Citation
WBWG News

Material Information

Title:
WBWG News
Series Title:
WBWG News
Alternate Title:
Western Bat Working Group Newsletter
Creator:
Western Bat Working Group
Publisher:
Western Bat Working Group
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Bats ( local )
Genre:
Newsletter
serial ( sobekcm )
Location:
United States

Notes

General Note:
In memorium - Elizabeth (Dixie) Pierson -- State/Provincial updates: USA: Arizona - Artificial Bat Roosts in Bridges in an Extreme Climate; Colorado - Bats and the Southern Great Plains Rapid Ecoregional Assessment ; Utah - Utah Bat Conservation Cooperative and Utah Cavers ; Canada, British Columbia - Bats and Cavers Program -- Winter Bat Research Continues in B.C. -- Long-eared Complex Genetic Samples Requested -- Got Bats? -- Kootenay Community Bat Project -- Genetic Identification of Myotis Now Commercially Available in BC -- Southeastern Bat Diversity Network (SBDN) Bat Blitz Committee Seeks Additional Participants! -- North American Bat Monitoring Program Update -- PDF corner -- Upcoming events -- The vintage bat.
Restriction:
Open Access - Permission by Publisher
Original Version:
Vol. 9, no. 1 (2014)
General Note:
See Extended description for more information.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of South Florida Library
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
K26-04886 ( USFLDC DOI )
k26.4886 ( USFLDC Handle )
17187 ( karstportal - original NodeID )

USFLDC Membership

Aggregations:
Karst Information Portal

Postcard Information

Format:
Serial

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

Elizabeth (Dixie) Pierson radio tracking bats in California Volume 9, Number 1 Summer 2014 WBWG Newsletter, Spring 2014 Page 1

PAGE 2

WESTERN BAT WORKING GROUP NEWSLETTER S ummer 2014 Volume 9 Number 1 IN MEMORIUM ELIZABETH (DIXIE) PIERSON .......................................................... 4 STATE/PROVINCIAL UPDATES .................................................................................... 5 U SA ............................................................................................................................. 5 Arizona ................................................................................................................................ 5 Artificial Bat Roosts in Bridges in an Extreme Climate ...................................................... 5 Colorado .............................................................................................................................. 7 Bats and the Southern Great Plains Rapid Ecoregional Assessment ............................... 7 Utah ..................................................................................................................................... 8 Utah Bat Conservation Cooperative and Utah Cavers ...................................................... 8 Canada ........................................................................................................................ 9 British Columbia .................................................................................................................. 9 Bats and Cavers Program ................................................................................................ 9 Winter Bat Research Continues in B.C. ...........................................................................10 Longeared Complex Genetic Samples Requested .........................................................1 2 Got Bats? ........................................................................................................................1 2 Kootenay Community Bat Project ....................................................................................1 2 Genetic Identification of Myoti s Now Commercially Available in BC ................................. 13 Southeastern Bat Diversity Network (SBDN) Bat Blitz Committee Seeks Additional Participants! .................................................................................................................. 13 North American Bat Monitoring Program Update .......................................................... 14 PDF CORNER .............................................................................................................. 14 UPCOMING EVENTS ................................................................................................... 15 Canada ...............................................................................................................................15 USA ....................................................................................................................................15 Elsewhere ...........................................................................................................................15 THE VINTAGE BAT ...................................................................................................... 16 WBWG Newsletter, Spring 2014 Page 2

PAGE 3

The Western Bat Working Group (WBWG) is a partner in the Coalition of North American Bat Working Groups. The WBWG is comprised of agencies, organizations and individuals interested i n bat research, management, and conservation from 13 western States, the Provinces of British Columbia and Alberta, and Northern Mexico. Membership in the WBWG is open to anyone who is interested in participating in bat conservation. There are no membership fees or dues. Funding for bat conservation work accomplished by the WBWG is generated by State and Federal land management agencies, nongovernmental organizations, and by donations from individual members. Visit our web page http://wbwg.org to contact us, find information on bat conservation and upcoming meetings, become a member, link to state or provincial bat working groups, or download previous issues of this newsletter. President Angie McIntire Vice Pre sident Laura Ellison Treasurer Brad Phillips Secretary Becky Abel At large representatives: Amie Shovlain, Roger Rodriguez Presidential appointees: Rob Schorr, Dave Johnston Newsletter Editors : Lorraine Andrusiak Bronwyn Hogan NOTE: Generally common names are used for bat species in the newsletter. Corresponding scientific names are listed below. Common Name Scientific Name Arizona myotis Myotis occultus Big brown bat Eptesicus fuscus Californian myotis Myotis californicus Cave myotis Myotis velifer Eastern red bat Lasiurus borealis Fringed myotis Myotis thysanodes Greater mastiff bat Eumops perotis Hoary bat Lasiurus cinereus Little brown myotis Myotis lucifugus Longeared myotis Myotis e votis Longlegged myotis Myotis volans Brazilian freetailed bat Tadarida brasilensis Northern myotis Myotis septentrionalis Pallid bat Antrozous pallidus Pocketed free tailed bat Nyctinomops femorosaccus Spotted bat Euderma maculatum Silver haired bat Lasionycterus noctivagans Southwestern myotis Myotis auriculus Townsends big eared bat Corynorhinus townsendii Western small footed myotis Myotis ciliolabrum Western red bat Lasiurus blossevillii Yuma myotis Myotis yuman ensis WBWG Newsletter, Spring 2014 Page 3

PAGE 4

IN MEMORIUM ELIZABETH (DIXIE) PIERSON Photo by Pat Brown Dixie Pierson was one of the core founding members of the Western Bat Working Group. Dixies tireless leadership and efforts promoted more effective bat conservation efforts globally. For over 25 years, she was one of the most influential personalities in the sphere of bat biology. Dixie was courageous and strong but also gentle and humble. She felt personally hurt by injustices to bats. Her responses to those threats were often highly effective as a result of years of experience, research, intellect, and hard work. She was more than willing to put herself in jeopardy for the sa ke of bats, friends, and anything she held dear. The strength of her personality made her one of the first influential female pioneers in bat biology and conservation, once an almost entirely maledominated field. Her effectiveness inspired many other women to become bat biologists and/or conservation advocates. Of all of her accomplishments, it was the one she most cherished. Dixie was a member of the team that developed the Townsends big eared bat Conservation Strategy in 1993 1994 that eventually led to the formation of the Western Bat Working Group in 1996. She and her husband, Bill Rainey, were the go to experts regarding bat conservation, ecology, and management of bats in n orthern California. Their research was extensive and added greatly to the current knowledge of the habitat needs of little known species such as Townsends big eared bats, spotted bats, western red bats, and greater mastiff bats across their entire range. Dixie was an incredibly valuable member of any conference, workshop or meeting. Her ability to cut through falsehoods and niceties of personality and bring forth a simple, candid embodiment of truth was unparalleled. In addition to their participation in the formation of the WBWG, Dixie and her husband have an incredible number of accomplishments and successes to their credit in the conservation and management of bats. Dixie developed a key to b ats of California that found widespread use by biologists across the western United States. Their strategies for survey and conservation of bats in bridges have been widely adopted across the entire country. Dixie was the lead for the creation of the California Bat Plan, sponsored by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. She gathered together other California bat WBWG Newsletter, Spring 2014 Page 4

PAGE 5

biolo gists to assist her, but she was the guiding force for the plan framework. Her cancer diagnosis and treatment limited her involvement at the phase where the final document was being compiled. As a legacy to Dixie, her friends and colleagues will complete this important task in her memory. Photo by Bill Rainey Photo by Bill Rainey Dixie and Bills many years of research and monitoring in Yosemite and Sequoia National Parks has resulted in some of the best information on bat fauna and ecology of any national park in the United States. Their work on abandoned mines, caves, anthropogenic structures, and forest roosting bats has not only led to direct conservation efforts for specific bat populations, but increased knowledge of bat ecology across western North America. Photo by Bill Rai ney Renowned for her work in protecting bats in the continental U.S., Dixie also played the lead role in writing the proposal for the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species that gave international protection to many species of Pacific Isl and flying foxes. The loss of her dynamic personality, profound influence and advocacy in bat conservation efforts leaves a vacuum in our small community unlikely to ever be filled. Her loyal friendship will be remembered and cherished by all who knew her well. Lyle Lewis STATE/PROVINCIAL UPD ATES U SA Arizona Artificial Bat Roosts in Bridges in an Extreme Climate The Ina Road Bridge (fig. 1) is one of many bridges in Tucson that provide significant roosts for bats. This bridge is home to WBWG Newsletter, Spring 2014 Page 5

PAGE 6

10,000 to 15,000 thousand bats; cave myotis and Brazilian free tailed bats during the summer, with less than 1,000 Brazilian free tailed bats present in the winter. While the existing Ina road bridge provides an abundance of high quality crevice habitat, it has become structurally unsound and is inadequate to handle traffic volumes. As part of the environmental scoping process Arizona Game and Fish (AZGFD) recommended mitigation for the large bat population roosting in the bridge. Figure 1. Ina Road Bridge over the Santa Cruz River, Marana AZ The existing twolane bridge spans approximately 630 feet between the banks of the Santa Cruz River and has parallel expansion crevices that are used by the bats. The new design for the replacement consists of two flat bottomed bridges which would not have crevices available for roosting bats. Because Tucson can get very hot during the summer and cold during the winter, it was important to design bat roosting habitat that is well insulated, to mimic as closely as possible the temperature moderation provided by the thermal mass of the bridge. The Town worked with Premier Engineering, (Phoenix) to thicken a portion of the deck on the new Ina Road Bridge design and incorporate bat crevices in the thickened section. While at the Western Bat Working Group meeting in Santa Fe last year, Sandy Wolf (who is working on a similar bridge project in Tucson on Houghton Road) happened to overhear Justin Stevenson and Holly Smith, of RD Wildlife Management, talking about a new type of bat box they were developing. Their design is a molded light weight concrete product that provides a high insulation va lue. Joel Diamond (AZGFD), Sandy Wolf ( Bat Research and Consulting), Justin Stevenson and Holly Smith (RD Wildlife Management, and I (Town of Marana) met to discuss creating a box to fit under the Cortaro Road and Houghton Road Bridges. The Regional Tr ansportation Authority Wildlife Linkages Working Group in Tucson approved just over $80,000 to fund incorporation of bat habitat into an existing bridge at Cortaro Road, just one mile north of the Ina Road Bridge and into one of the two new bridges replac ing the existing Ina Road Bridge. Figure 2. MODERNBAT modular boxes by RD Wildlife Management April 2014 The box shown in figure 2 was installed by AZGFD on Maranas Cortaro Road Bridge in early May of 2014 (fig. 3). AZGFD constructed a metal frame to hold the box in place under the bridge and placed microclimatic data loggers in the old Ina WBWG Newsletter, Spring 2014 Page 6

PAGE 7

Road Bridge and i n the new bat box under the Cortaro Bridge, to provide baseline data for comparison to post construction conditions. Comparison with baseline conditions will allow us to determine the effectiveness of the new design in recreating existing bat roost condit ions. Figure 3. Installation of MODERNBAT box under Cortaro Rd. Bridge Through coordination with Arizona Department of Transportation, the same type of bat boxes will also be placed in gaps left in the thickened portion of the new Ina Road Bridge deck, sized to allow AZGFD to install the bat habitat boxes. AZGFD and Sandy Wolf will monitor for bats one year prior to construction and for two years post construction. The older bridge designs provided crevices for bats to roost; however, as these bridges are being replaced with new, flat bottomed bridges, bat roosting habitat is being lost at an accelerating rate. This project has the potential to be a successful model for future bridge replacements so that habitat continues to be available for roosting bats in the Sonoran Desert. Janine Spencer Colorado Bats and the Southern Great Plains Rapid Ecoregional Assessment Bats have been included as a key conservation element of the ongoing Southern Great Plains Rapid Ecoregional Assessment (REA), coordinated by Bureau of Land Management in cooperation with U.S. Geological Survey. This Rapid Ecoregional Assessment seeks to rapidly within 3 to 4 years assess and synthesize existing information on species and habitats of conservation concern in the Southern Great Plains. The Southern Great Plains REA encompasses three ecoregions located in the South Central U.S.: the Central Great Plains, the High Plains, and the Southwestern Tablelands. Combined, these ecoregions total nearly 180 million acres managed mostly in private ownership. The area covers parts of five states: eastern Colorado, eastern New Mexico, northcentral Texas western Oklahoma, and western Kansas. Three of these states (Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas) have groups within the Western Bat Working Group. Of the approximately 45 bat species that occur in the contiguous United States, 17 species (just under 40%) regularly occur in the Southern Great Plains. The bat species assemblage section of the REA will provide an introduction to the natural history of bats that occur in the Southern Great Plains, and will include brief discussions of bat diversity and distributions, roosting ecology, diet, and reproductive patterns of bats in this region. This section of the REA will also address key change agents related to the WBWG Newsletter, Spring 2014 Page 7

PAGE 8

conservation and management of bats in the Southern Great Plains, including: human development; energy and infrastructure, including wind energy development; agriculture and grazing; altered fire regimes; invasive species; introduced insects and diseases, including whitenose syndrome; and climate change. For more information, see the Southern Great Plains Rapid Ecoregional Assessment website (link below) or contact Mark Hayes at: hayesm@usgs.gov. http://www.blm.gov/wo/st/en/prog/more/Lan dscape_Approach/reas/splains.html#locatio n Utah Utah Bat Conservation Cooperative and Utah Cavers In late 2013, I was asked to be a liaison between the Utah Bat Conservation Cooperative and Utah Cavers. Specifically, the UBCC wanted to reach out to local cavers to learn more about where bats are roosting underground. Utah has 18 species of bats that have been studied to varying levels of detail, but information on roost sites is sorely lacking. There are only a few significant known cave hibernacula in U tah. These sites do not begin to account for the abundance of bats observed in the state. The UBCC recognized that any appropriate response to WNS in Utah should start with a reasonable baseline of current known conditions. Thinking that cavers might have some information to offer, the UBCC decided to reach out to our allies in bat conservation, the cavers of the National Speleological Society. As a member of both organizations, I was asked to find a way for cavers to report bat sightings to the UBCC. Rather than ask grotto (caving club) chairpersons, I decided to create a Google Form where any caver could enter information at any time. The Utah Bat Habitat Survey form has fields for cave name, cave type, date of sighting, county, distance from cave entrance, number of bats observed, cave temperature, cave humidity, and responders contact information. All fields are voluntary. Cave locational information is sensitive, and tightly controlled by cavers and land managers alike. There was some concer n that cavers might feel threatened by an organization made up of mostly government employees asking for sensitive cave information. For this reason, the form only asks for the county where the cave is located. Unfortunately, throughout the history of the response to WNS, cavers have often been treated poorly by wildlife and land management agencies. Cavers have been one of the most valuable partners in protecting bats for many years before WNS. Cavers have long abided voluntary closures for hibernati on and maternity roosts. Cavers have provided volunteer services to agencies including bat surveys, building bat gates, cave restoration, and public education. It is regrettable that after cavers discovered WNS and reported it, that they were treated as pariahs by some agencies and shut out of the public resources that they love and long provided volunteer monitoring for. Even worse was when cavers began to be blamed as the cause of WNS by agencies in interviews with the media. In some cases, cavers were asked to provide lists and locations of caves in order to help the bats. Many cavers were dismayed when WBWG Newsletter, Spring 2014 Page 8

PAGE 9

these very same lists were used to close all caves across entire regions. The damage that has been done to caver/agency relations by heavy handed and misinformed management actions will take many years to heal. Keeping all this in mind, I knew that any further requests for information from cavers would have to be handled in a sensitive manner. I attended a joint meeting of the Utah Grottos and explained who the UBCC is and why they are collecting this information. I also explained that any and all participation is voluntary and will not be used as a hit list in order to close caves. The idea was well received once it was discussed and concerns alleviated. To date, response has been somewhat slow, but this is partly due to the annual slowdown in Utah caving due to winter conditions. Another hindrance has been trying to get more exposure for the link to the reporting form. I posted it on the U tah Cavers list serve, and presented it at the meeting, but I think for most folks it tends to fade from memory. I am currently working with the Salt Lake Grotto to get a link to the Bat Habitat Survey Form onto their home page. Even with these hurdles, 22 responses have already been submitted, providing the UBCC with valuable information on previously unknown bat roosts. I am hoping that with more promotion and visibility, the form will see more use, provide agencies with much needed data, and perhaps even help to repair the bridge of partnership between cavers and and natural resource managers. ~ Andy Armstrong C ANADA British Columbia Bats and Cavers Program Learning what constitutes critical winter habitat and normal hibernation behaviours for western bats will be fundamental to mitigating the devastating disease and facilitating future population recovery post White n ose Syndrome. Fourteen species of bats hibernate in western Canada; at least eight of these species hibernate but hibernacula have yet to be located. WCS Canada is developing a new program called Bats and Cavers. This program will be modelled on a similar and highly successful Montana program, where biologists teamed up with cavers to seek out new hibernacula and monitor bats for changes in population size, species diversity, and appearance of WNS disease. West Kootenay Search and Rescue member, together with caving guide, Kevin Stanway, explore a deep mine suspected of having hibernating bats in southern BC. This mine is now known to have at least 4 species overwintering, and while numbers seem large, an estimate has not yet been possible. Netting here during winter has captured free fl ying bats, including a big brown bat banded in Idaho. Photo: C. Lausen The premise of this program is twofold: 1) Need to locate more bat hibernacula, and caves are numerous and unexplored, especially during winter when bats are hibernating; 2 ) Would li ke to establish whether humans have already tracked the fungus into popular caving destinations in B.C. With regard to the latter, there are many caves popular in B.C. used by Canadians and foreign cavers. To date there has been little to no regulations on using gear in these caves and thus if the fungus causing White n ose Syndrome could possibly have been transferred already to this province it seems likely to show up in WBWG Newsletter, Spring 2014 Page 9

PAGE 10

these well used caves along well trodden paths. This project will hire a program co ordinator and develop a website specifically to connect the caving communities in BC, Alberta, Yukon and NWT, with western bat biologists. There are 2 basic arms of the Bats and Cavers Program: 1. Baseline fungal sediment testing of western caves; 2. D iscovery and monitoring of cave hibernacula. The former arm is already under way with soil samples being collected by cavers/biologists in BC and AB. These samples are being analyzed using fungal culture techniques in Dr. Ann Cheepthams lab (Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, BC), and will be genetically analyzed in the Animal Health Centre in Abbotsford, BC (Dr. Hein Snyman, Dr. Tomy Joseph, Dr. Chelsea Himsworth). Partners in this program include Ministry of Environment (Dr. Purnima Govindarajul u) and Ministry of Forest Lands and Natural Resource Operations (Dr. Helen Schwantje). Soil samples from several popular BC caves will be tested for the presence of WNS fungus ( Pseudogymnoascus destructans ). C ori Lausen, radiotracking a silver haired bat to a mine in West Kootenays. The bat was captured flying in January and roosted in a tree and a mine during the life of the transmitter. In the second arm of this program, cavers will deploy detectors, examine caves midwinter when possible, measure relative humidity/temperature in caves, take samples of guano, photos of bats or bat sign such as bones/skeletons, etc. In November I presented this program at the Alberta Speleological Society AGM, and BC Speleological Federation AGM in April, and collaborators to date include Greg Horne, Dave Hobson, Nicholas Vieira, Martin Davis, Phil Whitfield, Kathleen Graham, Richard Varela, Jeremy Bruns, Kevin Stanway, along with a number of other cavers who have expressed interest in becoming involved. We hope to know about funding this summer/fall allowing us to have a fully functioning program in time for next winter. Cori Lausen Two Townsends big eared bats found hibernating in a mine in West Kootenays, B.C. Photo: C. Lausen. Winter Bat Research Continues in B.C. I have continued to do bat monitoring, with the help of many colleagues, across southern B.C. This winter s monitoring program was less intensive than usual, focussing mostly on the West Kootenay region of B.C. With the help of the caving groups in BC and AB, some Titley Roostlogger s were deployed in caves and mines this past winter. A new mine hibernaculum containing 40 kHz myotis bats was found, and many roostloggers still have WBWG Newsletter, Spring 2014 Page 10

PAGE 11

yet to be retrieved as the snow is preventing ac cess in high altitudes. There are few locations known in BC where 40 kHz Myotis overwinter, and thus I will be following up on these this coming winter. One of our largest mine hibernacula (3 species, ~50 bats) was gat ed in June 2013, and during wint er I verified that all 3 species continued to use the mine: Californian myotis, T ownsends big e ared bat, and silver haired bats. I tracked the latter species using temperature sensitive transmitters to describe their hibernation/arousal patterns. After 2 winters of tracking I now have enough data to proceed with a publication to describe the winter roosting characteristics and arousal patterns of silver haired bats. Finally, I have been compiling microclimate data from known winter bat roosts in BC and A lberta (A B ) thanks to collaborators in AB, N orthwest T erritories, and BC. Ideally it would be great to collaborate with others in western North America to combine datasets on microclimates assuming that many people have small sample sizes for a few speci es -together a large collaborative publication could advance what we know about winter roost conditions in the west. Let me know if you are interested in coauthoring such a synthesis paper. The next step would be to take these microclimate conditions into disease modelling that I will be doing with WCS Wildlife Health program (Bozeman, MT office); these WNS survivorship models will be adapted from those currently being developed by collaborator David Hayman, Smith Fellow, Univ of Colorado. Cori Lausen C ori Lausen monitored Queen Victoria mine in West Kootenays this winter; pictured detector is Titley Roostlogger and the Anabat Express prototype being tested. Photo: C. Lausen. Gating of Queen Victoria mine in BC. Gating crew consisted largely of members of the Canadian Cave Conservancy (led by Search and Rescue and Wildlife Enclosure design expert Steve Blackmore of Kamloops, BC). Photo: Angus Glass, Nelson, BC. WBWG Newsletter, Spring 2014 Page 11

PAGE 12

Longeared Complex Genetic Samples Requested Long eared myotis ( M. evotis /M. keenii ). The long standing project to resolve the taxonomy of Keens Myotis is coming to a close. The final year of sampling will take place this summer. Karen Blejwas of AK Fish and Game is funding the completion of this project and will be collecting samples in southeast AK, along with providing field assistance in Haida Gwaii. Doug Burles of Kamloops, BC and Cori Lausen will be capturing and genetically sampling bats in Haida Gwaii and Hazelton. Cori, Leigh Anne Isaac (Kimberley, BC) and Brandon Klug (University of Regina) will be sampling a few other BC locations. Genetic samples of longeared bats from elsewhere in the province or in neighboring US states, would be a welcome addition! Please contact Cori, clausen@wc s.org Thanks! ~ Cori Lausen Got Bats? The Got Bats? network in BC is being initiated this year modelled on the successful Kootenay Community Bat Project and South Coast Bat Action Team initiatives. Funded by the Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation, this network of 10 community bat projects in BC includes Greater Victoria, Saltspring Island, South Coast, Sunshine Coast, Lillooet, Okanagan, West Kootenay, East Kootenay, Peace and Skeena regions of BC. The objectives of this project are to: 1) Increase detection of bat roosts in anthropogenic structures through a public education, targeted information solicitation and a reporting program called Got Bats? 2) Decrease destruction of bat roosts by encouraging landowners to either protect the roost site or us e bat friendly exclusion methods and installation of alternative roost features 3) Initiate baseline bat population assessment using the Annual Bat Count, a Citizen Science program at multiple sites around BC 4) Enhance bat habitat in human altered landscapes through installation and monitoring of bat houses. The network will promote a provincial toll free number (1 855 9BC BATS) and website ( www.bcbats.ca ) for bat reports and communications. ~ Juliet Craig and Purnima Govindarajulu Kootenay Community Bat Project The Kootenay Community Bat Project (KCBP) is busy again this year doing outreach activities and landowner visits. Funded by the Columbia Basin Trust and the Columbia Valley Local Conservation Fund, the project will build on its success. During its five y ears of activity (200406; 2012present), the KCBP has visited almost 500 private properties to work with landowners who have bat issues, identify the species present, and provide educational material. The KCBP is also promoting the Annual Bat Count, a cit izen science initiative to monitor bat populations. In addition, the program delivers community presentations and, in partnership with Wild WBWG Newsletter, Spring 2014 Page 12

PAGE 13

Voices for Kids, dozens of school programs each year. Educators participating in Bat Workshop for Educators hos ted by the Kootenay Community Bat Project. Because of the high demand for school programs, particularly around Halloween, the KCBP hosted a Bat Workshop for Educators this April. Twenty enthusiastic educators from around the Columbia Basin attended this weekend event which included mist netting with Dr. Cori Lausen, participating in an Annual Bat Count, and 1 days of classroom activities. As a result, there is now a trained bat educator in every region of the south east portion of BC who is able to del iver bat school programs. The KCBP is continuing the Building Homes for Bats program which encourages landowners to build and install bat houses on their property by reimbursing the cost of materials. Funded by the Public Conservation Assistance Fund, t he program requires a landowner to install at least two bat houses to compare a feature (e.g. aspect, style, colour) and then report on success of occupancy. In order to be reimbursed, the landowner is required to submit photos of the installed bat houses. To learn more about the Kootenay Community Bat Project and its programs, see www.kootenaybats.com ~ Juliet Craig Genetic Identification of Myotis Now Commercially Available in BC Wildlife Genetics International ( wildlifegenetics.ca ) is now offering identification of Myotis genetic samples. WGI is based in Nelson BC and has over a decade of experience using mitochondrial DNA to identify species. Within western Canadian Myotis we have used pellet and other samples to positively identify M. septentrionalis and M. yumanensis although extreme mitochondrial diversity within M. lucifugus would dictate more involved multilocus methods to separate that species from M. evotis/M. keenii in some situations. Local reference samples of known species identity analyzed at no charge. Please call or email in advance to discuss sample col lection and storage methods. David Paetkau S OUTHEASTERN BAT DIVERSITY NETWORK (S BDN) BAT BLITZ COMMITTEE SEEKS ADDITIONAL PARTICIPA NTS! As most of you probably know, SBDN has had yearly bat blitzes since 2002. Check out our past blitzes page for informa tion ( http://sbdn.org/past_blitzes.html ). This year is the first time since the beginning of our blitzes that we have not had a dedicated blitz host. This is primarily due to the economic uncer tainty of federal and state budgets in the last couple years. The good news is, we have a great prospect for a traditional blitz in 2015. Instead of skipping 2014, the SBDN Bat Blitz Committee decided to hold a multi state blitz effort. We ask that each participating state net at least 2 nights during the period of Sept. 4th 10th, 2014. We certainly dont expect you to organize a big event like the traditional blitzes! No effort is too small. Even one team out netting is some information. But we hope that states will take the opportunity to get WBWG Newsletter, Spring 2014 Page 13

PAGE 14

together and survey some areas of your st ate t h at may be lacking information. If you or additional folks in your state would like more info please contact me ( katrina.morris@dnr.state.ga.us ) Were really excited about this oppor tunity and hope you will be able to participate! Thanks! The SBDN Bat Blitz Committee ~ submitted by Trina Morris (GA Dept. of Natural Resources) NORTH AMERICAN BAT MONITORING PROGRAM UPDATE The North American Bat Monitoring Program (NABat) is still planning several pilot studies the summer of 2014 (June, July, and August) to test out the protocols and the proposed study design. Many states and agencies have already contacted the team letting them know they are interested in helping out. The NABat plan went through its first peer review and is in draft form for pilot participants to look over. We are currently working out the kinks of the master sample of grid cells to survey. We will be contacting everyone who volunteered to participate in late spri ng and early summer with how to proceed with their pilot surveys by providing the draft protocols and the ordered list of grid cells to survey for their state or land management areas. For more information, please contact Laura Ellison ( ellisonl@usgs.gov ). ~ Laura Ellison PDF CORNER The PDF Corner lists recent openaccess publications that may be of interest to WBWG members. If you come across a full text online publication that you think should be listed here, please send the link to lorraine.Andrusiak@keystonewildlife.com Silvis, A., Kniowski, A. B., Gehrt, S. D., & Ford, W. M. (2014). Roosting and Foraging Social Structure of the Endangered Indiana Bat ( Myotis sodalis ). PloS one, 9 (5), e96937. http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0096937.g001 Erickson, Richard A., Wayne E. Thogmartin, and Jennifer A. Szymanski. "BatTool: an R package with GUI for assessing the effect of Whitenose syndrome and other take events on Myotis spp. of bats." Source Code for Biology & Medicine 9.1 (2014). http://www.scfbm.org/content/pdf/1751 -04739 -9.pdf Gregory G. Turner, Carol Uphoff Meteyer, Hazel Barton, John F. Gumbs, DeeAnn M. Reeder, Barrie Natlia Martnkov, Jiri Pikula, Jan Zukal, and David S. Blehert (2014) Nonlethal screening of bat -wing skin with the use of ultraviolet fluorescence to detect lesions indicative of white-nose syndrome. Journal of Wildlife Diseases In -Press. http://jwildlifedis.org/doi/pdf/10.7589/2014-03058 Jung, Thomas S. "Attempted predation of a diurnally active Spotted Bat ( Euderma maculatum ) by a Belted Kingfisher ( Megaceryle alcyon )." The Canadian FieldNaturalist 127.4 (2014): 346-347. http://www.canadianfieldnaturalist.ca/cfn/index.php/cf n/article/viewFile/1517/1535 Neubaum, D., K. Navo, and J. Siemers. "Recommendations for Defining Biologically Important Bat Roosts in Colorado Related to Local Population Persistence." http://www.cnhp.colostate.edu/teams/zoology/cbwg/ Basil, Gladrene Sheena, and Juliet Vanitharani. 2014. "An Extensive Review of Methods of Identification of Bat Species through Acoustics." International Journal of Computer Applications Technology and Research 3.4: 186-192. http://www.ijcat.com/archives/volume3/issue4/ijcatr03 041001.pdf Coleman, L. S., Ford, W. M., Dobony, C. A., & Britzke, E. R. (2014). Effect of passive acoustic sampling methodology on detecting bats after declines from white nose syndrome. Journal of Ecology and The Natural Environment, 6(2), 56-64. http://www.academicjournals.org/journal/JENE/articlefull -text -pdf/859932242855 WBWG Newsletter, Spring 2014 Page 14

PAGE 15

Fritsch, G., & Bruckner, A. (2014). Operator bias in software aided bat call identification. Ecology and Evolution http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ece3.1122/f ull UPCOMING EVENTS Canada Canadian Wind Energy Association (CANWEA) CanWEAs Annual Conference 2014 is being held October 2729, 2014 in Montreal, Quebec Annual Conference 2015 is being held October 5 8, 2015 in Toronto, Ontario http://www.canwea.ca/events/index_e.php USA The Wildlife Society 21st Annual Conference, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, October 25 30, 2014 http://www.wildlife.org/conferences Southwestern Desert Bats Class October 10 12, 2014 Desert Studies Center at Soda Springs (Zzyzx) south of Baker, CA http://biology.fullerton.edu/dsc/ (T hen click on the Maturango Museum Southwestern Desert Bats hotlink for the pdf with class details and registration information) 63rd Annual Wildlife Disease Association International Conference July 27 August 1, 2014, Albuquerque, New Mexico http://www.wildlifedisease.org/wda/CONFE RENCES/AnnualInternationalConference.as px AWEA Offshore WINDPOWER Conference & Exhibition, October 7 8, 2014, Atlantic City, NJ http://www.offshorewindexpo.org/ North American Symposium for Bat Research Annual Meeting, October 22 25, 2014, Albany, NY http://www.nasbr.org/pdfs/Albany_NASBR_ 2014.pdf Elsewhere 4th International Berlin Bat Meeting: Movement ecology of bats 13th 15th March 2015 in Berlin, Germany http://www.izw berlin.de/welcome197.html National Bat Conference University of Warwick, 5 7 September 2014. http://www.bats.org.uk/pages/national_bat_ conference.html WBWG Newsletter, Spring 2014 Page 15

PAGE 16

THE VINTAGE BAT WBWG Newsletter, Spring 2014 Page 16


Description
In memorium -
Elizabeth (Dixie) Pierson --
State/Provincial updates: USA: Arizona Artificial Bat
Roosts in Bridges in an Extreme Climate; Colorado Bats and
the Southern Great Plains Rapid Ecoregional Assessment ; Utah -
Utah Bat Conservation Cooperative and Utah Cavers ; Canada,
British Columbia Bats and Cavers Program --
Winter Bat Research Continues in B.C. --
Long-eared Complex Genetic Samples Requested --
Got Bats? --
Kootenay Community Bat Project --
Genetic Identification of Myotis Now Commercially
Available in BC --
Southeastern Bat Diversity Network (SBDN) Bat Blitz
Committee Seeks Additional Participants! --
North American Bat Monitoring Program Update --
PDF corner --
Upcoming events --
The vintage bat.