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WBWG News

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WBWG News
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WBWG News
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Western Bat Working Group Newsletter
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Western Bat Working Group
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Western Bat Working Group
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Bats ( local )
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WBWG news -- President's corner -- Elections Updates: Baseline bat work in northern Alberta continues -- Flagstaff's diverse assemblage of bats - more than just big brown bats -- Bosque wildlife habitat / Lincoln National Forest -- Bat data logger testing -- DOD surveys -- Bridge monitoring for bat use -- USFWS region 1, eastside refuges acoustic bat inventory -- Hibernation chamber protected at Boulder Cave -- Bats northwest: a unique organization -- Factors affecting the foraging activity of bats over wetlands -- Western bat working group to meet in Santa Fe -- Auction items needed for April 2013 WBWG meeting -- Songmeter training course at the WBWG meeting -- Large forest patches increase bat species diversity in a fragmented landscape in Nicaragua -- Announcements: Post-doctoral position - bridging the gap between renewable energy solutions and bat conservation in Arizona -- PDF corner -- Upcoming events.
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Open Access - Permission by Publisher
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Vol. 7, no. 3 (2012)
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See Extended description for more information.

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PAGE 1

WBWG Newsletter, Fall 2012 Page 1 White-throated round-eared bats (Lophostoma silvicolum) Jos Gabriel Martinez Fonseca photo Volume 7, Numbe r 3 Fall 2012

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WBWG Newsletter, Fall 2012 Page 2 WESTERN BAT WORKING GROUP NEWSLETTER Fall 2012 Volume 7, Number 3 WBWG News ......................................... ................................................... ...................... 4President’s corner ................................ ................................................... ........................ 4ELECTIONS ......................................... ................................................... ........................ 5STATE/PROVINCIAL UPDATES .......................... ................................................... ....... 5CANADA ............................................ ................................................... ....................... 5 Alberta ........................................... ................................................... ....................................6 Baseline Bat Work in Northern Alberta Continues ... ................................................... .......6 USA ............................................... ................................................... ........................... 7 Arizona ........................................... ................................................... ...................................8 Flagstaff’s diverse assemblage of bats – more than just big brown bats ............................8 Nevada ............................................ ................................................... ................................10 New Mexico ........................................ ................................................... .............................11 Bosque Wildlife & Habitat / Lincoln National Forest .................................................. .......11 Bat Data Logger Testing ........................... ................................................... ....................11 DOD Surveys ....................................... ................................................... ........................11 Bridge Monitoring for Bat Use ..................... ................................................... ..................11 South Dakota ...................................... ................................................... .............................12 Texas ............................................. ................................................... .................................12 Utah .............................................. ................................................... ...................................13 Washington ........................................ ................................................... .............................13 USFWS Region 1, Eastside Refuges Acoustic Bat Inven tory ..........................................13 Hibernation Chamber Protected at Boulder Cave ..... ................................................... ....15 Bats Northwest: A Unique Organization.............. ................................................... ..........16 Factors Affecting the Foraging Activity of Bats ove r Wetlands ........................................ .17 Western Bat Working Group to meet in Santa Fe ..... ................................................... 18AUCTION ITEMS NEEDED FOR APRIL 2013 WBWG MEETING .. .......................... 19Songmeter Training Course at the WBWG Meeting ..... ............................................. 19Large Forest Patches Increase Bat Species Diversity in a Fragmented Landscape in Nicaragua ......................................... ................................................... .......................... 20ANNOUNCEMENTS ..................................... ................................................... ............. 21 Post-doctoral position – Bridging the Gap between R enewable Energy Solutions and Bat Conservation in Arizona ........................... ................................................... ........................21 PDF CORNER ........................................ ................................................... ................... 22UPCOMING EVENTS ................................... ................................................... ............. 23USA ............................................... ................................................... ......................... 23Elsewhere ......................................... ................................................... ...................... 23 The Western Bat Working Group (WBWG) is a partner i n the Coalition of North American Bat Working Groups. The WBWG is comprised of agenc ies, organizations and individuals interested in bat research, management, and conservation from 13 western States, the Provinces of British Columbia and Alber ta, and Northern Mexico.

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WBWG Newsletter, Fall 2012 Page 3 Membership in the WBWG is open to anyone who is int erested in participating in bat conservation. There are no membership fees or dues. Funding for bat conservation work accomplished by the WBWG is generated by State and Federal land management agencies, non-governmental organizations, and by donations fr om individual members. Visit our web page http://wbwg.org to contact us, f ind information on bat conservation and upcoming meetings, become a member, link to state o r provincial bat working groups, or download previous issues of this newsletter. President Angie McIntire Vice President Dave Johnston Treasurer Brad Phillips Secretary Rob Schorr At-large representatives: Amie Shovlain, Donald Sol ick Newsletter Editors : Lorraine Andrusiak, Bronwyn Hogan NOTE: Generally common names are used for bat speci es in the newsletter. Corresponding scientific names are listed below. Common Name Scientific Name Arizona myotis Myotis occultus Big brown bat Eptesicus fuscus Cave myotis Myotis velifer Eastern red bat Lasiurus borealis Fringed myotis Myotis thysanodes Hoary bat Lasiurus cinereus Little brown myotis Myotis lucifugus Long-eared myotis Myotis evotis Long-legged myotis Myotis volans Brazilian free-tailed bat Tadarida brasilensis Northern myotis Myotis septentrionalis Pallid bat Antrozous pallidus Pocketed free-tailed bat Nyctinomops femorosaccus Silver-haired bat Lasionycterus noctivagans Southwestern myotis Myotis auriculus TownsendÂ’s big-eared bat Corynorhinus townsendii Western small-footed myotis Myotis ciliolabrum Yuma myotis Myotis yumanensis

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WBWG Newsletter, Fall 2012 Page 4 New Co-editor of the WBWG Newsletter! We’d like to welcome Bronwyn Hogan as new co-editor Bronwyn is a Wildlife Biologist with the US Fish an d Wildlife Service Region 8 Renewable Energy Program. She is currently working on the De sert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan, but also becoming more involved in Service bat prog rams, including coordinating with refuge staff who are interested in setting up bat acoustic monitoring stations and moving into the Region 8 WNS coordinator position (as time allows). She has a bachelor’s degree in Wildlife Biology fro m UC Davis and a Master’s degree in biology from CSU Sacramento, where she did her Master’s the sis on bat activity in walnut orchards. Prior to her move to the US Fish and Wildlife Servi ce this year, she worked for the California Department of Fish and Game’s Renewable Energy prog ram, where she focused on bats and wind energy issues. nrn As we head into fall, planning for the April 2013 W BWG Biennial Meeting/Workshop is well underway. We’ll meet at the beautiful Inn and Spa a t Loretto in the Land of Enchantment Santa Fe, New Mexico. What a great location this is going to be. Santa Fe is the oldest capitol city in the U.S. and I’m excited thinking about the history, culture, delicious southwestern food, gallery and museum options…oh, and of course the be st part of all will be our conservation assessment of western bat species! A similar effort was undertaken back in 1998, when WBWG held a workshop in Reno, Nevada. The product of tha t workshop – Western Bat Species: Regional Priority Matrix – was intended to provide states, provinces, federal land management agencies, and interested organizations a better und erstanding of the overall status of western bat species by ecoregion. As decided at our 2011 La s Vegas WBWG meeting, it’s time for an update. Emerging threats such as climate change, wi nd energy, and white-nose syndrome necessitate a re-evaluation of the existing matrix. In addition, our state of knowledge for many bat species has grown over the past 14 years, and i t is important to evaluate, reassess and incorporate the latest biological information, not only to share that knowledge, but also to capture and build on it into the future. In the next several months leading up to the Santa Fe Meeting/Workshop, we will reassess the conservation status of western bat species at a reg ional scale by applying NatureServe’s methodology for assigning conservation status. The west will be broken down into nine Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC) regions. N ine regional teams will compile available information for eight core status rank factors – ra nge extent, area of occupancy, population size, number of occurrences, number of occurrences or per cent area occupied with good viability, overall threat impact, and shortand long-term tre nd. This information will be used to make status determinations for each species, using Natur eServe’s Rank Calculator. Our goal is to gather available data and complete these assessment s prior to the Santa Fe meeting, where we will review and discuss the results, and make adjus tments as needed.

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WBWG Newsletter, Fall 2012 Page 5 We all know bats are a challenging group of creatur es to study. At times it may seem like we know so little about most bat species. And yet, whe n we come together to share what we do know and where we need to focus attention on, the r esulting collaborations advance our collective knowledge. As we undertake this assessme nt over the next several months, I encourage you all to participate, contribute, and b e part of this effort that will result in a product that reflects our collective best understanding of the conservation status of bats in the west. Sincerely, Angie McIntire, President n WBWG elections will soon be underway and we anticip ate that the ballot will go out in December. Remember—each State/Province/Territory re ceives only ONE vote so it is essential that members send their vote to their respective St ate/Provincial representative. Also, those voting must be WBWG members. Instructions for obtai ning membership, as well as information on elections, are located on our website at http://www.wbwg.org/ nr CANADA Canadian White-Nose Committee Meets to Draft Nation al Action Plan On 16 – 18 Oct. 2012, just over 20 participants gat hered in Ottawa to work on the first draft of the Canadian National Action Plans as outlined in t he National Management Strategy, a document that was accepted by the Canadian Wildlife Directors last spring. These implementation plans mirror those of the US Plan wi th 6 working groups: Communications, Conservation and Recovery, Data Management, Diagnos tics, Epidemiology, and Surveillance. Attending this workshop were 3 members of the US WN S Committee: Jeremy Coleman, WNS Coordinator USFWS; Scott Darling, Vermont Fish and Wildlife; Katie Gillies, Bat Conservation International, Imperiled Species Coordinator. Ted Leighton, Director of Canadian Cooperative Wild life Health Centre (CCWHC), will present the Action Plans to the Canadian Wildlife Directors in November 2012. As part of these plans, the group is requesting from the Wildlife Directors (provincial and federal directors) that a Canadian WNS Coordinator position be created at the CCWHC. submitted by Cori Lausen, Wildlife Conservation S ociety Canada; clausen@wcs.org

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WBWG Newsletter, Fall 2012 Page 6 Canadian White-nose Syndrome committee. Photo by M ichelle Jauvin Alberta Baseline Bat Work in Northern Alberta Continues It was another busy field season conducting bat sur veys in northern Alberta. We surveyed bats near Fort McMurray, Conklin, Wabasca and Peace Rive r. We spent just under five weeks working on five different baseline surveys for Envi ronmental Impact Assessments. Standard mist netting and acoustic surveys were con ducted at all five Project locations. In total we set nets up at 26 sites and collected data from 150 acoustic detectors throughout northern Alberta. In total we captured 95 individual bats belonging t o six different species while netting: n rr r !"!r!#rr$% r "&'! (!#r)*%r r (+r ,% r n r&&!rr-+",.#r r(!r-+" ,)/r We detected all the same species of bats with the a coustic detectors. Little brown, northern and silver-haired bats were detected at each of our study areas and at the majo rity of our detector locations. Hoary, red and big brown bats were not captured/detected as often. In addition to our standard survey methods, Matrix has been swabbing each individual bat captured to collect DN A for species verification and to detect white nose fungus ( Geomyces destructans ). In certain cases, one swab and one wing punch are taken to compare the accuracy in determining sp ecies identification using the two methods. The hope is that in the future, we will only need to collect swabs from eac h individual Eastern Red Bat

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WBWG Newsletter, Fall 2012 Page 7 and can have the same data with less invasive metho ds. To detect the presence of G. destructans bat wings were swabbed with duplicate sterile dry cotton-tipped applicators. After swabbing, the app licators were shipped to the lab in individual sterile cases. Fungal DNA was extracted from the a pplicator tip, and probed for two different DNA regions specific to G. destructans These regions were amplified by PCR (Chaturvedi et al. 2011; Lorch et al. 2010). To confirm that DNA w as isolated from the swabs, a positive control PCR was performed that detected all fungi. Fungi we re detected on all swab samples indicating that swabs had been collected in an appropriate man ner. Along with testing for G. destructans from DNA, one set of swabs were used for plating o n agar medium. Sabourad-Dextrose agar plates, supplemented with chloramphenicol and gentamycin antibiotics to suppress bacterial growth, were used for culture. Plates were streaked with the dry swabs then incubated at 4C in the dark for 30 days Plates were examined for fungal growth at 20 and 30 days. Where fungal colonies developed on the plates, samples of each colony were examined microscopically in water mounts, using a Z eiss Axiocam 200 or 400X brightfield. Fungi were identified based on conidial morphology. To date (not all swabs have been analyzed), the fol lowing has been detected: 1. 2. r"0/ 3. !r"-0&!r1r(!r#!r234&!" Our identification of G. pannorum corroborates the results found by Vanderwolf et al. (2012) that Geomyces species, which are not the pathogenic Geomyces destructans are found on the external surface of bats. Chaturvedi, V. and S. Chaturvedi. 2011. Editorial: What is in a name? A proposal to use geomycosis instead of white nose syndrome (WNS) to describe bat infection caused by Geomyces destructans Mycopathologia. 171 (4):231-233 Lorch J.M., Gargas A., Uphoff Meteyer C., Berlowski -Zier B.M., Green D.E., Shearn-Bochsler V., Thomas N.J. and D.S. Blehert. 2010. “Rapid poly merase chain reaction diagnosis of White-Nose Syndrome in bats.” Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation 22: 224230 Vanderwolf, K., McAlpine, D.F., Forbes, G and Mallo ch, D. 2012. The Pre-white-nose Syndrome, Mycological Flora Associated with Cave Hi bernating Bats in New Brunswick, Canada (abstract). 41st Annual Meeting of the North Amercian Society for B at Research. Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, Canada, October 26-2 9, 2011. submitted by Matrix Solutions Inc., Delanie Player, Kirsten Pinney, Lynsey Spry, Katerina Makos, Patti Swan and Cori Lausen, Calgary, AB USA Multi-State SWG Grant: Western Coordinated Multi-St ate Response to a Deadly Emerging Threat: White Nose Syndrome in Bats (20112014) This cooperative project between Arizona, Californi a, Idaho, Nevada, Montana, Washington, and Bat Conservation International has provided gra nt money to the partner states to establish

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WBWG Newsletter, Fall 2012 Page 8 surveillance and various monitoring methodologies f or white-nose syndrome. Funds are also being used for outreach, to work on white nose synd rome action plans, purchase and install data loggers in caves, conduct winter surveys at pr iority sites, collect soil samples to look for Geomyces destructans, deploy acoustic detectors to collect baseline activity data and detect winter bat activity, establish new white-nose syndr ome information webpages, and hold coordination meetings with working groups and grott os. Arizona Flagstaff’s diverse assemblage of bats – more than just big brown bats Rabies is a highly fatal zoonosis that is transmitt ed by bite. The number of animal rabies cases increased significantly in Arizona during the past decade. This increase is linked to repeated spillover of rabies virus from big brown bats to st riped skunks in Flagstaff. We are investigating interactions between these species in Flagstaff in rabies outbreak areas. In the rabies outbreak area we captured bats on gol f course ponds from May to October 2012 and located day roosts of big brown bats using radi o telemetry. We captured a diverse assemblage of bats (254 individuals of 11 species; Table 1) including a lactating female bat listed by US Fish & Wildlife Service as a Sensitive Species, Allen’s lappet-browed bat. The most common bat captured was the Arizona myotis, a close relative of the little brown bat ( Myotis lucifugus ), which commonly roosts in houses. Big brown bats were also commonly captured and represented 12% of our captures. Most captures of s pecies and individuals occurred in June and July (Figure 1) when bats are reproductively ac tive and form maternity colonies in northern Arizona. We had higher captures of big brown bats i n May, June, and July and declines in capture rates in August and September. Figure 1. Number of species, individuals, and big b rown bats captured per net hour (1 net hour = 1 6-m net open for 1 hour; mean SE) during the repr oductive season for bats in northern Arizona, 2012. We radio-tagged 20 of 30 big brown bats captured an d monitored them for up to 14 days (when transmitters fell off). We also conducted exit coun ts at roosts. All bats used houses as roosts with the exception of one roost which was an artifi cial bat roost placed on the side of a house. Interestingly, all roosts were close ( 5 500 m) to capture locations. We identified 16 roos ts in 12 nrrrnrn nn n

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WBWG Newsletter, Fall 2012 Page 9 houses used by females. Males used 7 houses and nev er shared female roosts. During the 14day period bats were tagged, bats used an average o f 1.5 roosts. Maternity roosts averaged 30 individuals in May, June, and July (range 3 to 56) but for the single roost documented in August the number of individuals was low (n = 4), suggesti ng maternity colonies were dispersing. Four of 10 bat roosts were positioned so that bats falling from roosts would contact the ground (as opposed to roof, wood pile or other inaccessibl e site) and thus be available for scavenging by carnivores. We placed mice ( Mus musculus ) carcasses on the ground below roosts for 2 weeks at these 4 bat roost sites and found that mic e were removed at 2 sites. At one site mice were taken by a raccoon and a skunk, indicating pot ential for scavenging, contact, and rabies transmission by carnivores. If these roosts are rep resentative, a rough estimate of bat-skunk contact rate could be based on the assumption that roughly 20% of roosts resulted in contacts. If a higher percentage of roosts were actually acce ssible for scavenging and all available roosts were visited, the number of bat-skunk exposures cou ld increase substantially. Next year we will again radio track bats to identif y roosts (Figure 2). We will also track bats at night to develop home range estimates and for every bat captured, we will sample DNA to use in estimating populations of Arizona myotis and big brown bats. nnrnrn Table 1. Captures of bats from May – October 2012 i n the rabies outbreak area of Flagstaff, Arizona. Common name Species # of females # of males Number captured Percent of captures Arizona myotis 1 Myotis occultus 116 48 165 65.0 big brown bat Eptesicus fuscus 21 9 30 11.8 long-legged myotis Myotis volans 17 12 29 11.4 pallid bat Antrozous pallidus 8 0 8 3.2 hoary bat Lasiurus cinereus 1 5 6 2.4 long-eared myotis Myotis evotis 4 2 6 2.4 Mexican free-tailed bat Tadarida brasiliensis 1 3 4 1.6 western small-footed myotis Myotis ciliolabrum 1 1 2 0.8 fringed myotis Myotis thysanodes 2 0 2 0.8 Allen's lappet-browed bat Idionycteris phyllotis 1 0 1 0.4 silver-haired bat Lasionycteris noctivagans 0 1 1 0.4 1 Includes 1 individual of unknown sex

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WBWG Newsletter, Fall 2012 Page 10 Figure 2. A big brown bat equipped with a radio tra nsmitter prepares for flight. Nevada Christy Klinger, Biologist in the Southern Region N evada Department of Wildlife (NDOW) participated in several different mist net captures at Desert National Wildlife Range, Moapa National Wildlife Refuge and Las Vegas Wash. The “B at Night at Moapa” was a public education event and there was a large attendance. Eastern Region NDOW Biologist, Jason Williams did extensive surveying of caves and mines for bats and collected samples of soil and guano for WNS testing. This survey included 12 cave s and 50 abandoned mines. The Western Region NDOW Biologist, Jenni Jeffers surveyed 35 ab andoned mines for bat use and 11 abandoned mines have been scheduled to have bat-com patible closures constructed this winter and spring. During late August/early September a riparian bat s tudy was done by Jenni Jeffers, George Baumgardner and two volunteers on one of the few in tact cottonwood galleries along the Carson River in North-central Nevada. Fifteen bats were captured of eight different species, and six bats were fitted with transmitters, includi ng two female Lasiurus blossevillii One of the L. blossevillii was post lactating and she weighed a little over 1 4 grams. Bats were tracked for 311 days to record foraging activities, and day/nigh t roosts. The two L. blossevillii roosted during the day just a few thousand feet from the capture s ite in some of the older age cottonwoods within the campground. The campground was occupied although not as active as in past years during the Labor Day holiday. At dusk we observed a t least 35 L. blossevillii emerging from cottonwood trees in the campground. One female pall id bat used three different live cottonwood trees to day roost. The BLM in Nevada constructed 98 bat-compatible clo sures on abandoned mines for the Federal fiscal year 2012. They conducted 167 bat sp ecific surveys and 824 initial site inventories in the year. They also did hard closure s on abandoned mines and environmental cleanups. Ken Maas reports that the US Forest Service in Neva da installed 27 bat compatible closures (gates, grates and culvert gates) in the Ely area a nd Santa Rosa Mountains. He had bat surveys completed on another 65 features in the Manhattan/B elmont, Ellsworth area and Gabbs. During 2012 Mike Visher from Nevada Division of Min erals (NDOM) reports that they paid for, and Environmental Protection Services (EPS) built, two bat gates and one cupola in Washoe County and one gate in Lyon County. nnnnnnrrn n rn

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WBWG Newsletter, Fall 2012 Page 11 New Mexico Bosque Wildlife & Habitat / Lincoln National Forest Quentin Hays, wildlife biologist and owner of Bosqu e Wildlife and Habitat (and Assistant Professor at Eastern New Mexico University – Ruidos o) continued bat population survey and monitoring efforts for the Lincoln National Forest in southern New Mexico. Several sites on the Smokey Bear District and the Sacramento District co ntinued to be monitored seasonally as part of long-term survey efforts. Unfortunately, severa l sites on the Smokey Bear District were damaged during the Little Bear Fire and subsequent large-scale flood events, including a wetland site in Littleton Canyon that was previousl y restored (for bat habitat) and for which the group was given a Wings Across the Americas award i n 2010. Notable records included Eastern Red Bats ( Lasiurus borealis ) in the Sacramento Mountains, an apparent range expansion or previously unrecorded locality, as wel l as bat occupancy/use at previously unsurveyed caves (also in the Sacramento Mountains). On the Guadalupe District, in conjunction with the Lincoln National Forest Cave Specialist, W hite-Nose Syndrome surveillance efforts were implemented. This work was initiated by sever al internal cave surveys by biologists who accompanied the cave specialist, and will continue to be conducted internally by the Lincoln National Forest. USFS biologists who contributed t o or assisted with this work include: Jack Williams (Sacramento District Biologist), Larry Cor dova (Smokey Bear District Biologist), Rhonda Stewart (Forest Biologist), Jason Walz (Cave Specialist), Ryan Jonnes (Sacramento District) and Reuben Gay (Sacramento District). Bat Data Logger Testing This fall/winter the Lincoln National Forest will p artner with the US Forest Service’s San Dimas Technology & Development Center to test and demonst rate the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of using bat data loggers. The intent of the demon stration is to test the ability of bat data logging devices to monitor bat activity and environ mental conditions within the bat hibernaculum and to monitor nightly and/or seasonal bat activity to and from the cave (ingress and egress). The partners plan to test at least two bat data log ging devices in caves on the Lincoln National Forest: the Bat Logger II manufactured by Tony Mess ina and the recently released AnaBat Roost Logger manufactured by Titley Scientific. Fo r more details contact: Jason Walz of Lincoln National Forest (JAWalz@fs.fed.us) or Rey Farve of SDTDC (RFarve@fs.fed.us). DOD Surveys The Department of Defense Legacy Program has, for t he past two years, funded an extensive and comprehensive roost survey and documentation ef fort across all of New Mexico’s DoD lands. To date, the project has surveyed over 700 a bandoned mine and natural cave features with most of the effort being concentrated on White Sands Missile Range (WSMR). Bat Conservation International working in a close partn ership with DoD personnel will be helping the resource managers at DoD installations update or re vise their Integrated Natural Resource Management Plans (INRMP) to account for best practi ces when managing bat roosts, largely subterranean bat roosts. The project has one more y ear left in which to wrap up field efforts and focus on management recommendations. Many important roost sites have been located during the course of this work and will be protected due t o the survey efforts. Bridge Monitoring for Bat Use NMDGF is funding Justin Stevenson of RD Wildlife Ma nagement to conduct monitoring of bridges and their use by bat species as roosts in t he middle Rio Grande Valley over a 12-month period. His project began this spring. He is lookin g at bat species composition, roost

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WBWG Newsletter, Fall 2012 Page 12 microhabitat, changes in thermal regimes within bri dges, and seasonal changes in bat numbers and species at roosts. South Dakota The 7th Annual ‘Bat Festival’ hosted by SD Bat Working Group was held August 18th. The festival continues to grow and as always is a fun event with activities f or kids and adults. It’s held in Custer State Park in the southern Black Hills. Planning for next year’s ev ent has already started. The SDBWG ‘Bat Books for schools’ program continues and a few more sets of books awarded to elementary schools across the state. SDBWG members also did bat education presentations to schools and civic gr oups, and installed a few bat boxes. The Black Hills National Forest, working with SDBWG and the Paha Sapa Grotto, has started a program to monitor for WNS. Temp/Rh data loggers were also installed this summe r in a dozen caves known to be bat hibernation sites. The Rocky Mountain Region of the Forest Service is still unde r an Emergency Cave Closure Order. by Brad Phillips Texas The Republic of Texas has been ramping up bat surve y efforts through key partnerships. This summer, Texas Parks and Wildlife and Bat Conservation International partnered to conduct summer roost surveys for Myotis austroriparius and Corynorhinus rafinesquii Field surveys were conducted in early July at 13 sites with assistance from USFWS personnel and private landowners. A total of 502 individual bats were documented. This survey effort contributes to one of Texas’s only long term bat datasets. Currently, an analysis and report of this 18 year dataset is contracted and should be completed this month. As these two species are rare on the Texas landscape, this report will help resource managers direct limited resources for conservation priorities. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department currently h as 2 Requests for Proposals out which specifically address bat conservation needs. Wildl ife Conservation Grants from TPWD and A cave closure is in effect in the Rocky Mountain Region. Eager participants at the Bat Festival. Corynorhinus rafinesquii artificial roost.

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WBWG Newsletter, Fall 2012 Page 13 Section 6 Traditional Grants from TPWD both seek to expand survey and monitoring efforts for Geomyces destructans and White-nose Syndrome as well as collating cave and karst environmental baseline and trend data in the state. Projects that meet these goals will help Texas meet objectives in their Wildlife Action Plan as well as contribute to a national WNS surveillance effort. Submitted by: Katie Gillies, Bat Conservation Inte rnational Utah Our annual “Bat Blitz” is held to help fill in data gaps in under-surveyed areas of the state. This year, eleven biologists and volunteers met in the R aft River Mountains of northwestern Utah with their nets and acoustic gear. Highlights incl uded one potential acoustic record for a spotted bat. An acoustic inventory training workshop led by Jane t Tyburec was held in Escalante. It was an excellent opportunity for biologist to gain and imp rove their detector placement and call analysis skills. Utah received $25k of White-Nose Grants to States f unding. That money was used to support summer monitoring efforts and will be applied to hi bernacula monitoring this winter. Biologist with the Utah Division of Wildlife and pa rtners conducted acoustic surveys at our 65 long-term monitoring sites. Additional netting and acoustic work was completed improve our knowledge of species distribution and habitat assoc iations. !n"n#n$rnnnn% n Washington nnn&r'rn USFWS Region 1, Eastside Refuges Acoustic Bat Inven tory In summer 2012, the USFWS I&M Initiative began an a coustic inventory of bat species on select National Refuges in Region 1. The project was conducted on 13 refuges in eastern Washington, eastern Oregon, and Idaho (Figure 1). A sampling scheme based on the OR/WA Bat Grid was used to select sample locations on ref uges. Pettersson D500x bat detectors were deployed adjacent to water features and left for 7 nights at a time. Timers were set to record from sunset to 3.5 hours after sunset. SonoBat 3.0 5 was used to automatically classify call files and calls are being verified by an experienced bat biologist. Sampling will continue in 2013, and 4 additional refuges are planning to participate. Bat detectors were deployed at 64 locations. Over 6 4,000 files were analyzed using SonoBat software and over 16,000 were automatically classif ied to species. A total of 14 species were detected on the refuges. The study also provides d ata on summer bat activity, which provides a baseline to site occupancy and activity data for fu ture monitoring, especially in light of Whitenose Syndrome.

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WBWG Newsletter, Fall 2012 Page 14 SPECIES Camas Cold Springs Conboy Lake Deer Flat Grays Lake Hart Mountain Kootenai Little Pend Oreille Malheur McKay Creek Minidoka Toppenish Umatilla NUMBER OF 7 NIGHT DEPLOYMENTS 4 3 4 2 3 2 5 9 3 3 4 4 9 Antrozous pallidus D* Corynorhinus townsendii D D Eptesicus fuscus D D D D D D D D D Lasiurus blossevillii D Lasiurus cinereus D D D D D D D D D D D D Lasionycteris noctivagans D D D D D D D D D D D D D Myotis californicus D D D D D D D D D Myotis ciliolabrum D D D D D D D D D D D Myotis evotis D D D D D D D D Myotis lucifugus D D D D D D D D D D D D D Myotis thysanodes D D D D Myotis volans D D D D D D D Myotis yumanensis D D D D D D D D D D D Parastrellus hesperus D D D *D = detected at that refuge based on preliminary classification from SonoBat software. Highlighted values represent rare species or species detected o ut of their range. These calls will be scrutinized during the verification process. nrnn(n)nrn*n nn+ ,-r./0 1n rnn%nnrnrn Figure 1. Location of National Wildlife Refuges ac oustically sampled for bats during summer, 2012. Refuges participated in the Eastside Refuge Acoustic Bat Inventory, coordinated by the USFWS Region 1 Inventory and Mon itoring Initiative.

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WBWG Newsletter, Fall 2012 Page 15 Hibernation Chamber Protected at Boulder Cave Thanks to the help of numerous Naches District empl oyees, volunteers, WDFW employees and the expertise of Jim Nieland, we were able to insta ll a long awaited bat gate at Boulder Cave. This gate will provide much needed protection to hi bernating TownsendÂ’s big-eared bats through the elimination of winter disturbance. Boulder Cave provides a winter roost site to one of the largest known TownsendÂ’s big-eared bat populations in eastern Washington. The cave presen ts wildlife management challenges, since it is a developed recreation site, receiving over 30,0 00 summertime visitors each year. With the assistance of wildlife and recreation expe rts, a long term management strategy was started in 1995 to protect and enhance bat use while maintaining recreational access. The cave offers a special opportunity for public education. The Nache s Ranger District has developed a program to educate the public on the ethics of caving; bat ecology and WNS. The program includes on-site interpretive programs for schools and visitors to the cave. Interpretive signs at the trailhead describe the importance of bats and threats they face. Boulder Cave was once used by a large TownsendÂ’s big-eared bat maternity colony. Dalquest documente d seeing hundreds of pregnant TownsendÂ’s big-eared bats in Boulder Cave. After a n access trail was constructed to the cave by the CCC in the mid 30Â’s, numbers dropped to less than 75 females. Presently Boulder Cave is not used as maternity roost. Management actions attempt to protect hibernating b ats from human disturbance and provide a protected area for maternity use if the bats are so inclined to use it. Winter hibernation surveys have shown a steady increase in bat numbers. Management highlights: 66,7rr!r"r"&&!#rr(!r3&#!r'!r44! ""r#%r8r-&!r1-r(!r4'!/rr (!r!r"r4&"!#r"3--!r("r#r#3r(!r r(!r"!"/r 66*7rr!r4&"3!r#!r"r"3!#r4&"r (!r4'!r#r&r!!!r n'!-!r r#r0&r /rr). r("r4&"3!r0!# r"r4!"!#r1-r4!r r (3(r0&r, /rrr !0!-!r 6697rr 1!#&+r!"r!!r"&&!#rr4&"!r11r(!r"3"0 !4!#r -!+r"r"!/rrr :3+rr"3'!+"r('!r;!r0&4!rr3&#!r' !r+!&+r"4!r 66.r#r "!#"r3-!"r('!r#3&&+r4!"!#/r3 r(!r&!r 6<."r3-!"r!!rr (!r&!r$."=r+r(!r-#r 66."r(!+r(#r4!"! #rr9./rr)..*r(!+r(#r4!"!#r r<*r#rr). )r'!r ..r"!#"r !!#r"r!!r43!#/rr'!r(3(r 4&"3!"r!!rr0&4!%r0!0&!r43!#rr44!""r (!r4'!r#3r(!r!r-("/ +r)..67r!r"3'!+"r#!1+rr"-&&r"#!r4(!r(!!r>.?r1r"r(!!/ ). .7rrr!@0!"r-!!rr!'!r-!-!/rr !4r1r(!r(!r4(-!r "r#!1!#/ Welding gate.

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WBWG Newsletter, Fall 2012 Page 16 !0!-!r). )7rr!rr!r"r"&&!#rr0 !4r(!r(!r4(-!/rr Funding for the bat gate project was provided by Pacific Northwest Regional Office of the U.S. Fores t Service and Oregon/Washington State Office of the Bureau of Land Management Interagency Species Status/Sensitive Species Program. A special thanks goes to the many volunteers and agencies and employees who made the project possible: Ella Rowan, Peter Forbes, Gary Wiles, Chris Anderson, Laurie Ness, Patrick Paulson, Jim Nieland, Joan St. Hilaire, Cary Henning, Kevin Hill, Jacob VanVleck, Doug Rohl, Monica Kim, Jake Wilcox, Angie Niebuhr, Lindsay Boutillier, and Lindsey Lenox. rn20n#rn$2&2nr n n Bats Northwest: A Unique Organization Bats Northwest is a not-for-profit organization for med in 1996 by scientists, educators, and interested lay people to help protect Pacific North west bat populations through education and research. Bats Northwest (BNW) maintains an excell ent web site < http://www.batsnorthwest.org >. BNW puts out several quality newsletters each y ear, back issues can be found on the web site (for folks inte rested in Pacific Northwest bats, I highly recommend John Bassett's article in the summer/fall 2011 issue titled Update on the Status of the Western Red Bat in Washington State: Death of a n Urban Legend? "). The BNW web site provides numerous resources for bat conservation and education; BNW has assisted with the Washington Bat Grid surveys, organizes and leads 8 or more summer bat walks at an urban lake i n Seattle, and the organization has a booth at the annual 5-day Flower and Garden Show in Seattle. Bats Northwest membership includes bat rehabilitation experts, researchers, private and government wildlife biologists, and educators. Meg, Barb, and John are familiar faces at WBWG and NASBR meetings. This past summer Chris Anderson of Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) organized a series of acoustic bat surveys with strong involvem ent from volunteers from Bats Northwest. Three WDFW Wildlife Management Units (WMU) in Lower Snoqualmie Valley (east of Seattle) were surveyed: the Stillwater, Cherry, and Crescent Lake WMUs. Su rveys were conducted via manual "active" recordings by multiple teams equipped with a Petter sson D240x detectors and an iRiver recorder. Each of the three sites was surveyed du ring June, July, and August by doing area searches on foot. The recordings are now being exam ined by Bats Northwest members who have been learning call analysis from a couple of t he bat acoustic 'techs' in the group. Foodinspired social events have turned into planning an d training sessions. Check out the web site if you get a chance! n&r'rnnn BNW volunteers at Crescent Lake Wildlife Management Unit prior to a night acoustic survey. Boulder Cave gate.

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WBWG Newsletter, Fall 2012 Page 17 Factors Affecting the Foraging Activity of Bats ove r Wetlands Foraging animals face decisions about when and wher e to forage and these decisions are mediated in part by prey availability. For temperat e insectivorous bats, prey availability fluctuates temporally as well as spatially. Wetland s are an important component of bat foraging habitat because they contain high abundances of ins ects. However, insect densities are typically patchy in distribution because species ex hibit differential flushes in response to biotic (e.g., species phenology, macrophyte communities) a nd abiotic (e.g., water depth and temperature, hydroperiod) factors. This past summer I conducted my graduate research at Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge (TNWR) in Cheney, Washington. With over 180 wetlands and 12 bat species (including several Washington priori ty species), TNWR provided an ideal location to examine what biotic and abiotic factors affect b at foraging over wetlands. I chose 12 wetlands as study sites and sampled each 3 times throughout the summer. To measure insect abundance at my sites, I used a combination of aqua tic emergence nets, pan traps, and sticky nets. Each site contained 10 stations with each typ e of trap. I used acoustic monitoring equipment to record bat activity on same nights whe n I was collecting insects. I will use the recorded bat calls to gain a relative measure of fo raging activity by counting the number of feeding buzzes each night. I also recorded water te mperature, water depth, abundance of emergent vegetation, presence/absence of fish, and hydroperiod at each site. I am currently in the process of identifying the insects I collected and analyzing the acoustic recordings. I hope to have results to share by the spring! In the long ru n, by evaluating what factors influence bat foraging, my study will help identify quality habit at for conservation purposes. 2rrn2r3r n4rnrn$ Wolf Haven Prairie-Oak Habitat Restoration Update In the Spring 2012 WBWG Newsletter we reported on t he bat habitat enhancement and public education work underway Wolf Haven in partnership that includes US FWS and CNLM on 40 acres of native prairie-oak habitat in rural western Washington State. The Year of the Bat was highlighted during summer evening 'howl-in' events, and included a table with the ever popular 'guano stati on:' a microscope and 3 types of guano -from moth, fly, and beetle specialists. Six custom bat houses were constructed and installe d during March 2012, and interpretive signs are in production. In addition to four standard flat boxes the 6 new pole-mounted houses had bat use this first summ er, including occasional counts of 30-50 myotis bats da yroosting in the large nursery box. Three dual-chamb ered rocket boxes of the BCI design had varying amount of use, and unattended acoustic moni toring indicated a large amount of bat activity near the array of 2 'rockets' and the larg e nursery box, which may indicate use as night roosts as well as the documented day roosting. The maternity roost box which we've installed will help provide some replacement to the loss of s nags and other natural roost habitat in the local area. 2nn2rn&nnnrrn5r n*rrn+5*1n

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WBWG Newsletter, Fall 2012 Page 18 nrrnn The Western Bat Working Group is pleased to announc e the 2013 Western Bat Working Group Biennial Meeting to be held April 1-4 2013 at the I nn at Loretto in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The WBWG meeting will begin with an opening recepti on on Monday evening. The conference will feature several invited speakers, and three da ys of facilitator-run workshop where we will review and update the Western Bat Species: Regional Priority Matrix. During the conference there will be an acoustic workshop which will demon strate hands on state-of-the-art workflow solutions availa ble from Binary Acoustic Technologies, Pettersson, Titley, a nd Wildlife Acoustics. We will also have a poster session, ban quet, and special auction on Wednesday evening. The meeting w ill conclude at 5 p.m. on Thursday. After the conferenc e, on April 4-6, Wildlife Acoustics will be holding a Song Mete r SM2BAT+ and Echo Meter EM3 training class. Since the development of the first Western Bat Spec ies Regional Priority Matrix in 1998, emerging threats such as climate change, wind energy, and WNS necessitate a reevaluation of the matrix. In addition, better met hodology for assessing speciesÂ’ status allow more consistent, re peatable, and transparent ranking. To update the matrix, WBWG will reexamine the status of western bat species by appl ying NatureServeÂ’s methodology for assigning conservatio n status ranks. We will assess speciesÂ’ status within each o f the eight western Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs). For each species, regional teams will compile available information for eight core status rank factors. The initial assessment will be presented for review and discussion during the April 2013 WBWG Biennial Meeting. Located at 7,000 feet in the southern Rocky Mountai ns, Santa Fe is one of the great destination cities of the world. There are numerous art galleries and museums in San ta Fe, and culinary enthusiasts can find great restaur ants in every price range. The city lies on the edge of the Santa Fe National Forest and 320,000 acres of wilderness, which offers skiing, hiking, fishing, mountain biking, ri ver rafting, horseback riding, hunting, camping and outdoor adventures. The rich multi-cultural history, mild c limate and clean air make the area a delightful experience. A more detailed circular of information and online registration will be available in December. http://www.wbwg.org/business/biennialmeetings/2013/ 2013WBWGmeeting.html We hope to see you in Santa Fe! During the conference there will be an acoustic wor kshop which will demonstrate hands on state-of-the-art workflow solutions available from Binary Acoustic Technologies, Pettersson, Titley, and Wildlife Acoustics. For preliminary det ails contact John Chenger < jchenger@batmanagement.com > of Bat Conservation and Management.

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WBWG Newsletter, Fall 2012 Page 19 AUCTION ITEMS NEEDED FOR APRIL 2013 WBWG MEETING In past WBWG meetings, we had a fun fundraiser than ks to the generous donations of our members and vendors. To keep this great tradition g oing, we need your help. Please contribute an item or service for our raffle and/or auction fo r the April 2013 biennial WBWG meeting in Santa Fe. Contact Marikay Ramsey ( marikayr@blm.gov ) with what you can contribute. We will have an address in Santa Fe where you can send the item to in March if you don’t want to carry it to the meeting. Thanks in advance for your gener osity. SONGMETER TRAINING COURSE AT THE WBWG MEETING Wildlife Acoustics is donating an Echo Meter EM3 handheld bat detector and training session in support of the Bob Berry Scholarship fund After the conference, on April 4-6, Wildlife Acoust ics will be holding a Song Meter SM2BAT+ and Echo Meter EM3 tra ining class. Course Description: Conducted by Dr. Cori Lausen of Birchdale Ecological ( corilausen@birchdalebc.ca ), The Wildlife Acoustics Bat Detector Training Course will provide background on the principals of bat echoloc ation, hands-on experience with the SM2BAT+ and EM3 and discussion of the various software components for configuration and analysis. Topics will include: #!"#rr!4(&4r – r00!!"r1r"3#%r!11!4"r1r4&3!%r!4/ 40&!"r1rr#!!4r!4(&+ "4"r1rr"0!4!"r#!14r – r03&"!r "(0!"r#r!-&+ 40&!"r1r0""'!r#r4'!r-r Arr3"!r#r0-r(!r2)B Arr3"!r(!r2, 1!r1rr!4#"r – r%r%r)r#r(!r 13r&+r1! "4"r1r&+Cr!4#"r – rD! ""r#rE3&&r0!43Sign up now because seating is limited. Contact sales2012@wildlifeacoustics.com sign on today or call +1 978-369-5225 for more information.

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WBWG Newsletter, Fall 2012 Page 20 rn rr nrnrn Tropical dry forests supply important ecological an d economic benefits. However, threats to forests in Central America such as resource extract ion and forest conversion to other land uses (e.g., agriculture) often result in a fragmented landscape. We surveyed bats on the Paso del Istmo of southwestern Nicaragua. This isthmus, between the Pacific Ocean and Lake Nicaragua, is considered an important passageway for migrating wildlife. Our objective was to increase knowledge of bats and determine impacts of forest fragmentation on bats. We mist netted bats for 35 nights during the dry season (December 2011 – January 2012) and captured 1476 bats representing 44 species. We recorded a new species for Nicaragua pale-faced bat [ Phylloderma stenops ] (Figure 1) and range extensions for at least 2 species, c hestnut shorttailed bat ( Carollia castanea) and white-throated round-eared bat ( Lophostoma silvicolum; Figure 2 ) Three species (Jamaican fruit-eating bat [ Artibeus jamaicensis ], Seba’s short-tailed bat [ Carollia perspicillata ], common vampire bat [ Desmodus rotundus ]) that are associated with altered forest landscapes (logged or farmed) accoun ted for 50% of all the bats we captured. Only 5% of captures represented the forest-associat ed subfamily Phyllostominae. We compared capture rates of individuals and species (number pe r net hour) to fragmentation indices for capture location s using FRAGSTATS. Capture rates of individuals were higher in areas with extensive young forest but captures of s pecies was positively related to total landscape edge and density of mature forest patches. Despite their scarcity on this landscape, mature forest patches helped maintain a more diverse bat assemblage. Increasing patch size and connectivity will benefit forest-associated bats. Our team of 16 volunteers from the US and Canada with our Nicaraguan colleagues captured this female pale-faced bat, the first capture for the sp ecies in Nicaragua. This gives us hope that mature forest fragments provide habitat for forest-associated bat s like this species. Figure 1 Pale faced bat Phylloderma stenops with Arnulfo Medina and Carol Chambers. Figure 2 White throated round eared bat by Jos Gabriel Martinez Fonseca

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WBWG Newsletter, Fall 2012 Page 21 Captures of two species, the chestnut short-tailed bat and white-throated round-eared bat (Figure 2), extend known ranges of these specie s indicating the importance of Nicaragua’s Paso del Istmo as habitat. Our radio telemetry work in June 2012 proved that reproductive groups of white-throated round-eared bats use arbor eal termite nests as roosts as they do elsewhere in Central America. n Post-doctoral position – Bridging the Gap between R enewable Energy Solutions and Bat Conservation in Arizona The School of Forestry seeks a Post-Doctoral Schola r to conduct work on population genetics of Arizona bat populations in relation to wind power d evelopment. The Post-Doctoral Scholar will work under the mentorship of Dr. Carol Chambers (Fo restry) and Dr. Jeff Foster (Biological Sciences). Molecular genetic approaches to investig ate scientifically intractable species, such as bats, have recently come of age, and provide an effective means to understand basic ecology and populations. This project will dovetail novel genetic analyses for estimating bat population sizes and migration routes with GIS-base d landscape genetic and species distribution models, thereby generating more realis tic mitigation thresholds for wind energy developers. This job is for 2 years at $50,000/year plus full benefits. The work will be done in the School of Forestry at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaf f, Arizona. Applicant should have: (1) an earned PhD in the field of biology with expertise i n molecular genetic approaches by the time of appointment, (2) a publication record in biology an d genetics, (3) experience with collaborative interdisciplinary research, (4) a strong interest i n this topic, and (5) availability to start January 2, 2013. For more information, contact Carol Chambers Professor, School of Forestry, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff AZ 86011-5018 USA; Ph one: 928-523-0014; E-mail: Carol.Chambers@nau.edu Be a part of it! Unravelling the mysteries of bat migra tions and winter hibernation: Western Acoustic Monitoring Initiative There is of course a growing urgency to determine b at migration routes and hibernacula. The WBWG, USFWS and USFS are working together for a bro ad-scale approach to filling in these knowledge gaps. Currently there is a core group of individuals meeting to discuss strategy, how best to network those doing bat acoustic monitoring in western US and Canada, and how to move forward with a database. This Western Acousti c Monitoring Initiative is in its early stages, but the goal is to network everyone doing long term bat acoustic monitoring in the West. A database will facilitate visualization of large sca le patterns that will hopefully elucidate important bat migration routes or features, and provide insig ht into where the various species may be congregating/migrating for mating and hibernation i n Western North America. If you are doing long term acoustic monitoring of bats in the West a nd would like to be part of this network, please fill out the form that can be found at: http://dl.dropbox.com/u/52367482/ACOUSTIC%20MONITOR ING.Western%20Contacts.March2 012.xlsx and contact Karen.blejwas@alaska.gov

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WBWG Newsletter, Fall 2012 Page 22 New tools for long-term passive monitoring : Titley’s new RoostLogger, installed in an abandoned mine in B.C. This new inexpensive detector enables mines, caves, buildings, bridges, and more to be monitored for us e by bats long term. This unit can sub-sample throughout the day/night for 6 months running on 4 internal D batteries. Wildlife Acoustics SM2BAT+ recording near a small w ater body that stays open year-round in the BC Interior. In zerocross mode, this detector can monitor continuously from dusk to dawn for one month using 4 internal D batteries. n5rnnrn2 nrrrn .r%0 r n n The PDF Corner lists recent open-access publication s that may be of interest to WBWG members. If you come across a full-text on-line pub lication that you think should be listed here, please send the link to lorraine.Andrusiak@keystone wildlife.com. Alsheimer, Laura. 2011. The Effect of Artificial Ni ght Lighting on the Little Brown Bat ( Myotis lucifugus ). M. Sc. Thesis. State University of New York at F redonia. http://dspace.sunyconnect.suny.edu/bitstream/handle /1951/57866/Alsheimer.pdf Grol, B.P.F.E., A. M. Vote, and B. Verboom. 2011. The influence of a Christmas market on hibernating bats in a man-made limestone cave. Lutr a 54 (2): 69-88. http://zoogdierwinkel.nl/sites/default/files/imce/n ieuwesite/Publicatie%20fotos/Lutra/downloads/L utra_54_2.pdf#page=6 Silvis, A., W. M. Ford, E.R. Britzke N.R. Beane and J. B. Johnson. 2012. Forest succession and maternity day roost selection by Myotis septentrionalis in a mesophytic hardwood forest. International Journal of Forestry Research, vol. 20 12, Article ID 148106, 8 pages, 2012. doi:10.1155/2012/148106. http://downloads.hindawi.com/journals/ijfr/2012/148 106.pdf Langwig, K. E., W. F. Frick, J. T. Bried, A. C. Hic ks, T. H. Kunz, A. Marm Kilpatrick. 2012, Sociality, density-dependence and microclimates det ermine the persistence of populations suffering from a novel fungal disease, white-nose s yndrome. Ecology Letters 15: 1050–1057. http://bio.research.ucsc.edu/people/kilpatrick/publ ications/Langwig%20et%20al%202012%20Ec ol%20Lett.pdf Reeder DM, Frank CL, Turner GG, Meteyer CU, Kurta A et al. 2012 Frequent arousal from hibernation linked to severity of infection and mor tality in bats with White-Nose Syndrome. PLoS

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WBWG Newsletter, Fall 2012 Page 23 ONE 7(6): e38920. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0038920 http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371 %2Fjournal.pone.0038920 Jonasson, and C. Willis. 2012. Hibernation energet ics of free-ranging little brown bats. Journal of Experimental Biology. 215, 2141-2149. http://www.willisbatlab.org/uploads/8/0/0/6/8006753 /jonasson_and_willis_2012_hibernat ion_energetics.pdf Papadatou,E. Carlos Ibez, Roger Pradel, Javier J uste and Olivier Gimenez. 2011, Assessing survival in a multi-population system: a case study on bat populations. Oecologia 165( 4): 925933. http://www.springerlink.com/content/hqv764228275125 2/ Brownlee, S. 2011. Altered Behavior in Bats Affecte d by White-Nose Syndrome. M. Sc. Thesis, Bucknell University. http://fedora.bucknell.edu:8080/fedora/get/bu-dl:sa b045_2011/VIEW Voigt, C.C., K. Schneeberger, S. L. Voigt-Heucke and D. Lewanzik. 2011. Rain increases the energy cost of bat flight. Biol. Lett. 23 vol. 7 no 5 793-795. http://rsbl.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/7/5/ 793.full 2nrn USA WBWG Conference 2013 April 2-4, 2013, at Santa Fe http://www.wbwg.org/business/biennialmeetings/2013/ 2013WBWGmeeting.html North American Wildlife and Natural Resources Confe rence March 25-30, 2013, Arlington, Virginia. http://www.wildlifemanagementinstitute.org/index.ph p?option=com_content&view=article&id=34 8&Itemid=61 The Wildlife Society (Western Section), Jan. 28-Feb 3, 2012, Sacramento, CA http://joomla.wildlife.org/western/index.php?option =com_content&task=view&id=220&Itemid=35 0 National Wildlife Rehabilitators Association (NWRA 2013 Annual Symposium, March 5 to March 9 in Portland, Oregon. http://www.nwrawildlife.org/content/exhibitor Western Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies, Ja nuary 3 6, 2013, Tucson, AZ. http://www.wafwa.org/2013/Winter/index.html ELSEWHERE 9th International Conference on Behaviour, Physiolo gy and Genetics of Wildlife 2013. Sept. 1821, 2013. University of Freiburg, Germany. http://www.wildlife.uni-freiburg.de/events-1/izw201 3 Conference on Wind Power and Environmental impacts Effects on Human Interests, Wildlife, and Nature, 5 February 7 February 2013, Stockholm Sweden. http://www.business-biodiversity.eu/default.asp?Men ue=25&Termin=278


Description
WBWG news --
President's corner --
Elections Updates: Baseline bat work in northern Alberta
continues --
Flagstaff's diverse assemblage of bats more than just
big brown bats --
Bosque wildlife & habitat / Lincoln National Forest
--
Bat data logger testing --
DOD surveys --
Bridge monitoring for bat use --
USFWS region 1, eastside refuges acoustic bat inventory
--
Hibernation chamber protected at Boulder Cave --
Bats northwest: a unique organization --
Factors affecting the foraging activity of bats over
wetlands --
Western bat working group to meet in Santa Fe --
Auction items needed for April 2013 WBWG meeting --
Songmeter training course at the WBWG meeting --
Large forest patches increase bat species diversity in a
fragmented landscape in Nicaragua --
Announcements: Post-doctoral position bridging the gap
between renewable energy solutions and bat conservation in
Arizona --
PDF corner --
Upcoming events.