Citation
The oracle

Material Information

Title:
The oracle
Uniform Title:
The Oracle (Tampa, Fla)
Creator:
Wright, Sandra (Editor)
Moormann, Dave (Managing editor)
Wallace, Tom (Advertising manager)
Place of Publication:
Tampa, FL
Publisher:
University of South Florida
Creation Date:
January 4, 1973
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 online resource (16 pages)

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
University of South Florida -- Newspapers ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )

Notes

General Note:
The Oracle continues Tampa times (USF Campus edition) and is continued by USF oracle.
General Note:
Published history is Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 6, 1966) -- Vol. 23, no. 144 (Oct. 22, 1987)

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of South Florida
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
029781466 ( ALEPH )
08750603 ( OCLC )
O12-00241 ( USFLDC DOI )
o12.241 ( USFLDC Handle )

USFLDC Membership

Aggregations:
The Oracle

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Format:
Newspaper

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PAGE 1

Special legislative session called TALLAHASSEE, (UPI) Gov. Reubin Askew called a one day special session yesterday for next week, seeking arriendments in the law so that Special Prosecutor T. Edward Austin can try former Education Com missioner Floyd Christian. Askew called the session for Tuesday when legislators will already be at the capitol to be sworn in and organize them selves for the next two years. He said his executive order, which will contain specific information on bills the Legislature can consider, will be issued later. It will be the eighth special session Askew has called in his four yeai.-s as governor. The last one was in January, when legislators ignored his request that they exempt Florida from daylight savings time. THE FIRST State Court of Appeals overturned the in dictment of Christian last week, maintaining that Askew's assignment of Austin was illegal and that Christian was improperly quizzed before the grand jury by assistants to Austin. Newly -elected Sen. Edgar Dunn Jr., D-Daytona Beach, former legal counsel to the governor, is already working on legislation to change the law for assignment of state attorneys. He met with President-elect Demp sey Barron, D-Panama City, yesterday. Dunn said the bill, which leaders plan to push through the Senate first, will not undertake major changes but merely "restore the status quo. The bill would permit the governor to assign outside state attorneys to another area without disqualifying the local prosecutor. It would also permit the state attorney so assigned to Projected utility debt l may hit $150,000 here on the best information available," USF is facing a projected utility deficit of up to $150,000 this year, Assistant Vice President for Administration, Bob Wallace said yesterday. However, Wallace said he feels any difference between the $973,000 allocated to USF for utility consumption and the actual bill will be covered by a $3-million dollar Department of Administration reserve set up to cover cost overruns instate agencies. PHYSICAL PLANT Director Charles Butler is in Tallahassee today presenting a report on USF's utility expense so far this year, and an estimate on what the final bill will be. Wallace said he hopes the University will be able to reduce the budget by reducing consumption of on campus Butler has said the Administration Department's reserve was originally set up to cover price, rather than consumption, increases. It would be difficult to cut consumption here because of the addition of the Medical Center and Classroom Building A as well as a 1,200ton "chiller'', used in the air conditioning system, to the USF utility system this year, he said USF's final utility bill will not be totaled until the end of this fiscal year, Wallace said. bring along as many assistants ai necessary to aid in the in vestigation. THE BILL .would also permit a state attorney and one or more ol his assistants to be .in the grand jury room at the same ti.me. The Appeal Court said Austin could have been assigned to assist State Attorney Harry Morrison of Tallaha ssee in the Christian investigation, but not to take over the Christian probe without disqualifying l\llorrison, It said Austin had .no authority to bring along assistants Robert Willis and Aaron Bowden who did much of the investigatory work on Christi!:ln; and.it said on,ly_ one at a tirr.ie, not .two or all three should have questioned Christian before the jlirors .. Bob Wallace ... conservation needed The initiation of energy saving measures at USF a year before the state requested all agencies to begin similar programs should be given special consideration in the reallocation of reserve funds, Wallace said. No '1serious' flaws found If the cost overruns are not covered by the Adminis tration Depart ment reserve "We will have to come up with more energy savings programs" to cut down the utility bill, he said. He said, because the Physical Plant budget is separate from other funds on campus, it will be difficult to cut back programs in other areas to make up the deficit. during hiring investigation WHEN BUTLER GETS back from Tallahasse 'we'll know more or less how we stand in respect to getting funds reallbcated to cover our deficit," Wallace said. The addition of the Medical Center and Classroom Building A has not increased the University's deficit because the money is allocated on a square-footage-in-use basis, Wallace said. Looking for a book bargain BY DAVID RUSS Oracle Staff Writer After an inspection of about 35 personnel files, a state official yesterday indicated there are no "serious problems" in USF hiring procedures, John Weicherding, director of Per sonnel, said q Ordc1e pnoto oy Mary Lovinfosse At the USF Women's Club bazaar books at bargain prices for the one -or which lasts through tomorrow, student ones -which captures his interest. Ron Fox studies the titles of the many Allen Chapman, examination supervisor for the Florida Department of Personnel : n::.: .. v. campus tbls weekend ... ...... : 6 :=;::'. .. VOLLEYlJALl team .. loses to Flagler .. College .... :

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2-THE ORACLE November 15, 1974 Ford demands action on VP pick PHOENIX Pres. Ford called on Congress yesterday to "fish or cut bait" on Nelson Rockefeller's vice presidential nomination before the end of the year, and declared he has no intention of asking for the resignation of Chairperson George H. Brown of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. In a speech and a questioning session at a national convention of Sigma Delta Chi, honorary journalism society, Ford declared that Congress should act now on Rockefeller's nomination He said the nomination should be approved before adjournment of the post-election session which begins Monday. From the Wires of United Press International Gold up, dollar down BRUSSELS -Gold soared to an all-time high of $191 an ounce on the London bullion exchange yesterday. As gold went up the U.S. dollar went down, reaching a seven-month low in Zurich. Gold reached the $191 figure before settling at $188.25 at the official afternoon price fixing. It had reached a previous high of $186 on Wednesday. Dealers said the dollar's weakness and the U.S. Federal Reserves decision to pump $750 million back into the American banking system touched off the gold rush. They said another factor was West German Chancellor Helmut Schmidt's recent statement that he would not object to a further revaluation upward of the Deutchmark as a means of reducing West Germany's huge balance of payment surplus. The remark sent speculators rushing to buy up all the gold they could get. "Heavy demand-much of it speculative-has boosted the metal up from its overnight level of $186." a dealer said. Prices to be higher WASHINGTON Contrary to expectations of an easing of in flation, the wholesale price index jumped 2.3 per cent in October, the government said yesterday. The higher wholesale prices mean higher prices for con sumers. The surge in wholesale prices came at a time when pressure has increased on the Ford ad m in i strati on to direct the government attack more directly at recession instead of inflation. The October rise was more than double the September in crease of 1 per cent, a modest rise that 'Jed some administration officials to express the belief that inflationary pressures were easing. PLO guards accilsed LONDON -The London Evening Standard said yesterday that three Palestine Liberation Organization guards in PLO leader Yasser Arafat's New York entourage were principally responsible for the assassination of two U.S. and a Belgian envoy in Khartoum in March, 1973. It said confirmation of the report is causing embarrassment among United States and United Nations security officials. Jury finds Prevatt guilty of tax evasion TAMP A -A Federal court jury found former Hillsborough County Commissioner Clarence E. Prevatt guilty yesterday of 10 counts of income tax evasion. The jury found the funeral home operator guilty of in tentionally not reporting income allegedly received from his two funeral homes operated in Pinellas County and with not reporting profits from two land transactions and the sale of some stock. U.S. Circuit Court Judge John A. Reed ordered a pre-sentence investigation for Prevatt, who faces a maximum of 38 years in prison and fines of up to $70,000. 'Unity talks' to begin TALLAHASSEE Florida's two teacher organizations, locked in a fight over who will represent the most teachers, each an nounced steps yesterday to strengthen their positions. The Florida Education Association said it will begin "unity talks" with the American Federation of Teachers, an AFL CIO affiliate, a major step toward merger of the organizations Proceedings stop TALLAHASSEE -All court proceedings involving criminal charges against State Treasurer Tom O'Malley, former Sen. George Hollahan of Miami and Clearwater architect Walter Melody have been halted because of the doubt cast over the validity -------------------1 Rolling 201: HOW TO ROLL BETTER I I Required Textbocklet: e-z wider Prof. E. Z. Jay I I I 2 1 1 I I I / I I Fold the paper (approx. 1" ") at lhe end that I isn't gummed. Sprinkle tobacco into this Hold both halves of lhe paper, cradling the I fold. Put more at the ends than in the midtobacco with your thumbs closest to I die Close the paper over the tobacco. Bui you and your second clnd third fingers in 1 don't tuck it in back of the tobacco just yet. back. I I I I I I When the tobacco is shaped and packed: I I pinch the tobacco and the paper at the cen I Spin the tobacco by sliding the paper back ter so that when you start to roll. the paper I and forth a number of timM. will guide itself around the tobacco. I I I i 5. 6.(1,t/ i I I I Roll the cigarette tightly, beginning at the Lick the gummed edge closed. Trim loose I center: and by pulling, work your fingers out tobacco from the ends. The cigarette is now I to the ends. ready to smoke. I I This course is open to both beginning and advanced I I students of hand-rolled cigarettes: Emphasis is on I easier, better rolling via the use of E-Z Wider I double-width rolling papers. The course exposes the I disadvantages of conventional rolling practices such I as sticking two regular papers together to roll one I smoke. Students will learn that there is no better I gummed paper made than E-Z Wider. I f ruben burton a"ul' .. ltd. ne\lo lllHIO ----------------------The Oracle Is the. official student-edited newspaper of the University of South Fklrida and Is published four limes weekly, Tuesday through Friday, during the academic year period September through mid-June; twice during the academic year period mid-June through August, by the University of South Florida, 4202 Fowler Ave., Tampa, Fla. 33620. Opinions expressed in the Oracle are those of the editors or of the writer and not those of the University of South Florida. Address correspondence to the Oracle, LET 472, Tampa, Fla. 33620 .. Second class postage paid at Tampa, Fla. The Oracle reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all advertisements and revise or turn away copy ii considers objectionable. Programs, activities and facilities of the University of South Florida are available to all on a non.discriminatory basis, without regard to race, color, religion, sex, age or national origin. The University is an affi1mative action Equal Opportunity Employer. From the Wires. of United Press International of the assignment of the prosecutor who got the in dictments. Circuit Court Judge John Rudd said yesterday he has canceled the arraignment of O'Malley, set for Monday, where he was to have entered a formal plea of innocent to charges of taking $50,000 in kickbacks in return for state favors. Buick stingy on gas DAYTONA BEACH Professional drivers put a dozen 1975 automobiles in the 4,000pound class through their paces yesterday and a Buick Skylark with a V6 engine proved to be the stingiest on gasoline. The compact Buick scored best of the 12 in all three phases of the tests getting 14.5 miles per gallon under city conditions, 20 m.p.g. in the suburban phase and 20.9 m.p.g. under expressway con ditions. IMPORT m 0 I 0 R P Q R l S 11" 410 No. Dale Mabry Rd. Tampa, Florida 876-7021 f 10 per cent discount 'with this coupon: In the beginning there was foldedhornbassreflexacousticsuspension. THE STEREO GO ROUND Now offers BIC VENTURI For years speaker designers have oeen juggling the characteristics they wanted from speakers. They tried folded horns, the bass reflex, the labyrinth and the most recent favorite, the acoustic suspension. All of them had corresponding compromises. Today's most advanced speaker--BIC VENTURI--encompasses all of the sought after characteristics: compact size, high efficiency, high power handling and accuracy. The principle that makes all this possible is the"Venturi" principle of fluid motion transformation reapplied in a form better suited to acoustics. A scientifically-fomulated Ventur,i coupled path delivers up to 140 times more bass energy than comes directly from the woofer. In addition, the bass is reinforced broadly over the low frequency spectrum, rather than at a single tuned frequency. BIC VENT\JRi That was thebegin ning. The BIC VENTURI principle is just one of four other major developments in these speakers that makes this the era of BIC VENTURI. We have three models to prove it. 4237 W. Kennedy (near Lois J Mon.Fri. 930 -9 Sat. 930-6 4962 Busch Plaza l next to Proud Lion J Mon.Fri. Noon-9 Sat. 930-6 Formula 2 Stereo Go Round

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Oracle photo by Mary Lovinfosse Knowledge being borrowed With books lining its shelves, the USF Library is the haven for many knowledge-hungry students. Here, a shelf is inade slightly lighter by the removal of a text while its contents remain to be shared. Light at Palm, Oak to be repaired soon The traffic lights at Oak and South Palm should be repaired "within a couple of days," University Police (UP) Traffic Coordinator Otto Meerbott said yesterday. The lights were pulled down Tuesday when a boom truck was driven through the intersection with its lift boom partially ex tended. An outside contractor has been hired by the Physical Plant to repair the lights. UP Public Information and Education Director Max Bromley said the driver of the truck, Weldon Parry, has been charged with a load violation. Bromley said he has no idea how much the light repairs will cost. Robert Kraemer, Physical Plant supervisor of Maintenance, said his department was called to turn off the power when the lights went down, but responsiblity for repairs is left to other areas of the Physical Plant. PRESENTS Tues & all brands .75 Wed. all night long ELDERS The best progressive musical group to perform here -seen at Street Dance -Thurs. thru Sun. THE ORACLE-November 15, 1974 Campus alcohol policy will be completed today Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs Dan Walbolt, said he will finish drafting a set of general guidelines today allowing students, faculty and staff to drink alcohol at private gatherings on campus. Walbolt said he will a wait for more "logistical from Housing Director Ray King before formally announcing the plan, but said several qualifications will have to be met before alcohol may be served at any on-campus gatherings. The gatherings may not last for Dave Heinz Imports Sales Service Parts 238-8485 1101 E. Hillsborough Ave. CBA 103 more than one hour he said. And all liquor must be "checked-in" with food service personnel who will serve and assure "quality control," he said. "We haven t ever done this before," he said The gatherings must supply their own alcohol he said. None will be sold, and none of the gatherings can be open to the public. A final plan for the program will be drawn up by next week, Walbolt said. "It's something we've long needed," he said. on a regular Blood Plasma Program ... and receive Dan Walbolt change 'needed' oppoinfment available to fit your class schedule! Hours 8 am ta 2:30 pm HYLAND DONOR CENTER 238 W. Kennedy Phone 253-2844 Monday, Nov. 18th 2 P.M. "The Chinese People, 1974" A Personal Encounter A lecture with slides by: REV. WILLARD UPHAUS Director World Fellowship of Faith 3ponsored by the University Lecture Series !' ; \ ... ) .. I> ;, .:.. J 3

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4-THE ORACLE November 15, 1974 Affirmative action needed now Whether USF officials like it or not, the doctrine of separate but equal was shot down by the U.S. Supreme Court 20 years ago. And the Congress in 1972, through adoption of Title IX, made it clear that this applies to sex discrimination as well as classification by race. We feel the law speaks for itself but perhaps the Athletic Department is hard of hearing. Intramural sports still are divided into three classifications, which are apparently based on sex rather than skill. AT THE beginning of the quarter, the Intramutal offerings were listed under three categories: untitled, untitled and coed. It is not hard to guess the inferences would-be participants were likely to Q.raw. Now, however, in the "Recreational Sports Newsletter," published through the University to update Intramural sports information, the old men and women classifications are again in use. But the Athletic Department now has graciously invited any interested women to participate in the sports set primarily for men. Although no similar invitation has been extended to men, Student Senator Jay Welch has written his own. The only male in the billiards tournament, which he has said he was advised not to enter by those signing-up competitors, is showing the world will not fall apart if competition is based solely on skill. The Oracle thanks Welch for his stand. And we thank the Student Senate and the Tampa chapter of the National Organization for Women (NOW) for their interest in equality; the two organizations have requested the Department of Health, Education and Welfare investigate the athletic program to see if it is discriminatory. WELCH HAS said the investigation was initiated only after changes 1n the athletic program were sought through available USF channels. That, we feel, is a statement heard too often on this campus. All too frequently University groups are forced to turn outside USF (to the attorney, the attorney general or the to clear up an in-house matter. The Oracle urges Athletic Director ORACLE ACP All-American since 1967 SDX Mark of Excellence 1972 ANPA Pacemaker Award 1967, 1969 Editor ... ................. Sandra Wright Advertising Manager ......... Tom Wallace Managing Editor ......... Dave Moormann News Editor .... ..... ... .. Wayne Sprague Entertainment Editor ........ Ellie Sommer Sports Editor ........... ... Rindy Weatherly Editor .................. Matt Bokor Copy Ed!tor ............... Luanne Kitchin Wire Editor ........ ...... Larry Viane110 PhOto Editor . . Mark Sherman Illustration Edltor ....... Terry Kirkpatrick Librarian ......... .... ......... Anna 8010 Adviser .... ... ... ...... ... Leo Stalnaker Advertising Coordinator .... Harry Daniels Produdion Manager ......... Joe McKen1ie ................. Kim Hackbarth DEADLINES: General news 2 p.m. daily for following day issue Advertising (with proof) Thursday noon for Tuesday, Monday noon for Thursday. Deadlines extended one day without proof. Classified ads taken 8 a.m.-12 noon two days before publication in petson or by mail. with payment enclosed Advertising rates on request, 974-2620, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m .-5 p.m. Stories and pictures of interest to students may be submitted to the Oracle in LAN 469 or through the suggestion boxes in the Library and UC. editorials "The dodrine of separate but equal has no place in our system. Separate facilities are inherently unequal.'' -Earl Warren Richard Bowers to take a good look at Title IX of the 1972 Education Amend ments Act and then take a long look at the Intramural program. We then suggest he look at the athletic scholarships given for women, the schools to which coaches go seeking recruits and the job specifications within his department. Although the HEW interpretations of the law will not go into effect until Jan. 1, the law is in effect now. Saying "we will comply when we know what to comply with" is no good; the law is there and at least two groups feel the violations are here. It is time for USF to act before an outside agency may step in with a mandate Richard Bowers Jay Welch .. review needed now showing the way ''WHICH WA.S Tf'IAT MASl-
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THE ORACLE-November 15, 1974 5 Officer explains role of police BY MAX BROMLEY University Police What is the Division of Public Safet y at USF ? What i s the role of the University Police on this campus ? These two questions are frequently asked here in the USF community This commentary has been prepared to provide the campus community with a better understanding of the overall operation and realm of respon sibilities of the "UP." USF's Division of Public Safety is designed to serve, protect and assist the students, employes and guests of the univer sity The "public safety" concept is one which is emerging not only at this university but at other academic institutions and municipalities as well. The elimination of campus en vironmental hazards as related to the protection and preser vation of life and property in the academic community is a basic tenet of the public safety concept. THE FUNCTIONS performed by the Division of Public Safety are divided among three departments The departments are: the Department of Police; the Department of Traffic ; and the Department of Safety. For purposes of this statement, the Department of Police and its tasks shall be elaborated on. Historically speaking, it wasn't too long ago that Uni versity Police were little more than watchmen. This "watchman style" was primarily concerned with avoiding trouble and following the path of least resistance The principle role of patrolmen in such a style would be maintaining order by not rocking the boat. This particular approach to campus law en forcement ( or non-enforcement) may have been appropriate at one time or at particular cam puses. However, given a ur banized, expanding community such as one finds at USF, the watchman style does not appear to be the best method for helping to insure a safe, secure at mosphere For a number of years, universities in general were thought to be virtual havens, immune from thefts and assaultive type behavior. This myth seems to be dispelled, if one examines the current criminal activity trends at various universities. USF is not exempt from crime problems that occur in a community of similar size and composition. For example, in the first nine months of 1974, over 600 criminal offenses were reported to the University Police representing a personal property loss of approximately $45,000. In Qtr. 1 of this academic year over 140 offenses have been reported representing a loss of nearly $13,000. Offenses reported range from petty larceny to armed robbery THESE FIGURES are cited not to scare anyone or to suggest that USF is in the midst of a "crime wave, but rather they are presented to make the public aware of what activities take place in this community The documentation of criminal ac tivity is essential in planning the style of policing to be utilized in responding to the universities needs It seems evident that the police at USF must be more t han security guards or wat c hmen. The Florida Legislature recognized this fact sev e r a l y e a rs IUtst commtntary ago and took action to remedy the situation Florida Statute 239.58 declares that university police will be commissioned as law enforcement officers in this state Thus, USF Police have the full authority of other police agencies in Florida Consequently all University Police officers must satisfy police minimum dards, including attendance at the 400-hour police academy. In order to provide a more professional response to the complex needs of an academic community, the USF Department of Police has recently made the attainment of an A.A. or A.S. degree a minimum requirement for a police Officers ace strongly encouraged to continue their higher education while in police service. The average level of academic achievement for police personnel is now over two years of college Many officers have already received a four-year degree and several are pursuing advanced degrees here at USF Officers are also enrolled in in-service training programs and seminars to be kept abreast of current law enforcement practi ces. AS WAS mentioned previously, the University Police has as its responsibility the maintenance of public safety and security to help insure the orderly pursuits of the academic community The duties for the University Police include all which would be performed at a similar-sized municipal police department. With a service or i entation the University Police seeksto provide prompt responses to its citizenry. Highly visible car and foot patrols are utilized to assure adequate coverage of the large campus area. Three separate patrol shifts work round the clock to meet the needs of the university population. The patrol division is the backbone of any police organization and is therefore continually engaged in the identification and apprehension of offenders The patrol section is supplemented by full-time detectives who are responsible for follow-up investigations of crimes reported to the police. Frequently, the arrest of an alleged offender is the result of close work between these two divisions of any police depart ment. Yet it is only a partial answer to have a well trained patrol and investigative staff. Crime is not merely a police problem, rather it is a complex community issue that requires police-citizen interaction in order to be dealt with effectively. Without the necessary cooperation of citizens within the university community, the police are hampered The University prides itself on the record of safety maintained on campus, but effective safety and protection require the cooperation and assistance of all members of the University community. CITIZENS MUST assume their responsibliity in crime prevention. The University Police is attempting to educate the public as to their role in prevention. The first step is to heighten the awareness of the community concerning criminal acti vity on campus Therefore, an extensive campaign is underwa y to inform all members of the University about crime and encourage citizens to report suspicious and crimianl activity Project ALERT
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6-THE ORACLE November 15, 1974 Gene Kelly plays swashbuckler in film classic 1The Pirate' Editor's note: A trio of 'MGM classics will be presented this weekend by the Film Aris Series. Following are three separate articles about the films. All showings are al 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. in the Engineering Auditorium. Tickets are Sl. Tonight: "Singin' in the Rain," Tomorrow: "The Pirate," Sunday: "The Band Wagon" Heviewed by ELLIE SOMMER Entertainment Editor For a film made in 1948, "The Pirate" screens like a 1974 original. The MGM classic stars the multi-talented Gene Kelly and the beautiful Judy Garland. Musicals are notoriously uninteresting in plot and dialogue. "Pirate" is an exception. The lines, perhaps because the film is dated, are witty a:nd sharp. The pace is fast. The songs do not dominate the 102-minute film. They are carefully and succinctly placed as part of the plot, rather than a break from the action, as in most musicals. "Pirate'! will capture any viewer with the slightest in clination toward romanticism. As unrealistic as most musicals, "Pirate" offers an emotional fantasy for those who wish to become involved. For the less amorous, the classic is a superbly photographed piece of cinematic art, displaying the best .in song and dance. The fantasy is achieved without the slightest hint of corny sen timentality. Directed by Vincente Minhelli, "Pirate" is based on an S. N. Behrman play. The songs are the work of Cole Porter. IVJinnelli uses only stage scenery rbuildings, streets and platforms), except for one brilliant shot of the Caribbean Sea. But there are no fake back drops to increase the un believable elements of the film. Bright and clashing costume col<; rs make up for the lack of foli;:ige and countryside. :Tia! fJJk:e I Free Draft Beer Fri. 15 Nov. Starts 8:30p.m. ti/ 9:30p.m. All Draft Beer From 1 :OOp.m. ti/ 11 :OOp.m. )f(Across from Northgate Shopping Center 8872 N. Florida Ave. Gene Kelly gets a few rainy days .. in a film spoof on the.late '20s. ********************************************** Songs. highlight MGM film Jewish Student Uiiion Reviewed by DAVID RUTMAN Entertainment Writer A delightful diversion is provided by MGM's classic musical, "Singin' in the Rain." Made in the days when movies were supposed to be for fun, "Singin' in the Rain" is one of the most enjoyable, providing first class singing and dancing. The title tune is especially memorable and infectious. Once heard, the melodies stay with viewers for hours. Gene Kelly's choreography and performance are as memorable as the songs. Kelly and his co-star, Donald O'Connor, are probably two of the blues dominate plot in 18and Wagon' Director. Vincente Minnelli give5 Fred Astaire and Cyd Charisse the dance floor in MGM's film "The Band Wagon" ( 1953), choreographed by Michael Kidd. In the movie, a washed-up movie idol, a prima ballerina and a busy producer combine to stage a Broadway show which turns into a pompous musical version of the Faust legend. Complications arise during the rehearsals, the result of which is a general snipe at the egos of theatrical people and their machinations. Minnelli is said to have satirized himself in the self director played by Jack Buchanan. Songs include "That's Entertainment," "You and the Night and the Music," and "Dancing in the Dark." greatest song-and-dance men Hollywood ever produced. Their musical numbers are as flawless as a polished gem. O'Connor's "Make 'Em Laugh" has to be one of the most expertly choreographed scenes ever filmed. The plot of "Singin' in the Rain," which takes a back-seat in importance to the musical numbers, is the Hollywood transition. in the late 1920s from silent films to talkies. "Singin' in the Rain" is a musical to be enjoyed tii;ne and again for many reasons, the least of which is that after you see it, no matter what the weather, you'll walk away "singin' in the rain." l cakndar of events This Saturday Nov. 16 : : Wine and Cheese Tasting Party : : at Park Place Apts. Recreation Room s : Tis unday Nov. 17 : : Regular Meeting and Poster Party : : Prize for best creative poster. : Every Wednesday : : Israeli Dance Lessons UC 251 at Bp.m. : MAKE $500 Oneachcommission.Campusand ** Come to one or come to all.' ** local representatives are needed for nationwide employee search. E l ForfullinformationwriteSumner veryone lS We Come. Advertising Co., P.O. Box 643, ._P_e_or-ia_, 1_11._, G_1_Go_1_. ___ _. ********************************************** November 4-Star Pizza Specials I

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Band rocks Slappy Hour The musical group Dogwood will provide entertainment today from 3 to 5 p.m during Slappy Hour in the Empty Keg. Noted for their ac complished vocal harmonies Dogwood plays traditional Southern rock in the style of Neil Young and the Allman Brothers Band. They recently performed a split bill with the Outlaws at the Depot. Small beer prices will be reduced to 30 cents, courtesy of Saga. Marx Brothers featured in Head Theatre film The Marx Brothers make their final appearance of the quarter tonight and tomorrow as Head Theatre presents "Horsefeathers" at midnight, in LET 103. Made in 1932, "Horsefeathers" is a wildly funny spoof of college life and football Groucho plays Professor Wagstaff, the new president of Huxley College Zeppo is his son, and Harpo and Chico are, well, Harpo and Chico Wagstaff's chief duty is to get a winning football team for Huxley. He debates the costs of main taining the college and the football stadium He knows his priorities and decides to tear down the college and keep the stadium. The other professors cry out: "But where will the students sleep'?" Groucho replies, "Where they always sleep : in the classroom! '' THE ORACLE-November 15, 1974 7 f Convention offers Sci fi l Tampa's first nostalgia and science fiction convention will be Sunday from 10:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. at the Quality Inn North, 210 East Fowler Ave. Featured at the convention will be films, old comics, movie stills and posters and Star Trek items for sale. As Tampa has a large group of nostalgia collectors, a convention will be held every month in the area. Admission to the convention is $2 for adults, $1.25 for students. Key 'N_es!Sin9er-Songwriter In Concert SATURDAY NOV. 16 8 P.M; Melfi's one-act 'Birdbath' examines human relations "Horsefeathers" climaxes in a wild football game that the Marxes win with highly unusual game plans, like using more than one football to score multiple touchdowns Head Theatre will also present cartoons. Tentative scheduling includes Theatre Follies talent show, a weekly spotlight for way out talent. Admission is free with validated ID. Bayfront Center Theatre, Reserved Seats $5. $4 $3 "Birdbath," a one-act play by Leonard Melfi, will be presented today at 2 p m. in TAR 120 by the Laboratory Workshop in Performance. The play deals with two strikingly different people who meet in a New York cafeter.ia where they are working. It takes place in the present and focuses on the relationship that develops between the young man and woman and the discoveries they make about each other. They are both people who need someone to talk to and to listen to them What they have to say is very human and at times extremely unex-is the goal. of the professional ha ircutters at the House of England. They feature the finest hairstyling designed according to your type of hair, your features, and your I lifestyle. They'll also teach you about the chemistry of your hair and the products you use on it. Education is the answer ... to most hair problems because nobody ever taught you how to do it yourself. House of England creates your great looking hairstyle and teaches you how to duplicate it. Confidence is the feeling ... you'll have with your newfound knowledge about your hair. Now you'll know how to cleanse, treat, and groom your hair, like a professional. A new you is the reward .. from a trip to the House of England. Be part of today with happy healthy; hair. Wash and wear hair. Brought to you by the people who love your hair as much as you do. By Appo.intment Only 585-6544 Open till 8 -Wed. and Fri. S 11 Ro1ery Road, Largo pected as we learn more about the events of the young woman's life. JIMMY BUFFETI Directed by Chifra Holt, "Birdbath" stars Heather Gubner and Eddie Wilson. Head Theatre is sponsored by SGP. "Come Monday" "Pencil Thin Mustache" Tickets available at Modern Music &Music Phile, St. Pete; Stereo Tape, Clearwater; Rasputin's & Budget Tapes, Tampa; Slipped Disc, Largo & Port Richey. Mildew Bros. Blue Grass Band First time ever for S99.95 Degree/Radian Mode Selector Square Y to the Power of X Arc for inverse trig Square Root Reciprocal Anti log Exchange Clear Entry Sign Change 2-Digit Exponent Clear--__, Wide 14-Character Display Common Log Raises a Log to a Power Trig Functions sine cosine, tangent Two-Level Parenthesis Keys AC adaptor/recharger Commodore SR-1400 37-key advanced math, true scientific calculator. 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8-THE ORACLE November 15, 1974 The Outlaws ride again Only one of three performances will be Taj Mahal and his Band. The scheduled for Sunday's music fest, the music begins at 1 p.m. on the soccer field Outlaws will play their rock and roll at 2 with guitarist-singer Don Cooper. The p.m. The highlight of the outdoor concert concert is sponsored by SGP. Women's Club sale The USF Women s Club is sponsoring a bazaar today from 10 a.m. to 8 p m and tomorrow from 9 a.m. to noon in the UC Ballroom The proceeds from the sales will go to the USF Women s Club Scholarship Fund Clothes for small children are reasonably priced between 25 and 50 cents, said Creola Ragan, president of the club. Plants, games, books and crafts will also be on sale. The bazaar chair persons are C'Mari Cameron and Lois Boren. [}'ampa's First Convention!! N ostalgia Scie nce-Fi c tion WHEN! November 17, 1974 10:30 a.m. to9:00 p.m. ADMISSIONS: WHERE! Quality Inn North 210 E Fowler Avenue S2.00 Donation for Adults $1.25 Donation for Children .. Everyone must have a Ticket FEATURED FILMS! Star Trek Episode The Thing Flash Gordon Feature Frankenstein meets the Wolfman Bloopers Little Rascals Marx Brothers Shorts King Kong For Further Information Unique Books 2943-Florida Ave. Call 935-0782 .. .. .. .,,....-_._,,_,_ "':' ..... ... A !<',,:. t l"-W4Ji ...... ... hor",, t/)-.. li1'.liil .. '"7 6\v, ::Y,,, _,.,;-.i _c:i"""''"!-liil ii'.''11 'i "" .,,,,. CHILLY CONCERT Cold weather did not keep students away from the UC sponsored Street Dance Wednesday The Elders played to a crowd of 1,000 people from 8:30 until 10:45 p.m without a break. JAM SESSION Student musicians are invited to jam in the Empty Keg from 7:30 to 10:30 Monday night. All electric instruments must have their own amplifiers. ART FACULTY EXHIBIT USF Art Department faculty will display their work in the Library Gallery Monday, Nov. 18 through Dec 12. On opening day the exhibit will be open from 11 a m. to 1 p m. and from 2 to 4 p m Thereafter, Gallery hours will be 10 a.m. to 1 p.m and 2 to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday. The Gallery will be closed for Thanksgiving, Nov. 28 and 29. NOVA VILLA -2 bdrm., unfur. in Temple Terrace (2 locations) from $160 1000 ft. north of Fowler on 5Sth St. 988-2412 988-2102 New Show Every Monday! MINI-DOWNTOWN BURLESK THEATRE 1002 Franklin St. Downtown Tampa Call 227-8341 Stag e Shows-Sun. 3-8-10; Mon. thru Thurs. 1-4-8-10; Fri. & Sat. 12 6 9-12; Open 10 a.m. a WORLD FAMOUS (NEW) 4s il,.i-4s This has never been done before and will probably never happen again! QffJ So ... Now is the time to SAVE $100."' as well as getting a receiver GUARANTEED TO OUT PERFORM ALL OTHERS! Stereo "630" Stereo ''930" Quad "800 Quad "'900" Stereo "630" dual powe r supply receiver Stereo "9"JIJ" dual power supply receiver Built in Strapping Stereo power SO-SO Built in CD-4 Stereo power 90-90 W .R.M.S. $600.00 $499.00 Deposit will accepted to hold these low prices! widest frequency response, be st square wave r esponse, and lowest distortion of any rece iver in the world. Bring any receiver that out performs the "630" or "930" & we will give it to s you for FREE! 2 Sold Only At Stereo World! ..

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' 'Y(>U re making plans for t he weekend Corpus Christi Catholic Church 9715 56th St. Temple Terrace Rectory 102 Glen Ridge, ph 988-1593 Daily Mass: 7:30 a.m. Sat. 8:30 a.m.; Sunday Masses: 7:30 a.m., 9:00, 10:30, 12:00 & 7:00 p.m.; Vigil Confessions: Sat. 4 to 5 before and after Vigil Mass PASTOR: Fr. Nicholas McLoughlin ASST. PASTOR: Fr Leo Van Den Oetlaar, SJ. THE CHAPEL (University Chapel Fellowship) An Ecumenical Center for Ministries in Higher Education Sponsored by: United Methodist Church, United Presbyterian u S .A., United Presbyterian U.S., United C _hurch of Christ Disciples Sunday WorshipYear Round 9:45a.ni._. Coffee & Donuts at The Chapel 10:15 a.m. -Leave for First United Church on East Fowler 10:30a.m.-looking for something But can't find it???? TRY JESUS Florida Ave. Baptist Church 4208 No. Florida Ave. Ed Gardner, Pastor SS-9:45 AM CT-5:45 PM Worship Hours 11 : 00 AM 7: 00 PM Baptist Campus Ministry Forest Hills Wesleyan Church 914 West lllst Avenue Pastor John Chambers Sunday School -10 a.m. Worship-lla.m. Sunday Evening Service-7:30 p.m. Christian Science Organization at USF Meets Thursday UC 200 4:30 p.m. THE ORACLE-November 15, 1974 First United Church of Tampa +vRc11 Fowler Avenue at Riverhills 0 <.. o"'" Ph. 988-4321 1:. 't:> Morning Worship and Church School 10:30 Z ::J + "' ... + Ministers: Bob Haywood and Bill You. aJLe. ,ln.vile.d Temple Terrace 10002-56th t>t Wilh a. pWtpOJ.i e. ,[J.i_ Ufle. a.t ill Be1.1.t 988-1138 College Dept. Bible 8tudy 9:30 A.M. Worship 11:00 A.M. & 7:00 P.M. :: Catholic Student Center Ph. 988-3727 Mass Sunday lla.m. Fr. Muldoon Chaplin ALL LUTHERAN WORSHIP Every Sunday 12:15 Episcopal Student Cha el THE GOSPEL SHOP 10020 N. 30th St. 971-8862 13110 N. 50 St. phone 988-6487 .. \ \ :}{( Across from Busch Gardens HRS: 10 am 1ill 5 pm Ron Hawkins, Director Judy Cadenhead.Associate Dir. Regular Activities: Tue 6:30 p.m. Kaleidoscope Wed. 12:30 p.m. Mini Meditations Thurs. 11: 30-1: 30 Lunch served at Baptist Student Center Central Avenue Baptist Church Sunday School-9:4Sam Wed Prayer -7 : 30pm Wed. Worship Service-11: ooam & 7: 30pm William K. Botner Pastor 6608 Cctitrol A re. Ta ;np u, Fl a. .. < like orothers and sisters. Major religions agree on_ importance of brotherly love. Many Americans, accus-spiritual strength by which tomed to years of affluence, we come together to express have begun to pull in their God's love for those in need. belts as they feel the pinch This is the message of a of shortages and inflation. national advertising program Yet the people who have for 1974-75 by Religion In been hit hardest are those American Life.' Space and already at the bottom of time contributed through the economic ladder: the The Advertising Council to elderly living on fixed in-the 'RIAL program by such comes, the t ,memployed !iv-media as newspapers and ing on public assistance--not to mention the growing magazines, radio anq tele-millions of under-privileged vision, transit and outdoor and starving people around posters, is valued at over the world. $27 million annually. It is treating your brothers and sisters like brothers and sisters." It uses case histo1ies to show how local houses or worship have worked to helo build non-profit housing for the elderly, shopping cooperatives for American In dia. ns, employment oppor tunities for Chicanos, halfwaY. houses for parolees. ATTEND the Church of All major religions teach used by RIAL to tell the that God's love for each message of 4 3 nationaJ reli pcrson demands of us a con-gious groups (Catholic, Jewcerh for thos e les s fortuish, Orthodox, and Protcs your Choice n a t e t h a n ourselves. Ideall y iant) io the American people. our churches and This y ear's adve;"tising Th is Sunday f c n _t_l1i:m
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10-THE ORACLE DOONESBURY HfY, SCOTTY, WHEN'5 0 YOVR. 800K GOING 70 ... \ WANNA IWN THAT ONE 8YM& AGAIN, REV? \ NOT "SCOTTY''.! FROM NOW ON IT:S W. 5. SLOAN, JI<. \ Iii. 5. SLOAN, JI<..! IT'S MY NfilU NOM PC-PWME. I c9 G0701/I! 11/H/lf I'M VP, SHALl I GET YOll 1HAT'IJBE JOUY PECENT Or Y0{4 Ot..P SPOR.T! A Gt
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Face lift Oracle photo by Mary Lovinfosse THE ORACLE-November 15, 1974 11 Memos fly in court about faculty suit Several memos have been submitted this week in the U.S. Middle District Court in Tampa, following Judge Ben Krentzman 's denial of a Board of Regents