Widespread Bat White-Nose Syndrome Fungus, Northeastern China

Citation

Material Information

Title:
Widespread Bat White-Nose Syndrome Fungus, Northeastern China
Series Title:
Emerging Infectious Diseases
Creator:
Hoyt, Joseph R.
Langwing, Kate E.
Sun, Keping
Parise, Katy L.
Jiang, Tinglei
Frick, Winifred F. et al
Publisher:
CDC
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Tolerance ( local )
Emerging Infectious Disease ( local )
Geomyces Destructans ( local )
Pseudogymnoascus Destructans ( local )
Resistance ( local )
White-Nose Syndrome ( local )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Notes

Abstract:
Predicting species' fates following the introduction of a novel pathogen is a significant and growing problem in conservation. Comparing disease dynamics between introduced and endemic regions can offer insight into which naive hosts will persist or go extinct, with disease acting as a filter on host communities. We examined four hypothesized mechanisms for host–pathogen persistence by comparing host infection patterns and environmental reservoirs for Pseudogymnoascus destructans (the causative agent of white-nose syndrome) in Asia, an endemic region, and North America, where the pathogen has recently invaded. Although colony sizes of bats and hibernacula temperatures were very similar, both infection prevalence and fungal loads were much lower on bats and in the environment in Asia than North America. These results indicate that transmission intensity and pathogen growth are lower in Asia, likely due to higher host resistance to pathogen growth in this endemic region, and not due to host tolerance, lower transmission due to smaller populations, or lower environmentally driven pathogen growth rate. Disease filtering also appears to be favouring initially resistant species in North America. More broadly, determining the mechanisms allowing species persistence in endemic regions can help identify species at greater risk of extinction in introduced regions, and determine the consequences for disease dynamics and host–pathogen coevolution.
Original Version:
Emerging Infectious Diseases, Vol. 22, no. 1 (2016).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of South Florida Library
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
This object is protected by copyright, and is made available here for research and educational purposes. Permission to reuse, publish, or reproduce the object beyond the bounds of Fair Use or other exemptions to copyright law must be obtained from the copyright holder.

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serial

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