Dr. Arthur Guilford oral history interview

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Dr. Arthur Guilford oral history interview

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Title:
Dr. Arthur Guilford oral history interview
Creator:
Silva, Stephanie de
University of South Florida -- Library. -- Digital Scholarship Services - Digital Collections. -- Oral History Program

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Genre:
Oral history. ( local )
Online audio. ( local )
letter ( marcgt )
Oral history ( local )
Online audio ( local )

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Full cataloging of this resource is underway and will replace this temporary record when complete.
Statement of Responsibility:
interviewed by Stephanie de Silva.

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Source Institution:
University of South Florida Library
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
U46-00008 ( USFLDC DOI )
u46.8 ( USFLDC Handle )

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subfield code a U46-000082 USFLDC DOI0 245 Dr. Arthur Guilford oral history interviewh [electronic resource] /c interviewed by Stephanie de Silva.500 Full cataloging of this resource is underway and will replace this temporary record when complete.1 600 Guilford, Arthur7 655 Oral history.localOnline audio.local700 Silva, Stephanie de710 University of South Florida.b Library.Digital Scholarship Services Digital Collections.Oral History Program.773 t USF Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders 50th Anniversary Oral History Project4 856 u http://digital.lib.usf.edu/?u46.8


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8 transcript
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text Stephanie de Silva (SS): Well first of all, thank you for coming and being here.
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Arthur Guilford (AG): Oh, Im delighted to be here.
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SS: Okay, so, what is your current position?
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AG: Im retired.
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SS: Okay.
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AG: Thats my current position, but I retired from being regional chancellor of the University of South Florida, Sarasota-Manatee.
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SS: Okay. How long have you been retired?
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AG: Um, I just retired in January of 2015.
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SS: Okay. (SS writing and speaking softly.) So what years were you a part of CSD?
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AG: Oh heavens. I started hereit was an odd time to start. I started in December of 1975.
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SS: Uh-huh.
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AG: I then moved to the deans office in 2004.
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SS: Okay.
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AG: And I was associate dean faculty from 2004 to 2007, and then in 2007, I went to USF Sarasota-Manatee and became the regional chancellor.
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SS: This is just in case that doesnt work, so its all going to be on here. (SS laughs) Yeah, I cant write that fast. Okay, from 2007?
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AG: Until I retired in January of 2015.
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SS: Okay. How is retired life treating you?
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AG: Um, its been good. Different.
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SS: Yes. I can imagine its a big adjustment.
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AG: Right. Yes, it is.
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SS: So what was role at USF?
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AG: Well, I started as an assistant professor.
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SS: Okay.
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AG: And um, then worked my way up to full professor, and then 1990, I became the chair of the department and was chair until 2004.
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SS: Okay.
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AG: When I became associate dean in the College of Arts and Sciences.
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SS: Wow. Okay. And why did you choose USF?
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AG: Well, Im a native Floridian, and um, our son, whos now 42 years old, was born in California, but we quickly knew that if we wanted him to know his grandparentswell, my mother died when I was a teenagerbut know my father and my wifes parents, we needed to get back to the East coast.
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SS: Okay.
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AG: And so, um this position opened up, and I got a call asking me if I wanted to come and interview for it. I thought, ugh Tampa. (SS laughs) As a native Floridian, you have to realize, Tampa over 40 years ago wasnt much of a city. Its dramatically improved since then. But um, I came for the interview, and they immediately offered me the job. And I told my wife that I would come, I would take the job to get us back on the East coast, but not to expect me to stay here for very long.
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SS: Okay.
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AG: Well
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SS: (laughs) Thats funny.
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AG: Forty years later I retired from the university. (SS still laughing)
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SS: Funny how life works out.
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AG: Yes, it is.
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SS: And why CSD?
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AG: Well, of course I was speech, language and hearing science PhD major, and so it just made sense.
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SS: Okay.
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AG: And this was a small but successful and growing department. And I really felt that if I wanted to make the commitment to stay here, I could really, really turn it around and make it a highly successful department.
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SS: Right.
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AG: Although at the time, I was not committed to staying here.
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SS: Can I ask where you got your degree or PhD?
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AG: Um, well my undergraduate degree was from Florida State.
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SS: Okay.
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AG: My masters degree was from Tulane, and my PhD from the University of Michigan.
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SS: And you said your masters was from?
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AG: Tulane.
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SS: Okay. Great thank you. And what did the facilities and surrounding area look like when you first started working here?
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AG: Well, it was pitiful. (SS laughs) It was pitiful. In three words. (AG laughs) I was going to say in one word or less, but no, it was pitiful. I understand that had I come for the interview about seven or eight months earlier, it would have even been more pitiful because they were located in an old motel across the street, on Fletcher.
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Now when I came, we were in Classroom Building A, which I later got the name changed to Behavioral Science Building.
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SS: (laughing) Okay.
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AG: But it was called Classroom Building A or CBA building. And um the clinical facilities were marginal at best, butthe restroom facilities for young children were not good. And, but we had dedicated faculty, and um I knew that we could turn this into a top-notch department.
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SS: Which you did.
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AG: Which we did.
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SS: (laughing) Thank you for that, that Im not in a motel on Fletcher. Was that the balloon out there (inaudible) for Mildew Manor?
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AG: No, Mildew Manor was the building I never saw. Mildew Manor was the one across from Fletcher.
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SS: Okay.
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AG: Which I think was an old motel.
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SS: Um, I interviewed Mr. Algeo. I dont know if you know him, but he mentioned that they were old apartments.
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AG: Yeah, thats what it was.
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SS: Okay.
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AG: Right. Thats what it was, old apartments.
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SS: Okay.
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AG: But I was never a part of that. They had just moved
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SS: Right, so you came after that.
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AG:into the CBA building and occupied the second floor of that building and then used some of the classrooms on the first floor.
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SS: Okay. The CBA building. On Fletcher?
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AG: Its that inverted pyramid over by the Faculty Office Building.
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SS: Hmm.
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AG: Um, not too far from Social Science.
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SS: Right. Okay.
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AG: But its now called BEH.
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SS: Now called BEH, yeah. I took classes there. Okay. Got it. And so what was the atmosphere like?
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AG: Well, when I interviewed, it was interesting. At lunch, people were sitting around the table playing bridge, and I was there for an interview. I thought, you know, this probably isnt going to work out too well for me, but Ill go for it anyway.
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SS: Uh-huh.
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AG: But it apparently did go well because they offered me the job before I ever left. Because I was in Las Angeles, so for me it was flying all the way across the United States to come in for the interview.
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SS: Wow. And so you got it right away.
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AG: Yep, yep. And I started um, as I said in December of 75.
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SS: Right. And the relationship between faculty and students, faculty and faculty, what was that like?
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AG: I think it was a good relationship. In fact, um some of those first students have gone on to be hired as faculty here. Silvia Diehl was one of my first students, and um she wasI think Silvias just retired
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SS: Yes.
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AG: herself. But she was, um a student in thatprobably the first year I was here. [We] had a number of terrific students. We used to have what was called a five-year program. Um, and so you went directly from your bachelors degree into your masters degree, assuming everything fell into place correctly.
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SS: Right.
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AG: I felt that, um wed be much better having a separate bachelors degree from a masters degree because for one thing, we could admit more students in the undergraduate program, gain more money for the department, and then if they were successful, they could apply to come into the masters program.
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SS: Right.
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AG: And we would give priority to our own undergraduate students. Assuming that their grades were good and, you know, and so forth.
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SS: And this five-year program, did you get two separate diplomas or was it just one?
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AG: No, you just got one. And so the unfortunate thing was, if you didntif you werent successful in being admitted to the masters level programs, we had a default ISS degree.
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SS: Okay.
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AG: So, um you wouldnt get a degree in communication sciences and disorders as an undergraduate, but you would get a degree in interdisciplinary social science with an emphasis in speech, language and hearing.
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SS: Okay.
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AG: So itI felt it sort of disadvantaged some students, and um they also had to take the GRE at a younger age because they would come intheir senior year would be their first year in graduate school.
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SS: Right.
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AG: So, it was just better to make the separation I felt. So we did it.
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SS: Great. Thank you. I actually, on my way down to meet you, I saw Mrs. Cheryl Paul. And shes like, Oh hes here. And she told me that she did her thesis with you and everything. She was my supervisor this semester.
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AG: Oh, shes a terrific person.
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SS: Yeah. I agree. Okay, so who were the major community partners?
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AG: At that time, um the major community partners were United Cerebral Palsy Center, Easterseals, well Sertoma, which is a service organization. But I got Sertoma to fund our very first graduate scholarship in speech language pathology, and Sertoma had not funded scholarships in the past. So it was a statewide effort to fund this scholarship, and its an endowed scholarship. And we still give it out to this day, Im assuming.
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SS: Yes. (AG laughs) Yes.
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AG: And um, then the Bolesta Center was another partner of ours.
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SS: Was it not always downstairs?
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AG: No, no. It was in a separateused to be up close toyou wouldnt know where it isMcDonald Training Center, which is out close to the airport.
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SS: Okay.
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AG: Close to International Mall now. And of course the VA has always been a huge partner of ours.
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SS: Right.
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AG: Particularly in audiology but also in speech language pathology and then Tampa General Hospital was one for speech pathology, particularly. And all the area hospitals really wanted our students. And weve always had strong students. Thats been the strength of this department, is the strength of our students.
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SS: Okay. And so who else was a part of the department when you were here?
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AG: Oh heavens. There were so many people, and some of them unfortunately are deceased. Jane Scheurle was here.
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SS: How do I spell Shirley, S-h-i-r-l-e-y?
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AG: S-c-h-e-u-r-l-e.
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SS: S-c-h
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AG: S-c-h-e-u-r-l-e (AG tapping table as he says each letter). And her husband Bill Scheurle was a faculty member here as wellnot in our department, but in another department. And um, Jane and I did a lot publishing together.
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SS: Okay.
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AG: Um, Lee Kasan was here, and his wife Marilyn actually worked for my wife when my wife was supervisor of communication disorders. Unfortunately, both Lee and Marilyn are deceased now. Glover, what was her first name? Um, oh its been so many years, Im blocking on her first name. Jean Glover. Im old so it takes a little time for it to (AG and SS laugh; inaudible).
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SS: That is quite all right.
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AG: Right. And of course Stewart Kinde was the chairman, K-i-n-d-e. Clarence Webb was the first chair of the department, but he died before I ever came here. He was electrocuted while working on his pool, so I never knew him.
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SS: Thats so sad.
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AG: But Stewart Kinde was the chair when I came here, and I sort of immediately became the de facto associate chair for the department because I was also the coordinator of the speech language pathology program, which was by far the largest of the programs.
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SS: Right. Okay. And was Dr. Silliman also here?
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AG: No. The way that worked was when Stewart Kinde retired, she was recruited outside to come in as the chair of the department. And so she was chair from about 1987 to 1990. So she arrived here ataround 1987.
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SS: Okay.
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AG: And then I took over as chairman in 1990.
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SS: Okay. So it was um Stewart Kinde and then
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AG: Well, the sequence would have been Clarence Webb first, Stewart Kinde second, Elaine Silliman third, and I was fourth.
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SS: And then you. Okay.
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AG: And waswell, I guess Steward Kinde and I were here the longest.
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SS: Okay. And so how has CSD changed? I mean its changed tremendously, but
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AG: Oh. Its changed tremendously. Well you know, I was instrumental in getting this building for us.
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SS: Right.
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AG: I had to work on it for ten years. I did everything.
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SS: Thank you!
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AG: I brought people over. I showed them my torn up carpet. I showed them our retched bathrooms in the clinical facilities. I also wroteIm not an audiologist but I wrote the first AuD [doctor of audiology] proposal
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SS: Okay.
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AG: and got that funded and implemented. And then I wrote our first interpreter training support and got those funded. I was a big grant writer. I still am. I mean, I help various boards that I serve on write grants onIve probably written, I dont know how many millions. I mean, millions and millions of dollars worth of grants that I funneled all into the department. Only sad thing is, when I left and went to USF Sarasota-Manatee, I took some of that money with me.
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SS: Oh! (laughs)
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AG: And all of my research overhead dollars I took with me. I
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SS: Okay.
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AG: But it changed dramatically. I mean, we went from only a five-year program in speech pathology and audiology to undergradseparate undergraduate degrees in both disciplines and deaf education, and then masters degrees in both. And then to an AuD in audiology. And then under my time as chair, we also implanted our first PhD program.
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SS: (talking at same time as AG) Do you mind if I go outside?
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AG: No.
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SS: To see whats going on. (SS laughs)
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AG: So we went from a five-year program to separate undergraduate degree programs in both disciplines, to separate masters degree programs in both disciplines, to the doctor of audiology and then to the PhD in that fourteen years that I was chair of the department.
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SS: Massive growth. Okay. And, what are your favorite memories?
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AG: What are my favorite memories? People.
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SS: Yeah?
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AG: Yeah. People. The people I worked with. I mean, youll see the reaction now even in the people who know me. I mean, there will be many people here who dont even know who I am, but um [it] was the interaction with people. In fact, my children really grew up as part of this department.
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SS: Really.
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AG: I mean my son was 18 months old when we moved here, and our daughter was born here. My daughter is now a masters degree speech language pathologist, which she would not agree to do until after her mother had retired and I had become chancellor. And I took her aside and said, Bev honey, youre no longer competing with me. You know, Im not a speech pathologist anymore. Im runningIm a president of a university.
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SS: Uh-huh.
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AG: But you know, the fact [was] that so many of the people who were here saw my children grow up.
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SS: Wow.
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AG: Um and all that we accomplished are favorite memories. I mean, yes, did I have some dissention from time to time? Of course I did. But um, basically people saw the road that I felt we needed to travel, and they bought a ticket. (SS laughs) And we traveled that road. And I had a lot of support. A few negatives, but far more support than negatives.
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SS: Thats good.
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AG: And I convinced um, the provost and the president that CSD was a research-based discipline and was worthy of funding.
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SS: Uh-huh.
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AG: And that we could bring in a lot of money. And so, since I convinced them of that, I felt like I had to show them that I could bring it in. (SS laughs)
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SS: Yeah because they were probably looking at you like, where is it? Where is the research or the money?
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AG: Thats exactly right.
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SS: Okay. Thank you, and any last words that you would like to leave behind?
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AG: Well, Im very proud of what CSD has accomplished. And you know, while I was here, we even changed the name from communicology to communication sciences and disorders. And so, Im very proud of everything theyve done. I think the department has excellent leadership again, and um so I think its all on the right track. And you know, Im wrong. I left out Dr. Chisolm was chair after I was.
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SS: Okay.
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AG: So I was four and Chisolm was five, and then Jennifer is six.
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SS: Okay.
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AG: Jennifer Lister.
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SS: Dr. Lister, yeah. Okay. So yourethe last years that youre very proud of with (SS and AG talking at same time; inaudible)
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AG: Oh Im very proud of it. Im very proud to have been a part of it, um and very proud that I could be a part of shaping the direction of what it became. I wont say it wasnt without hard work. Remember, I was only 30 years old when I came here.
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SS: Right. Can I ask, where did you get your inspiration from to make all these changes? Had you seen another university that their program
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AG: Well, of course I went to powerful programs.
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SS: Right.
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AG: Because I went where the best faculty were in the United States at the time. And thats what I chose my degree programs, based on that. But Ive always been just a driven person. I mean, when I became a chancellor at USF Sarasota-Manatee, we were not separately accredited. We didnt have freshman and sophomores. When I retired, we were a separately accredited institution. We were a four-year institution and developed a whole bunch of new degree programs. Thats just me. Im not one to tread water.
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SS: Thats very inspirational to me. (SS and AG laugh) Thats how I would like to be for the rest of my life.
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AG: So, I like to keep busy, and thats one of the things that I struggle with a little bit in retirement is keeping busy. Although Im still on about eight or nine boards.
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SS: (laughs) Thats not busy at all.
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AG: Right. So they keep me busy but in a different way.
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SS: Right. Okay. Wonderful. Well thats it. That was a short interview.
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AG: That was painless.
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SS: Thank you so much for your time.
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AG: Oh, youre very welcome.
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SS: I really appreciate it.
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AG: Now are you going to compile this is into some type of book?
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SS: Well, what Im doing right now isIm going toafter I listen to this again and I type up everything, I transcribe all of the interviews and then I mightIm making a timeline of how the department has changed and grown. And then were going to use the interviews for other things, and then well show it at the anniversary party.
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AG: Oh good. Well make sure Im invited.
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SS: Of course. Of course. So thats the plan, but thats next fall. But I wanted to get a head start on getting all of this done.
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AG: Right.
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SS: So we can have it all in line.
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AG: Well thank you for interviewing me.
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SS: No, thank you.



PAGE 1

COPYR I GHT NOT I CE This Oral History is copyrighted by the University of South Florida Libraries Oral History Program on behalf of the Board of Trustees of the Univ ersity of South Florida. Copyright, 1995 201 7 University of South Florida. All rights, reserv ed. This oral history may be used for research, instruction, and private study under the provisions of the Fair Use. Fair Use is a provision of the United States Copyright Law (United States Code, Title 17, section 107), which allows limited use of copyrighted materials under certain conditions. Fair Use limits the amount of material that may be used. For all other permissions and requests, contact the UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA LIBRARIES ORAL HISTORY PROGRAM at the Univ ersity of South Florida, 4202 E. Fowler Avenue, LIB 122, Tampa, FL 33620.


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