Bettina Sanders Tucker oral history interview

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Bettina Sanders Tucker oral history interview

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Title:
Bettina Sanders Tucker oral history interview
Creator:
Silva, Stephanie de
University of South Florida -- Library. -- Digital Scholarship Services - Digital Collections. -- Oral History Program

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Oral history. ( local )
Online audio. ( local )
letter ( marcgt )
Oral history ( local )
Online audio ( local )

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Full cataloging of this resource is underway and will replace this temporary record when complete.
Statement of Responsibility:
interviewed by Stephanie de Silva.

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Source Institution:
University of South Florida Library
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
U46-00016 ( USFLDC DOI )
u46.16 ( USFLDC Handle )

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subfield code a U46-000162 USFLDC DOI0 245 Bettina Sanders Tucker oral history interviewh [electronic resource] /c interviewed by Stephanie de Silva.500 Full cataloging of this resource is underway and will replace this temporary record when complete.1 600 Tucker, Bettina Sanders7 655 Oral history.localOnline audio.local700 Silva, Stephanie de710 University of South Florida.b Library.Digital Scholarship Services Digital Collections.Oral History Program.773 t USF Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders 50th Anniversary Oral History Project4 856 u http://digital.lib.usf.edu/?u46.16


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8 transcript
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text Bettina Tucker (BT): So my current role is an adjunct clinical instructor.
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Stephanie de Silva (SS): Okay.
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BT: And prior to that, I was a preceptor mentor for students who were doing their clerkships in the community. And I did that for 31 years.
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SS: Okay.
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BT: So, for the time that I started at the VA  in 1980 until I retired in 2011.
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SS: Okay. Wow. How was it working for the VA? This one right here?
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BT: Uh-huh. Yeah.
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SS: How was that experience?
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BT: I loved it. It was a great experience, so we mentoredwe had a lot of USF students that came through the VA to do their clerkships and their externships. I mean, the name changes over time, but you know, so even when it was a mastso for years when it was a masters program and then when they changed it to the AuD [doctor of audiology] program.
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SS: To the doctorate, right.
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BT: And then I worked here at USF as a VA employee because the VA had an office here fromfor about nine and a half years.
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SS: Okay.
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BT: So it is currently where all the clinical instructors sit downstairs.
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SS: Right.
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BT: That used to be the VA office.
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SS: Oh, I didnt know that.
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BT: Yeah. Most people dont know that.
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SS: Okay. So actually I wanted to ask you first, what years were you a part of CSD? So you said
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BT: Okay, I came here inlet me think for a minuteI came here in August of 1973.
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SS: Okay.
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BT: And I graduated in December 1977.
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SS: Oh, so you were a student as well at first?
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BT: I graduatedI got my masters from here.
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SS: Nineteen seventy
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BT: Seventy-seven.
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SS: Seventy-seven, you graduated.
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BT: With my masters. And then from 1980 until I retired, I was a preceptor.
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SS: Okay.
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BT: That was 2011. And actually, even before I retired from the VA, I started working a very few, part time hours helping with _____(??) and management. So I actually, I think my official time I started here as part time as adjunct was 2009.
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SS: Okay.
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BT: So I did that for a couple yearfor a short period of time before I retired. And then Ive just continued in my time that I work here as adjunct hasthe amount of time has obviously increased.
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SS: So thats 2009 until now.
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BT: To present.
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SS: To present. I know this looks awful but this just in case anything happens.
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BT: Thats okay. Okay.
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SS: This is just notes in case. Okay, wonderful. Thank you.
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BT: I basically have spent my adult life somehow connected to USF.
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SS: Thats a good sign. That means things around here are good.
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BT: So just for the short time that I worked in Lakeland for an ENT doctor, thats really the only time I really wasnt at USF
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SS: Right.
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BT: working with the students and in some capacity because being a young, baby audiologist I, of course, didnt have students to mentor at that time.
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SS: So you got the experience first and then
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BT: I was still being mentored myself, so
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SS: Okay. So you were in Lakeland when? Just curious.
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BT: I worked in Lakeland fromwell, I actually worked part-time for Tampa Speech and Hearing before I graduated because I had a license. And then I went to work full time at ENT in Lakeland from like March of 1978 until January of 1980. I finished there on a Friday and started at the VA on a Monday.
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SS: Oh.
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BT: So there was no downtime. My class graduated the year before me. I took an extended trainingship at the VA. And so, I had to be a student longer to take that. So, I should have graduated in 76, but I took this extended trainingship. And the VA trains fiscal years, so weacross the country, those of us who were already trainees stayed a little bit longer.
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SS: Okay.
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BT: And then they started their new fiscal year and started with their one year trainees. So it was fine. Its probably why I got into the VA because I was a known entity.
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SS: Right, of course.
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BT: It worked to my
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SS: You had your foot in the door, so it was great.
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BT: Yeah. It worked to my favor. So it was very good.
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SS: Wonderful. And so, why did you choose USF CSD?
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BT: I chose USF because it was actually the closest public university to my hometown.
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SS: Okay.
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BT: I was not prepared to go too far away. I had a scholarship for a public university in Florida, so it was critical to stay in Florida, and USF was the closest. Although, Im from South Florida, and I had to go north to go to the University of South Florida, which I always found kind silly.
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SS: The name. (SS laughs)
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BT: I think when it was named, the only thing it was south of was Gainesville.
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SS: Gainesville, obviously because its kind of right there with UCF.
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BT: Exactly.
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SS: Its funny. Everytime I tell friends back home that I go to the University of South Florida, they say, oh so youre in Miami? Im like, no.
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BT: Where are you from?
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SS: Im from Trinidad and Tobago.
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BT: I heard that little British [accent].
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SS: Yeah. (SS laughs) Okay, so what did the facilities and surrounding area look like when you first came here?
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BT: When USFI started coming over here in 1972 because I friend who came over to visit somebody. So I actually had been in Tampa. And my parents and I, when I was a young girl, we used to vacation at Busch Gardens. So I actually kind of remembered Tampa.
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SS: You knew the area.
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BT: I knew the area a little bit, and it was just barren. It was just really barren, you know thewhen you come in the front entrance to the university now itseven though the main administrative building is the same, you know, all the signage and all the palm trees and all the oak trees that you take for granted were not there at all.
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SS: It was all just very empty.
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BT: Right, the library was not there. That was just a big blank spot. There were only a few buildings on campus when I came here. [The] Marshall Center was not here. The dormitories they just tore down were my dormitories.
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SS: Mm-hmm.
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BT: So I lived in Delta.
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SS: A friend of mine lived there a few years ago and it was a mess. It used to flood out, the whole first floor would flood out.
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BT: It did that.
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SS: You know it well.
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BT: Yes. I, luckily, was not on the first floor. The audiology department was in what we called Mildew Manor across the street. It was on Fletcher and 46th Street in an apartment complex that USF rented, and we called it Mildew Manor.
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SS: (laughs) Ive heard of it. Mildew Manor on Fletcher.
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BT: Pardon?
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SS: Mildew Manor on Fletcher.
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BT: Yeah.
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SS: The apartments.
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BT: Yeah, so that was my first experience to audiology. And it was just, you know, there was a long walk from space to space, from one building to other. You know, we had some class over here in like the chemistry building. Its that one story building thats still there.
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SS: Right.
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BT: And it was like a hike across campus.
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SS: And nothing really nice to look at in between, apparently.
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BT: It was just, you knowit had a little bit of a hill, but you know. So it wasnt totally flat. The front was flat, but the back where the Marshall is now, that little hill was always there. And you had to take a little walk down to get to Delta, to where I lived, so it was a little hill, just not much.
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SS: In the Mildew Manor, Ive heard about what the SLP little clinic used to look like, what did the old audiology clinic look like? Was it these tiny little rooms?
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BT: It was tiny little rooms. Little tiny observation ports that you would look through.
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SS: Like through the door?
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BT: Like through the door, like a window they made. And it wasI was like just starting, and they were actually building the BEH building. So most of my classes were in like what the all the social sciences, social behavioral sciences were. And then I would go over for some observations, or if you wanted to talk to somebody, a professor, you had to go over there because thats where their offices were.
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SS: Right.
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BT: It was dingy and dungy and dark. It looked like it was kind of put together, not real professional. But, you know, it did the job. That was what we had then.
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SS: Yeah.
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BT: So when we moved into the BEH building, it was like a mansion.
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SS: It was like luxury.
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BT: It was like luxury accommodations.
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SS: And then, now this.
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BT: Right. So we went from like a, I dont know, kind of shack to a motel and now were in a hotel.
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SS: (laughing) Thats great. And so, what was the atmosphere like between the students, and the professors, and just being in the department.
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BT: It was friendly, a lot of fun. It was of course, much smaller, so small groups. And Im still very good friends with the people I went to school with.
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SS: Thats nice.
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BT: Weve kept in touch. I still consider them very good friends. I still stay in touch with Dr. Shepherd.
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SS: Okay.
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BT: And [I] call him regularly to check on him, see how he is doing. So it was very congenial. I felt welcomed and, of course, it was still intimidating being likelearning something new and doing something youd never done before, but I certainly didnt shy away from the experience.
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SS: Thats great.  And with professors, did you feel that there was a comfortable relationship or was it very professional, or distant?
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BT: It was not distant. We had, you knowI would say it was not distant all. I mean it wasnt always strictly professional. You know, you would go to meetings and be able to socialize with them, and we did have parties with the professors, parties at their houses sometimes. They would host a party at the end of the semester. So it wasI dont thinkits very different maybe. It was very different for us than it is now.
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SS: And it was a smaller program as well, right?
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BT: It wassometimes it was a party atmosphere, but it waswe still learned.  And you knew when you had to be serious and when it was a party and when it was serious. I mean, there was a firm distinction.
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SS: Thank you. And who were the major community partners at the time? So when you did externships
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BT: The VA, Tampa VA; Tampa Speech and Hearing, which now has a different name; the school system, Hillsborough and Pinellas County. There were not a lot of private practice audiologists at that time, so it was mainlythere were just a few places. Tampa Speech and Hearing had three or four ENTs associated with it, that owned Tampa Speech and Hearing at the time. So, and it was primarilyeven [though] it was called Tampa Speech and Hearing, it was primarily audiology.
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SS: Okay. And it has a new name now.
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BT: It has a new name. Im really not, I want to say Suncoast but dont quote me on that.
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SS: Okay.
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BT: Okay. And then I think there was ain Lakeland, the Speech and Hearing Center in Lakeland.
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SS: Okay.
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BT: Watson Clinic, in Lakeland.
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SS: Is that something else or thats the same one?
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BT: No, its different. The Watson Clinic is different. Thats what Im familiar with. Thats what I remember.
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SS: Okay, thank you. Thats actually a lot. Thats great. Okay, and who else was a part of the department. How many students and programs were there at the time?
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BT: They had an oral rehab department. So it was audiology, speech pathology, and oral rehab, and they were all masters programs. So we were in a five-year masters program. We did not get a bachelors degree. It was athere were just a few programs in the nation like that. And we were called communicology. We were not communication sciences and disorders. And my degree is a masters in communicology, you know, audiology. Its a masters in audiology from the Department of Communicology.
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SS: So they almost make it like a specialty in communicology?
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BT: Right. So just like now its the department of
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SS: Totally different now.
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BT: It was justwe didnt have the disorders part at all. It was just the Department of Communicology. So how manyyou wanted to know how many (BT and SS speaking at same time; inaudible)
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SS: Like an exact number is not necessary, but about how many.
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BT: We had two primary professors that did most of our, you know, strict audiology and oral rehab. And then we had several, there were several people that did both thethey taught both the speech pathologists and the audiologists. There were some crossover classes. We all took anatomy and physiology together. We had a class overwe had a special class over in the physics department for acoustical physics. And then we hadat that time, the audiologists had to do language therapy also. So we did work with the speech pathology instructors, clinical instructors because they would, you know, supervise us. And we had one primarywhen I was in school, we had one primary clinical audiology instructor.
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SS: Okay.
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BT: It as Connie Kuffel-Hare. Sadly, shes deceased.
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SS: Okay.
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BT: Its K-u-f-f-e-l. Hare, H-a-r-e. But she kept her name professionally. She kept Kuffel, most of the time.
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SS: And do you remember the names of these two primary professors?
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BT: Dr. Crittenden and Dr. Shepherd.
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SS: How do I spell Crittenden?
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BT: C-r-i-t-t-e-n-d-o-n, or d-e-n. And Dr. Shepherd, Dave Shepherd. Hes supposed to be being interviewed actually.
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SS: Yes.
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BT: Okay.
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SS: Okay. Thank you. And some your classmates names that you said you kept in touch with?
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BT: John Berardino, Tricia Blake.
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SS: I was hoping to interview Dr. Blake.
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BT: Okay. And then the speech pathologists and audiologists, we all just kind of crossed over, so Don Lobelle.
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SS: Im sorry if Im butchering the spelling.
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BT: L-o-b-e-l-l-e.
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SS: L
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BT: L-o-b-e-l-l-e.
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SS: Okay.
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BT: Oh my gosh, Im drawing a blank. It would be horrible if they knew I was drawing a blank on their name right now. Ill come back to that. Ill think about it.
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SS: Thats fine.
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BT: Paula Sullivan, shes a speech pathologist. You guys should be interviewing her. Shes been very involved in ASHA and Florida Association
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SS: Yes, I have interviewed her actually.
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BT: Gail Rosenburg, she was an SLP BN, got her degree in audiology, and she is deceased.
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SS: Okay.
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BT: Ill come back to some other names.
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SS: Thats fine, thank you. And who was the chair?
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BT: Stu [Steward] Kinde. He had just taken over because the original person hadright before I came here, the original director had a fatal accident. I remember he was electrocuted something working on his pool.
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SS: Right.
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BT: Had a heart attack or something.
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SS: Okay.
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BT: So Dr. Shepherd had come in like right during that time, and whoever the other person was, I think was an audiologist and Dr. Shepherd got hired then.
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SS: Okay. And how has CSD changed?
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BT: Bigger. CIs have changedcochlear implants have changed a lot, what we do. Dispensing hearing aids, which was not allowed when Iwe did not dispense hearing aids. We recommended because the rules had just changed so that audiologists could dispense hearing aids. Because when I started, audiologists could not dispense hearing aids. It was illegal. I would say, you know, some difference in the relationshin the, like the party atmosphere is a little bit less than maybe it was when I was in school. And of course the location. I mean, the equipment and everything just itsin many ways much more professional. We were just beginning. So I think the other thing is Ive had an opportunity not only with my own classmates because Ive mentored so many students, [but also] Ive become friends with them, that some of my really good friends now arewere my former students that I mentored. So thats been like a really wonderful part of not only being an audiologist but mentoring students because it just has expanded my friends.
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SS: Yeah, and they become colleagues and friends.
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BT: Right, right. So they go from students to colleagues, and weve built this repertoire and have become friends. And so, going to meeting is like, oh hi, hi, hi. Hey, how are you doing? Hey, havent seen you in a long time.
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SS: (laughing) Hows it going.
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BT: Yeah, so thats like, you know a really marvelous part of that. And Helen Techlar would be another name.
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SS: Please spell that for me.
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BT: T-e-c-h-l-a-r
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SS: Okay.
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BT: And then the Devlins, Kathy, Dolores Devlin, D-e-v-l-i-n.
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SS: Okay.
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BT: So all three of them. The mother went to school with me.
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SS: Okay.
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BT: And Dave, David Devlin is alsoher son and daughter were Kathy and David. And David was just like a few months ahead of me. And Kathy was like a year behind me.
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SS: And Dolores?
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BT: And Dolores was the mom. So they were hearing aid dispensers. She saw the writing on the wall that audiology was coming of age, and she traveled from Sarasota and got her degree, and both her kids did too.
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SS: Fantastic. Its an audiology family.
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BT: And David, her son, is deceased. He died about a year ago. Jan Boger, J-a-n B-o-g-e-r. Shes an audiologist right over at Morsani.
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SS: Okay. Wonderful. Thank you. Okay and what are your favorite memories?
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BT: Well, I think my favorite memories would be, just the camaraderie with, you know, my groupthis group of people right here. You know, we studied together. We played together. You know, we went on conventions together. We really knewwe really just were such a part of each others lives for such a long time, and we continue to be. And we may not see each other every year, but somebodys keeping up with somebody. I may talk to John and he goes, oh I heard from Don Lobelle, or oh, I heard from somebody. Do you remember her?
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SS: Right.
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BT: So theres this um, Id say just the comradery always felt like somebody had my back. And we didnt have football then but, you know we had Gasparilla and the things in Tampa. So that was aand basketball. In addition to being in audiology, I was part of theI was a little sister for a fraternity. So I had an active life with, you know, outside of audiology. Also [I] had other activities on campus, so for me, just being at USF was just like a wonderful experience. I had never been away from home. So it was where I kind of my wings.
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SS: Right.
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BT: And I have lived within a five-mile radius of this campus, either on campus or within a five-mile radius for entire time that Ive lived here.
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SS: Wow.
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BT: And I moved here in 73. So I lived on 46th Street.
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SS: Right.
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BT: Across from the USF golf course, and I have lived in Temple Terrace, one place or another all that time.
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SS: Right. Thats convenient.
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BT: Very convenient.
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SS: I lived on 42nd Street for a while, so I know exactly where you lived across from the golf course.
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BT: Right. You know. And its just beensomebody commented to me and said, are you ever going to move? And I go, I dont think so. Im kind of likeIm like hung in here right around USF.
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SS: Its so convenient.
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BT: Its so convenient. The traffic has gotten worse, I will say.
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SS: I was going to say, now I live on Fowler and Im so happy because I dont have the Fletcher traffic anymore. I have to admit [it].
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BT: The traffic has expanded, but just reallyI think I really found myself as abecame of age here, if you want to think of it that way. So its just like wonderful memories for me. Im just looking through here if I see anybody else that I would be horrified if I left them off and didnt sayKen Booher.
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SS: You can always email me is all. Ken
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BT: Booher. And he still works in town.
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SS: Can you please spell that for me?
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BT: B-o-o-h-e-r.
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SS: These last names, they get me.
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BT: Thats okay. Thats okay.
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SS: Okay.
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00:24:51.4
BT: And theyre soway too many audiology students that Ive become friends withand, you know, still get Christmas cards from, and see them at meetingsto even mention. But, yeah, Im all about USF.
203
00:25:5.9
SS: Thats great.
204
00:25:8.2
BT: I would beyou know, somebody asked me, they said, do you actually bleed green and gold. And I said, sometimes.
205
00:25:14.7
SS: Yeah. Its there.
206
00:25:17.8
BT: So this is great. Do you know if theyve had the opportunity to talk to Dr. Shepherd yet? Because hes one of the few faculty [members] still around.
207
00:25:27.2
SS: Not yet.
208
00:25:28.9
BT: Okay, and you know he doesnt do emails. So youre just going to have to catch him by phone.
209
00:25:34.0
SS: Yes, I actually have to cold call him and explain to him what I am doing here. (BT and SS speaking at same time; inaudible)
210
00:25:39.1
BT: I already told him.
211
00:25:40.4
SS: Okay, so he knows.
212
00:25:41.2
BT: So he should know. Because last time I talked to him, he said, nobodys called me yet.
213
00:25:45.7
SS: I have to do that shortly.
214
00:25:47.7
BT: Yeah, I would just keep in mind too, he does have a little hearing loss now; although, he would not admit to it. So probably going to have toyour voice is a little soft [when you] speak.
215
00:25:59.2
SS: Okay.
216
00:26:0.3
BT: Clearly (BT and SS speaking at same time; inaudible)
217
00:26:0.9
SS: And louder. I can do that. Yeah and do you knowI mean, knowing him, when would be a better time to call. Because what happens is that Im in here so late and then I feel bad to call. So Ive been waiting for day when I can call him at a decent hour.
218
00:26:14.7
BT: If you can just find a few minutes any time to call him during the day, and I think he has a recorder.
219
00:26:21.1
SS: Okay.
220
00:26:22.5
BT: He lives in Apollo Beach, soand it might even be that if you have trouble getting a hold of him, even to mail it to him. And, I have his address.
221
00:26:33.5
SS: Okay. That would be great. But Ill call him first, and if I really cant get through Ill do that too.
222
00:26:40.0
BT: And you can, I just interviewed Tina, you know, and she providedbut he said he would do it.
223
00:26:48.5
SS: Oh, wonderful.
224
00:26:50.1
BT: He said he would do it.
225
00:26:50.2
SS: Im so glad. Okay. Because everybody else, weve had email contact with. But there are two people that Id really like to interview that I have to cold call, so I havent done those yet. And he is one of them.
226
00:27:0.0
BT: Did you get to interview John yet? Berardino?
227
00:27:2.2
SS: No.
228
00:27:3.4
BT: Okay. You should try to interview him or at least, you can also um, I know he has email, so thats another way too. Do you have his email?
229
00:27:20.8
SS: I dont have his email. Can I actually get that from you?
230
00:27:22.9
BT: Mm-hmm. (long pause; sound of writing)
231
00:27:49.1
BT: Dr. Shephard used to always get Tricia and Tina confused. So he would call Tricia byhe would call her Tina and hed call me
232
00:27:57.1
SS: Hed call you Tricia. (laughs)
233
00:28:1.3
BT: So, well, thank you very much.
234
00:28:3.2
SS: Oh wait, I have one more question for you. Sorry if you dont mind.
235
00:28:5.7
BT: Im here.
236
00:28:7.6
SS: Thank you so much. Are there any last words that you would like to leave behind? Anything that I havent asked you about that youd like to mention, or?
237
00:28:14.9
BT: Well, Im very passionate about, you know, giving back, and I think that you know, it kind of ties into what I was saying about mentoring students. I felt like that wasI felt like I, you know, my livelihood, myyou know, the things Im able to do because I have good training and secured a good job. I think that its enabled me to do so many things, and have so many opportunities. And not that were rich, but were financially stable. And so its allowed me to do things thatI think that I always have had this feeling to give back.
238
00:28:56.9
I went to school on scholarships, and I was very fortunate to have good enough grades to do that. So Ive made it really my effort in life to create scholarships for USF audiology, and I have done that. So the scholarships that we give out now, Im very much a part of the funding of those scholarships.
239
00:29:22.4
SS: Thats very special.
240
00:29:24.4
BT: So I think that, you know not only did I get my education but my friendships. The people I see on a regular basis, many of them, if not two-thirds of them, are people I know from audiology. So its not just my job or my profession but its my support system.
241
00:29:48.2
SS: Of course.
242
00:29:50.2
BT: So giving back by helping other students is really important to me.
243
00:29:57.4
SS: Thats great. Thank you so much. Thank you so, so much. This is wonderful.
244
00:30:1.9
BT: Okay. And good luck.
245
00:30:4.1
SS: Thank you.
246
00:30:5.2
BT: So [are] we off the air here?



PAGE 1

COPYR I GHT NOT I CE This Oral History is copyrighted by the University of South Florida Libraries Oral History Program on behalf of the Board of Trustees of the Univ ersity of South Florida. Copyright, 1995 201 7 University of South Florida. All rights, reserv ed. This oral history may be used for research, instruction, and private study under the provisions of the Fair Use. Fair Use is a provision of the United States Copyright Law (United States Code, Title 17, section 107), which allows limited use of copyrighted materials under certain conditions. Fair Use limits the amount of material that may be used. For all other permissions and requests, contact the UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA LIBRARIES ORAL HISTORY PROGRAM at the Univ ersity of South Florida, 4202 E. Fowler Avenue, LIB 122, Tampa, FL 33620.


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