an to do nl0re than rest hanging onto the rope, ThE' last l e dgC' i s about two fE'et wide a nd twent\' feet fron1 the floor. There is a depression i n thE' floor about fi\' e to f i f teen feet deep that is fill e d with boulders. SIE'maker expresses the belief that this is a lower p art of the ca\'(' that has filled up with breakdo\\ n The room a t the bottom of the holE' is describe d as being about laO feet long b y 80 feet wide. The ceiling is about 1 6 0 to 190 feet high. There are many large boulders on the floor making it as rough as possibly imaginablE'. ln one end of the roon1, thE'rE' is The TEXAS CAVER a crevice :."llf filled with stalactit" curtains in which Sl-emake r thinks he could e ventually break into given enough time with a han"lmE'r. There i s also one othe r hole h i\!h up on one of the ledges t hat looks promising, but only a ca\' e c rick,,! could reac h it. The r e were found two name s burne d into the wall and the date near onE' o f then1 \\as 1 910. W e later found the man w h o was probabl y the first man to enter the cave and who had put his name and the date on the wall. H e wa, a state e n1polyee at the tim e \V m e t him, and was i n his sever H e climbed hand o l 'er hand ,'or: 85 feet t o get out ot thE' c ave. W ,len asked how he did it h e r eplit" that h e had to. W c never found who the othe r pC'rson was H owever, one of our m e n 1 -bers had p revious experience in the cave. Lon g before h e heard of NSS, he and one of his friends triet. : ') negotiate the cave, H e clin,ucd clown t1'l(' long rope, but !Jot lE'5s than 20 ieet up again b d O!'l' he fell. It took the entire IiJ'c depart ment of MarblE' F a ll s to get him out, H e was knocked unconscious but not seriously hurt. T h e san 1 C n1an disobeyed orders w h i l e on ; trip east and fell from a ledge> in a Virginia ca\'e, H e b r okC' his g lasses 1 24

PAGE 7

JULY 1976 F EET o 10 20 30 4 0 50 6 0 70 80 90 100 110 120 1 3 0 140 1 5 0 154.5 123 DE ADlvfA:t' J S HOLE F \ U q NET COUNTY, T EXAS fl R I J NTON a TAPE S U R VEY -'lose b ? :: "ERSON L b. t: ... I: .. OHt.F1:":. J ::r' o 1 0 20 30 40 50 I C.K 11-68

PAGE 8

124 possible to prevent any of this. It is also impossible to climb out from the flo 0 r of the cave on a rope except in sheer superhuman desperation. The two people who were'lowered into the cave on the University of Texas expedition were Carroll Slemaker, and a reporter, Torn Tony. In short, the cave is now fully explored. It is composed of a verticle sink about five feet in diameter dropping to a ledge about ten feet wide and sloping to an offset hole about four feet in diameter which falls sheer for 185 feet to a rocky floor. The sink widens just below the first ledge to about 60 to 90 feet long and 40 to 60 feet wide. The room at the bottom is about 160 X 80 and 180 feet high. There is one crawlway choked with stalactites. The cav e was entered first in 1910, again in 1949 and in 1951. Grosser's Sink From the TSS file s by Ronnie Fies eler The entrance is a IS' in diameter hole located in a large sink into which a small draw runs. A 45' drop from the surface leads into a passage running northwest-southeast. To the southeast a passage leads to a crawl which has been only partially explored. To the northwest the passage continues a s a stoopwayfor IS', drops 12', and then continues for' 40' more. From here a s"Tlall 10' squeezeway opens into a room formed b y the int e rs e ction at ri ght -angle s of a passage. The floor of the room is covered with large slabs of mudcovered breakdown. To the right the passage extends about 50' to an end, whil e to the left it extends about 40' before it also ends. Straight across the room a passage about 30' high and 5' wide rises steeply up. It is possible to craw l dow n through breakdown slabs and reach a hole too small to negotiate but into whiLh much flood wate r runs. The cav e has been \ 'isited several time s b y m embers o f the University o f T e x a s Grotto. It was mappe d b y Bill Russell and othe r grotto members in M a r ch, 1963. Stonewall Cave From the TSS files see map page12 7 When we f ound Stonewall Cave, we were doing what e very Texas caver should be doing once in a while .... looking for new caves. This was .one of f our caves that we found one S unday afternoon. A Richa r d Smit h Billy C ampbell, Charles Fromen, Mike Connally Theresa M ::>rr i= and I were in Kimble County one weekend on a caving/partying trip. On the w a y home we looked at the K i mble County issue of the TS.c;, and dr0\' e to a n a rea where no ca\'es wer e indicat ed. A few inten'iews with some local re=idents lE'd us to a ranc h w here we obtai n e d p ermis sion to explo r e a cave owned by the ranch When we arrived and check e d out t h e cliff, we found not one but fou r caves! Stonewall Ca\'e, though s m all The TEXAS CAVER by some standards, pro\' idE'd us with an hour or so of E'njo>'abl e exp loring and m a pping, It is basically a 257' east trendi ng passage \\ ith an a\ crage ceiling hieght of 5 6'. Sc\' eral domes are scattered t hroughout t h e ca\' e with other points of interest being the stonE' wall just inside the e n trance (built to keep li\ 'estock o ut). the Big S lab ( a large break down b lock). and the Guano Passage. The owner had t he' guano tested with the thought of using i t as fertilizer. T h e r eport, howe\'er, showed the guano t o be leached o u t and worthless, Hundreds of these s m all, but interesting, ca\'es arc wai t ing to be found in the ca\ e a reas of Texas. What a re you doing this weekend? Make a friend: Map a Caue!

PAGE 9

ULY 1976 I I / I ,,-----, / \ \. o 25 50 FT __ I!=::JI_-===-_-========-, .... / \ --"/ ( 511-lK \ \ / GR05SER'S SINK COIvIAL CO TEl(AS BRUN"TO)J T,I..;>E .suRVI:'{ BY B. FtU:;:;ELL ,E T A.L .3 -Go."!> DRAWN Boy D ::'I.I.lT I-l 3 -29-UTSS 125 ,\ S.IIJI( '\ o\PPIU)'l 100'(0.

PAGE 10

126 EQUIPMENT :\11 yl'::i I it '::i SUnl!11C'rtilTIC again (ul" illusl y) --that ti111C of ycar \\lll'll u s thin skinncd Southcrncrs Jllanage to COI1\ 'iIlCC our s,,1 \ eS Ihal i l is \\ 'an11 to "1,,,"dol1 our dO\\,11 5 1 cepil1g bags (i()" ()r alJu\' e ) No\\' C0111eS a pruIJIl'111 -what to do with it. T\'.u SOlllliol1s; fi,'st, stuff it, and stOI"l' it long lcrlTI con'1-prl'ssion is hard all thc down, pl us, then."s nothin,[.( quitc like pllil ill,!! OUI Ih" bag (fi rst cold o Fig l a Sllil p) which has steepecl in its ()\'.'Il jllices all sunlmer, It can IJ,' IHl'lI\' ral1k, Sccol1c1, leave it IlilstUf("d --good for down and it \\ill ill' \\'ell aired by \\'inter '.!.:!.!.' \\'hal do ),011 do with this Z I "H)I di;rl11L'lcr G foot long "thing"? II dlll'sll't readily tll c k anywherc, ,illll if Ivft Ollt, il lJel'on,es prc)' fold B The TEXAS CAVER A STORAGE PiLLow FOR YOUR WiNTER SLEEpiNG BAG It's sin'ple, easy, it works, and the bag becomes functional. All you do is make a g iant pillowcase for the bag, It's large enough to permit air circulation and the down isn't compressed, while at the san,e time it's useful, even handy What you need: About 1 m eter '--', Sti tch around Fig Ib or so of moderate l y heavy material, most ideall), of a cotton/pol y este r con,bination (cotton breathes, polyester adds strength), I bought som e of the wildest cotton/pol y corduroy I could locate (I like the texture of corduroy and it washes and wears well --that' s Next, ; , ' b y Gandalf --b y hand takes a lot more time and dedication. Now, lay material out flat with outside of fabric down. Fol d one end over about -_., 3 cm (Fi.gure I ) Align two halves of sticky-tape on the fold back from t h e edge about 1 cm (so you will have area to grasp when opening pillow) and leave a space beSe\v on Velcro : y Hooks : : fold B t>--; -----------: Fig I c tween two halves of sticky-tape and enough space on ends for a SealTI, Sew it in securely iow, fold material in h alf. sticky-tape at one end, outsidc of fabric in lTIiddle and sew remaining two sides (Figure Z). Flip it right side out, put your bag in (and an)' othcr loose down equipment) Velcro on outside , , Fig I" I ll,t\1\ llllforsl'ell haza "cis (nest1I1e! .rt'," uf best fricl1c1s, canine Irl "llll,t', suiJjl'ct 10 spills, 11111 1 1:---, hl'ill,L! t r,".Jnlj)i C'cl on, et "It',,) \ ."i," dVl't'l'aSC scn'icc ,Id, I ii -dlld, afl e r pUltil1g 111 .. 1111. ,11\ Il"rd l'arl1cd dollal's in II. 1 1 l l l 'l'<\:; tl) \.ls t f o rc\" c r \\"'11, I'", ,"UIIiHI solution, , : : I =. 1 some vclcro or sticky-tape to seal pillow (about 30 cm). I prefer sticky-tape to snaps ( a real chore to install) and to zippers (risk snagging bag) And some thrcad, preferably to match, What you do: Find a sewing machinc ",ith instruction booklet. It's fastcst to do it 011 a machine Fig Zb donlt forget the stuff sack, and seal. The beauty of this i s that you can throw the pillow in the truck to b e used to increase comfort of riders, leave as is for close to vehicle campin g and last n,inute stuff it for packing. You now know how. 0

PAGE 11

JULY 1976 o STONEWALL CAVE Kimble County Texas Explored and mapped 18 June 1972 A Richard Smith Ronnie Fieseler Billy Campbell Charles Fromen Mike Connally Theresa Morris Drafted by Ronnie Fieseler Brun ton and tape survey 25 Feet m Big Slab 50 Entr a nce Guan o Pas, , ,'--'C 127 c

PAGE 12

128 POETRY by Jim Solimine From beneath the bush I felt the breeze; Down I knelt on my hands and knees, To peer in the hole which I found there That led into--I knew not where. So off I ran to get my light And hurried back to the hidden site. I crawled until the passage thinned, Then squeezed on through against the wind;. Which blew so cool against my face Where my eyes were staring into a space. A passage just beyond the twilight zone, Which led me deeper into the unknown. I walked with care and searched each wall To watch for things that I might recall; That would lead me back to the entrance way Which would take me :i.om darkness into the day. Then, in front, a room Hl y light couldn't trace. A cavern of such, I've seen no place! Within the room I bAgan to ruam And followed a pit bel'.eath a dome. I gazed in silence and. in awe At the beautiful fonnations which I saw: A column over sixty feet tall, A curtain of flowstone covering each wall, A stalagmite so massiv e it would cover a stage And it staggered m y mind to think of its age. It was a mountain of st on e like I've never seen before, Which was as old as eternity--or maybe even more. I walked for what must have been an hour or two With no end in sight; the room would continue To lead me to scenes so enchanting and rare That only with Heaven could its beauty compare. On my right a forest of columns; a petrified maze. Where I could be lost for hours--if not days. Then to my ears I did detect A low rumble which I commenced to inspect. The closer I drew, The louder it grew. But little did I know, That the scene which was to follow Would stagger m y eyes, In such a surprise That I would collapse against a rock, To recover from the shock O f witnessing the most beautiful sight of all, In the forms of a canyon, a lake, and a waterfall. The canyon walls were smooth and steep, Cutting down into the Earth so deep That the lake below looked like a small pond Which flowed into the "creek" that was just beyond The reach of my light. The waterfall gushed From over my head and rushed To the lake; 150 feet below. Along the canyon rim I followed the flow, Until I came upon a bridge set prone; The TEXAS CAVER

PAGE 13

JULY 1976 Which arched across the canyon like a rainbow of stone. I started across to the other side; It was wet and slippery--and only two feet wide! The canyon wall on the opposite end Was slanted 2nd rugged; thus easier to descend. So I found a pa.th and down I climbed In restless anticipation at what I may fin d I lay at the bottom on a beach of white sand With grains so fine that they ble.v from m y hand. L ying on m y back, I switched off m y light, I rested for a while in the darkest of n ight. I listened to the roar of the churn i n g water, Which sounded more like a swift flowing river. I thought of the sights I'd been able to see And knew that no one above would actually b elieve me When I told them about this cav e I disc o vered; Of which e ven I hadn't quite reco \'ere d From its beauty its size a n d its proportions, Or the mysteries and secrets of its ston e f o rmation". I thought of the "Big Room", now a mile b", h i q d And the splerulor of its beauty 'x a s I'resh on m y n1inc!: A small stalactite clings t o c ei ling Bui lding its w a y to ward the g rO l l'ld. While up from below the wat er's forming A stalag m ite in the shape of a mound. Longer and longer the stalactite w i ll gro' A drop at a time--the n anothe r Toward the mounting stalagn1ite directl y bela.\, Until they grow together. The total sile nce, brok e n o n'y b y t h e s o u nd,; o f \'.'aler dr,p" j : lf: ; The ete r nal darkness, darke r t h a n a l l o f space. Squeezing up against m:, flesh, clos c r clo s cr, intil it's choking, Suffocating drowning me as it pushe s in against my face. switc h e d on m y light; throug h the d arkness it burst. walked to the river, to quench m y thirst. At the edge of the wate r I turned m y light downstream. But the river continue d past the reac h o f its b e am. I put my light on the.e d g e of the bank, Cupped n1 y hands, bent over and drank. Then the rock I knelt on broke loose from its h n l d And down I plunged into water so cold That I didn't notice that I was carried away .From m y light on the bank; my source of day. Farther downstream I was carried along Then I realized that the current was too strong It was pulling me, dragging me with all its might. The river turned a bend--now no more light! Tcitally blind, I was thrown over s tones, A loud snap was the breaking of m y bones. A roar carne to my ears, it sounded like thunder, It was a whirlpool pulling me under! Gasping, choking, m y life I fought to save As I was being pulled toward my watery grave. With m y last breath o f air I cried out a scream ... Then awoke in my bed, for it had all been a dream. 129

PAGE 14

130 The TEXAS CAVER TEXAS SPELEOLOGICAL SURVEY The Cave Resources of Texas b y James Reddell Work has begun on the publication of a hook o n the ca\'e r e sout"CCS o [ T c:-.:as This \'01-U ll1e sponsored the Texas ]\;atural ,\reas is bei n).! com pilc d by ll1ernbers o f the Tcxas Speleolog ical Surv e y It will not b e a t)"pical "Caves of. .. book, inthat it is not in tendcd a s a guide to the ca"es of Tc:-.:a s Instead, i t will empha size thc importance of caves in Te:-.:as to thc study of archeology h iolog\', geo l ogy, history pa leontology, e t c --as well as the ::iignif icance o f C(l\"es as scenic t"l'S Ou rccs. Thc book will serve sc\ <.:r a l [unctions: (I) as a scien tif ic' sourcc book [or researchers and sci cntis t s caves or C a \ c r c l a t e d subjccts; (2) as an c clucationa l tool [ 0 r the a verage c a \ c t or non-ca\'cr \\'ho desires a ).!cncrill backgt"ound education i n Tc:-.:as ca\'cs; ( 3 ) as a refer l'ncc work for those en\ 'ironment :tlists, consel"\'ation ists, and politicia n s c oncerncd \\'ith protect ing the cl1\"irOnn10nl, planning p arks t"ccrcation areas, and ).,lut"a l a reas. The inlportance of C01\ C5 as natura l resources is l itlie known out sidc of the ca\ i n).! COlnn1unih' and it i s hoped Comal Countythat this book w ill demonstrate to a wide range of people that the underground natural environ ment is as worthy of consideration as the pine forests, the deer population, or the oil and gas fields. The book w ill be divided into three parts: a lengthy introduc tion, written by experts in e ach fie ld o[ stud)", en"lp ha si z i ng the significance of caves to the archeologists, paleontologists, biol o gist, geologist, and historian and sun"lmarizing what is known about the caves of Texas with respect to each of these disciplines. The second part will include descriptions, lnaps, and photog r aphs of between one and two hundred of the more important caves o f Texas. These caves may include the largest and most scenic caves i n T exas as well as the small caves o f great scientific importance. The third section of the book will include a complete inventor y of the known ca ve s of Texas, including i n t abular form the cave nan"l e Ie n gth, depth, t ype of entrance, and other pertinen t data (as, for exarrpl e if the ca\'e is of unusual h istoric, geo l o gic, etc. importance). Ca\'es Files Lost Tlte C0l11 a l County file s of the Texas Speleolog ical Surv e y have been lllissing for se"eral years. Attempts to recover theln have all failed. If 'Oll Ita'" e these file s their return is urgentl y needed. A t the pre sent tin1C' essentially nothing on thi s important cav e county is in the {i lC's of the TSS. Shce it appear.s that this material is not to be re co\' ercd \\'C are now asking t h a t everyone who has any information on tit, CL!\"es of Coma l Coun t y send us the infornlation on this county \\,ltil,1t bc i n thei r files whether or not they had given it to us i n thl' p :lsl. This is an unfortunate situation and s ince it's occurrence the TSS has c hanged its policy of handing out inforn"lation on caves. :'\u\\' onl \ copies of material are given to people--the original informatiult t ",,11101ins in the files. To repeat, we URGENTLY need all inforl1l:ltiol1 may ha,'c on Con"lal County. We will be happy to reim !' ltt"sc' :l11\ 0l1e ior the cost of copying their material and sending it to pa\' or \\'hate\'er is necessar y to try to recover what kilo\\'I c'd)..:L' \\' L can on this county will be located only to county To repeat, this is NOT a t ypical cave guide. It is instead an attemp t to show t hat caves are an important natu ral re sour ce and to co n v e y the idea of the underground wilderness. A very strong safety and conservation message will be included i n the beginning o f the book. It i s possible that this \'olume will increase traffi c in some caves, but in the absence of specific locations it is doubtful tha t any c aves not a lrea d y susceptib l e to heavy traffic will be undul y a f fected. Furthermore it is felt tha t the potentia l good tha t such a volurne can generate will f a r outweig h any a dverse affects whic h its publication may have. As a p art of the p reparation [or this v o lume the TSS is complctel y reworking their fil e supdati ng, redrafti ng map s which may need it, etc, It is appalling how poo r our informa tion is on many well-know n caves and how l1lany caves are reported i n t h e TEXA S CAVER whic h ha," e never found thei r way into our filcs. The files are now housed i n the offices of the Texas atura l Areas Surv e y and we are seekil1g to con"lpl ete them, For this to h appen it i s essential that the cavers or Texas cooperate in ever y way possible If you hav e information on caves which has not been supplie d to the TSS please do so immediatel y We particu l arly need exact cave locations, d etaile d descriptions and copies of maps. During the summer we p lan to visit most of the active caver s wo rki ng in Texa s fo r the purpose of obtaining information If you have material you know no t to be i n our fil e s let us know in advance so that we can bring the appropriate files and maps when w e visit you. This will give you a chance to see what we already hav e and us a chance to find out what you ha ve done and/ or doing continued on next page

PAGE 15

JULY 1976 131 Did You Say Cave Rescue 111 the past year the r e has been al nun1ber of cav e res cue call s in Texas. This has brought the topic of cave rescue in to" great m a n y discussions among m"nl!ers of the TSA. Most ever y 0 ;,(' has by no w decided how he or sl e bel i e':es cave r escues in Texas s1.01!! d be run, a n d som e h ave taken s t ep,; t o improve the existing system in the s t ate, To these p eople I giv e 111:. g r e a test thanks, The fact still r' mains (as i t a lways seenlS to) the r e h;;s been very little v isi b l e ;)ct i o n t aking p lace and so, p e o p ic' i" o n the situation thin k thilt no t.l.i n Q all has been s a i d or done i n tr,c area Qf cave rescue, I must a d [;, it howc\'er, that the work don e at,d the accomplishments m ade h a v e b cn al l but dynamic ; but, finally t!c, _'re is o n e tha t you can hold in y t u r h and. O':er the years, the members o f t h e TSA have been passing out ca\' e r escu c cards to cavers, land own et' s a nd law enforcement officers (I hope), It is current opinion t h a t th e C;}\'C rescue c <;lrds are extrelne l y ,'ague as to t h e process of mak i n g a cave rescue call. We felt tlut a p erson who hysterically calls for h e l p and is confronted with an o p e r ator who takes his number and hangs u p just might freak out and r un For this reason, it was decided tha t a new card should be made u p whic h gives additional inC \\-E RESOURCES continued no\\' T h ere is a lot of Texas c
PAGE 16

132 SAFETY TIPS The TEXAS CAVER is proud to annouce a new safety series. Beginning with this issue we hope to present near misses we've been a party to in the past, and in this way give new and future cavers th e benefit of our mistakes in the, hope that they won It have to lear n them through trial and error the way we did. Some of us were lucky like the cavers in this story. \V e Lived to learn from our mistakes. Others were not so lucky. Several deaths have occurred to Texas cavcrs i n th e past few years because lessons learned were not passed on to new cavers, We. as exp erienced cavers, are cheating new and fellow cavers, as well as ourselves, by not passing on our near misses and dumb mistake s to other cavers so t hey too can benefit from our mistakes. Please, if you have been in vo!\'ed in accidents, near accidents, or unsafe caving practices due to ignorance, lack of proper training, or even l aziness, write up a report and share it w i th us. We do not intend to suggest that you should be ashaITled of Y Ol1r Jua J't'y Cave, and Eme r ald Sink. W(: probed into Langtry Lead a Ie\\' tilTIeS, eventually finding the crawlway to the Hall Of Unicorns, but were stopped a t the top of a sinuous 100' pit as we had b rought no rope. It was on a third or fourth trip t o the Cil\'e that we had an interesting e x perience. To put this in perspective you must know that all the \ 'ertical gear we possessed was "club" prope rty and c onsi sted of 150' of 7 / 16" goldline, one cotton web bing seat-sling ( with flimsy buckle), one set of 1/4" n ylon prussik slings, and three carabiners (two with bra k e bars). Our custom was to slide this gea r down the rope or pull it up as require d It seems incredible, but that's how it was and we didn't do too badl y Anyway, on this particular occasion, 5 of us were a t the bottom of the 100' pit cussing because we needed another rope for the next drop. The pit we h a d just descended is less tha n vertical and danger ously climbabl e for the first 60' to a tiny ltrlge Jnd then is free fall for the rem aining 40' to our location. As we couldn't get down any farther, Perry Clifton wen t up f irst and s lid the seatsling and prussik gear down to Grainger with no probl e lTI. Grainger went next, ancl at the top h e shoute d W e a r e going to go out now and here c:on,es the gear." The three of u s still at the bottom heard the usual sounds of gear s liding down the rope and watchcd in facination as it hung u p on thc l e d g c 40' a bove. Hey! wc shouted, "It's hung! "Don't g o yet!" But Grainger and Perry were gone. We shook and tug ged and w iggled and cursed, but the gear was stuck f ast. Wha t to do? True Grainger would even-

PAGE 17

JpLY 1976 tually return for us, but without the gear he couldn't rappel down to "th e I e d ge, If h e tried to pull up the rope the gea r would slide off the end of the rope. We would get the gear but there was no way h e could get the rope back down to U S as it would hang on the ledge without guidance. If P erry returne d with Grainger, he could helay him to the ledge, but the be lay position was precarious and bot h wer e Sure to be beat after two t.rips through t h e cave. I n all)' event, we were certain to spend many uncomfortable hours a t the bottom ot the pit before being rescued. To top it off, w e were low on carbide, nearl y out of water, and had zero food. Sudden l y we wanted out! We discus s e d the pos sibilit y of climbing hand over hand up the rope t o o the ledge and decided w e \ ou ld p roba b l y m ake it but getting u \ c r the l e dge would be rough a n d \ : e woul d try that only as a last res ort. The solution to our d ilemma (hare-brained, but it \':orkcd) came to u s after a few minutes of frenzied thought. ( Clll t h e astute reader g uess how wcdidit?) Sam Skipworth h a d a fairl y new G. I. canteen belt and Ron Griff i r h all d I took t h e leather laces out or our boots and fashioned them iI '\<' prussik slings. As it was San1 ',; bel t he got to "test" it for use as a seat sling whil e Ron and! s tood beneath to break Sam's f all if the l a ces broke. The l aces elongated like taffy but someho": held Sam's 180 pounds and he sprang onto the ledg d and grinned like a Chesh i r e cat. To a void a reoccurrence of our original probl em, Ron and I climbed t o the ledge before any of us continue d up the pit. When we finally reached the surface, Grainger and Pen), were waiting impatiently ir; the c ar. I w ish I could say that experi e nce m a d e a radical change in Oll r explor ation procedures. It did make a change (we watched out ior that problem in the future), but we were still using the same scatsling on a later trip to Terl in gua Sinkhole when a new club l11ember backed to the edge o f the drop, and just before pushing off o n I'appel, the seat-sling can1e unbuckled and slithered dow n around his ankles. Those were the "good 'ol days" so often referred to. None of the other guys on the Langtry trip continued their interest in caving more than a year o r so after that trip, but the Sul Ross club carried on until 19 6 4 with all sorts of weird people making a few trips. A female novice k n o cked herself u ncon scious (no hard hat) when she ran i n t o the ceiling in a cave near Allamore in Hudspeth County a n d Will Gardner carne within a small, thorny bush of hav ing "G2.rdner's Fall", near Langtry, ,;arned after him posthumously Another freaked out at the very bottom o f M o ntgomery's Gq)sum cave and w e had to hoist him up all drops like a bag o f j e Jl0. Never mind the poisor. gas" in Adam's Cav e ---that's another story. LESSONS LEARNED E'.erybod y shoul d ha,-e a hard hat ant'! 3 sources of light E v erybody must have their own ,-crtical gear --adjusted and tested before entering the caqS c a.t slings should be made of n.,.l cln. I: a r e a l pinch, prussik loops .--In h e made b y cutting off the end -_" th., rope 1 rioubt the int elligence of US! l e .. ther boot laces fpr prusik sii ngs, even if they work --11\';on (especially parachute cord) Hl,"Y COD1e closer to being ac("eplctl,J E cryc.ne should be familiar with ",-,,' .. ,lI)abl e of t h e prussik r.!; a r ope using t ilf' :)', D c:,' t stand under someone to b reak their fall"_ You're like l y ,,, l1e t squashed as well, Cave Safety is NO ftCCIDENT 133 POETRY "It's all in the mind, y' know, ,,* c OJ III l u .... < >-.D , C U) -0 l ... OJ E kl c: .... ..... III 0 0 p:j OJ ..c:: t-< by Kathryn Kerr Urbana, Illinois Death w ishers seek an early, easy entry into the ground. noy d Collins. Unable to f unction a s adults, aging children crawl into the womb o f the earth. Caving is fucking, foreski n helmet f orcing the entry leaving no virgin passage. M y tongue explores the c a vity of m y tooth. Y ogis speak of the heart ave. Have they mapped the corposa ca-ver nosa? Tripping, I find each e y e has an opening I dare not entfi:r. --'P,e<.ttles, Yellow Submarine 1 \ \ \ , I:: I I I \ \, \ I : \ 1 1 \ \\"1' I'" \ -Ii-\ 'V'" ,-1"\\, I .', t ,. 110 I 1 , t 'i' \ -1\ \ r -t . 1 -.. i I J 1 \ 1 ; " I : -, I ,\,' 1 /l,d l ;;. /1'1 --oj.-_ \ 1 .' 1 1 I \ i l'll 1'1''1,,1 '-;1 :::J

PAGE 18

134 The TEXAS CA V ER FBAB LOATHIPIG at the '78 NSS Convention Texans began arri\'ing at the cOJl\ 'ention campground on the can1pus of West Virginia Univer sity on Saturday the 26th of June, and continued to arrive at \'arious times on into the week. Territor ialgamesensued as the early arri\'ing Texans tried to maintain the integrity of Groad Hollow from encroachment by groups of lesser importance who were loath to see us claim so much of the swamp, duly roped off and posted, for our ever swelling numbers, But, perseverence paid off and the invaders were cursor i l y repelled. The peace and quiet normall y associated with the Texas camp was unceremoniously interrupted when certain members of the Caliprunia delegation ignited various whizbangs and whirlygigs and launched minor versions of mClon rockets in strict violation of WV law This practice soon earned the Wester ners the scorn of the WV State P o lice whose headquarters were adjacent. Things started slowly Monday morning as the BOG meeting got rolling late as usual. Texas Board members included Ronnie Fieseler and Ron Ralph, who was proxie for D wight Deal. Gill Ediger was confirmed as chairman of the Caver Training Commission, and later was elected by the Boord to fill the one year remaining on the unexpired term of Donna Mroczkowski, who resigned this spring. The vertical competition also began Monday and ran throug h Thursday with several records being broken and much of the fo rmer animosity within the Ver-. tical Section being smoothed o ver as COlnmon sense edged out earlier displays of narrow minded ness and unwarranted face saving. It was a welcom e change which 1'111 sure will ser\'e to strengthen thl' \'crtical Section and help it to "lil11b to ne\l' h eights. W O l'd \las that the Ca\'e Sun'eyin'.! Workshop was not as well attl'ndl'd as had bcen hoped, A large bonfire and free-for-all songfest Monday night attracted hoards of boisterous inebriets from the upper and middl e (family) camping area to the mud and muck ot: the liberal bU, t peaceful lower swamp, whos e residents, being accepting and tolerant, simply wandered off t o the solitude of the "illegal" campfire in a secluded wood nearby. The rains of the previous days had dampened the area and a fungus attacked more than a few of the merry makers that night, but with the ri.sing of the Tuesday morning sun, the effects had vanished and near normalcy reigned again. Sometime around noon on Tuesday, a northward migration began as the scheduled activities moved to commercial Laurel Caverns i n Pennsylvannia, some 30 miles away by "tarmac" (that's "as phalt pavement" to us Texans) Entertainment at the cav e included a poorly layed out four w heel drive course ( s l o w race) with no really enviab I e time s resulting, an uninviting and not-too-popular speleo-olympics, a tour of the commercial portions of the cave, a wedding in the cave, and the erection on the surface, of a huge plastic inflatable structure about 200 feet long and 25 or so high. Credi t for this monster goes to some folks from Windy City Grotto. People and dogs alike suffered from overstuffed guts as a fine feed was put out for the Howdy Party. A versatile band wailed all manner of musical offering for the entertainment of those as s embled and an overenthusiastic b elly dancer was unwilling l y forced to shorten her extended routine w hen somebody unplugged her tape recorder. The band returned and played on into the night. The Congress of Grottos took precedence Wednesday morning. Among policies recorded there was one indicating a desire for the BOG to reinstate and enforce the r equirement for Convention Com-mittees to submit Environmental Impact Statements. (The BOG wisel y voted down that suggestion at its Friday meeting.) The COG recommended that the NSS Bulletin take several enumer -ated stepsto reduce production costs; that a "popularity award" be instituted for the photo salon; that an ad hoc committee be established to study cave use by "wilderness schools" and adopt a policy on the matter. The COG further recommended that NSS e lection ballots be mailed b y First Class Mail, and attempte d to place restrictions on the NSS News editor concerning con m vatio;and landowner relations, authors rights, and certain review criteria. A policy statement limiting the use and permanent installation of artificial climbing aids (bolts p i tons, ladders, e t cetra) was strongl y supported b y the Congress and was late r adopted, in an amended form b y the BOG at i t s Friday meeting. A statement suggesting that a committee b e established to keep a current list of closed or sensitive caves throughout the US received strong support from the COG, but overwhelming l y vetoed a suggestion that the committee be given any sort of "police pow ers Mike Dyas of Mary land was e lected Chairman of next year s COG and Dave Cowan of C a lifornia was e lected Vice-Chairman. Wednesday continued as a Cave Div ing Session dipped and blew bubbles i n the "Natatorium". A Beer Can Crushing Contest was much simplified b y the popular use of a luminum cans. This was followed b y the announcing of winners of the Cave Ballad Con test, and sli ght of hand (and possibly head) presentation b y "Th e Great Ogden", an erstwhil e magician and actual brothe r of Al Og' den, convention bigwig ancl clay olel groom (marital r efugee of the pre vious day's wedding activ ities). A girls head was cut off, and vari-

PAGE 19

JULY 1976 o u s run-of-the-mill rope and card t ricks wer e performed. But few e ompl aints were hea rd, as the "price was right! ". Sometim e Thursday morning an attempt was begun to break the w orld's craw Ling record (as indirate d b y the Guiness Book of \' Iorld Records). L a t e that night, k n ees wer e still sLiding over ber Jl1u d a grass as a new record of s l igh tl y over LO miLes was being s e l. Thi s distance surpassed the L sted record b y nearly 4 miLes. In the Lat e afternoon sLides of l 'lC 1975 B ritish New Guinea E xpe iition wer e presente d and many a I.cnis sheath and Femin T e L forma L on were ogL e d at. Thursday night flashed onto the ,ee ne and screen simuLtaneously ;s the N SS 1 9 7 6 Phot o Salon was presented. A few members relaps d as th e same creeping fungus Ihat hit Monday night r eturned. Somc were disappointed, others o\'( :rwhelme d The S alon by the ",a \ was fairly a bust --not tot all y S o m e good photographs w e r c presented, but few were really of Salon quality Judging being subjective, was sometimes doubtful. As S a lons continue to get worse (for w h a tever the rea son ) a n impassioned plea went out for more and b ette r s lides b y the knee bent Salon Chairman, Ed Herre!. Movies o f conven t ions p ast followed as several r C\'ellers floated out the door and into the 10 PM sunset. Friday morning and afternoon wer e again consumed b y the Board of Governors Ineeting with the 3 Texans Fieseler, Ediger, and Ralph controlling 18. 75% of the availabl e votes. lmportant motions include d the e s t ablishment of a Special Publications Fund unde r the Executive Vice President's Department, es t ablishment of a Cave Preserve Fund within the National Speleol o g i c a l Foundation -_ the separate, lax-exempt Foundation which administ ers the Society's money A Special Board M ember Gift Fund was also set up. College Outing Clubs may now be Internal Organizations (but may not be called Grottos) of the N SS. A standard set of cave map symbol s was approved. Future Board Meetings were set for Austin, Texas on 23 Oct ober 1976 and Washington DC sometime next spring. The controversi'al Don Davison was confirmed as Chairman of the NSS Safety and T echniques Committee. An attempt b y Rob Stitt to weaken the Caver Training CQmmission failed. The meeting adjourne d amid shouts and hoo-raws as people rushe d off to get dressed for the ensuing Banquet. Awa rd s pres entations fo llowed the Banquet. The Honorary Membership A ward went to Dr. Marjorie Sweeting of Oxford University, England, and the Outstanding Service Award was presented to Bill Cuddington of Huntsville, Alaba m a The Ralph W. Stone Research Award went to Barbara J. Martin, Universi t y of Illinois, for her "Bat GuanoArthropo d Communi ties" paper. Certif icates o f Merit were awarde d Ray Mansfie l d and Tony Oldh a m for producing "Current Titles i n Speleolog y P eter Thompson and Russell Harmon for their work with radiometric and climatic interp retation of caves, and to Richard L Powell for his studies of structual c o n trol o f caves and karst i n Indiana. The annual Conservation Award was presented for the 2nd c onsecutiv e year to Escabrosa Grotto (Tucson) for their untiring efforts in the Southwest. Marion Smith of Atlanta receiv ed the much coveted Lew Bicking A ward. Fellowships were awarded G erry Forney Jay H erbein, Maril y n Gossett, Elizabeth White, Reynolds Duncan, Frosty Miller, 135 Bill Gregg, Gill Ediger, Nick Noe, Angelo G eorge, John M ylroie Bill Steele,. Mike Dyas, Jill Moody and Mark Stock. F ollowing the Awards Presen tations, John Cooper, ex-Board Member, Biologist, 'an' d stand-up comedia n gave a talk on hi s (and his wife's) work on creepy-craw l y things i n Shelta Cav e Alabama, at "the conclusion of which everyone retired to the campground. More revelling followed i n the lower s wamp. A few Texans had by that time pulled out for home and Saturday morning saw most of the rest clean up their area and depart Groad Hollow. All i n all, it was not too exciting of a convention but was not conspicuously bad either. The mediocrity devolved from the fact that the campground and the meeting rooms were about a mile apart (mile and a half b y road) making travel between the t w o places a maj or chore. Many sessions would hav e been better attended had the t w o sites been closer to each other. Rain and mud had surprizingly little effect on the campers and dogfights were nearly non existant. Tolerance of other's ideas and actio n s was at an all time high, indicating that perhaps w e are maturing The beer was 3.2 the air was mountain, the caves were wet and cold, a n d hamburgers were serv ed without m ustard, lettuce, onions, or tomatos. What hath OZTOTL wroght? Next year's convention will be in Alpena, Michigan, on the shore of Lake Huron, amid glacial scarps and till, polluted water, and six caves See you there. HIJS TE VE. DIDN'I I SEE you LilST I>J ARKA>JSAs 7 oR WAS I T FEBR.uARY r

PAGE 20

136 The TEXAS CAVER RALPH, who has not been a member of [he NSS for 15 years, sat in as D wight DE:ll's proxie (after rejoining the Soc i e t y ) during the recent NSS Board of Go\'ernors m eeting in M 'organtown, WV and did a s well as anyone else some of \\'hon1 h a \'e been on the Board those s a m e 15 'ears, O\'erheard at the convention: D o Tl, ' s ha\' e a blueprint for building their trucks?" One member o f the "PI Grotto (Vir2i:l; \\as heard to mumble from a drunken stupor. "In Texas the" .), : : t\\' o factions--Liberals and Radicals." Whic h direction the Radi,"" Inok h e didn't rnentio n The follo\\ing 2 were disco\f,l'cd \\hi.le reviewing the TSS files: "I believ e that Big Red Sink is l o calec i n I h i,; area (San Solomon Springs, Reeves County, Texas), though H ,'0";', ; b E \(H :il t e d in Val Verdl' County about 250 miles southeast of thl' r (' -]\ob Jluclson ", .. is reason to belie"'e # 1 and ;lI', : '(J!lll(ected) because (a) dea d chicken in # 2 was smelled in # 1 a lso, .. -Don Widner W illiam and Vernelle Elliott :Ire Icappy Ie) '1nllounce the birth o f LISA CHRISTI!': E E L L IOTT at 12:20 PM. J-I J t d l C 1<)7 6 at St. M a r y s Hospital, Lubbock. Lisa weighed 7 lb 14,5 o z :ln d measure d 20.5 inches Mothe r and child are doing fine and will be home in a few days, Daddy is loo king for a j ob. The fall NSS Board of Governors meetin g has been set for 2 3 Octobe r i n /\lIstll: !t h a s long bee n t h e p olie,' o f the Board to mov e their meetings around the country so that a m aximurrl o f l 11errd)ers may t ake p art in and \'ie'" the conduct of business of the Society You are urged to make plans to .1tr end the m e e t ing, which will iast mos t of the day probably beginning around 9 AM a n d running til 4-6 PM. A b a r beque/p arty i s being planne d i n true Texas style for that e vening. If you are i nterested in h elping with any pha s e of t h e m eeting/feed/ p arty contact Ronnie Fieseler at PO Box 5 672, Austin, T X 7 8 763, or fone (512) 282-06 1 3 Plans are being made to hold an NSS Convention in ,Texas in lQ78. Suggested site s include Austin. Rocksprings. a ranch nea r Junction, and several State Parks. Other possible sites are badl y n e eded. If you k now of a n y please contact the TC edi tor ASAP. R equirements for a sit e include c amping f o r 600-800 p eople a c lean river or running water, electricity and several 30-50 person m E'et :ng rooms o r a place under the trees to s e t up 6 to 8 GP Medium arrr1Y tents. The campground should be adjacent the m eeting area. The county should b e wet, the Sheriff friendly and the sit e f ree (or nearly so). DALE PATE has been added to the staff of the TSS. We feel that thi3 i s a \\ 'ise addition whic h will r e s ult i n more effeciency within the survey. At the July meeting of the Balcones G rotto, Terry Sayther, while gi\' ing a s l i d e show o n Mex i co. \\ a s hear d to comment, "There were mountains right beside each othe r \\:ith valley s i n bet\\'een the n1, The TEXAS CAVER congratulates these folks on taking the big step a nc! joining t h e \iS S : Sheila Balsdon (NSS 17208) 215 Postoffice #1001, G a l veston, TX 7755 0 Kelly Sayther (NSS 17247) 1606 Fortview Rd., Austin, TX 78704 Mike Moore (NSS 17214) 6306 Shoalcreek West Dr, At;stin, TX 78731 John Clark (NSS 17227) 9004 Springlake Dr., Aufti n T X 78759 Please note the following address c 'la"g ei3: Elbert Bassham (7674) to 10345 Luell
PAGE 21

ULY 1976 B ob Littlefield (3854) 919 Pinecrest Dr., Richardson, TX 75080 Louise Power (11740) to 3217 Plumb, Houston, TX 77005 R i chard Russell (4727) to 1802 Auburn, Richardson, TX 75080 Bill Steele (8072) to 1307 1/2 Kirkwood, Austin, TX 78722 John Walker, Jr. (15453) to Box 306,. Rt I, Hockley, TX 77447 S h erri Sutton to 4517 Carroll Ln., Corpus Christi, TX 78415 Roger Bartholomew to 318 St. George St., Toronto, Ontario, CANADA Lisa Wilk to 11709 Caprock, San Antonio, TX 78230 John Chelf to 6101 South Ri ce A ve, Bellaire, TX 77401 Paul Streeter to 718 Estancia Way San R a f ael, CA 94903 B i ll Dea n e to PO Box 8460, UT Sta Knoxville, TN 3791t Gordon Messling to Rushmore Cave, Keystone, SD 57751 Dick Montgomery to PO Box 6406, San Antonio, TX 78209 Roger More to 1010 Allston, Houston, TX 77008 dropped b y the NSS for not paying tneir d o les: Kelly King--Graham 137 The f ollowing folks have been Fred Douglas--EI Paso Tony Grichard--Waller Pet e Linds ley--Dallas Ka r e n Lindsley--Dallas Maurice Miller--Houston Mark Shuma t e--Sinton Dennis Murphy--Austin F r a nk H erzig--San Antonio Richard Rus sell--Richardson Ronald Schulz--EI Paso James Alan Weatherford--San Antonio Charles Whites--Austin Marcia Cossey--Austin Katie Monahan--Houston S tan Shaw, you have not given t h e NSS you r new address--they hav e lost you! Speleo Digest 1969 Edited by Eleanor W. Burns. New format., with 325 pages of photo-reduced text, maps, and drawings. Information :)" o v e r three hundred caves in thirty-three states, with one hundred fifty maps. Seventy-five pages on cave science; forty pages of equipment and techniques. Scores of drawings and cartoons. A few of the items included-vertical caves in Vermont maps of Oklahoma caves caves of Nova Scotia White River Plateau caves, Colo. "Amador Cave, California Ellison's Cave, Georgia *Garry Self Cave, Alabama "the limestones of Arizona -geology of Bull Cave, Tenn. cav e reptiles and amphibians *archeology of Mother Lode caves *the ascender knot *flash photography in caves *computers and cave surveys *Blue Water II rope *caves in the movies *humor by Carol Eckel *poetry.by S.P. Lunker *drawings by Loren Bolinger *cartoons by Cooper and Kramer SPELEO DIGEST ORDER FORM Name and address: Please send: Speleo Digest 1967 $6.50 Speleo Digest 1968 $6.50 Speleo Digest 1969 $7.50 TOTAL ZIP Prices include postage. Order from: National Speleological Society, Cave Avenue, Huntsville, Ala. 35810 CREDIT DEPT. Terri Treacy collated the June issue single handedly Many thanks t o her and the others ""10 helped her. B ill Elliott :'IrLad :--after i.t v.as tcc . I and \'[est t yped i 5:--' .IC and :tt leas t t w o of us"p l oofre a d e ach article. :'\SlDE EARTH # 4 is here. The TEXAS CAVER is the Officia l publication of the Tex-a s Speleologi-cal Association o f the National Speleological Society ( NSS). It is published monthly b y Gill Ediger and the Oztotl Supply Company. Gra-phic and literary items should be sent to the Editor at the address inside the front cover. Subscriptions and address c hanges should be sent to Jim J asek at the address inside the front cover. Subscriptions are $4.50 per Back issues are available from the Editor for each.

PAGE 22

1 3 8 S URVEYI NG TIPS by Charlie Yates Let's t a k e a c loser look at Trilat l r ation: WIl ('n til e word trila t e r ation is dropped I i k e a n anellol' in front of mos t p eopl e tile f i rst reation is lIsu a l l y "wh a t or "\ve've got a P assn10re incarnate on our hands". Aduall y despite the ominous sound ing nan1(" tl'ilateration is no t near 1\' as c01l1plex or difficult as one 111ight aSSUI11e Trilateration is a surv e ying technique using onl y chained or measured distances, i n the forn1 of trian gles, to locate a point fron 1 a base line Tile base line usually has a direction, 111Ust be of a know n dis t a nce, and serves as one side of til e triangle. The lTIOst simpl e way to explain the rest o f the procedure i s to refer to a diagram (ugh diagram s ), Lets use line AB as our base line with a direction, from A to B, of 1800 or due south and a distance of 100'. Now we chain to point C fro111 both points A and B and we obtain 120' and 200' respectfully Now w hen drafting the map, the sketch i s extremely i111portant and g reat care should be exercised in its 111aking. After placing base line AB On the draftin g paper, an arc of 120' radius is struck using a C0111pass, with point A as the radius point. The n another arc of 200' r a dius is struck using point B a s a l'adius point. Where the two arcs cross is point C. However, the ;-Ircs can be struck on eithe l side 1 1 1 8 L XJ, 'OII!h S O JO I.:I A>5.' IZ ',I N l lW,'''cI 1/' GIVd t \ 3ClV l S OcI 's 0 \ The TEXAS CAVER of the base line therefore there can be two places to put point C This i s why the s k e t c h of the map, lTIacle in the cav e is in1portant. There is also a mathematical way to locate point C using the c hained d i s tances, but as the m e thod above is the most simpl e and most convenient to use for draft.It) c \'" \"'" \ "-'" \ \ \ \ \ 3lYli )l,orr "'--frm JULY 1976 AllO ing purposes, I'll leave the 111ath ematics to the trig books and those of you who are industrious enough to look it up. Now you can trilatera t e so try it when mapping, or s havin g or i n bed, or something. B e sure to send a copy o f your map t o the TSS, i t helps us all. '1-,0 \ SSV13 c 081 HI G3lS3003'll NOIl:)3'll'llO:) SS3 SIIBJ 86xog Zl8 SanD:)


Description
Contents: Letters to
the Ediger: proofreading fails to an all-low --
Letter about suuntos: forestry suppleirs tells why
tritium suuntos are available / Wayne Russell --
The rescue that never was: folks and facts on the fringe
of some frantic fone calls / Tom Byrd --
Caves: Deadman's Hole: an historic report from the files
of the TSS / Bob Hudson --
Map: Deadman's Hole --
Cave: Grosser's Sink: more from the files of the TSS --
Stonewall Cave: even more from the files --
Map: Grosser's Sink --
A storage pillow for your winter sleeping bag: useful and
protective summer storage / Gandalf --
Map: Stonewall Cave --
Poetry: an untitle work submitted in response to the
editor's plea for material / Jim Solimine --
The cave resources of Texas: revamping the TSS files and
making them more useful / James Reddell --
Did you say cave rescue? new rescue cards now available
from the safety committee / Tom Mills --
Safety: escape from Langtry Lead Cave: sharing our
foolish past with others / Carl Kunath --
Poetry: it's all in your mind, y' know: a new expression
of an old idea / Kathryn Kerr --
Fear and loathing at the '76 NSS convention / a not too
detailed report of activities / Ediger --
Garbage: more announcements and doubtful quotations to
strike fear in the heart of many a mortal / Staff --
Surveying: trilateration: pulling chains and striking
area are not all that physical / Charlie Yates.