The earliest unequivocally modern humans in southern China

Citation

Material Information

Title:
The earliest unequivocally modern humans in southern China
Series Title:
Nature
Creator:
Liu, Wu
Martinón-Torres, María
Cai, Yan-jun
Xing, Song
Tong, Hao-wen
Pei, Shu-wen
Jan Sier, Mark
Wu, Xiao-hong
Edwards, R. Lawrence
Cheng, Hai
Li, Yi-yuan
Yang, Xiong-xin
Bermúdez de Castro, José María
Wu, Xiu-jie
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Homo Sapiens ( local )
Modern Humans ( local )
South China ( local )
Daoxian ( local )
Neanderthals ( local )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Notes

Abstract:
The hominin record from southern Asia for the early Late Pleistocene epoch is scarce. Well-dated and well-preserved fossils older than ∼45,000 years that can be unequivocally attributed to Homo sapiens are lacking1,2,3,4. Here we present evidence from the newly excavated Fuyan Cave in Daoxian (southern China). This site has provided 47 human teeth dated to more than 80,000 years old, and with an inferred maximum age of 120,000 years. The morphological and metric assessment of this sample supports its unequivocal assignment to H. sapiens. The Daoxian sample is more derived than any other anatomically modern humans, resembling middle-to-late Late Pleistocene specimens and even contemporary humans. Our study shows that fully modern morphologies were present in southern China 30,000–70,000 years earlier than in the Levant and Europe5,6,7. Our data fill a chronological and geographical gap that is relevant for understanding when H. sapiens first appeared in southern Asia. The Daoxian teeth also support the hypothesis that during the same period, southern China was inhabited by more derived populations than central and northern China. This evidence is important for the study of dispersal routes of modern humans. Finally, our results are relevant to exploring the reasons for the relatively late entry of H. sapiens into Europe. Some studies have investigated how the competition with H. sapiens may have caused Neanderthals’ extinction (see ref. 8 and references therein). Notably, although fully modern humans were already present in southern China at least as early as ∼80,000 years ago, there is no evidence that they entered Europe before ∼45,000 years ago. This could indicate that H. neanderthalensis was indeed an additional ecological barrier for modern humans, who could only enter Europe when the demise of Neanderthals had already started.
Original Version:
Nature, Vol. 526 (2015-10-14).

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