Receptor Usage of a Novel Bat Lineage C Betacoronavirus Reveals Evolution of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome-Related Coronavirus Spike Proteins for Human Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4 Binding

Citation

Material Information

Title:
Receptor Usage of a Novel Bat Lineage C Betacoronavirus Reveals Evolution of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome-Related Coronavirus Spike Proteins for Human Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4 Binding
Series Title:
The Journal of Infectious Diseases
Creator:
Lau, Susanna K. P.
Zhang, Libiao
Luk, Hayes, K. H.
Xiong, Lifeng
Peng, Xingwen
Li, Kenneth S. M.
He, Xiangyang
Zhao, Pyrear Su-Hei
Fan, Rachel, Y. Y.
Wong, Antonio C. P.
Ahmed, Syed Shakeel
Cai, Jian-Piao
Chan, Jasper F. W.
Sun, Yinyan
Jin, Dongyan
Chen, Honglin
Lau, Terrence C. K.
Kok, Raven, K. H.
Li, Wenhui
Yuen, Kwok-Yung
Woo, Patrick C. Y.
Publisher:
Oxford Academic
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4 ( local )
Hypsugo Bat ( local )
Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus ( local )
Spike Glycoprotein ( local )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Notes

Abstract:
Although bats are known to harbor Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV)-related viruses, the role of bats in the evolutionary origin and pathway remains obscure. We identified a novel MERS-CoV-related betacoronavirus, Hp-BatCoV HKU25, from Chinese pipistrelle bats. Although it is closely related to MERS-CoV in most genome regions, its spike protein occupies a phylogenetic position between that of Ty-BatCoV HKU4 and Pi-BatCoV HKU5. Because Ty-BatCoV HKU4 but not Pi-BatCoV HKU5 can use the MERS-CoV receptor human dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (hDPP4) for cell entry, we tested the ability of Hp-BatCoV HKU25 to bind and use hDPP4. The HKU25-receptor binding domain (RBD) can bind to hDPP4 protein and hDPP4-expressing cells, but it does so with lower efficiency than that of MERS-RBD. Pseudovirus assays showed that HKU25-spike can use hDPP4 for entry to hDPP4-expressing cells, although with lower efficiency than that of MERS-spike and HKU4-spike. Our findings support a bat origin of MERS-CoV and suggest that bat CoV spike proteins may have evolved in a stepwise manner for binding to hDPP4.
Original Version:
The Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 218, no. 2 (2018-07-15).

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University of South Florida Library
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
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