Discovery of Novel Bat Coronaviruses in South China That Use the Same Receptor as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

Citation

Material Information

Title:
Discovery of Novel Bat Coronaviruses in South China That Use the Same Receptor as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus
Series Title:
Journal of Virology
Creator:
Luo, Chu-Ming
Wang, Ning
Yang, Xing-Lou
Liu, Hai-Zhou
Zhang, Wei
Li, Bei
Hu, Ben
Peng, Cheng
Geng, Qi-Bin
Zhu, Guang-Jian
Li, Fang
Shi, Zheng-Li
Publisher:
American Society for Microbiology
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Novel Bat Coronaviruses ( local )
Coronaviruses ( local )
Bat ( local )
Bats ( local )
Mers ( local )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Notes

Abstract:
Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has represented a human health threat since 2012. Although several MERS-related CoVs that belong to the same species as MERS-CoV have been identified from bats, they do not use the MERS-CoV receptor, dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4). Here, we screened 1,059 bat samples from at least 30 bat species collected in different regions in south China and identified 89 strains of lineage C betacoronaviruses, including Tylonycteris pachypus coronavirus HKU4, Pipistrellus pipistrellus coronavirus HKU5, and MERS-related CoVs. We sequenced the full-length genomes of two positive samples collected from the great evening bat, Ia io, from Guangdong Province. The two genomes were highly similar and exhibited genomic structures identical to those of other lineage C betacoronaviruses. While they exhibited genome-wide nucleotide identities of only 75.3 to 81.2% with other MERS-related CoVs, their gene-coding regions were highly similar to their counterparts, except in the case of the spike proteins. Further protein-protein interaction assays demonstrated that the spike proteins of these MERS-related CoVs bind to the receptor DPP4. Recombination analysis suggested that the newly discovered MERS-related CoVs have acquired their spike genes from a DPP4-recognizing bat coronavirus HKU4. Our study provides further evidence that bats represent the evolutionary origins of MERS-CoV.
Original Version:
Journal of Virology, Vol. 92, no. 13 (2018-04-18).

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University of South Florida Library
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
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