Ancient West African foragers in the context of African population history

Citation

Material Information

Title:
Ancient West African foragers in the context of African population history
Series Title:
Nature
Creator:
Lipson, Mark
Ribot, Isabelle
Mallick, Swapan
Rohland, Nadin
Olalde, Inigo
Adamski, Nicole
Broomandkhoshbacht, Nasreen
Lawson, Ann Marie
Lopez, Saioa
Oppenheimer, Jonas
Stewardson, Kristin
Asombang, Raymond Neba'ane
Bocherens, Herve
Bradman, Neil
Culleton, Brendan J.
Cornelissen, Els
Crevecoeur, Isabelle
de Maret, Pierre
Fomine, Forka Leypey Matthew
Lavachery, Philippe
Mindzie, Christophe Mbida
Orban, Rosine
Sawchuk, Elizabeth
Semal, Patrick
Thomas, Mark G.
Van Neer, Wim
Veeramah, K
Publisher:
Springer Nature
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Archaeology ( local )
Evolutionary Genetics ( local )
Haplotypes ( local )
Population Genetics ( local )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Notes

Abstract:
Our knowledge of ancient human population structure in sub-Saharan Africa, particularly prior to the advent of food production, remains limited. Here we report genome-wide DNA data from four children—two of whom were buried approximately 8,000 years ago and two 3,000 years ago—from Shum Laka (Cameroon), one of the earliest known archaeological sites within the probable homeland of the Bantu language group1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11. One individual carried the deeply divergent Y chromosome haplogroup A00, which today is found almost exclusively in the same region12,13. However, the genome-wide ancestry profiles of all four individuals are most similar to those of present-day hunter-gatherers from western Central Africa, which implies that populations in western Cameroon today—as well as speakers of Bantu languages from across the continent—are not descended substantially from the population represented by these four people. We infer an Africa-wide phylogeny that features widespread admixture and three prominent radiations, including one that gave rise to at least four major lineages deep in the history of modern humans.
Original Version:
Nature, Vol. 577 (2020-01-22).

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University of South Florida Library
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
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