History of Florida : past and present, historical and biographical, volume II.


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History of Florida : past and present, historical and biographical, volume II.

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History of Florida : past and present, historical and biographical, volume II.
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Cutler, H. G.
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Lewis Pub. Co.
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History -- Biography -- Florida -- United States, Florida ( lcsh )

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University of South Florida
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HI S T O R Y O F FLORIDA P ast and Present HISTOR I CAL AND BIO GRAP HICAL l ssued i n Three Volumes Volwn c I I 00043 MAR 13 1980 THE L E W IS PUBLI SHING CO MPANY CHICAGO AND NEW YORK 1923 •

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l ti C uPYH 1 G11T , 1923 B Y Tl-Ile: L E \ \ . J S P UBLlS H LNC C . \ll, A '\'Y

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History of Florida IIoN. CARY AucusTus HARDEE, who was in augurated Governor in Florida in 1922, has proved in hi s career as a lawyer, bu s i n ess man and citizen a possessor of a ll the S llbstantial qual iti es and abi liti es n eeded by th e c h icf executive of a g reat commonwealth. Governor Hardee Jia s come up from lhe r:rnk s . A native of Florida, he was born o n a farm in Taylor County near Perry, November i3, 1876, son of James B. and Amanda Katharine (Johnson) Hardee. His father i s s till livin g a r etire d r esi d ent of :Mad i so n . Both parents were born in Quitman, Georgia, where the g r and father Thoma E. Hardee was a planter a nd s lav e owner. Jam es B. Ha1dee spent hi s boyhood in Georgia and as a yollng man moved to Tayl o r County, F lorida. In 1863 h e enliste d in Com pany B of the Firs t Special Brigade, a Florida regiment of Infantry and se rv e d two years. A ft e r the war he located on hi s farm in Taylor County and was active in its m a nagem ent until h e r e tired several years ago. F o r many year s h e was tax collector, and has been a l ea d e r in the Missionary Baptist Church. His wife died at :Madison in 1 9 12. Governor Hardee, fourth in a large famil y of ten chi ldren, spent hi s b oy hood o n the farm. and had o n l y a public sc hool educati o n. His ea rl y ambitio n was for the law, and in co nj unct i o n with hi s ea r ly s u ccesses in that profession h e set for himself the high ideal s of publ ic sen i ce, a ll of which have b ee n s p lendidl y r ea l i zed . He began making hi s own way at the age of seventeen. He had an experience as teacher in rura l sc h oo l s, and whi l e so engaged took up th e study of law with books b orro wed from hi s bro th e r C. J. Hardee also an attorney. He read in th e night hours, o n holidays and vacations, and at t h e age of twenty-two was admitted t o the bar and began practice at Live Oak, th e town still h o n ored b y hi s leg a l r esi d e n ce. Governor Har d ee continlt e d to prac tice law llll til 191.j, and gained a p lace a mong the Stat e's l eading-attorneys. From 1905 lo i913 h e was state' s attorn ey of th e Thin] Jt!di cia l Dist1icl. In l 9 I S h e was e l ec t e d t o represent Suwanee County in the Legislature, was c hosen speaker of the House, and w a s again speak e r in the sessi on of 1 917. Since 1 914 his business ener g i es have been largely directed to banking. He was one of the organiz e r s in 1902 of the First Natio n a l Bank of Live Oak and has been its president since 1 90 7. H e i s also president of th e Branford State Bank at Branfor d in Suwanee County, and i s owner and one of the organizers o f th e :H ayo Stal e Bank at Mayo in Lafayette County . He w as fo r over twenty years a D eaco n in th e Baptist Ch llrch of Live Oak and active in its Sllnday sc h ool. During the Vlorld war Mr. Hardee acted as chair-man of Liberty Loan committee m Suwa n ee County during a ll the five campaigns fo r the s a l e of Government bonds. H e is one of th e trustees of the Florida Historical Soc i ety, a n d hi s private library indicates his strong inc l inati on fo r historic a l reading and research. Gove rn o r Hardee i s affiliated with the Royal Arch Cliap1e r and Knight Templar Commandery of t h e Masonic Order at Live O ak, and Morocco Templ e of the Shrine at Jacksonvill e . He is a Past Chancellor Com m ander of Liv e Oak LodgKnights of Pythias and a m ember of the Elks at Tallah a ssee. Ilis favorite outdoor recreati on is fis hin g. In hi s public caree1-, and since he entered th e Governor's mans ion a t Tallahas. cc. Mr. Hardee has r epresented the yery esse n ce of democracy, and s hows n o t a trace of personal egoti s m. He has the sympathies of a man w h o has a c hi eve d succe s by rugged effort a n d exertion. A mong other qualities he i s a brilliant orator. February 7, 1900, at Madison , h e married Miss Maude Randl e of that town, daughte r of Theodore and l\Ioseley (Harriman) Randle, both natives of Florida and r ep resenting o ld time families o[ the s t ate. His grandfat h e r Capt. Vance R:rndle was a so ldier in t h e Civi l war. Theo dore Randle was a planter, served as stale senator and was a n active democrat and Baptist. During the vVorld war, l\ l rs. Hardee was a leader in h e r home community at Live Oak in war a uxilia r y movem ents. They have o n e daughte r Moseley, wi fc of .Louis J . Day. a lumbe r m ercha n t at Live Oak. Mr. and ::vi rs. Day ha Ye a daughter Mary Virg inia . ARTHUR F. PERRY. The financiers who have left the impress of their abilit y on th e financial hi sto r y of Florida h a v e been,_ in a. rnaj or_ity <;>f cases, m e n of affa irs, with littl e 1nstruct1on 111 sc i e nc e . They have s t e pp ed from th e count e r o r office to the co untin g-room, demonstrating-tit ir fitness t o be lead e r s by soundn" ess of j ndgment and s kill in managem e nt. Such a man t h e ge neration of bu s in ess m e n now passing fro m th e scenes of active business recog ni zed in Arthur F. Perry at a time when he had just passed hi s m a j ority a t Jac k so nville, to whi c h city h e had co m e in 1 88-1, as a youth of eigh t ee n yea r s . During the follow ino-years he d eve lo p e d a capacity fo r financial m;nagement, inc luding those opposite qualities o f bold n ess and caution, enterprise and prudence, w h ich stam ped h im as a born e ngineer of finance, eve ntuall y leadi n g to hi s present position of president of the Florida Nation al Bank of Jackso nville. H e is di tinguished as well as a publicspirited citizen, an influe n tial public man and a promoter of public institutions. , Mr. Perry w:is born at Yarmouth , Nova Scoti a , 2

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4 HISTORY O F FLORIDA i\fay 13, 1866, a n d left public sc h oo l at t h e age o f fiftee n years t o ente r a m e rc anti l e co ncern. H e was eigh teen years of age when h e came t o J acksonville, and four years l a t e r , in l 888, was appoin t e d sec r etary a n d treas m e r o f the Citizens Ga _ s and E l ectric Comp a n y . He occ upied t h i s post until 1893 , whe n h e was appoi n ted sec r e ta r y and treasurer of th e South ern Savi n gs a n d Trust Co mpany, which n a m e was la t e r changed to th e Mercan tile Exch a nge Bank, of which h e b eca m e ca s hi e r. At th e t i m e o f the o r ga nization of th e F l orida Ban k and Trus t Company, January 5 , 190_;, h e became vice pr es id e nt, a nd retai ned thi s position w h en t h e bank was natio na l ized, in Sep t e mb e r, 1906, a s the F l orida National Ban k of ] acksonville . H e s u cceeded t o the pres idency in J anuary, 1913. Mr. Perr y's ability a n d j udgment h ave bee n r ecog ni ze d on numero u s occas ion s a n d i n various way s . H e i s th e di r ec t o r fro m F lorida o f the Federal Inte rnationa l Banking Compa ny, the $ 7 , 00o , ooo E d ge Law Ban k for fin anci n g so uth ern commodities; d u r i n g the \ V o rl d war p eriod was stat e treas u rer of th e United war \Vork Ca mpaig n , and l a t e r ha s been state treas u r e r of the R ooseve l t Memorial Association. Fro m 1897 u n t i l 190 1 he was a m e mb e r of th e Jack so nvill e C i t y Council; from 1 9 0 3 t o 191 l was a m ember o f th e Board of Bond Trus te es, duri n g four years of which time h e se rved as sec r etary of that bo dy; has b ee n secretar y of t h e J ac k so nville Public L ibrary s i nce it s o r ganiza t i o n ; and was a member of t h e Board of Gove rno r s o f th e J ackso nville Board of Trade from r900 t o 1902 . and a v i ce p r esi d ent of that o r ganizat i o n in 1 903. His soc ia l co nn ec t i o n s are numerou s a n d i n c lud e m e mb e r s hip in th e Semin o le C lub, th e Flo rid a Co u n try Cl ub and the Timu qua n a Country Club. Mr. Perry's s ucce ss h a s b ee n the r esult of hi s o wn exe r ti o n s, g u i d e d , n o d oubt, by a natural endowment as admirabl e a s it i s r a re. He h as attained s u ccess in b u s i n ess, h igh soc ial position, and, what is the hi g hest tribute to hi s man y es timabl e q ua l iti es, the affect i o n o f hi s frie nd s a n d th e estee m o f th e best m embers of society. On Octo b e 1 7 , 1 8go, M r. Perry m a r ried Mi ss I sa b e lle C. Sti-awn, a nd th ey hav e two so n s : . rthur F., Jr., b o rn in r894, and Henry S . , born i n 1897 , both of w h o m serve d during the \ Vo rl d w a r, having bee n co mmi ss i o n e d lieute n ants i n th e Coas t Artillery Corps. \VrLLlAM BosTW JCK SHEPPARD, United States Judge of th e North e rn Dis t r ict of F l o ri da, h as earne d so m e of t h e b es t d i s t i nct ions associated with the F e d eral judici ary. H e has b ee n at all t i m es in intimate t o uch with t h e life and affairs o f hi s time, and ye t hi s deci s ion s have indicate d t hat detachment wh i ch is perh aps the first esse n tia l of wise a nd well co n s id ered judgme n t. J u d ge S heppard was born at Bristol , F l orida, October 5th , r 86 r, so n of Jose ph and Cynth i a ( M cA l i ley) Sheppard. H e was educated in pub l i c sc h oo ls, and during 1 88 1-82 was a studen t i n t h e U ni ve r s it y o f North Carolina. He was admi tted to th e ba r i n r8g1 , and prac ti ce d law at Apal achico l a, until 1903; h e b ecam e interes t e d i n pub l i c affa i r s befor e q u alify ing as a lawyer. H e was ca ndidate fo r state se nator in 1 888. In r8g6 , he wa s t h e nomin ee of h i s party for stat e -atto r n ey ge n e r al. He wa s collector of c u stoms at t h e port of. Apal achicola, from 1889 to 1894 , and agai n from 1 8g7 t o i 90 1 , and mayo r of Apal a c hi co l a in 189 4 -95. Tn 1903, Presi d ent: Rooseve l t a pp oi nt ed him Unite d States a a o rn ey for th e Northern Dis t r ict o f F l o r ida and h e h r l d that post of cl11ty 11nt i l h e was a pp o inted U n i te d States j udge for t h e same d i stric t o n September s . 1907 . Judge Sheppard ha s pres id e d i n m a n y important cases. He e njoys the disti n c t i o n of havi n g h e l d court i n m o r e diff e r ent states than a n y judge l iving. H e ha s s a t in eve r y d i s t r i c t , except o ne, in the Fifth Judic i a l C ircu i t comprising Geo r g ia a nd t h e live g u l f states , inc lu d ing a term i n t h e pri n cipa l c it i es of t h e Fifth C irc u i t from Savannah, Georg ia, to E l Paso, Texas. A phrase, now of gen erally c u r r ent usage in newspaper a nd other ed i torials, was o r i g ina te d by J ud ge S h eppard in the notab l e American Naval Stor es case tri ed at Savannah i n April , 1 908, when h e dec l a r ed "g u i l t to b e p e r sonal , " an d was th e first ] udge t o i mpriso n offe nd e r s un d e r t h e S h erman A n t i T ru st Law. Judge Sheppar d i s a l so famous for the promptnes with which h e d i spa t c h e the bus i n ess of t h e co u r t wh e r e he presides. In 1 9 1 1 , f o r mo r e than a yea r h e h e ld the ter m s and transac t e d the bu s i n ess s imu ltaneously of the Southern Distr ict of Geo r g i a and t h e Nor t h e rn and S o u th e rn di st ri cts of F lori da. Since 19q, by invitati on h e s i t s i n 1 e w York C i ty, t h e South ern Distri c t of New York, i n aid of the r es id ent j u dges two m o n t h s eve ry summer. Judge S h ep pard was a r e publican in polit i cs . i s affiliated with th e Knights of Pythias and E lk s, and i s a membe r of the Country C l ub in h i s h o m e c it y of Pensacol a. At Bristol, F l orida, May 10. . 1 890, h e marrie d Mary E mil y Gibson , daughter of R ev. ]. '. G i bson, w h o was a U n i ta r i an m i n i ste r. Judge and Mrs. Sheppard have the fo l l owing c hi l d r en: Pearl F l e min g. wife of Haro l d Wakefiel d Scofield of Morenci, Michigan ; Claire Sheppard; E lizabet h , wife of Li e ut. Freel l'vL Byers of th e U n i ted States N avy. now stat i o n ed a t the ca na l zone; Chri stine, w h o marri e d Her ma n E . Holland, a l i eute n a n t in t h e navy at San Diego , Ca lif ornia; a nd \ Vill iam B., Jr., n ow fourteen yea r s of age. MosES OscAR OvE l < STREET, one of the for e m o s t of the progr ess i ve bu si n ess m en o f O r lando, judicial cente r of Orange a u n t y , and present ( 1 922) r e p r ese 11ta t i ve of th e 19th d i strict i n the F l o r ida senate, was born at Kirkland, Geo r gia, October 1 0, 1 869, a nd i s a so n of James \V. a n d Susan Ann (Sol o m o n ) Overs t r eet, \\' h o were born and r ea r e d in that tate, wh e r e t h e father passed hi s entire I i f e and wh e r e th e widowed m othe r s t ill r es i d es, at th e ve n e r ab l e age of e ight y seve n years. James 'vV. Overstreet became a s u ccessfu l exponent of agricultural and l i ve s tock industr y i n h i s native state, wa a l oya l an d s u b stantia l citizen and commanded unqual i fiecl popu lar confidence and estee m , he having been seventy-e i ght years of age at t he time of hi s death. Of the fine family of fifteen chi ldren all but o n e attained to yea r s of maturity . i'vfoses 0. Overstreet was reared o n the o l d h o m e farm, a n d h i s early ed ucati o n was ac quire d unde r the preceptorship of private tuto r s em p l oye d by hi s father to instruct the ch ildren of the h o u seho l d. i\i[r. Overstreet co n t i n u e d to be associated with t h e activiti es of the home farm unti l he had attained t o hi s legal m a j o r ity, and h e then init iated hi s ind epe nd ent car ee r , i n w hi c h h e h a s mustere d hi s fin e power s in s u ch a way a s t o w i n large and s ubstantia l s u ccess, the w hi le he has so orde r e d hi s course in all of t h e r e l a tions of l if e as t o m erit and receive the u n e q uivoc a l respect and esteem of hi s fellow men . His firs t i n d e p en dent en t erpri se was initia t ed when h e e nt e r e d int o a contract to bu i l d rai l r oa d c ro-;sing s a nd wate r-clr a i 1 1 s . TTe s oo n co m -

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HISTORY OF FLORIDA 5 p lctcd thi s w ork, a nd th e reaft e r h e t a u ght i11 t h e publi c sc h oo l s o f h i s nati,e s t a t e fo r a p e r i o d o f tl\ o years , in th e meanwhile u sing his v a cation pe ri o d s profit ab l y . He n ex t g a v e four years o f e x cellent se r v i ce in r iding turpentine camps for his bro th er-in-law. D . N . H o rn e , with whom h e came t o F l orida in S e p ' t e m b e r , 189&. T h ey purc h ase d a turpenti n e camp n e a r Plymouth, Orange County, where Mr. O verstreet mai n tai11e d hi s r eside nc e seve ral y ears. During th e enti r e p e ri o d of hi s r es id e n c e in F l orida h e has con tin ued hi s a s soc iati o n with t h e navalstores indu stry. a nd a b o u t i 905 h e expande d h i s fiel d of p r o du c t i ve e n terprise . b y e n gaging in the saw mill bu s irn.:ss. Jn thi s co nn ec ti o n he s o o n pro\' i ckd f a c iliti es f o r th e manufacturi n g of orange a 1 1 d , ege t ab l e crates, and the enterpris e i s n o w c011du c t e d unde r t h e titl e of t h e O ve r street C r a t e Company. I le i s pres i d ent aml gen eral mauage r u[ thi s co n1pan y . which , s inc e th e d estruction o f i t s large m i l l , a t Lockhart, i n 1 917, ha s fun c ti o n e d prin c ipall y in th e d ev e l opm ent and s ale o f lands w hi c h it had f ormerl y acquired. l n th e y ea 1 1 90 3 Mr. O v e r s t ee t r e m o v e d fro m P l y m o uth t o O r lando, th e county s eat, and h e r e , in 1 913, h e b eca m e pres id ent o f th e ba n k t hat i s n o w charte r e d a s the Firs t Nati o nal Bank o f Orlando . H e c o n t inu e d pres id ent o f thi s r epresentati v e fina nc i a l i n stitutio n until 1920 , w h e n th e d emands o f hi s oth e1 l arge and i m p ortant b u si n ess inter es t s l e d him t o r es i g n t h e office. H e i s pres ident o f th e Atl a s M anufac t uring Co mp a ny, manufacture r s o f th e Phillips wind ow-frame m a c h in es, and th i s i s o n e of t h e im portant i n du stri a l co n cerns o f Orlando . ln h i s business ca r ee r :Nfr. O vers t r ee t has shown marked initiati ve and co n structive abil ity, and hi s energy a nd progr ess i ve a n d well orde r e d po l icie s have enabl e d him to achie v e s ub s ta ntia l and worthy m a t e rial pros p e r i t y . A l r . Over st r ee t has n eve r wave r e d in hi s l oy al allegian ce t o th e d e m ocratic p arty, and h e h a s bee n c alle d u p o n t o se rve in Yari o u s offices o f pub l i c trus t. H e w a s a v a l u e d m e mb e r o f th e citv co un c i l o f Orlando a number o f t erms, wa s f o;. t w e h e o r m o r e years c ounty commi ss i o n e r , a nd in th i s co nn ec t i o n was a stalwart force in acl , a n c i n g th e good-roads m ov em e :it in Orauge County, a nd i n 1 9 20 h e was e le c t e d to the state Sena te, fo r th e regu lar term o f four y ears, h i s preferm e n t in thi s c o nn e ction being a n a ss u r an ce o f l oy al a n d effec t i ve se r v i ce in b ehalf o f th e state, a s w ell a s hi s con s t i tu ent di strict. In th' e t im e h o n o r e d Masonic fraternity 1v!r. Over stree t ha s r e c e i, e d th e maximum d e g r ees of t h e Y ork Rite . a s a m ember o f th e O rl a n d o c o m m a nd e r of K n i ghts T cmplars, and a l so the thirty>eco nd degr ee o f th e S co t t i s h R i t e, b es id es being a no b l e of th e Mys tic Shrine. H e i s affiliate d also with t h e !-.:nights o f P ythias and the B e n e v o l e n t a nd Prot ect i ve Orde r o f E l ks. The yea r 1 9 0 0 marke d the marriage o f Mr. O ve r st1ee t t o l'vliss R . Ethe l y n Chapman, daughte r o f J o h n T . C h apman, o f P lymo u th, O range Co un ty. Mrs . O ve r stree t w a s born in Geo rgia and was ab out eight years of age at the time of th e famil y r e m o va l t o F lorida. S enator and M r s . O verstreet are t h e parents of four c h i ldren: Robert T . , Hazel , E l izabeth, and M ildred. C H ARLES F . B u R Gl\IAN, who for many years has be e n a s ucces s fu l b u siness man and o u t standing figur e in the civic affairs of Volusia County, w a s at o n e tim e o n e o f the national leaders and organize r o f lab o r , and on e of the founde r s of t h e Ame rican F e d eratio n of Labor. There is prnbably n o m a n in F l orida m o r e t h oroughl y inform e d a s a sc h o lar and student o f t h e labor mo ve m ent in hi s t o r y than thi s Daytona real es ta t e and insurance man . The exp e r i e nc es o a v e r y bu s y Ii f e have brough t him an unus ua l u n d e r standing of 11ationa l a nd int ernational conditions bot h i n labo r circle s and bu s in ess affairs at large. H e was born at Mue nd en, Hanove r , G e r many, July 2 1 , r853 . His fathe r was a mi litary m a n and h i s mother a daug h1er of a Lutheran mini s t e r . Burgman a s a s ch oo l b o y too k the k ee ne s t mt e r es t i n th e s ubj ec t o f geography, hi s to r y and mus ic. and th ese int e r es t s have b ee n th e f eature of h i s int e l l ec tual l ife. H e was n o t of the wealth y c l a ss, and had a f tc r th e c o mm o n school s t o sen e a n appre nti ces hip fo r a practic a l trad e . H e l earne d th e t r ad e o f tai l o rin g i n o n e o f th e h igh c l ass es tabli s h m e nt s o f that kind in .the C i t y o f Hamburg. In M .arc h , 1872, bc111g nin e t e en years o f age, in orde r t o e scape t h e c ompu l sory mi litary servi ce of th e G erman army, h e went to L o nd o n , wh e r e he found emp l oy ment. Whil e th e r e h e attende d many of t h e So cialist meeti ngs h e l d by foll owers of Carl Marx a nd b eca m e so m ewhat ind octrinate d with the Marxian th e ori es of internationalism . In S epte mb e r , 1873 , h e arrived in America, i . n the mids t o f the g r e a t p a nic o f that year, and 111 t h e fac e of unprecc d e11tecl un e mpl o ym ent conditi o n s the n e w immi g r ant c o uld find no w ork in his l in e 01 a n y o t h e r and h e se i ze d an off ered oppor t u n i t y t o e nli s t in th e Unite d States Army, b eing a ss i g ned t o d u ty i n C ompany L of t h e Sixth U . S . Ca,alry . s tation e d th e n at For t Rile y , Kans a s . During t h e fiv e years h e was in t h e a rmy h e participate d in a numbe r of t h e Ind i an campai g n s, part icularl y i n th e Mi l e s ex pedition a g ain s t the C h ey enn es . The Sixth CaYa lry was t r a n s f e r r e d t o Ari z ona in th e summ e r o f 1 8 7 5 . F o r a tim e h e was stati oned at F o r t B o w ie, a n d fr o m t h e r e h e trave l e d o v e r exte n sive p o rti o n s of th e g r e a t South w es t ern co untry and into parts of Mexi co b efore the clay of railroads. In 1878 , o n l e a ving th e arm y , he built th e fir s t h o u se and s t o r e at D os C a bezo s , Ari z ona, th e n a n cwlv o p e n e d min ing c amp, but s o l d thi s bu siness in i 879 and went t o t h e Pacific Coas t . Herc a g ain h e w orke d fo r a tim e at t h e tai l oring tra d e in San Fra n c i s co, and soo n b ecame prominent in t h e organize d lab o r m o v e m ent a s r epresentative of t h e Tailors' Union . In November, r88r , a great labor C ocgress a s sembled at Pittsburgh , including r epres e ntati ve s fro m all ov e r th e nati o n , and that C o ngres s r e s u lted in the orga111izatio n o f the Ame r i can Fede r ati o n o f Labor. The five membe r s of first Exe c u tive B oard of that organization wer e : Richard P owers, presi d ent, who r epresented the Lake S ea m en's Union of Chicago ; Samu e l Gompers, fir s t vi ce president and n o w president of the Ame ri can F e d eratio n of Labo r, repr esenting the C i g.armakers Internation a l Union of New Y ork City ; Charles F . Burgman, second v i ce presi d ent, who represented the Pacific Coast Trade a n d Labor Unions through t h e Trades As se mb l y of San Francisco; A . C. Rankin , of tl;e Coa l M in e r s U n ion of the Monongah e l a and O hi o valley s , who w!l's e l ected treasurer; and 'vV . . H . Fos t e r , of Oincmnaiti , secretary, and representmg t h e International Typographical Uni on . M r . B urgman atte nd e d the Congress for the s p e cial pnrpose of prese ntin g data s h owing the infl u ence of C h i n e s e l a b o r in th e Pacific States, and it i s n o t eworthy tha t a s a res u l t of the presenta-

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G HISTOR Y OF FLORIDA t:on of this data a n d the influ e nce exerted b y the A m e r i ca n F e d eratio n of Labor t h e fi rst C hinese exclu s ion act was passed b y Con g ress in r 882. From 1 882 to 1 884 Mr. Burgman assi s t e d in t h e publication of Truth, a l a b o r paper at San Francisco. He late r establis hed himse l f as a m e r chan t tai l o r in that city for sev e n year s, but d i sliking c lose indoor confin e m ent h e sol d out hi s b u siness and the n b ecame state g rand sec retar y of th e Improve d Orde r of R e d m e n , and fro m r 8g3 to l Sgg was in c h a rge of Ins i g ni a , t h e offic ial paper of t h e Redm e n's organization for the Pacific Co a s t . In 1 898 Mr. Burgman with h i s w i fe, m a d e his fir s t v i s i t to Florida and to Daytona to visit hi s wife's m othe r , Mrs . H e l e n Wil m a n s Pos t . Soon afte rward h e took charge of Mrs. Post's publ icati o n. Free d o m , at S eabreeze. T hi s paper had a world-wid e circ uiation, and was publis hed by Mrs . Post in t h e inte rest o f m e ntal sci e nce. The deve lopm ent and b eautificati o n o f Seabree z e, the building o f th e Col o nnades Hote l , b h e o l d Clarendo n H o t e l and Hotel Princess Issena are achievem ents t hat a r e l a rgel y clu e t o Mrs. P os t' s influ e nce and acti vity . Fro m r 903 t o 1 905 M r . Burg m a n was in Philade lphia, and upo n hi s return to S eabreeze associate d hiJ111se l f w1th hi s son s, Jerom e A . a n d L eo C., in t h e j o b printing b u s in ess, known a s t h e P e n in s ul a Publis hi n g Compan y, an establishment later tra n s f erre d t o Dayto n a and n o w conducted unde r the nam e o f Burg man Brothe r s. by Jerom e Bur g m a n , whi l e Leo e ngaged in th e t ractor bus iness. Anoth e r so n , Carl F . . i s a p ainte1 and decorator at Seabreeze. H e l e n E .. a daughte r , i s the w i fe of B. B. Baggett, a promine n t m e r c h a n t of Daytona. !vir . Burg m a n m arried in 1883 F l o r e nce Nigh t in g al e Bake r , whose fath e r was a C al i f ornia f o r t y -nine r , and a ft e r hi s d eath hi s w idow b e cam e th e w i fe o f Col. C. C. Post. Si nce 1 909 l\Ir. Bur gman has b ee n e w ,.age d in r ea l es tate and in surance . wi th hi s b u s i ness now p ermanently locate d in Dayton a. His e a rl y r elio-i o u s affiliati o n s was with t h e Luth eran H e i s a promin ent m e mb e r o f t h e Daytona C h a mber of Comme r ce, and during all th e year s of hi s r es id e n ce in Florida has d e v o t ed himsel f to many movements identifie d with th e p u blic w e lfare . A f e w year s ago h e wro t e a notabl e seri es o f arti c les o n the labor movem ent, publis h e d in th e Dayton a Dail y News. These arti c l es betray hi s quality as a thinker, hi s i n t imate knowl edge o f labor hi s t o r y and of Euro pean eco n o mi c, industrial and p o litical histor y in gen e r al, and hi s compre h e n s i ve g rasp of t h e te ndencies of labor movem e n t for the welfar e o f soc iety in gen e r a l , a n d with a reco g niti o n of th e erro r s and the limitatio n s of labor l eade r s, who in m a n y cases, in J\ifr. Burgman's judg m e n t , have f aile d to exemplify that broad and e nli ghtened judgme n t which wou l d have m a d e it poss i b l e for such l eade r s to turn t h e ir o pportunities t o th e p erma n e n t advan t age and welfar e of labor in particul a r and soci e t y in gener al. In hi s advan c in g years and with hi s ri p e n e d j udgmen t Mr. Burgm a n has turned hi s att e n ti o n t o the a dvan ce m ent of t h e s tate and particul a r l y that part o f t h e s t a t e o f F l orida w h e r e h e has made hi s h o m e during t h e pas t twentyfour years, feelin g, as h e expressed it, that h e who does all h e c a n l o a dvance hi s h o m e t own t o that ext ent h e l p s to advan ce the w o r l d . B 1 ; NJAMl N A . l\1Ec1r-;N1ss. It i s a fact that needs n o proof at this late clay that the g reat State of Florida has m a n y othe r c la im s t o d istinction tha n h e r beautiful sce n e r y , h e r f e r til e soil and d e lightful climate, and o n e of t hese recognized clai m s i s her contributio n of able, t h o r o ughl y educated youn g m e n to h e r c i t iz e n ship. H e n ce the compos iti o n o f her professi o n a l b o dies a r e a bove the average, a n d this i s particularly noticeabl e i n h e r c ourts of law. Perha p s n o ci t y in the s t a t e has a m o r e a b le bar tha n T alla hassee, m a n y o f it s m embe r s be in g m e n of b rilliant attainments and promine n t a l so in o th e r lin es o f effor t. One o f the r ep resenta ti ve m embe r s of t hi s body i s Benjamin Andre w s Meginniss, a forme r county judge o f Leo n County . Judge Meginniss was born at Tallahassee, Florida. October 1 7 , 188 4 . His par ents wer e Benjamin A . a n d Mary H a mi l t o n (Scr e v e n ) Meginni ss, the latter of who m was b orn a t Tallahassee, b u t of o l d South Carolin a a ncestr y . T h e father of Judge Meginniss was a nati ve of Mar y land. but the g r ea t e r part of hi s life was passed at Tallahassee, whe r e h e was a man of conseque n ce . In hi s earlier b u siness career h e was a m e r chant, late r becam e associated with the p rivat e b anki n g firm of G. V..T . Saxon & Com pany, and fo1 twenty-five year s was cashie r of the C api t a l C it y Bank o f Tal l a hassee. T o som e exte n t h e was acti ve in d e m oc rati c p o litical ci r c l es, was a libe r a l contributor t o c harity and was a faithful m e m b e r of the M etho dist Episcopal Churc h. H e was promin ent in the fraterna l orde r o f Odd F e l l o w s, and fo r twenty year s was g rand treasure r o f th e G r and L o dge o f Flo rida. Both par e n t s o f Judge l\Ieginni ss have passed a way, hi s fathe r dying in 1900, a t th e age of fifty years, and hi s m othe r in 1918, i n h e r s i x ty-eighth year. Enjoyin g excepti o n a l education a l p r i vileges, Benj amin A. Meginni ss won hi s A. B. degree at the F l orida S tate Col lege in 1 90 3 . and hi s LL. B. degree fro m the University of V irginia in 1 906, a n d in the s a m e year, altho u g h but twenty -two year s o l d , was ap\)o int e d county j udge of L eo n County, and se r ve d o n the be n c h with r e m arkabl e judic ia l effic ie n cy until h e r es i g n e d i n r918 . H e had ear l y id e n t ifie d himsel f w ith t h e You n g M en's Chri s tia n Associati o n , a n d aft e r r etiring fro m t h e b e n c h offer e d hi s se rvices to thi s o rgani za ti o n and accomp a ni e d a unit t o Cannes, France, and sen e d s i x m onths during th e \.Vo rl d war as sec retary o f t h e enterta inm e n t committee. H e returned t o the Unite d States in 1 9 1 9 and open e d a gen eral practi ce in hi s nati, e c ity. \Vhile s t ill serving as county judge Mr. 1.fe g in ni ss served a lso as Government appeal agen t for L eo n County, hi s wi lli n g ness a n d capacity fo r work seeming b o undle ss as w e ll as effic i e n t. In J anu a r y, 19 2 1 , h e was again publicl y h o n o r e d, bein g appointed U nited States commissi o n e r for the Distric t of Florida, i n w hich office h e served until the followin g April , w h e n h e 1esigned i n orde r t o accept t h e a pp ointment of c hief c l erk o f the H o use of R epresentatives in the Legi s lative sess i o n of 19 21. Notwiths t a n d in g the demands m a d e upo n hi s time and attenti o n by the respon s i b ilities o f office, Judge Meginni s has never b ee n i n attentive in regard t o c ivic affairs r e latin g t o the gen e r a l welfare of T allahassee, o r t h e m ent of subs t antial l oca l e n t erprises. He 1 s a director of t h e Tal l a hassee C h ambe r o f Comme rce, and serve d for e i ghteen m o n t h s as sec r eta1y of that important o rgani za ti o n , a n d i s a stockholde r in the Exchange Bank o f this c it y. Judge l\leginni ss m arrie d in 1 9 1 0, at Gadsden

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HIS T O R Y O F F L ORIDA 7 A labam a, M i ss Mar y Murph1 ee, w h o i s a n i ece o f Dr. A . A. 1v[urphree, pres id ent of th e Flo rida State U ni ve r s i t y a t G ain es vill e, a n d a daughter o f l{on. \ Va lt e r T. Murphr ee, a n attorney a nd form e rl y a m e mb e r of th e Legi s l ature and mayo r o f Gadsd en. Judge a nd M r s . Meginni ss h a v e two c hil d r e n , Benjamin A ndre ws, Jr. , a n d Mary H a mil to n . T h e fa mil y be l o ngs t o St. J ohn's E p isco p a l Churc h , in whi c h Jud ge Meginni ss i s a ves t r y m an. M r s . Meginni ss g r aduate d in r 9TO fro m th e F l orida S t a t e College fo r \ Vo m e n , wi t h t h e degr ee of A . B . . a nd t a k es a pr o min ent p art in muc h o f t h e pleasant soc i a l life of the c ity. S h e h as literar y t a l ent, and i s corres p onde n t fro m t h e cap it a l to t h e newsp ape r s of Jac k so n v ille, T a mp a. Pen saco l a a nd M iami. S h e h as a r ea d y w i t a n d w i e l ds a n ab l e p e n , a nd h e r contributi o n s a r e m a d e features in t h ese j ourna ls. Judge Meginni ss i s a Mason a nd Shrine r , b eing a m e m be r a n d a p as t m as t e r o f Jac k so n L o d ge No. r. F. a nd A . M.; pa s t hi g h priest of F l o r ida C h a pt e r No. T, R. A . M.; p as t e min ent commande r of St. O m a r Commande r y No. 1 2 , K . T.; a nd o f Temple, J ac k so n ville, A. A. 0 . N . M . S . H e i s a l so a pas t exal te d rnl e r of Lod ge No. 937 , E l k s , at Talla h assee. Judge llfegi nn i ss h as l e d t oo bu sy a life t o a dm i t of m u c h t ravel beyo nd hi s n a ti, e s t a t e o r taking p a r t i n m a n y of th e r e laxati o n s that a pp ea l t o ti 1 ecl b u siness m e n . but h e makes an excep t i o n of ten n i s and i s r ecog ni ze d as no easily va n quis h e d a ntagonis t in t h i s ga m e . HoN. F RED HENR Y DAvr s, w h ose sta11cli11g as a lawyer i s well kn o wn t o t h e F l orida ba r , h as b ee n e ngaged in a s uccessful pr ac ti ce a t Talla h assee fo 1 n ea rl y t e n y ea r s . } k i s t h e present r e pr esenta ti ve of L eo n County in th e Legi s l ature. i \fr. D av i s was b o rn a t G r ee n v ille, So uth Carolina, May 1 8 , 1 89 4 , a nd h as live d in F l orida since ear ly i n fa n cy. H e i s a son of Fre d H enry a nd Ann ie E . (Pear so n ) D avis . H i s fath e r was b orn at \l\ l aclesboro , North Ca r o l in a, and hi s m othe r at G r ee n ville, So u t h Carolin a. S h e d i e d in 1 9 r8. F r eel H enry D av i s . S r. . wh o di e d D ece m be r 5, 1 9 16, was a t y pographica l mac hinist by tra d e, a n d from 1 89 4 t o 1 90 7 w as e mpl oye d o n the F l o ri da T im es-Uni o n a t Jack so nvill e . In 1 90 7 h e r e moved t o T allahassee, a nd was i n th e se r v i ce of Col. T. J. A pple yard, s t a t e pri nt e r . H e se rved as pr es id ent o f th e Tallahassee Typogr a phi ca l U ni o n fro m i t s o r g a ni z a ti o n until his d eath . H e was a de m oc r a t a nd a M e t h o di st. F r eel H enry D avis atte nd e d the publi c sc h oo l s at J ac k so n ville and T allahassee, a nd follo win g a course of study o f t h e law h e w as admitte d t o t h e ba r TO\e mb e r 4 , 1 914. Since th e n h e has bee n activ e l y e n g a ge d in pract i ce a t Talla ha ssee. an d was assoc iated wit h H o n . J o hn L. Neel y until the l a t te r 's ap p oint m ent as Unite d States di s tri c t a tt o rney. He h a n d l es a ge n e r a l pra c ti ce, a nd in assoc i a ti o n w ith Senato r \1\1 . C. H o d g e s, well k n ow n c rimin a l lawyer of W est F l orida, h as b ee n co nn ec t e d h e r e w ith so m e o f th e imp ortant c rim ina l cases. Both in a nd o u t of hi s professi o n h e ha s r e nd e r e d so m e im p o r t ant p ubli c se rvi ce. H e wa s county p r osec utin g atto rn ey of L eo n County in 1 9 1 9 -20, a n d fro m 1 917 t o 1 920 w as n on-res id ent co un ty p rosecuting atto rn ey o f \ Vakulla Co un ty. During t h e \ Vo r lcl war h e se rv e d fo r a t im e as a s p ec i a l ass i s t a n t U n i te d States a tt o rn ey, until h e r es i gne d to j o in th e Office r s Traini n g Ca mp a t Ca m p Han coc k , Geo r g i a, wh e r e h e was co m mi ss i o n e d a seco nd lieute n a nt of i n fantry. H e r ece i , ecl hi s h o n o r ab l e d i sc h a r ge Decem be r 12, 1 9 1 8 . Mr. D av i s r ep r ese nt e d L eo n Co un ty i n th e Legi s l ature i n th e sessio n o f 1 92 1 , a n d was r ee l ec t e d in 1 922. H e was autho r o f th e Dav i s Bad C h ec k Law, and ha s pr o v e d o n e o f t h e 1 a lu ab l e w o rkin g m e m b e r s o f th e Legi s l ature. H e i s a l eade r in d e m ocratic p o liti cs, i s a m e mb e r o f th e Ame ri ca n L e gi o n , th e N ati o nal Geog r a p hi c Soc i e ty, th e Lak e B r a d ford C o un t r y C lub , a nd hi s h o bb y i s M asonry . H e i s m aste r of J ac k so n L o d ge, F. a n d A . M . , i s a R oya l Arc h M aso n and h as se r ve d as n o b l e g r a nd of L eo n L o d ge o . 5, Indepe nd ent Orde r o f Odd F ellows . At T alla h a ssee, F e bru a r y 3, 1921, :Nfr. D av i s marrie d Fra nc es C h a m b e r s, d a u ghte r o f Be nj a min R. a nd Geo r g i a Chambe rs. H e r p a r ents l ive o n th e i r pla nt a ti on n ea r T alla h assee . :Nfr. D av i s i s a M e th o di s t , a nd t a k es a n ac t i , e p art in B i b l e Class a nd S unday sc h oo l w o rk. CoL. J o11N Au:xANDER HENDERSON was o n e of F l o rida's m ost co n spic u o u s figures n o t only in th e l a w bttt publi c affa ir s duri n g and s ub seq u e n t t o th e C i vil war. H e w as b o rn in C l ark Co unty, Geo r g i a, a nd dming hi s yo uth h e h a d only those a dvantages and o pp o rtuniti es t ha t a d e t e rmin e d a m b i tion made a , aila h le. As a yo un g m a n h e r ea d law in th e office of Judo-e Ge tti s of T a mp a, a nd w as a dm itte d t o th e bar . A t th e outbrea k of th e war b etwee n th e states h e e nlisted in th e South Flo rid a Infantry, wh i c h d i d so m e duty a t T a mpa an d 1 ew Smyrna, a nd o n April 26, 1862 . was mus t e r e d in a t Gainesville as Co mpan y B. Seventh Flo rid a Infan t r y . H e se n e d a s l i eute n ant with thi s r eg i m e n t in T e nn essee und e r Ge n e r a l B ragg u n til mus t e r e d out Apr i l 10, 1865. Co l o n e l H e nd e r so n t oo k a p ro min e nt p art in r eco n struc ti o n affai rs, was a m e mb e r o f the S tate Senate, a n d i n 1 8 7 6 m ove d hi s h o m e fro m Tamp a t o T alla h a ssee. For ove r a qu arte r of a century h e w as o n e o f th e p o lit ca l di c t a t o r s o f F l or i da. H e w as 1 e r y s u ccess ful in h i s p rofessi o n , h avi n g a s t a t e w i d e r eputatio n , a nd f o r m a n y yea r s w as ge n e r al co unsel a n d v i ce pr es id e n t o f th e F . C. H. P. Railroad , n o w part of th e Seaboard Ai rline. His la s t y ea r s w e r e s p ent in r etire m ent, a nd h e di e d a t T alla h assee i n 1 9 04 , a t th e age o f s ixty tw o . Co l o n e l H e nd e r so n se r ve d a s o n e o f the o ri gina l direc t o r s and trus t ees o f th e W es t Flo ri da Se min a r y at Tallahassee . Gov. W. D. B loxh a m app ointe e ! him to t h e U n it e d States S e n a t e, but h e wa s n ever seated. Col o n e l H e nd e r so n m a rri e d M i ss Mattie \Van! , a n a tive o f L eo n Co u nt y , w h o di e d at Talla h assee in 1 903, a t t h e a ge o f fif tythre e . Geo r ge T . v\larcl , h e r fa th e r , wa s a n o th e r im p ortant figure in early F l orida hi s t o ry. H e m a r ri e d Jane C h a ir es, of t h e w ell kn o w n family o f tha t n a m e . Geo r ge T. \Varel wa s a p l ante r a nd o n e o f t h e earl y sett l e r s o f F l orida . H e serve d in th e T errito r i a l Legi s lature, was a m e m be r of the Firs t Co n stitutio n a l Co n v e nti o n o f th e s t a t e, in 1 838, and s ub se qu entl y was a m e m be r o f the S e c ess i o n Legi s l ature . H e wa s e l ec t e d a m e mber of t h e Co n f edera t e Con g r ess , and se rv e d fro m 1 86 1 until F ebrua r y 5, 1862 , wh e n h e r es i g n e d to b ec om e co l o nel o f the Seco nd F l o rid a Infantry. H e w as kill e d a t v \l illi a m s bu r g, Virg ini a, in the e a rl y part o f t h e war. J o hn \ Varel H e n d e r so n , a so n of th e l a t e Col. J o hn A. H ende r so n , wa s b o rn at T a mp a, O c t obe r 28, 1873, wa s e d ucat e d in t h e publi c sc h oo l s a nd the v\lcst Flo rid a Se min a r y a t T a l l a h assee, and fin i s h e d hi s l aw course at t h e Univer s it y of V i r -

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8 HIS T O R Y OF F L ORIDA gin i a i n 1895. H e h as since b ee n e n g a ge d in practice at T alla h assee, a nd in 1 920 h e b e c a m e v i c e pre side nt o f th e L ew i s State Bank, th e o lde s t ba n k in F l o rid a, o r ganized in 1856 . M r. H e nd erso n se r ve d as m ayo r of T alla h assee i n 1905, w as , e lected in 1906 and reel ecte d i n r9ro t o t h e State S e n a te, a nd in 1 9 1 I was appointe d b y G o v erno r G ilc h ri s t t o a v aca n c y in t h e office of state ' s at t o rn ey . In 191 I h e wa s v i ce presi d e nt o f the Flo r i da St a t e Bar Association, a nd during the W o r l d w a r was a m e m be r of t h e Dis trict Draft Board a nd c h a irman of th e Li b erty L oa n drives in h i s county. I n 1897, a t Talla h assee , h e married M i ss Sara h E . L ewis, w h ose fa th e r , Geo r ge Lewis, was pr es i de n t of th e L ewis S t a t e Bank. They h ave four so ns, Geo r ge L ewis, W i lli a m D o u g l as, J o hn Ward, Jr., a n d Edward Ever ett. WrLLIAM REUBEN T noMAS. Loya lt y to one ' s birthpl a ce a nd h o m e co mmu n it y ha s perhaps n o m o r e illuminatin g exam p l e th a n t h e c a se of V/il liam R e ub e n T h o m as o f Gai n esville , wh ose w o rk, p l a n s and enthu s i as m h ave fo r yea r s b een e n l iste d in e n te r p r i s es t hat wo uld di1ect l y promo t e th e w elfare a nd p rosperity of t h e C i ty of G aines v ille, which du r ing hi s boy h oo d w as a struggl ing village . H e h as b ee n a l eade r i n practi cally eve r y m ove m ent fo r t he u plif t of that community . H e w as b orn at Gai n esville, May 24, 1 866, so n o f Dr. G abriel P hilli p Thom as, a nd grandso n o f R e ub e n Tho m as, w h o was a pla n te r and s l ave o wn e r in L au r e ns, South Carolina. Dr. Ga bri e l P hillip T h o m as was born near Laure n s , S o uth Carolina, finis h e d his ed ucati on fo r t h e m e d i ca l profess i o n i n P h i l ade l ph ia, and in 1855 m o v e d t o G a : ne sv ille, t h e n a country v ill age . H e a c qui r e d ext e n s ive p r operty i n te r ests bo th in t own and in th e c ountry , bui l t w h a t was th e n th e fines t h om e in thi s sect i on, a nd i t was the fir s t pa inted h ou se i n th e t own . H e wa s a l a r ge l a nd o wn e r in A l a chua Cou nty. H e served as a ph ys i c i a n i n th e i C o n fe d e r a t e Army. Doctor T h o mas m arrie d Ome r e a B r az i e l F r aser, a n a t ive of Col umbi a, S outh Carolin a , a n d t h ey w e r e the p a r e n t s o f fiv e c hi l d r en, William R . bei n g t he third. Mr. Thomas as a boy attend e d th e commo n sc h oo l s at Gainesville. co n ti nu e d hi s e du c ati o n i n th e East F l o ri da Mi litary Se min a ry, a militar y sc h oo l at Gainesv i l le, at t ende d th e State N ormal at B o w l i n g G r ee n , Ken t u c ky, spe n t two years i n P ea b o d y College, a n d i n 1 888 gradua t e d A. B . fro m V a nd e rbi l t Univer si t y a t Nashville, Ten n essee . H e w a s a m e m ber of th e Kappa A l ph a frate rni ty. After his college ca r ee r Maj o r Tho m as was fo r two yea r s p rin c i pa l of th e F ort M e a d e High Schoo l i n F l orida, and t h e n too k th e c h a ir of languages in t h e East F l o r i d a S e min a ry, a nd whi l e in that m i l ita r y schoo l h e l d th e r ank of maj o r , a ti t l e by w h ich h e i s still kn ow n . H e w as fo r t wo yea r s pri n cipa l of t h e Gainesv ille Hig h S chool. Having devoted a nu m ber of years t o th e ca u se of e du cat i o n , Major T ho m as in 1 89 4 e n g a ge d i n bu siness, b eing assoc i a t e d with th e e arl y fo r t un es of w hat i s n ow t h e Tho m as Comp a n y , h ardware, bui l di ng m a t e r ia l , fa rm i mpl e m ents and u nd e r ta king. H e i s still a s t oc kh o l d e r, bu t h i s bro t h e r , T. F . Tho m as, i s pres id ent of t h e company. : M a j o r Thom as h as se rved a s pres ident of th e G ainesv ill e Furniture Company and secre tary a nd treasure r of th e \;\,Til so n Co mpan y, o p erat ing th e l a r ges t d r y g oo ds sto r e i n G ai nes ville. H e r eo r ganize d D u t t on & Co m pa n y and estab l i sh e d a n d b eca m e p r esident of t h e Dut t o n B an k , a n d was a l so p r es i d e n t of t h e Ga in esv ill e Nation a l Ban k, but s inc e 1 9 1 9 h as r et ir e d fro m ba nkin g . H e was a l eade r a m o n g t h e banke r s of A l achua County in di s p osing of Governme n t securities a nd . filling the fina n cia l qu o t a o f thi s di strict. Majo r Thomas was chairma n of t he l o c a l co m mit tee th a t w as instrumental i n sec urin g the l oca ti o n of th e Unive r s it y of F l orida a t Gain es v ille. H e se rv e d t en c o n secutive yea r s as mayo r of G aines v ille , h o ldin g that office unti l h e wou l d co n se n t t o se r v e n o l onger. During th a t t i m e Ga i nesv ille w as raise d fro m th e pos iti o n of a struggl in g c o untry v illage i n to a co m munity of modern imp rove m ents, a nd in t hat t i m e mu c h of t h e im po r tan t work o f se w e rage co n st ructi o n , s i d e wa l k s a n d othe 1 fac i l i t i es were p rov i de d . Major Tho m as has b ee n stron g l y proh ibit i on , a n d w h i l e not a po liti c i a n h e se r ve d fo u r yea r s as a m e m be r of th e S enate fro m t h e Thir ty-secon d Distri c t. H e was ch airman of th e b o n d trus t ees of th e county a n d a prim e mover i n good r oads m ove m e nt. Majo r Tho m as has o n e of th e m os t p erfec t l y appointe d and bea u t iful h o m es of Gainesv ille, a nd has b een r eady w it h hi s t i me, m o n ey a nd e n e rgy in eve r y good ca u se. H e is president of th e M e n' s Bib l e C l as s of th e Meth o dist Episco p a l C hu rch , and w as one of th e fo u nd e r s of the Gain es ville Go l f a n d Country Club in l92 I , and i s on e of it s B oard oJ Gov e rn o rs. H e i s pres ide n t o f the C h a m be r of Comm e r ce, and i s . p r es id en t o f th e W . R. Tho m as R ea l Esta te Company, w h i c h laid o u t several a d d iti o n s a nd bui l t a numbe r of h o m es. H e i s a m e mb e r of th e R otary C l ub , and h e built th e W hit e H ouse, o n e of Flo rida's fine ho t e l s and 1ecen t l y es t ab l i s h e d th e White filling stati o n s . Maj o r Tho ma s i s affil i a t e d w it h Gainesville L odge No. 41, F . a nd A . M., G ainesvi l l e C h apte r No. 2, R. A. M., Pilgrim Co mm a nd e r y No. 7 , K. T., M o r occ o T e m p l e of t h e M ys t ic Shrine of J ac k sonv ille a nd th e Sc o tti s h R i t e Con s i sto r y of J ac k so n v ille . H e i s a l so affil iate d with th e Be n evo l e n t and P ro t ec ti ve O r d e r of E l ks L o d ge No. 990. A t Bruns wick , G eorg i a , J a nuary 2 1 , 1896, Mayor T h o m as m arrie d M iss K atie M. Krause, of Brunswic k. H e is a l so an act ive m e mber of t h e Meth o di s t Church. They h ave five ch ildr e n : C l a r e n ce S., a graduate of t h e U n iver s ity of F l o rid a, wh o se r ved in t h e a rm y during t h e v Vorld war; Phillip E., who during t h e w a r was in t h e n av y on the t r an s p ort Von S teuben; \ . R., J r . ; J ohn H enry; a n d Margaret O m e r ea . S TANU : Y C. ARCHIBAL!l fo r a quar le r o[ a cen t u ry was a t 1 avelng represe n tative of t 1 h e g r ea t C i ncinu a ti ma11ufact1u-ing concern o f Procter & Ga m b le, a nd gai ne d a n ex t ens . ive f r i e nd s h i p ancl ac q u a i n t a n ce th ro u g hout t h e So u t h e rn S t ates. Even t u ally h e establishe d a w i nter h o m e . al Day to n a a nd conte m p l a t ed r e tirin g from b u s ines s al-toget h er, but soo n b eca m e interestecl i n both bhc b u s i ness a nd c i v i c affa irs of F l o r i d a, a nd i s one o f t h e stat e's l ea din g m en of affairs to d ay. H e was born i n M a di so n , Indi a n a, Jul y 23, 1 865, so n of R ev. G eo rge D . a nd Nan cy K e r r A r c hib a l d . His fath e r w as o n e of tJh e di s t i n g u i s h e d di vines o f th e P r es b yte ri a n G hurc h . Bo rn in W as hington County, Pennsyl va nia, F ebrua r y 15, 1820 , h e g r a d uate d [ ro m J effe r so n College o [ Pennsyl vania in 1847, was ordaine d a m i nist e r i n 1849, h a d c h a r ge of t h e First Pres byte ri a n Churc h i n Allegh e n y City until i 855 , the Fir s t P r es b y t erian G hurch o.f Cinc inn a ti in 1 860-6 1 , t h e First Presbyte rian C hn rch of Mad i so n , India n a, un t il 1 866, was pa s t o r of \ iVest m i n s ter Ohurc h i n New Yor k City, se r ved two

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H I STORY OF F L ORIDA 9 yea r s a s pres i d ent of H a nover College, a n d was of Pasl o r ;li Tlico logy a l D a n v ille, Kenl11c k y, 1111lil 1 883. w h e n lie r e l i r e d . .H. e lia d a lso scr1 e d f o r a li111e a.s p r cs id enl o [ \ N i l s o n ' s F clllhe E a s t Coast Railrnad. Dur iu g hi s e a rl y years h e had been a n cmpl o y e of th e P e r e M a r q u ette R ailway C o m p a n y . F r a t erna l l y h e i s affil i a t e d with t h e local l o dge o f t h e Inde p e nd e n t Orde r of Odd F e ll o ws. H e a n d hi s worthy a nd e stimabl e wife a r c m e m b e r s o f Pres b y t e ri a n Churc h , a n d a r e h e l d in h i g h es teem b y those w h o know t h e m a nd appre c i ate their good q u a l it i es. D a r r ell f\. \ ' V es t o n , t h e o nl y c h i l d o [ hi s p a r e nts. aMc nclccl th e p ubli c s chool s o f P a w Paw, " ' h e r e h e was g r aduate d fro m t h e hi g h school a t tJ1e age o ( e ighteen yea r s . H e the n took a c ourse in d r afting i n t h e Internati o n a l C orres p onde nce S c hool s . a nd in 1<)1 2 accompani e d hi s p a r e n t s t o Fl o ri d a . s i n ce w • hi c h ti m e h e h a s b ee n a r es i d e n t o f D a y t o11a Beach . Al th e tim e of hi s a r r i va l lie s ecure d a posit i o n wi t h t . h c fre i ght d e p a r t m ent o f t>h e F l o r id a Eas t o a s t Railway, a co n ce rn w ilJh w hi c h h e r e t mLine d un til j o inin g t h e offic e f o r c e o f t h e E a s t Coas t Bank and Trus t Com p a n y in 1 9 1 8 . M r . \ V es t o n was a ss i stan t c a s h i e r of: t h e b a nk fro m 1 9 1 9 until Octo ber, i 92 r , w h e n a hili t 1 r , indus t r y a n d l1dc l it y w e r e r e cogn i ze d b y h i s advan ce m e n t t o th e post of c a s hi e r , i n w h i c h h e has continue d t o act t o t h e p rese n t. Thi i s one of r h e s trong b a n kin g i nstitutio u s o f V o lu s i a Cou n t y and has a n e:sc ellen.t r e p u t a t i o n . 1fr. \\Teston has p layed a p art in its contri butin g sou n d banki n g a b i l it y, a pleas i n g p e rson ality a nd natu r a l courtesy t h a t d o muc h to gai n th e f r i e n d s h i p and confi d e n c e of t h e bank's patron s. In S epte m b e r , 1 9 15, M r . \<\/es-ton w a s united i n llla r riagc w ith M . i ss Mari o n I. T arbe l l , d a u ghte r o f Har r y Y . T a r b ell, o f Day t o n a B e a c h , a n d co u s in o f Ida M . T arbe l l , the note d a u b h o r ess . T o thi s unio n t h e r e have been b orn three c hil dren: Ric h a r d , Margar e t and Virg i n i a. M r . a nd 1 •frs . v V es t o n a r c m e m b e r s o f the Pres b y t e r i a n Churc h , t o t h c s u p p ort o f w 1 h i c h r hey contrib u t e J , iiJc r a.ll y . H e i s a n acti v e m embe r o f t h e P e n i n s ui
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HISTOR Y OF F L O RJDJ\ a n d two d allg h t e r s . O n e dau g h t e r, n o w d e ceas e d , wa s th e w i f e of D r . P . 11. G uy, a w e ll kn o w n physi c i a n at Day t o n a Beac h . D ea n T . S m ith a t t e n d e d c o untr y sc h oo l s i n Nebr as k a fro m t h e age of tw e lve, a n d also worke d Oll h i s fa t h e r 's s h ee p r a n c h . H e g r a d uated B ac h e l o r of Sc i e n ce f r o m )/eb r a ska . ' ta l c i n 1887, a n d t a u g h t t w o t e r m s of rmal sc h oo l l cf o r e e n t e ri n g college . In l88g h e graduated f r o m th e Chicago H o m eopa thi c Medical Co l l ege. a n d fo r a t i m e was as s oc iated w i th h i s fat h e r i n pr act i ce a t D ecatur , .Al abama, and at Jackso n . 711 i chiga ri. From 1 9oc u n t i l 1914 D oc t , • r Smith h e l d t h e c h a i r o [ p r ofesso r of surge r y arid c l inical s ur ge r y i n t h e univc1 s it y of Michi g-;u 1 H omeo p a t hic Co l l ege . Jn 191 4 h e r es i g n e d ; u 1 d ca m e Snl!l h l o D ay t o na , t h e Unive1s i t y o[ i\I icl1i g a n b e s t ow ing o n h im th e h o n orary-ma s t er"s d eg r ee at the time. D octo r S m ith fo 1 years ha s ran k e d as u n e of t h e ach a nccd m e n i n t h e licl d o i s m g cr y . H e purs u e d s pe c i a l w o r k in s m g c r y i n t h e New Y o rk P o s t G r a d uate College i n r 89-1. i r 1 th e J o h n s H o pk i n s M e d i ca l College uf Balti m ore i n 1 900, a l so atten d e d cli ni cs in P h i ladel p h i a a nd Broth e r s H os pita l i n M in n e s o t a , a nd i n 1903 we nt abroad and vistc d h os pit a l s in L o n d o n , B e rl i n , H e idelbe r g a n d V i e nn a . 1-1 e i s a m e m b e r o f th e A meri ca n I n s t itut e o f l f o m eo p a th y , th e M i c hi ga n State Hom eo p a t h i c Society, t h e South ea s t e rn H o m eo p a thi c Soc i e ty, t h e So u t h e rn H o m eopa th i c Society a n d a m o n g o t h e r co ntri b u ti o n s t o m e dic a l l it e r ature h e i s a uth o r o f '"Befor e a n d .Afte r Sur g i ca l Oper a tio11s , " p ubli s hed i n 1 906. S i nc e coming t o F lori d a D oc t o r S mi t h h a s scn e d as cha i r m a n o f t h e l oca l sc h oo l boa rd as c h a irm a n o f t h e cou n ty Y . :M. C . A., a11c1' as t ru s t ee o i t h e Dayt o n a Indu s t rial Ins t it ut e (a co l o r e d i11sti t uti o n ) . H e i s a m e m be r and d eaco n n f t h e Fir s t Bap t i s t Churc h and t e ac her of th e Y o un g Bibl e c l a s s . H e b e l o n gs t o t h e 1.; iwani s C l ub a11d Cha m b e r of Co mm e r ce. J a n u a r y 1 7 , 1893, at J ackso n . M i c higan , D oc t o r S m i t h ma r r i e d Mi ss Ella .A. S m i th , daugh t e r o f J o h n a nd 11.rs . .A. \ ' V . S m i t h . T h ey h ave fo ur d a11g-h t e r s . t e l la, G r e t c h e11, Ad e l i a a nd H a t t i e . S t ella i s t h e wife o [ EYcrett D r ake, of D ay t o n a . ! \ L IJERT Ar.r-:xi1xnrn p r esi d e nt o f t h e Uni, e r s ity o f F l o rida s i nce 1909, and a l ea d e r in t h e ed ucati o n al affair s o f t h e s t a t e fo r ove r a (llla r t c r o f a cent u ry, w as b o rn a t Vlalnu t G r ove, . !\ l aba m a , .A pnl 29, 1 870 , so n o f Capt. J esse E ilt s a11d H e l e n (Corn e l ius) Murphree. His g rand fat h e r wa s a l a r ge pla n t e r a n d s l ave own e r a t .\[urphrees Valley in A Ca pt. J e sse Mur p h rec se rved a s a ca pt a in i n t h e C o n fe d e rate army and was all t hrough th e w ar, b e in g wound ed at t h e battle o f S h i l o h . Fie was a m e r c h a nt afte r t h e wa r a11d a l so a farm e r , and s e r ve d a coun ty co mm i ss i o n e r . A lbert .A. Murph r ee wa s th e fif th i n a famil y of t e n c hild r e n . H i s boy h oo d a mbition was i n t h e dir ectio n of teac hin g, a n d wi t h l ittle h e l p from t h e o ut s i d e h e acq uir e d a l i bera l ed u ca ti o n , t eac h i n g, selling boo k s and d o ing o th e r work t o d e fray his ex p e 1 1 scs w hile i n col l ege an d un iver s i t y . H e wa s a s tuden t i n t h e \ Va lnut Grove College o f .Al aba m a from 1 88o t o 1 887, b ega n teac hing i n the r u ra l sc h oo l s of Ten n es see i n t h e latt e r year, a n d s ub se q u e n t l y wo n b y corn p e titi, e examina t i o n a sc h o l a r s h ip i n t h e P ea b o dy Norma l Colle ge at Nas h v ille, T ennessee , w h e re h e wa s a s tude n t duri n g 1890 -92. H e g r a d uated wit h t h e A . B . d eg r ee from t h e U n ivers i t y of N a s h v ille i n 1 89 4 , a nd in 1902 was awarde d t h e M a s t e r o f Arts d eg r ee b y the univer s ity. T h e h o n orary LL. D . degr ee was be s t o we d u po n him b y R o lli n s College i n Florida in 1 909 a n d by t h e Univer si t y o f Alaba m a in M ay, 1 919. D oc t o r Murph 1 ee p r ior to co min g t o Flo rid a wa s s up e r i nt ende nt o f s c h oo l s at C ullm a n , A l a b a ma , princ ipa l o f Summit Institute i n th a t s t a t e, a nd fo r two year s prin cipa l of th e C it y High Sc h oo l at C l eburne, Texas. He ca m e t o F l orida a n d t oo k t h e chair of math e mati c s in th e F l o 1 i d a S t a t e College i n 1 895 . F ro m 1 8 9 7 t o T 9 0 .'i h e was pres id ent of t h a t college, and w a s p r eside nt o f th e S ta t e College fo r Vlo m e n fro m r 9 0 5 t o r 909. D oc t o r Murphree was indu c t e d i n t o t h e office o f pres id e nt of t h e Unive r s it y of Flo r id a July I, i 909. D octo r Murphree h as a g r eat , a r i cty o f i n te 1 es t s o ut s id e t h e realm o f sc!to l a r s h ip and edu cati o n . H e s a ti sfie s hi s m ec h anica l turn o f m i n d l a r ge l y by a u t o m obilin g, i s a n e n t hu s i a s t i c fis h e r man < rnd go lf e r , was o n e o f the o rganize r s a n d i s a direc tor of th e G ain esv ill e Go l f and Country Clu b , wa s fir s t p r e s i dent of th e Gai n esv ill e R otary Clu b , se r ve d as p re s i d ent in 1907 o f th e Flo rida State Teach e r s ' .Assoc i atio n , wa s v i c e p r es id e n t i n 1922, and forme rl y a m e m b e r of the execu tive committee of the Nati onal Associati o n o f S t a t e Unive r s it ie s , i s a m e mb e r o f th e A l a c h u a C ou n t y M o t o r C l ub , a n d h i s time and effo r t s a r e h eartil y e nli stee! i n e v e r y m ove m ent for m a kin g Gain es ville a r ea l c it y i n m a t e ri a l i m proveme nt s and as a c e n t e r o f culture a n d e d uca t i o n . H e was a Four M in u t e Spea k e r d ur i n g t h e \l\T o riel war. He i s s up e ri n t e nd e nt o f th e Bapti s t S unda y S c h oo l a n d fo r four years was pre s id e nt of th e Distri c t A sso ciatio n , i s a Kni ght T e mp l a r Mas o n and was o n th e R eg i onal B oard as a d ir ecto r d u ri n g th e b u i l d i n g o f th e Carneg i e Libra r y, and h a s s i n c e b ee n c h airma n o f th e b oa r d. H e i s a m e m b e r of t h e Nati o n a l Educa ti o n a l Assoc i a ti o n , i s a Kap pa .Alph a and fo r several y e a r s was e dit o r of th e Flo rida S ch oo l Exp o n e nt. July 27, 1897, D octo r Murphree m arrie d Miss Jenni e H ende r so n , d a u g ht e r o f Col. J o hn A . H e nd erson , o f T alla h a ssee , Flo r id a . Mrs . Murphree d i e d Mar ch. 26, 1921. There a r c four chil d1en : Mi ss A l berta, w h o w a s e du ca t e d i n t h e F l orida S t a t e W o m e n' s College, in th e G o uch e r Col l ege a t Balt i more and th e P ea b o d y Co n se r va t o r y of Mus ic; M artha, a gradu a t e in r 922 from th e F l o r id a State Co l l ege fo r vVo m e n ; John A lex a nd e r , atte ndin g t h e U n iv e r s i t y o f F l o rida; a n d A lbert A l ex a n d e r , Jr., a pupil in t h e Gain es v ill e H i g h Sc h ool. WILLIAM G. B R O R EIN. Si nce the hi s t o r y o f any country o r community i s but t h e biograph y of those who h a ve pl aye d the m o s t important part in it s a f fa irs, so any ade qu a t e d esc riptio n of the i mp orta nc e, d e v e l o pm e nt a n d g r ow th of Tam p a and Hill s b o ro u g h County and s e veral other adjacent c o u nt ie s in S outhwes t Florida, m u s t n e ce ssa r i l y includ e so m e thin g Of the character and ac hi e v e m e nt s of \ Vi lli a m Go Bror ei n w h o , fo r two d eca d es h as b ee n o n e o f t h e m o s t prom i n ent ch a r ac t e r s i n it s mate ria l d e velop m en t , as w e ll as a r ecognized 1eade r in a ll matter s pertainin g t o it s m o r a l and s o c i a l up lift and other p ubl ic , p r og r ess. During thi s t i m e , i n additio n to t h e duti es of conduc t in g t h e affai r s o f i t s most ex t e n s i ve p u bli c utility e nt e rpri se , h e has bee n a l eader o f a n d fille d the office o f head of n early every o r g ani z ation c o nduc t e d for th e general pub l i c we l fa r e. It i s t h e refore fit ting that we here

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HISTORY OF FLORIDA 11 give a b ri e f b iographic a l s k e tch o f Mr. Brorein a nd so m e of t h ese a c h i e v e m ents. The purpose of biograph y, and probably it s o n l y jus tificati o n , i s t o se t f o r t h th ose achi eve m ents of our fellows in whi c h t h ey ha1 e excel led and those attributes o f charac t e 1 p ossesse d a n d di s play e d by t h e m , whi c h see m to hav e b ee n m os t p o t ent in such acco m p l i s h m ents, to t h e end that o th e r s may s t ri1e t o em11lat:e them. Altho u g h "'v\I . G." Bro r e i n , as h e i s m os t familiarl y kno w n , i s a man o f 1er sa tilc c h a racter and amazing ener gy, i f those wh o k now h i m b es t and a r e most capable o f a ppr ec iating hi s qu a l iti es o f m ind and t r a it s o f c h a ract e r were as k e d to d e sc rib e so m e o n e n o t e o r q11ality w h i c h h a s con tributed m os t t o hi s acl 1 i e ,erne n t s and to hi s g r eat p opul ari t y, t h ey would agr ee that it i s hi s e x e mplificati o n o f the adage ''w h o w o u l d have fri ends mu t be a frie n d. " \ V . G . Brore i n i s a fri end t o all and t o eve r y w o rthy thing o r ca u se . Tho u g h p ossessing g reat fo r ce of c h a r acter a nd finely di scriminating qua l iti es of mind , h e see m s t o exemp l if y th e s pir i t o f co n s ide ratio n f o r the vie w s of oth e r s which bri n g s diff e r ing o pini o n s a nd i nAu c n ces t o•,.ethe1 in thorouo-h co o p eratio n . During the e nti r e peri o d of hi s r es iden ce in Florid a, h e has bee n pres id e nt and gen e r a l man ager of th e Peninsular T e l e p h o n e Co mpany, o p e ratin g the t e l e ph o n e exch a n ges and t oll l i n es throughout H ill s b o r ough, P o l k , Manatee and Pin ellas co unti es . No publi c servi ce i s m o r e c alcu lated t o make fo r th e 11npo pula r ity o f its m a n agement than the t e l e ph o n e . Yet, e ver y year o f hi s managem ent o f thi s corporatio n wh ose bu sine ss and o p e rati o n s now ext e n d i n to many mil l i o n s of d o l lars . has inc r e a se d h i s p o pu larity through out th e fiel d o ( its o p e rati o n . Between t h e company it e lf and th e p11bli c th e r e exi s t s an attitude o f co o p e r a ti o n and i ri c n dli n ess that i s unus u a l fo r a publi c sc n i cc co r p o r a ti o n to receiv e and th e co mpany h a s b ee n ext o l l e d e di t o ri ally by a t l eas t o n e l ea din g dai l y j o11rn a l o f Tampa a s a m o d e l co rporatio n who se bu siness p racti ces hav e a lways p l a ce d community i n t e r es t s fir st, a nd wh ose m e th o d s o f :fair d e ali n g arc worthy o f th e co111mc nd a ti o n o f th e e n t ir e community . M r. Bro r ein was o n e o [ sc , e r a l childre n and wa s born o n a farm n ea r Mar i o n , Ohio, O c t obe r 30, r8 6 r. Whe n h e was four years of age hi s pa r e n t s r e m o , e d from the r e t o Augl aiz e County, Ohio, wh e r e th ey r eside d durin g hi s mi n o r it y a n d wh e r e h e attende d the public s ch oo ls. H e l a t e r attende d th e Northwest ern Ohio Normal Sch oo l , and lik e m a n y o th e r promi n ent m e n , began hi s ca reer as a teach e 1 in th e pub l i c sc h oo l s i n which professi o n h e r e main e d fo r se,e r a l years. On O c t obe1 29, 1 883 . Mr. Bror ein wa unit e d in marriage t o Sarah E. Butch e r, ;it VVapako n e ta , Ohio, and they have o n e daughte r , Edn a. In 1 886, h e e ngaged in m e r ca ntil e a n d m a nufactur ing busin ess, at Buc kl and, Ohio, in whi c h he co n tinue d until rgor , and establ ished a r eputation for the highes t bu siness integrity and so und business m e th o d s . During thi s p e r i o d h e a l so beca m e active in a l l m atte r s of public inte r es t , and in p o l i t i cs as a d e m oc rat, serving fro m 1893 lo 1897 as a m e mber of the l o w e r h o u se of the Ohio State A ssembly, and fro m r897 t o 19oc as a m e mb e 1 o f th e Senate fro m th e Thirty-second District of Ohio. A s a m ember of the Legi s l ature h e t oo k an acti ve part i n all progress i ve legi s lation, b e ing a u th o 1 of the b ill wh i c h b eca m e l aw, r emaining in e ffect for ma n y years, r eo rgan izing th e publi c sch o ol s o f Ohio o n a mode rn basi s . H e r epresente d t h e D e mo cratic min ority o n all imp o r tant committees during t h i s p e ri od, se rvi n g o n the Finance Committee durin g th e e n ti r e p e riod in b o th h o u ses. V\lhilc in t h e S ena t e h e se n e d with Pres ident Harding, t h e n in the Ohio Senate, l;ci n g e l ected president p r o tern w hile Harding, as L i eute n a n t Gov e rn o r , wa s preside nt o f th e Senate. It wa s abo ut t h e tim e of t h e expirati o n o f thi s p e ri 9 d of se r vice i n th e Ohio State A sse mbl y t hat h e p e1ccive d th e p oss ibi l iti es o f th e d eve l o p m e n t of the t e l e ph o n e int e r es t s o f Tampa and Southwes t F l orida, up t o that tim e a l m os t completely negl ec ted, th e r e b e i n g only a few s mall exch anges \vit h subs tantia l l y 110 toll lin e se rvic e south of Jackso n v ille . The pri n cipal exch a n ge (lp e rat e d in S outh we s t Florida was t hat o f t h e Bell Com pany at Tampa, with so m e 300 o l dfas h i o n e d t e l eph o ne s i n se rvice. Having pr ocured in th e n a m e o f h i m se l f and hi s assoc iates a fran c h i se fo r the i n s t allatio n and ope r atio n of a t e l ep hone sys tem in the C i t y of Tampa early in t h e yea r r9or, h e returned t o Ohi o a11d e n listed ca pital amo n g th e l oca l fri e nd s :,ho h ad learne d t o r e p ose co nfide n ce i11 h i s integrity a nd b u siness judgment during hi s yea r s o f b u siness activity in t h e ir mids t, and inve s tin g alo n g with th e m the great e r part o[ hi s p e r so nal h 0ldings , h e a d o pt e d Tampa and Florida as hi s h o m e . Si n ce that ti m e h e h as been o n e of th e mo st acti , e a n d progress ive bus i n ess m e n i 1 1 t h e state, as well as a l ea d e r in all matters o f soc i a l uplift a n d com m e r c i a l a n d eco n o mi c adva11cc m e n t . A s pr esident of th e Flo rid a Stat e T e l e ph o n e Associ atio n fo r m a n y yea rs, h e wa s largel y in s t r um ental in se curingt h e e nactment by the F l orida Legi s lature of th ose laws p lacing the te l ep h o n e proper t i es of th e state u nd e r co mmi ss ion r egulatio n as t o r a t es, and o th e r matte r s co n n ec ted with their o p e r a tion in which th e telep h o n e patro n s and p ublic gen eral l y co uld be in t e rested . The growth o[ th i s e nterpri se ha s bee n o n e of the m os t ph e n o m e n a l o f a ny public uti l ity thro u g h o u t th e co untry. It b egan with a n au t h oriz<:d ca pital s t oc k u f $50.0 00 in r 9 oc, and befor e the end o f th e fir s t yea r had inc r ease d it s anth orized capita l s t oc k to $s oo , ooo o f s t oc k a nd an equal a m onnt o f b o nds, and in s t a l l e d s mall exchanges, rang i n g fro m 5 0 t o 300 t e l ep h o n es, co n n ected. by toll I i n es, in sc , e r a l counties. The t o tal numbe r o f s nb sc rib e r s o f th i s sys tem at th e tim e of ins ta l lati o n did n o t exceed 800 . .'\t the tim e of thi s writing its s ub sc rip tion l i st app r oximates 20,000 s ub sc rib e r s , ro,ooo of which a r e o n th e Tampa main and seve r a l s ub-ex c h a n ges, a n d th e r emainde r o n th e fourtee n o th e r exchan g es o p erated at Bradentown, Palmetto, Sara so t a, Bartow, Lake l and, P lant C ity , C l ea rwater, Tarpo n Sprin gs, Mulberry , Largo, Winte r Haven, Frostproo f , Lake \ Va l es and Haines C it y . A l l th ese exchanges and othe r communities a r e co n n ec t e d by a system of m o r e th a n 2,0 00 mi l es o f m e talli c t oll c i r cuits, extending thro u ghout the co unti es o f Hillsboro, Polk , : Man atee and Pine llas, with connect i o n s w ith a l l o th e r t oll lin es and exchanges throughout th e s t a te, a s well a con n ec ti o n with th e Bell syste m g i ving l o n g distan ce se rvi ce t hrou g h out th e country. T h e confide n ce repose d in Mr. B r o r ein b y hi s co inv estors has bee n equaled by the te l ep h one u s i n g patrons hi s co mp a n y has se rved, and in co n necti o n with the tel e ph o n e ser v i ce unde r his management, hi s name i s probabl y better known and m ore freely u se d than the name o f th e com p a n y it se lf; and it i s safe to say that n o man within the territory of hi s acti vities shar e s a

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1 2 HISTORY O F FLORlDA g r e a te r degree of p o pul arity than d oes William G . Bror e in. The r e i s a saying "i f y o u w ant so m ething d o n e get a bu s y man t o d o it," and thi s i s an o th e r a dage exe m p l ified b y ::\[r. Bror ein. A s w ould b e e x p ec t e d , t h e de m a n d s up o n M r. B ro r e i n' s tim e fo r t h e c onduc t of th es e tele ph one int e r es t s , in orde r to m a int a in th e hi g h s t andard o f se r v i ce t h e co m pa n y h a s at all time s main t ain e d , w ould h ave bee n s uffici e n t t o p r e v e n t m o s t m e n , even o f the hi g h e s t a b ili ty , from e ngaging i n oth e r ac tivities; but n o t so w ith 'vV. G. Brore in. A s h a s a lr ea d y b e e n s a id , h e h as, during thi s tim e, bee n a l e a d e r i n all matter s of ge n e ral p u b l i c i n tc i es t , s e rving fro m 191 6 to 1 9 1 8 a p r es id ent o f t he T a mpa B o a rd of T r acie , from 19 t 8 to 1 9 1 9 a s pr e s i d ent of th e T a mp a R o t a r y C lub , and a t the p r ese n t time and fo r s eve ral yea r s p a s t , as pr es id ent of t h e Tam pa Young M e n ' s C hri s ti a n . i\ sso c i a ti o n and a l so the T a mp a Associa t e d C h a ri t i e s. Ilis m os t n o t able w ork i n Florida has b ee n r cnAY . J\l.. D. !\ 11a t ive of F l orida , m e mb e r of a fami l y p r o mi n e n t in bu s i n es s in th e s t a l e , D oc t o r 1Ierry day has had a s u ccessful p r a c t i ce as a ph ys i c ian and surg e o n a t D ay t o n a fo r th e p a s t nine ye a r s. H c was born ovemb e r 1 7 , 1884 , o n o f \,\/ i l lia m A . a n d E l la (Lucas) M erryclay. I I.i s m o t h e r i s n o w fif t y nine y e a r s o f age. v\Tilli a111 J \ . . M.crr y day wa s b orn i n E n g l a n d i n J 854 , an d at th e a g e of ca m e t o t h e n i t e d States w ith hi s b r o t he r s L. H . a n d J . H . Merry d a y . The ir pa r ents a l so ca m e t o t h i s co u n t r y, a n d l oca t e d at Pal atka , Flo r i d a . vVill iam A. M e r r y d ay s p e11t s o m e tim e n e a r 11ac o n , G eorgia, a nd t h e n cam e to Flo rid a t o g r o w o r a n g es . H e starte d h i s grove a t N o r wa lk , n e a r Drayto11 I s land. .1 t w a s a w i l d e rn e ss c o un t ry, an d \i\T ill i a m 1\crryclay J i,ed f u r a tim i n a log cabin with a d irt floo r. Gam e was p l enti ful, a n d th e tabl e co uld b' liberally s uppli e d w ith veniso n , a n d w o l v es w e r e . fre qu e ntl y heard at ni g ht. T h e g r o ve was o n it s way l o commerc i a l pos s i bility w h e n i t wa s d est r oye d 111 t h e freeze of 1895. W i lli a m A. 1lcrryday afte r thi s set b ac k o p e n e d a littl co n fec tion e r y s t ore at I a l atka, and g r a d ually d eve l o p e d a large bu s i n ess, c hi efly as a w h o l e s al e grain a nd c r a t e deal e r . H e and hi s b ro th e r L. H . w e r e pa r tners 111 tl11s bu s i ness , whi l e t h e o t h e r b r o th e r . J. H. M e r r y clay beca m e a w h o l esa l e grocer at P a l atka . D oc t o r M erry da y 's p a r e nt s a r c m e m b e r s o [ th e 1lcth o di s t Church. O f th e ir s i x c h i ldre n t wo a r e n w l i vin g, H arry L . and H a r l o w , th e latt e r a stude n t i n hi
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HISTORY OF FLORIDA 1 3 c i a n a n d surgeo n a nd h ea d o f th e Pulcston a111t a r i um of t hat c i ty. A n y thin g like a n a d e q ua t e acco11n t of Doc t o r Pules t o n s ca r ee r wo u l d r e qu ir e at least a vol11111e, and hi s I i ( e ' s exp e r i e n ces can o nl y b e bri c A y s11ggcs t c d h e re. H e was b o rn i n L o nd o n , E n g l a nd , Novemb e r 22, 1 86 4 , so n ' o f a nd J a n e (Tho mp s on ) Pules t o n . His fa th e r w a s a m e r c h a n t o f L o n d o n a nd M a n c h es t e r , a nd h a d ext e n s ive r e l a t i o n s with th e o ri e nt a l tra d e . Fre d Pules t o n , o n e of: a family of three so n s a nd five d a u ghte rs, a cqui r e d h i s e du ca ti o n at U a n c h es t e r , and a lm os t i111mediate l y a ft e r l eaving sc h oo l h e bega n satis fyin g a tas t e fo1 tra1 e l a nd exp e r ie n ce w hi c h t oo k him t o so m e of th e most r e m o t e corne r s o f the g l o b e . His fir s t coming to t h e n ited Stat es was in l88 r. H e spent so m e thin g ove r a year i n outhwes t e rn T exas, a r o u n d Sa n Anto ni o a nd Lulin g, w h e r e h e w a o n cattl e r a n c h es. H e the n w ent back t o E n g l a nd , a nd s u bsequ ent j o urn eys t oo k h im ove r France, B e l g iu m , P ortuga l , S pa i n , Canary I s l a n ds, M o n aco, T a n g i e r, E gy pt and th e H e brid es I s l a nds. Doct o r Pulest o n i s p e r h a p s t h e o n l y A m c r i ca n w h o has a n int imate kn o w l e d ge o f th e fam o u s Co ngo di s tri c t of f \ f ri ca . 1foreove r. h e i s probabl y t h e l as t surv ivor of th e a ssoc i a t es o f Stanl ey in th e fa111o u s S t a n l ey exp e diti o n . During h i s exp e ri e n ces in Africa h e wa l k e d o v e r 6 o oo mil es in t h e co un t r y draine d b y th e o ngo. \>\l, hi l c t h e : c h e l earne d t o spea k t h e l a n o uage o f th e na t iv es . In s u bse qu ent • yea r s D octo r Pulcs t o n airain ca m e t o A m e ri ca, too k up th e stud y o f m e di c i n e , gradua t e d fro m th e Iowa S t a t e Univer s it y in 1 90 1 , and was . in t h e prac ti ce o [ h i s pr o fe s s i o n at M o ntice l lo, Iowa, u n t i l 1 9 16. In t hat ye a r h e ca m e t o D ay t o na Beach i n se a r c h o f r elief . fr o m asthma, a nd h as fo u n d co mp l e t e c n r e h e r e . H e . th e n r esume d pri va t e p r actice, and built t h e samtanum w h i c h bea r s hi s n a m e , wh e r e h e dis c h a1ges hi s r espo n s i b ilit i es a s a s kil l e d p h ys i c i an a nd su r geo n . In 1 9 1 6 D oc t o r Pulcs t o n m arrie d Ruby J o hn s t o n . H e i s a Knig h t of P yt hias a nd a d e m oc r a t i s a be lic1 c r in t h e f u n da m e n t a l truth of: 1 clig i o n'. a nd thro u g h o u t hi s life of varie d exp e ri e n ces h e h as a lways a im e d t o p la.y th e ga m e squar e l y \\'h c th e r . h e was huntmg big gam e i n Afr i ca o r assoc i a t 111 g w ith th e Co ngo sa vagcs . He i s a th o r o u g h A m c ri ca n . D oc t o r Pu! sto n has a flu ent comma nd of seve r a l lan g uages. H e i s o n e o f t h e fe w m n wh o t h o r o u ghly a p p r eciat e t h e e n v ir o n m ent a n d t h e s p ir it o f J (ipl i n g, w h o i s hi s favorit e a ut h o r. J . \V. APPLEY: In eve r y communit y and in eac h b r a n c h o f indus tri a l ac ti vity th e r e a r c ce r t a m m e n w h o s t a nd o u t fro m t h e ir associa t es b c of t h e ir purposefu l pe r so na l ity a nd d c t c r m m c d m c th o d s o f action. S u c h m e n a r c b ound to dominate any s i t uati on and contr o l whateve r ,?JlP O r tu niti e . l i e i n th e ir o n ward progr ess . I hro uo-.h th e m a nd t h e i r effo r ts spri n g th e va s t enterpri ses that have so direc t an inAu e nce o n th e pros p e r ity o f t h e country . B ec ause of the es tabli shment a nd m ainte n a n ce o f th ese i n stitutio n s , P .roducc r s a r e ab l e t o obtain a fai r p r ic e fo r th en-pro du c t s and c o n s um r s a r e g i ve n the a d vantages accruin g fro m co n certe d action and cflic i e n t managem e nt. These co nd i ti o n s woul d never have b eco m e poss ibl e h a d i t n o t b ee n fo r th e w o r kin g of masterful mi n ds a n d th e appl icat i o n of m odern bu siness m et hods. T o o l d id eas , a lso, a1e a dd e d t h e r esults of yea r s o f car e ful s t u d y an d experi m en t s of sc i e n ti s t s , pract i c al bu s i n css m e n a nd effic i e n cy exp erts, so that eac h d ay sees a n advance m a d e in managem ent w i th a c on se qu ent betterment fo r a l l parti es . One o f t h e m e n w h o ha s ri se n to a commanding p os iti o n i n hi s chose n calling, and ha s had a co r r es p o nd i n g l y important effec t u p o n hi s community, i s J . vV. Appley o f S a int P e t e r s b u r g, president o f th e Marin e Ways a n d M e an s Compan y . J . \Ill . Appl cy was b o rn at Hartford, Co nn ec ticut, Aug u s t 9, r 8 8 r , a so n o f vVill i a m L. a nd Kate ( M c A l l i s t e r ) Appl ey, th e fo r m e r o f wh o m w a s b o rn at Canterbury . Conn ec ti cut, and th e l atte r at Glasgow. S co t land, and J. W. A ppl ey i s th e se c o nd c hild b o rn to hi s p a r ents . H e g r e w up at Brookly n , N e w York, wh i c h c i ty b e cam e th e famil y pla ce of r es id e n ce whe n h e w as a c hi l d , a nd h e r ece i ve d th e e du c ati o na l adva ntages offe r e d b y it s pub lic sc h oo l s . S u b se qu e ntl y h e atte n d e d Pratt's Institute fro m w hi c h h e was graduate d in 1 899 a s a m e c h anic a l e n g in ee r. F o l l o win g h i s graduati o n Mr. Appl ey e nlis t e d i n th e U n ited State Army and s e r v e d in it a s a n e n g i n ee r fo r five year s . Afte r r ece i v ing hi s ho n o r able d i scharge h e b ecame a m as t e r mechan i c fo r th e Sultan M o t o r Co mp a n y of Springfi e l d, Massachusetts, and continue d with t h a t company until l 9 i 6 , wh e n h e b eca m e manage r of th e Libe r ty M a nu facturi n g Company o f Abing ton, Massachu se tts, and c ont; nu e d w i th it until the co nclu s i o n o f th e wa r , during wh i c h pe ri o d he w as co n n ec t ed with t h e m anufacture of m o t orboa t s , and in thi s way r e nd e r e d hi s war se rv i ce w h e r e it w as m os t n ee d e d . In th e lat e fall of 1 918 h e ca m e t o Saint Pete r s b u r g, wh e r e h e h as since b ee n in bu siness. In 1 921 hi s bu iness was incorporate d , with him a s the presid e n t, and h e h as th e larges t and bes t e quipped mac h ine s h op in t h e en t ir e State o f F l o r ida . Empl o ym ent i s g i v e n t o ab out tw c nt yfive m e n , and t h e t errito r y c o ve r e d ext e nd s all ove r F lorida . H e i s a m a n of k ee n vis i o n a nd good judg m ent and es t i m a t es a t it s true va l u e th e future of St. P e t e r sburg . In r 9 i 5 Mr. Appl ey was marrie d to Lucy M. Man of Prince Edwards I s land, C an ada, a nd th ey have one so n , J a m es E dw in. M r. Appl cy i s o n e o f the gove rn o r s of t h e S t . P e t e r bu r g C h a mb e r o f Co mm e r ce . H e b e l o n gs t o vVashing t o n L o d ge, No. 81, A . F . a nd A. M., and th e M ys t i c Shrine , A . A. 0 . N . M. S . of th e Maso nic fra t ernity, a nd t o St. P etersburg L o d ge N o . 1224 , B. P . 0. E. In him th e Pres b y t e ri a n ch u r c h h a s a n earnes t memb e r and faithful d e ac o n . The r e c o r d o f Mr. Appl e y' s l i fe pro v es what a man can a cco mpl i s h p r o v id e d h e ha s t h e natural ab ili t y a n d th e willin g n ess to d eve l o p h i s tal e n t s a l ong th e lin es for whi c h h e ha s a n aptitude. Those asso ciat e d with hi m a c kn o wl e d ge a nd r e l y o n hi s exp e ri e n ce and goo d judgment a nd ex press th e i r full confid e n ce i n him , a nd g i ve hi m a n un q u alifie d suppo r t i n w hat h e d es ir es t o acco m p l i s h. C A L VIN \V. DAVTS, M . D . A n a cco mplis h e d 1 P c mb c r o f the m e dic a l profess i o n , a s p ec i a l i st i n th e X-ray a n d o th e r bran c hes, D oc t o r D a vi s came t o Day t o n a B e a c h soo n afte r hi s rel e a se ffom army se r v i ce. H e se rv e d a numbe r of mo n t h s o v er seas . D oc t o r D a vi s was b o rn i n Atlanta, G eo r g i a , Apr i l 16, 1 8 90 , and h as earne d and mad e hi s o wn way t o s u cee s . His parents a r c R o b e r t \11 / . a nd El l a ( W e l ls) Dav is, still r eside nt s o f A t l a nta. H i s fathe r has s p ent m a n y yea r s as a conduc t o r w i t h th e C e ntra l o f Geo r gi a and South e rn R a i l r oa d. D octo r D av i s befor e fini s hi n g h i s pu b l i c sc h oo l e du ca ti o n w as ea rnin g hi s way b y w o r k

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14 HISTORY OF FLORIDA during vacations with lh e railroad com pany. H e worked in the yards as a sw it chman and switch conduc t o r . H e attendee! th e Atl anta High School , a lso the Griffin Dist rict Institute at Ze bulon , Geo r g i a , and o n June 2, i91 4 , gradu a t ed from the Atlanta Medica l College. In college a nd since he has specialized in X-ray laboratory work, a nd in the laboratory t ec hniqu e th a t is b eco min g m o r e a nd m ore esse ntial in the m o d ern practice of medicin e and surgery h e h as qu a l ificatio n s prob abl y not surpassed by an y oth e r physician in Flo rid a . H e i s a lso a hi g hl y-s kill e d surgeo n . Afte r g raduatin g h e spent o n e yea r in St. J ose ph' s Infirmary a t Atl a nt a , practiced medicine sixt een months in New Mexi co, and on A u g u s t rs, r9r7 , ente r e d the a rmy. He had ten weeks of training in Camp O g l e th o rpe, Georgia, , s i x months in the Base H osp ital at F ort 'Worth, Texas, s i x weeks in the Rockefelle r Institute a nd two months in the A rm y M e di ca l Sch oo l a t Was hin g t o n . On goi n g ove r sea s D octo r Dav i s was ass i g n e d to Ba se }fospital No. 84 in France, a nd w as chief of l a b o ratory at that p o int. He se r ve d there w ith th e rank of first lieute nant and subsequ entl y was promoted to ca ptain . H e returned to the U nit e d States in May, l9I9, and in August of the sa m e year b egan. hi s practice a t Day tona B each. H e i s a m embe r of t he County, State and Ame ri can Medi cal assooiat i o ns. \ V JLLTAM B . GoLDENJJERG. In view of the extent an d im portance o f hi s va ri o u s and varied connections William B. Goldenberg is a c counted o n e of th e leading m e n in business, soc ial and c i vic c ir c l es of D ay t o na . As a business man h e i s pr es id e nt a nd ge n e ral manager of the Adl e r Go l d e nb c r g Oompany, and hi s associations in offi c ial ca p acit i es with ent erprises whic h contribute to the pres tige of hi s cit y are of a nature that testify t o hi s ve r sa tility a nd acknowledged judg m e nt. Mr. Go ld en b e r g was born at Ci ncinnati, Ohio, May 28, 1884 , a nd i s a so n of Herma n and Eliza b eth (Exl e r ) Goldenberg, nativ es of Ci ncinna ti . T h e pare nt s pa ssed t h e ir lives in thei r native c it y un til r 92r, w h e n they came t o Daytona, Mr. G o ld e nberg being sixt y-seve n yea r s of age and hi s wife f-ive yea r s yo un ge r. In hi s yo uth Herman Gol d e nberg l ea rn e d t h e t lade o f ca rp enter, which h e followed som e yea rs, a nd , being indu s tri o u s and fruga l , save d sufficient from his ea rn ings so that h e co uld e n te r th e groce 1 y bu s ine ss . of which h e was the h ea d for a long pe riod or until hi s r et ir e m ent. He i s a democrat in poli t i cs, and h e a nd hi s worth y wife a r e m e mb e r s o f lhc Cath o lic Churc h , o [ w h ic h they a r e d e vout sup11ortc rs. They a r c th e p a r e n ts o f four so n s a nd one daughter: J oseph, w h o i s e ngaged in th e plumbin g bu siness at Daytona; C lara, w h o i s the w i fe o[ George 13. Mersch, co n nect e d with a Cinc inn a ti iron plant; H arry, who ha s t a k e n ove r hi s father's busin ess at Cinc innati ; G eo r ge , e ngaged in plumbing an d the r ea l estate bu siness, a nd contemplating residence at D ayvona; and Willia m B. Willia m B . Goldenberg received a public sc hool e ducation a t Cinc inn ati, but left sc hool w h e n o nl y thirtee n yea r s of age in ord e r to a pply himsel f t o l earning t h e business in the Norton Iron W orks. He co mpl e ted hi s apprenticeship in 3 ;/, year s, and at that time starte d out for Chicago with $rn in hi s pocket. He paid $6 of this for a roundtrip ti c k et , but o n his arriva l at hi s destinatio n so ld t h e return half for $2, which left him with $6 to begin life in a strange city. At C hicago h e secure d e mployment in the plant of Lammert & Lamm, as the youngest employe, :-ilth o ugh there were seve r a l boys se r ving their a ppr e nti ces hip s . This conce rn was e n gage d in t h e m anufacture of g a s a n d gasolin e e n gines, and Mr. G o ldenberg became greatl y inte rested in gas e n g ine s and m o t o rcycl es . H e was carer ul with his earnings, w hi c h h e sent to his father fo r safe ke e pin g, and eventually r eturned l o h i s Cincinnati b orne with hi g h hope s of enter i n g the m otorcycle business. His father h o w eve r , could n o t vision the future of bu s i n ess, lacked faith in m oto r cycles, and r efused t o turn ove r the youth's cas h for him to squande r i n a ny s u c h _ flighty business . The youn g man, hurt a nd dl scourage d , l eft hom e and went t o Pittsburgh, where h e secure d e mploym e n t in the \ 1Vestinghouse Electric Co mp a n y ' s plant at East Pittsburgh. During hi s s tay th e r e h e was e n gaged in the turbine d epartme nt, where, a s was hi s c u sto m , lie l ea rn e d all that th e r e was to be found o u t about e ngines and power, a nd after a time went ba c k t o Lamme r t & L amm a t Chicago, where h e was also e mpl oye d b y t h e C. A . Coey Company, at that time buildi n g the m o t o r cyc l e known as th e "Thomas Flyer." Mr. G oldenberg a t this time thought h e saw a n o pp ortunity of entering business i n a paying venture, and accordingly orga niz e d the Modern Sal es Bureau, m a nu facturing a mechanical starter. This had h a rdl y got te n und e r way when th e ele ctrical s t arte r was invented, and it prove d so much belie r that th e M o d e rn Sale s Bureau was put out of bu s ine ss . Mr. Gold enberg made u se of his i n surance poli c ie s to borrow $75, with which h e ca m e to Daytona B eac h , and h e r e was e mployed in the B . E. Williams Garage until 191 6 , when h e became th e organizer of th e Dayton a M a chine \Vorks on \/',T all Street. In 1920 was organized the Adler-Golde nb e r g Co m pa ny, of which Mr. Goldenberg became pres id ent; Loui s Adler, treasurer; M. Schon , vice president; a nd A. Mal o ne, sec r etary . This gar age, w hi c h i s eq uipped t o a ccommodate every known m a k e of ca 1, has 31,000 square fe e t of floo r space , of w hi c h 2 1 ooo square feet o f s p ace is on the l o wer floo r , is o n e of th e larges t and most comple t e en t e rprises of it s kind in the South. Fro m 1898, when Mr. Go ld e nb e r g assi sted in building the fir s t automobile in Ci n c innati a crude a ffair ;vhich h e d rove w ith o nl y a degree of s u ccess, hi s career ha s b een o n e of s u s t a ined effort a nd co n stant a pp l i catio n , co mbin e d w ith h o nest deal ing and h o no rable actions. His life h as been o n e that is n ow being crown e d with s u ccess , but h e has h a d to ove r co m e a numbe r o f di scouragem e nts. H e i s now president of the Day t o n a M o t o r C lub, a m e mb e r of the D ay tona C it y Commissio n and a member of th e executil'c board o f th e Dayto n a Cha mber of Cn mm e 1 ce. f\ 11 matte r s p e rtainin g t o c i vic bette rm ent h av e hi s warm s u ppo r t, b u t goo d road s a r e hi s h o bby, and, w1th George Van Pel t attends all goo d r oads meetings h e l d a nywh e r e o r at a n y t i me. H e also h o ld s m embe r s hip in the K i wanis C lub, i s a.n Elk, a nd b e l ongs to Halifax Blue Lodge, A. F . and A. M., and i s a Knight T e rnpl a r and a Scottish l\ite Mason and a Nobl e of t h e Mystic Shri n e. In 1912 Mr. G o ld e nb erg w as united in marriage with Mi ss Burnet Willia m s, d a u ghter of L. E. " Willi a ms. ARTHU R RAYMOND K.EY i s a native of Florida, began hi s car ee r in the railroad service, and for som e years has b ee n a prominent banker at San-

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H ISTOR Y O F F L O RID A 1 5 ford, w h e r e h e i s v i ce pre s i d ent a n d ca s hi e r o f th e Seminole C o un t y B a nk. H e w as born in t h e T o w n of Eus tis, L a k e C o un ty, A u g u s t II, 1 88 6 , so n o f Arthu r D . a nd Mi n n i e Elizabe th (Wrig ht) K ey . A r t h u r D . K ey w as b o rn i n Lond o n , E n g land , a n d wa s t e n yea r s o f age wh e n h e c a m e w i t h his pa r ents, a brothe r a n d two sis t e r s t o t h e U nit ed S tates. The fami ly l o cated at e w Yor k C it y , whe r e h e g r ew u p . In 1877 he ca m e t o Flo rida, se ttl i n g at E u s ti s , w hi c h was h i s h o m e fo r t we n ty y ea rs. H e b eca m e a s u ccess f u l o r a n ge g r o w e r th e re. A f t e r l ea v ing E u s ti s h e lived a t T a ngerine abo u t four yea r s , a nd th e n m o v e d t o Sa n ford, w h e r e h e w as e ngage d i n t h e b u s i n ess of cel e r y fa r min g u n til hi s d e a th in July, 1 919, a t th e age o f seve n t y s i x. His wife, Minn i e E l i zabeth W r ight, who m h e m a rri e d at Tangerin e , w as b o rn a t P o r t Huro n , Mi c hi g an, a nd i s no w livin g a t S a n fo rd. Her pa r e n ts w e r e H . a y m o nd J . and Emil y L. ( Ca r k e n e r ) \ V ri g h t. H ay m o nd J . \ V ri g h t was b o rn i n N e w Y o r k S t a t e, b u t fro m a n ea r l y a g e live d with h i s famil y a t P o r t Huron, :Michiga n , beca m e a s u r v eyo r , late r a m e r c h a n t at Por t Huro n , a n d abo u t 1 875, ca m e t o Florida a nd was o n e of th e fo und e r s wh o l a i d o u t th e t ow n o f T a ngerine, whic h he na m e d for t h e fru i t g r ow n in t hat distri c t. H e wa s in eve r y wa y a l ea d e r i n th e commun ity, a s u c cess fu l o ra nge grower , a n d died w h e n a b out i x t y five y e a r s of age. H e was a d e m o c r a t. Arthur D. Key wa s a l so a s t a un c h d e m ocrat, a n d was a d ev otee! m e m be r of th e Epi sco p a l C hu r c h. H e h a d a prom i n e nt p art i n th e u p bui l di n g o f t h e churc h of t h i s de n o m i n a t i o n at Eus ti s , Flo rid a . Arthur D. K ey was o n e of t h e earl y foun d e r s o f E u s t i s , F l o rid a . H e se ttl ed t h e r e in th e ea rl y '70s, d r ivi n g fro m S an ford by t ea m . H e t oo k u p a trac t of land, a n d h e a n d h i s s i sters o p e n e d a n "Inn, " w here ma n y hun te r s made th e ir h ea dq u a r t e r s , a s gam e was ve r y abu n d ant in th e ea rl y clays of t h a t sett l e m ent. It i s s t a t e d t h a t d ee r h a d t o b e kille d t o k ee p th e m fro m des t r o y i n g th e gard e n v e ge ta b l e . A r th u r D . Key w as o n e o f t h e s u b s tan t i a l c i t izen s of E u s t i s a nd s upported e ve ry ca u s e fo r a d va n ce m ent, b o t h p olit i ca l and c i v ic, a n d h e was o ne. of t he fir s t t o s u ccess fully g row o r a n ge s o n a co m m e r c i a l sca l e . The only c hild of hi s p a r e nts, A r thur R a y m o nd Key, h as s p e nt th e y ea r s o f h i s life o fa r i n threP. co mmuniti es , a t E u s t is, n i n e ye a r s , a t Tangerin e four years a nd since t h e n a t Sanfor d . H e was e du ca ted i n th e p u b l i c c h oo ls, a nd wa s o n l y fif t ee n w h e n h e w ent t o work in t h e office o f the s u pe r i nte n d e n t of the A t l a nti c Co a s t L i n e R ai l roa d a t San fo rd. He soo n le f t th e r e t o b eco m e collect i o n c l e r k wi t h t h e F i r s t Natio na l B ank o f S a n fore!. A I toge t h e r h e r e m a i n e d w it h t h a t in s t itutio n eleve n yea r s , a nd w as a s i stan t cas h i e r wh e n h e r es i g n e d . M r . Key w a s a ssoc iate d wi t h F orres t L a k e in o r g a n i zing t h e S e min ole Co un ty Ba n k i n 1 913, and beca m e i ts fir s t cas hi e r . S i n ce t h e n th e addit i o n a l duties of v i ce pres i d e nt h av e bee n g iven him . l\fr. Key i s a m e m be r of the C h a m b e r o f Co m m e 1 ce, l fotary C lub , i s a d e m o c r at, b e l o n gs t o the E p isco p al C hurc h , i s a Knig h t Templ a r Maso n a nd S hri n e r , a m e mb e r o f t h e I nd e p e nd e n t O rd e r of O dd Fello w s , t h e E l k s a nd t h e S a n fo r d Co un t r y Club. In r9 1 9 h e m a rri e d M i ss E l s i e E l o i se Ri c e , o f \ V o r ces t e r , M assac h u set ts. T h ey h a v e o ne daug h t e r , Ade l aide Ca r m en Key. CYRIL Jusn N MARSHALL, M . D . In th e community of San fo r d, Se mino l e Co un ty, D oc tor l\[ a 1sh all r e p r esents so m e of t h e fin es t qu alifi ca t i o n s o f t h e m o d ern ph ys i c i a n and surg e o n, o n e who has had t h e adva ntage of thoroug h tra in ing and who se vi e wp o int a nd s t andards are those o f th e twe n ti eth c entury. Docto r Mars h all was b o rn in O mah a, N e br aska , Jun e 15, 188 2 . His fathe r was an e du cato r who d e v o t e d m an y years t o the ed u ca ti on a l se r v i c e o f t h e India n B u r e a u , a n d w as co nn ec t e d with G o v e rnm e n t Indian sch oo ls, b oth in t he E a s t a n d W est. D octor Marsh all as a b oy receive d som e of h i s fir s t impress i o n s at Indian r ese rvati on s . His pare nts w e r e Tho mas M. and Olive A . (Hays ) M a r s h all, b o th n a tiv es o f Gilm e r County , \ V e s t Virgi nia, a n d r e p r es en t a ti ves o f o ld families in th e tw o Virg inia s . His fa th e r be l o n g ed t o th e Mars h a ll fami l y whi c h g ave Ame ri ca it s g r eates t juris t , J ohn M a r s h a ll. Tho m a s M . M a r s h all for se vera l yea r s w as prin cipa l of th e G l e n v ille State Norma l Sc h oo l o f W e s t Virgi n i a. In l at e r years, a ft e r r e t i r in g from ecluca ti o n a I w ork, h e t oo k up bankin g and r ea l e state. C y r il Jus t i n M a r s hall i s on e o f t wo so n s a n d five daughter s s till l ivin g . In hi s infa n cy hi s pa r ents m o v e d to N e w Mexi co, and hi s fa th e r w as t eac h e r in o n e o f the Indi a n sch oo l s jus t n orth of Santa F e . H e l ive d the r e un til h e was about ni n e year s o f a ge . His fath e r t h e n b e came co n n ec ted w i th th e g r ea t Indian s c hool at Ca r lisle, P e nn sy lv a nia, and afte r a year t h ey r e m o ve d t o White C l o ud , Kan sa s , w h e r e his fa th e r co n ti nu e d in the I n dian se rv ice for t wo years. T h e next h o m e Of t h e famil y was a t C h a rl es ton , \ Ve s t Virg ini a , a n d a yea r and a h a l f l a t e r t h e y went t o H y d e n in Leslie C ounty, Kentu c k y , liv i n g t h e r e a y ea r , and h i s p a r e nt s the n r e t u rn ed t o th e ir n a ti ve co unty o f G ilm e r in W es t V i rgini a . D oc t o r M a r s h a ll r e m a in e d in G i l m e r County unti l h e w a s t wen t yo n e . H e g r a du at e d fro m t h e \iVe s t Virg i n i a Norm a l S c h oo l o f G l e n v ill e i n r 9 03, w o n a sc h o l a r s hip i n the P e abody Norm a l College a t Nash v ille, T e nn essee , g r a du a tin g in 1904 with the degr ee of Li c e n t i a t e o f In struc t i o n , a nd fro m th e r e ente r ed t h e Univ e r s i ty of Nash v ille fo r hi s m ed i ca l e du ca ti o n , graduati n g i n 1907 . After graduatin g h e p ra c ticed at C l arks da ' le, Mi s s i s s i ppi , u nti l 1 9II, a n d in that ye a r ca m e to Flo rid a a nd l ocated a t Ovie d o in Sem i n o l e Co un ty, a n d s i n ce 1 917 h as bee n at S a n ford. Whil e e ngage d in a ge n e r a l p r ac ti c e as . a ph ys i c i a n a nd surg e o n h e s p ec i a l i z es i n roe n t g e n o logy and e l ectro-the rap euti . c s . H e i s a m e mb e r o f th e S a n fo r d M edic a l S oc i ety, i s a fo r m e r pres id ent o f th e Ora n ge C o un t y M edica l Socie ty, a m e mb e r of t h e F l o r i d a State a nd S o uth e rn M e d ica l assoc i a ti o ns, a nd a F ello w o f t h e A m e r i c a n M e d ica l A s socia ti o n . D oc t o r Mar s h all h as fil l e d th e vario u s c h ai r s i n the O dd F e l l o w s Orde r , i s e x a l te d rul e r o f th e E l k s a t S a n fo r d , a nd i s a l so affil i a t e d wit h t h e M aso ns. In 1 917 h e m arried Mi ss J ea n E tt a Mack a y , a nd th e y h ave o n e so n , Cy ri l J u stin. Jr. D oct o r M a r s h a ll wa s e l ec t e d a c i ty c o mm i ss i o n e r o f Sa n fo r d in 1922. }AMES FRANK C RANFORD, M . D . , p h y s i cian a n d surge o n of r i p e p owe r s a n d experience, b e gan h i s profe s s i o n a l ca r ee r in his nati v e s t a t e o f N orth Carolin a, but since 1915 h as b ee n e ngage d in p r ac t i c e a t Inv e rn es s , Flo rid a, exce p t for th e pe ri o d h e s p e nt in th e se r vice a s a n a r my m edica l offic e r . D oc tor C ranford wa s born a t Davidson , M a c k l e nbur g County, N orth Ca ro l i n a , S e p t e mb e r 27, 1884 , so n of Willia m a nd Sarah E . (Ca ld w ell) C r a n ford. His pare nt s we r e b o rn i n alawba Count y , North Caro lin a, a n d n o w l i v e a t Dav i d so n . H i s fath e r ha s b e e n a m e r c h ant, i s a for mer

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16 HISTORY OF F L O RID A postmaster o f Davidson and a n c id e r in th e Pres b y t e r ia n Churc h. In th e family wer e t e n childre n , six son s and four dall ghte r s . Doctor C r a n ford acquired a publ i c sc h oo l edu cation, attended Davidso n College two year s. where h e p layed o n the basebal l and football team s , and fro m th e r e entered th e m e di ca l d epart m e n t o f the U niversit y of North Ca r o lin a. grad uatin g M . D. in 1 909. The following yea r h e did s p ec i a l w ork i n th e C h a rlotte Sanitarium. and in 19ro took up practice at Hende r so nv ille, North Carolin a. \ 1 \fhi l e the r e h e was activ e in public a ffairs, be in g pres id ent of th e County Medical oc iety and bo th c it y and county heal th office r. O n r emovi n g to Inve rn ess, F l orida. in 1 9 15, D oc t o r C r a n ford r es umed gen e r a l practi ce , and i s surgeon f o r the Atlantic Coast Line a nd Seaboard A ir Line Railroad and a m e mb e r of th e Railwav Surgeo n s' a ssoc iati o n s of these two sys tems. He. h as taken seve r a l s p ec i a l courses in m e dic i n e and surgery at ew York, and i s pres id e n t o f th e Inve rn ess Drug Company, conduc tin g o n e o f th e bes t drug stores in Citrus County . D oc t o r C r a nford was commiss i o n e d a first lie u te n ant in th e Army M e dic a l Co rp s in 1918. a n d was se n t t o For t O g l e th o rpe, Geo r gia, whe r e h e was promote d to cap t ain, and continue d in se n i ce at the ba se h ospi t a l until h o n orabl y di sc harged in Janua r y, 1919. Docto r Cran f ore! se rved as mayo r o f Inverness in r921-22. H e i s a m embe r o f t h e State and A m e ri can Medical a sso ciation s , a Pres byterian, a R oya l A r c h Maso n , K ni g h t o i P ythias and a m e mb e r o f the A m e ri ca n Legi o n . In 1 9 12, at Co lumbia, South Car o lin a, h e mar ri e d Miss Qucnni e M ob l ey, d a u ghte r o f M. H . and Emma (McCrory) M obley, the l atter 'li1ing, whil e h e r fath e r died in August, 1 92 r , whi l e fillin g th e office of county treasure r. Doc t o r and :\frs. Cran fo r d have tw o childre n , Katherine M . a nd Sarah Elizabeth. Lucius GRAY STRTNGFl,LLOll", of San f ord. wa s a useflll so ldi e r in th e C ivil war and has h a d a l o n g and inte r es tin g experience s ince th e n , n ea r l y a l l th e year s s p ent in Florida. H e . has been in th e Government se rvi ce, has b ee n a farmer and bu s in ess m a n , and ha s achi eved an a mpl e de g r ee o f pros p erity for all hi s n ee ds. He wa s b o rn near C h ester, South Carolina , Augus t 15, 1848 , so n o f Robert H enry and :tvlari a h (Gray) Strin g fell o w , th e forme r a nativ e o f South Car o lin a and the latt e r of V ir g inia. His father was a planter. In the family were s i x so n s and three dall ghters, and all t h e so n s b e ca m e Co n f e d erate so l di e rs. Luc iu s G. String f e l l ow was s i x t ee n w h e n h e j oined th e army, and h e se r ved during the last t e n m onths o f th e w a r , in th e Third South Carolina Infantry. F ollo w ing th e war h e h e lp e d hi s fathe r make a crop in o uth Carolina , and in the foll owing winte r h e a n d hi s parents, a s ister and two brothers started South. H e rode h o rseback , and o n D ecembe r 24 , 1 865, th ey arrived at Lake C ity, Columbia C ounty, Flo rida. Except for e i ght m onths in New York C ity Mr. Stringfello w has b ee n a resident at Florida eve r s ince . His ext e n s iv e educa ti o n has bee n a cquire d l a rgel y by exp e ri e n ce, s in ce h e attended sc h oo l only a few m onths b efore th e war . F o r seve n o r e i ght year s after co min g t o Florida h e was engage d in farming, was in the l i ve r y business a t Enterprise for about two year s and th e n for two years was a ge n e r a l m e r c h ant th e re. In 1 879 h e ca m e t o Sanford and took charge o f the orange g r ove inte rest s of ] . E . Pace fo i o n e yea1-, and followin g that got into c itrus growin g o n hi s own acco unt. A ll that he accumulate d in this lin e was d est1oye d by th e g r ea t freeze of i 894 95, and follo win g that h e became a l i ghtho u se k ee p c r at Musquitte Inle t . A I togeth e r h e was in th e se r v i ce of the Govern m ent for nin e yea r s and ten m onths. \ "! h e n th e S pa n i s h -American war broke o u t Mr. Stringfel l ow ca m e t o Sanford a nd beat hi s way o n a tra i n Tampa, w h e r e h e was g iv e n a p os ition in the quartermaster's d e p a r t m e n t with th e Fifth United States Ca va l ry. From Tampa h e wa s orde r e d t o Hunts ville , A lab ama, an d r e mained th e r e until th e c l ose o f th e war. In April , 1899 , h e r eturne d t o San ford, and amo n g oth e r co nn ectio n s w a s e ngaged in saw millin g and i n th e grocer y b u s i n ess. Mr. Stringfell o w for ove r twenty year s has b ee n j u s t i c c o f th e peace, h o l d in g that office by r epea t ed r ee l ec ti'On s . H e g iv es h i s bu si ness attentio n fo r ea l estate, a nd h e l a id out a nd so ld the Stringfel low additio n t o th e C it y of San f o rd. Mr. Stringfe l l o w i s a d e m ocrat i n p o l it i c . At Providence, B r adford County, Florida, i n 1868 , h e m arrie d Miss Rebecca Turner. S h e d i e d leaving a famil y o f six c;hildr e n. I n 1902 Mr. Stringf ello w m arrie d Mrs . G r ace B . (Wilk e r so n ) Abbo tt. ]AMES N. R ousoN, M . D. Duri n g hi s p racti ce a t Sanford Doctor Robso n's ca r ee r has b ce . n m o r e than a n ordinary r outine o f 1es p o n sib ilit y and duty w ell p e r formed. His youthful year s wer e s p ent in C harles ton , whe r e h e l ea rn e d and fol l o w e d th e drug b u s in ess for so m e year s befor e t a kin g up m e di cine. H e wa s b o rn a t C h a r l es t o n , Sou t h Car o l ina, J un c 2 4 , I87r, so n of J a m es N . R obso n , S1 . , a nati ve of S outh Car o lin a, a n d son o f a n Englishm a n who se ttl e d in that state . James N. R o bson , S r. , marrie d Eliza \"lightma n , o f an o l d South Carolina famil y. The fath e r , wh o di e d in 1901 , wa s for m a n y year s a m embe r of J. N. R o b so n & Son, commiss i o n m e r c h ants at C h a r leston. Y o ungest 1in a famil y o f four so n s and four daughters, Dr. J a m es N. Robso n was r ea r e d and educa t ed in C h a rl es t o n . His o lde s t brothe r l os t hi s Ii fe in th e g r ea t C h a d csto n ea r thqua k e i n 1885. Docto r R o b so n graduate d in 18;:17 fro m th e South Carolina College of Pharmacy, and h e was a ph armacist am! until h e took up th e study of m e dicine. He s p ent o n e year in the M e di ca l College of C h a rl es t o n , two year s in the Atl anta M e dical Col lege and i n 1 907 graduated Nf. D. from th e U niv e r s it y of t h e South at Sewanc c, Tennessee . F o r about t wo year s h e was e ngaged in practice at Uni o n , South Ca r olina. and since 1 908 ha g iv e n hi s va lu e d professi o n a l se rvices t o San ford. While e ngaged in ge n e r a l practice h e conduc t e d a priva t e sanitarium, and i s a s p ec ialist in women's a nd childre n's d i seases . H e did po st-graduate work in T ul a n e U niv e r s ity at Tew O rl ea n s in 1 9 r8 , a nd i s a member of the Orange County and State Medica l soc i e ti es. Doctor Robson m arrie d Olive Hudgins, of Orangeburg, S outh Carolina, who di e d soo n afte r their marriage. In 1 900 Mis; Pead B r ecclin, o f Manning, South Carolina, b eca m e hi s wife. They have a famil y of six so ns and two daughte rs. Doc t o r R o b so n i s a Pres byt erian, while Mrs . Robso n be l o ngs to the Episco pal Church . He i s affiliated with th e Inde p ende n t Orde r o f Odd Fellows, the \ i\loodm e n o f t h e Vlorld and with oth e r orders . HENRY S. M cKENZIE. A r es id e n t o f Palatka throug h out almos t hi s enti r e ca reer , H enry S. : McKenzi e, edito r o f th e P a l a tk a Times-Herald. has bee n a promine n t figure in pub l i c a ffair s a nd

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HISTOR Y OF F LORID A 17 c i v 1 c m o v e m e n t s , a n d fo r s i x te r m s w as the r e p r e se n ta ti ve o f P u t n a m Cou nt y i n t h e F l o r i d a Legi s l ature. H e wa s b o rn at A u g u s t a , Geo r g i a, Ma y 2 7. 1 8 8 6 , a n d i s a s o n of H o n . H. A . B. McKe n z i e. The McKe n z i e family o r i gina t e d in S c o t land, a s t h e n a m e mio-h t i ndi ca t e , and t h e e a rl y m e m b e r s t h e r eo f immi gi-at ecl t o m e ri ca prio r t o th e \Var o f t h e R e v o l u tion , i n w hi c h se v e rnl o f Mr. ' \ fcKenz i e's a n c es t o r s pa r t i c ipate d a s s o l di e r s of th e p a t ri o t ;irmy. His g r ea t-gr eatg r a nd fa th e 1, S o l o m o n ivicKe nz ie, II, fo u g h t i n th e W a r o f 1 8 12, u n d e r G en. Andr e w J a c k so n , a n d se r v e d a s a m e m b e r o f t h e South C a r o lin a Leg i s l ature fo r ;i nu m b e r o f yea r s . Sol o m on M c K e n z i e II I. th e ;:-r a n d fa t h c r o f H enry C. M c K e m . ie, was a s o l d i e r u f J-fam pt o n's Legi o n , und e r \\Ta d e : H a mp t o n , in . t h e Con f ccle 1 d l e army , a n d saw 11111c h se r v i ce in a nu m b e 1 of tlte i m p ortan t C'ngagem e n t s f o n gltt i n V i r g i nia. H e di e d sou n a f t e r th e c l os e o f th e 11a r b e t wee n tlte s tales, lc a 1 i11g five c h i l d r e n , o f wlto m I L A. B. McKen z ie \\'as t h e se c o n d in o r der o f b ir t h . H . A . H. w a s IJOrtt i n Ge o r g i a , and a f t e r r ecci1ing hi s e d u c a ti o n i n t h e sc h o o l s o f Harnw c l l , South Carnli n a. a n d Aug u s ta , G eo r g i a. e n t e r e d t h e n e w spape r field a nd fo r year s w a s co nnecte d w i t h t h e o l d A u g u s t a C hron ic l e . B e c a u se o f faili n g h e a l t h , in 1887. h e c a m e t o Flo r ida and p n r c hascd a n orange grove a t Fruitland. Putna m C o un t y . Three y ears l a te r h e was again attracte d t o j ournalis m and p u r c hased th e Pal a tk a Times . w hi c h wa s l a t e r co n so l id a t e d w i t h t h e Pa latk a H e r a ld , w hi c h had h cc i 1 establis h e d in I 8 6g . . H e co n t inu e d as t h e p u blis h e r o f lite T im es ] J e r a ld . l\J r . McKenzi e r epresente d Put n a m County in t h e Legi s latur e duri ng-t h e s e ss i o n s o f 1<) 07 a n d 1 909, a nd th e n r e t i r e d fr o m t h e p o lit ica l f i e l d to resu m e h i s newspap e r duties . F o 1 so m e years h e \\'a s a m embe 1 of t h e County D e m oc r atic E xec u t i 1 e Committcr. H e i s a m e m b e r o f t h e i\. [ e t h o di s t Churc h . a nd a s a f r a t c rn alis t h o l d s 111c111lie r s h i p in t h e lnde p e nclc n l O rder o f O dd F e l l o ws. Of !ti s (j1 c c h ild r e n four a 1 c living, llcnry . hcing th e third i n o r de r o f birt h . H enry S. i \J'c' l ( c n z i c a t te n d e d t h e p u bli c s c h oo l a t Pala t k a a nd the ::iu t h . F l o rid a l\[ilil a r y C o l l e g e at B arto w . wh i ch l a tt e r was a b o l i s h e d by th e C u ck m a n b i ll. b n t wh i c h b ecame, a s n o w . a p a r t o f t h e U n i ve r s i t y o f F l o rid a. O n le av i n g th i s ins ti t utio n h e bec a m e assoc iate d witlt hi s > a th c r in t h e n c11s pap e r b u siness , and a s befor e no: t c d , i s n o w e dito r o f t h e Tim es H e r a l d , o n e o f t h e l eading n e w s p ape r s o f t h i s se ctio n , w hi c h e n j oys a l a rge cir c ul a t i o n thr o u g h o u t Put nam and t h e a d j o inin g counties , a n d w i e ld s a wide influ e n ce . Upon t h e r e t ir e m e n t o f hi s fat h e r fro m th e Legi s lature h e s u cce e d cl him . a n d r epre se n t e d P u t n a m o unty fo 1 s i x t erms, fro m l 9 l 1 t o i92r i nclu s i 1 e . D u ring hi s m e m b e 1 s hip i n that h ocly, in w h i c h h e es t a bli s h e d a n e x c ellent r e co r d , h e se r v e d o n th e commi ttees o n appropriat i o ns, judic i a r y, educati o n .nd of othe r im po r ta n t m e a sures n o w to be found o n th e statute boo k s . D u r in g t h e p e ri o d o f t h e W orld war Mr. McKe nzie was c h a i rman o f t h e Putna m C ount v Co un cil of Defe nse and r ende r e d v a l u abl e se r v i ce. A ll m ea sure s h a v i n g fo r their ob j e c t the betterme n t and a c h a n ce m ent o f hi s co m munity have his h e a r t y s u pp o r t. Mr. M c K e n z ie is r ecordin g s t ewar d o f St. J a mes M e th o di s t Churc h , a n d was forme rl y s u p e r i ntendent o f t h e M e th o di s t Sunday School. H e be l o n g s t o vario u s ci v i c bod i es, in c lu ding th e R o t a r y C l u b a nd t h e Chamb e r o f Co;11111e r cc, and as a fratcrna l i s t i s a pa s t chan c ello r comma n d e r o f St. J o hn 's L o dge o f th e K n i ghts o f Pythi as, a n d p as t sach e m o f P a latka T r i be o f th e lmprove d Orde r o f R eel M e n . H e i s unmarri e d . R A L P H E . STEVENS, l\ I. D . S p e n d ing par t o f h i s b o y h oo d a t San fo r d u nti l h e we n t away t o college and un i ve 1 s i ty, D oc t o r Steve n s r e t u rn e d for a b ri e f time t o e n gage in p riv a t e practice a nd t h e n a n s we r e d the c a ll o f p atriot i c duty a nd w e n t int o t h e army as a m e di ca l office r a n d w a s in t h e se r v i ce t w o vca r s . H e m a d e a di s t i n g u i s h e d r eco r d 11 hil c i n F r a n ce, a nd s in ce h i s r eturn l o t hi s co untr y h as res u m e d p r ac t i c e , l a rgel y i n surger y, a t San f ord. Doct o r Stc1 c n s w as b o rn al S u s qu clta1111a in S u sque h a nn a Cou nt y . F ' c n n sy l vania. F ebrua r y 7 , 1 8 9 r , a son of H arry 1' . a n d R e b ecc a (.131a c k ) S t ev e n s . His p a r ents w e r e nati ves of P cn11sy l v a ni a, !ti s fath e r o [ Engl i s h a n d hi s m o th e r o f Iris h a11ccs t r y . Harry R . S teven s fo r th e past twe n t y year s has h a d h i s h o m e at S an f o r d , F l o rid a, w h e r e h e i s m a s t e r m e c h anic f 0 1 lite A t l a n t i c Coast L i n e R ailr oa d . Ral p h E . S teven s was ab o u t e l eve n yea r s o f age wh c11 th e fami l y came l o F l o rid a, a nd h e fin i s h e d hi s p u blic sc h oo l educatio n i n San fo rd. H e was a m e mb e r o f t h e f i r s t g r aclu a l i nn-c l a ss fro m t h e hi g h sc h oo l in i 909 . Dming 1 900 -ro h e atte n d e d t h e Ste t so n U ni ve r s i t y at D e La11d, a n d t h e n f o r three yea r s w as a s tuclc11t i11 t h e U ni ve r s i t y o f N o r t h C a r o l ina. D oc t o r Ste v e n s c o m p leted his m ed i c a l t r aini n g in th e J cffe r so11 M e d i c a l College o f Phila d e l phi a, w h e r e h e g raduate d in r 9 r 5 . F o r o n e ye a r h e was attac h e d t o th e D e lawar e H os p it a l a t \ V i l111ingto11, D e l a w a r e , a nd afte r t hi s t h o ro u g h pre p a r a t i o n h e r e t u rn e d t o S a n f o r d a n d began p racti ce. S oo11 a f t e r A m e ri ca d ec l a r e d wa r o n Ge r m a n y h e volu11l ec r ecl hi s se r v i ces, and i n Jun e, 1 9 17. was commi ss i o n e d first l i e u t e n a n t in t h e Arm y M ed i c a l Co r ps. F o r so m e w ee k s h e was engaged in c x ami11ati o n w ork a t i\.I i a mi a n d \ V es t P a l m B e a c h , a11cl in A u g u s t was order e d lo F ort O g l e t h o r pe, G eo r g i a, a n d t h e n t o Ca mp L ee at .Pe t e r s b u r g, V ir gi11ia. wh e r e h e 11a s atta c h e d l o t h e Three Hund r e d F ifth E11g i n ec r s in t h e E i ghti e t h Di v i s i o n . In F ebrua ry, J D 18, h e w a s prom o t e d t o captai n , a n d i n May w ent over seas w i th th e Thre e H un d r e d and Fifth E n ginee r s . H i s fir s t ser v i ce w a s o n t h e B r i t i s h fro11t in t h e ommc offe n s i v e , a n d was t h e n w i t h t h e A m c ri c an For c es during th e St. M i h i e l dri1e and t h e A rgonn e offe n s i v e. H e wa s o n d u ly i n th r ee m a j o r a c t i o ns, S e p t m b c r 26, O c t obe r .+, and No1 e mb e r r , a n d r e c e i ve d ::i c i tati o n for di s ting ui s h e d and exce p t i o na l g a l l a n t r y o n N 1 c mb c r r , 1 9 18. Thi s was awar d e d o n Marc h 22, r919, b y G c11c r a l P c r s hi11g . The c i t a t i o11 m a d e s p ec ia l m e n ti o n of h i s faithful n ess i n ca ri n g fo r w o un d e d so ldi e r s a t that elate. From D ece m be r , r 9 1 8, t o J u11c , 1 9 19, h e h e l d t h e r a n k of r eg im enta l s u rgeo n fo r th e Thr ee Hundre d a11cl F ifth Engin eers. H e w a s r e turne d t o t h e U n i t e d S ta t es i n J u n e, 1 9 19, a n d was d i sc h a rged at Ca mp D i x . H e i s now a m a j o r in r ese r ve o f th e Med i c a l Co r p s, and i s a l s o r e gime ntal surg eo n of th e One Hundre d and F i fly F ourth Infa ntry i n t h e Flo rida N a t i o n a l G uard. Doct o r Steve n s r es u m e d practi ce a t S a nford i n Jul y, 1 9 19. H e h a s b ee n a n acti vc m e mb e r and p os t surgeo n of the C a mp b e ll-Lo ssing P o s t of the A m e ri ca n L e g i o n a t Sanford. H e w a s p r es i d e n t i n 1 9 2 2 o f t h e Orange Co unty M e di c al S o c i e t y , an d i s a m e m b e r o f the F l orida Sta te,

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18 H ISTORY OF FLORIDA S o u t h ern a nd A merican M e d i c a l associati o n s. H e i s a K ni ght T e m p l a r Maso n and Shriner, a m e m b e r of th e E lk s, th e Country C l ub, R oel a nd G u n C lub , i s a Rotar ian and a P r es b y t erian. Au: x HuGH OooM . During a pe ri o d o f about tw e n ty yea r s A lex H u g h O dom h a s b ee n e n gaged i n t h e p racti ce o f l aw, having b ee n a d mit te d to th e b a r of G eorgia in 1 90 2 and bui ldi n g u p a r eputatio n at Jac k so nville, Florida, prior l o hi s locating p erma n e n t l y a t Palatk a in 1908 . H e r c h e has b ee n ucccssful in th e acq u ir e m e n t o f a l a rge a nd lu c rative cli ente le, attracted by his so und abi l it y, g r ea t indus t r y a nd fid elity to t h e int e r es t s of hi s c l i e n ts, a nd has a l so estab l ished himscl f thorou g h l y i n t h e co nfide n ce of h i s f e l l o w m e mb e r s of th e profess ion . Mr. Odom wa s bo rn in w h a t i s now T oo mb s Co un ty , Geo r g i a, Janua r y 19, 1 8 75, and i s a so n o f James H . a nd Sarah Jane (McNatt) Odo m , n ali ves of th e same sectio n o f G eo r g i a as that in whi c h occurre d t h e b i r th of th e ir so n . They we r e r ea r e d a nd m arried and spent their entire Ii ves there, the fa th e r pa ssing a way in May, 1 9 1 r , at th e age of sixty nin e years. A p orti o n o f hi s lif e wa s d evoted t o t h e pursuit of agri culture, a n d fo r twe n ty year s p r i o r to h i s d ea th he wa s also a deal e r in na,a l sto1-es. F o r four y ea r s hC' se rved a s a so ldi e r of t h e Confe d eracy dur ing t h e war b etwee n the states, bei n g a p ri va t e in a Geo r g i a voluntee r infantry regi m e nt. H i s w i d ow, \Yho suni1es him , n o w m a k es h e r h o m e n ea r L yo ns, Geo1-g i a . In th e ir fa mi l y t h e r e we r e three so n s and four daugh t e r s , o n e c hi l d d ying at th e age of eleven m onths. Two of th e c hi l dre n now r es ide i n Florida: Patri c k H., a r es i d e n _ t o f Jack so nville ; a nd A lex H u g h , of t h i s r ev i ew. A lex Hugh Odom r e m ai n e d at th e plac e of h i s birth until h e left h o m e t o att e nd sc h ool. s u pp l e m e n ting hi s earl y e d ucation by a cou1-se at Emor y C ollege, w h e r e h e rece i ve d t h e degree of Bach e l o r of A r t s a s a m e mber of the graduati n g c lass of 1 899 . Two yea r s later the same in s ti t u tion con fcrre d upo n him t h e deg1 -ec of Master of Arts . He attende d Merce r U ni ve r s it y for h i s law c ourse, and was g r aduate d as a Bache l o r of Laws i n 1902, at whi c h ti m e h e e n te r e d up o n the practi ce o f hi s profess ion at Lyons, Ge o r gia, a nd in A u g u st, 1 904, r e m ove d t o Jackso n ville . H e r e main e d there until r 908, when h e l ocate d at Palatka, wh e r e h e has s i nc e b ee n e n gaged i n gen e r a l p racti.ce a nd h as bee n acco rd e d a l a rge a n d d istinctl y r e pr ese ntati ve clie n tagc, indi ca t i ve of t h e trus t 1 -epose d in h im b y th e p u blic and it s apprec iation o f hi s abi l it y . Mr. Odo m p r ese nt s h i s cases fa irly, i s s t r o n g in a r g u ment and logi ca l in hi s deducti o n s, and i n h i s e, e r yday practice r ecognize s and o b s e r ves t h e hi g hest e th i cs of p r o f ess i o n a l acti o n s . Both h e a n d hi s broth e r, Patrick, a r e o wn e r s of farms in G eo r g ia . l\fr. Odom i s a d e mocrat. b u t ta k es only a good c i t i ze n' s inte rest in politics, a n d h as n eve r so u ght n o r d esire d office . H e be l ongs t o the S i gma r u college fraternity and to t h e Knights o f Pyth ias, a nd in Masonry has attained t o hi g h r ank, having ta k e n the d eg r ees of b o th th e York a nd Scottish Ri t e b o die s up t o a nd inc ludin g t h e thirty-se co nd degree in t h e l atter, and h e i s a l so a 111c m be 1 -of Morroc:i T e mple, A. A. 0 . N. M . S . H e a l so h a s sever a l bu siness a n d c i vic connec t i o n s . The rul es that further govern hi s co n duct a n d s h ape h i s l ife a r e found i n the Method i s t Epi sco pal Churc h. Sou th, o f which h e i s a d evout m e m b e r . J. HANCOCK. In offic i a l circle s o f Putnam Co un ty t h e name of R. ] . Han cock is recog nized a s t hat o f a n individual w h o has bee n pro mi n ent in p u blic affairs for a numbe r o f year s, and wh o in th e several incu m be n c i es w hi c h h e has occ upi e d h as displayed th e possessi o n o f qualities t hat have m a d e his se rvic es of much va lu e to the community and it s peop le. At this t ime h e occ upie s th e office of clerk of the C ir cuit Court of Putna m Cou nty, a po s it i o n w hich h e h as h e l d since 1 9 1 7. His u se'ful n e ss i s not near it s c l ose nor hi s advan ce m ent at its hi g h es t , as witho u t d o ub t higher h o n o r s awai t th i s typi ca l so n of F l o rid a w h o personifies what i s best in it s public m e n . Mr. H a n cock was born Februar y 4 , 1 8 77 , in Putnam Co un ty , Florida, and i s a so n of the late J ohn H a n cock. H i s fath e r , a nati ve of Georgia, ca m e to Putnam Co un ty. F l o rid a, in youn g m anhood, and h ere applied h i m se l f t o th e vocat ion of fanni n g, w hi c h h e followed throu g h out l i fe with a g ratifyina m easure of s u ccess. H e was a m a n o f industry a n d integri ty , and t h e manne r in which he cond ucted hi s t r a n sac tions, b oth publ i c and private, won t h e friendship a n d esteem of man y . After a n active and useful ca r ee r h e died i n Putnam County, o n h i s farm, in 1 9 1 7. He a nd hi s wo r t h y w i fe w e r e the par e n ts o f seve n childre n , of w h o m R J. was t h e fourth in order o f bir t h . R. J. Hancoc k acquired hi s ed ucati o n i n the publ i c sc h oo l s a n d was r ea r e d o n t h e h o m e farn1, a mid a0Tic u1tural surro u ndings . Farming, howeve r , did not app ea l to him , and at th e age o f twenty y ears h e began . teachi1w i n the sch oo l s of t h e rural di s t r ict s, a rncation which h e fo l lowed fo r four yea1 s . Thi s was s u ccee d ed by hi s e n t e rin g th e U n it e d Stat e s rai lway m ail s e r v i ce, with whic h h e wa s co n n ec t e d fo r about seve n yea r s , du ring w hi c h h e had sever a l diffe r ent runs a nd v i s it e d several p o in ts. 1\1r . Han coc k seve r ed h i s con n ectio n w ith th e mail se r v i ce in 1 909 , in wh i ch year he was a pp ointed county ta x co l l ector. The duties of thi s po s iti o n c l a imed h i s attention and acti v iti es u n til 1 9 1 7 , when h e becam e h is party's ca n d idate for the office o f c lerk o f th e C ir c u it Court of P u t n a m County, t o w hi c h o flic e h e wa s dul y e lecte d . Ilis fir st term proved ve r y satisfacto r y t o th e peop l e , w h o evi denc e d their gratificati on b y r e tu rning h im to office t o s ucc ee d hi m s e l E. H e d i sc h a rges his du t i es in an e ntire l y capable, th o r o u g h and expedi tio u s m a nn e r , and has won t h e co nfid e n ce o f hi s associates at t h e courth o u se and the public in gen eral. M r . Hancock i s a d e m ocrat, a nd h as a l wavs been active in t h e i nt e r ests o f hi s pa r ty . He. b e l o ngs lo the Baptis t Churc h , a nd i s a memb e r of th e K i wa n i s C lu b a n d other b o d i es, c ivi c a nd soc i al. In 1904 Mr. H a nc oc k m arrie d ]\ [i ss R ci' a Green . t h e daug hter of Mr. and M r s . Nathan Green , of Putn a m County, n a tiv es of Flo rida. and to th i s uni o n th e r e have been born three chi l d r e n : Cox J., Edn a E. a nd R. \l\Tcnde l l , all attending sch ool. FRAKCI S vVILL TAM i\JAHONEY. A r es id ent of F l o r ida fo r over t h irty live y ea rs, F r a n c i s \i\liJ1 iam Mah o n ey h as bee n in b u s in ess at San for d during th e g reater pa r t o f the period, and has o n e o f th e l a rgest establis hm e n t s in the s t a t e h a ndlin g plumbing co ntracting a nd p lumbing a n d kindre d lines of merc handise. 1\Ir . Mah o n ey was b orn a t Richmo nd. V i r g ini a . A pri l 29, 1 853. so n of Fran c i s and E l len (Dodd) i\if a h oney , both r eprese ntin g o ld A m e r ican lin es, hi s fath er's pe o p l e coming l o Maryland w ith L o rd

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H ISTORY OF F L O RID A 19 Baltimo re. On t h e matern al side o n e bra n c h o f t h e family i.; t h e \ Vi lsons. Ell e n D o dd wa s bo rn at P o r ts mouth , V ir ginia, and F r a n c i s Maho n ey was born a t Geo rget o wn , D i s t r ict o f C o l u m b i a . H e \\ as th e seventh c h i l d o f h i s par ents, and w h e n hi s fathe r di e d h e h a d n o furth e r o p po r tunit y t o attend sc h oo l , so h i s s tudi o u s di s p o s itio n l e d h i m to acqui r e a w i d e r a nge o f k n o wl e dge throu g h h i s own effo r ts . At th e age o f fourt ee n th e r es p o n sibil i t i es o f a large fa mi l y came to r es t Y i r tual l y o n h i s s h o u l d e rs. H e l earne d th e trade of s t o n e m aso n , and a m ong o t h e r empl oyme n ts worke d during the c o n s truc tion o f F ortress 1v[ onroe . H e a c q uir e d a goo d kn owledge of th e Latin and F r e 1 1 c h l a n g uages, a nd w as for m an y years a skillfu l c i vil e n g ine e r . M u c h of th e t im e lie was in th e e m p l o y of t h e F e d e r a l Governme nt. O n e o f h i s ea r l y a c hi e v e m ents, a n d o n e r ece i v i n g h i g h commendat i o n f ro m a Governme n t exp e r t, w as b uild in g t h e fou n d a ti o n o f the Gover n m e nt l o c k s a t Ri chmond. \ • \/ h e n t h e c i v i l war ca m e o n , c o n s i d e ri n g him se l f a V ir gin ian , h e r es i g n e d fro m t h e Go v ernm ent se n i ce a nd cast in hi s l o t w it h th e Co n fe d e r acy. H e w as o n th e s t aff o f enginee r s in G e n e r a l L ee ' s a r m y, and co n t inu ell until t h e fina l s urre nd e r . After th e wa r h e r es um e d t h e w o r k o f h i s p r o f ess i o n a t Ri ch m o nd. a nd co n t inue d t h e r e u n t i l h i s d ea t h i n r 8 79, at t h e age o f sixty -three. His w idow di e d in 1888 , aged s ixty-ei g ht. The y w e r e t h e p a r e n ts o f s ix: so n s a n d o n e daug h t e r . Fra n c i s \ V . lVl ah o n ev was rear e d a t R i chmond, attend e d t h e p a id sc l;ools, a n d as a bo y b e g a n a n app r e nti ces hip at t h e tra d e o f s t ea m and gas fittin g a n d gen e r a l p lum b i n g . \ ' \/h e n h e w a s o n l y t wenty yea r s of age, clue t o hi s un u s u a l s k1JI a n d p rolic i e n cy , h e was m a d e f o r eman of the Ri c h m o n d G as 'vVor k s . H e h e ld t hat p os t seve n year s . L ea 1 ing V ir g i ni a. h e located at A u g u s t a , G eo r g i a , a nd fro m t h e r e we n t t o Atla n t a , w h e r e fo r five v ca r s h e w a s in th e p lu111bing bu siness o n hi s o w n a n d i n 1 885 t o P a latk a , F l orida. all(\ fi1e month s l a t e r ca111e t o San f ore\, w hi c h c i t y has bee n h i s h o m e since 1 886 . Thro u g h o u t t h i s p e ri o d h e h as bee n i n t h e p l u mbing bu sines s a n d a d e a l e r in gen e r a l plumbin g s uppl i e s a n d machine r y und e r t h e name o f Mah o n e y \ Va l k e r Comp any. f\l o n g wi t h t h e conduc t of t h i s s u c c ess fu l b usin ess h e h as inte rested h i m self in t h e enti r e p rogr a m of uph u i lc\i n g a n d d eve l o pm e n t of San f o r d . H e h as n eve r b ee n a c a ndi d a t e fo r pub l i c office , i s a d e111ocrati c vo t e r and a m e mh e i o f t h e Ca th o l i c Churc h . At R i chmo nd . Vir g i nia . i n 1 8 7_:;, ?vir. Mah o n ey m a r ri ec\ i ss F a n n y J . B y rn e . She d i e d D ece m be r 20. T 9 1 9 . t h e moth e r or two so n s and o n e da11,ght cr. S;1J\I u 1 :1. P L u s r o N . 'II . D . S t eadily practic in g m edicine a nd surger y at San forcl f o r n e arly twenty yea r s . Doct o r Puleston h as acq11i r e d m a n y i n te r es t s in that c i ty , bot h i n a b u siness and in a c i v i c cap a c i ty. He i s o n e of t h e m os t a cco111p l i s h e d m e n in h i s p rofessi o n in S e111i n o l e Co un t y . D oc t o r P u l e s t o n h as l ived m os t o f hi s l i fe i n F l o ri da , b u t w as born a t F o r t 'North, T exas , D e c e m be r 5,' T 88o. so n o f Tho mas M o r vin and M a r y (Arn o ld ) Puleston . His fath e r wa s b orn i n t h e C i t y o f L o nd o n , and was sev e n year s of age whe n hi s pare n ts, J ohn a n d Sara h Pule s ton , came t o t h e Unite d Sta tes and settle d i n Ill inois , w h ere they li ve d out t h e i r live s . Tho m as M . Pul e s t o n m a r r ie d in lllin o i s M a r y Arno ld. a nativ e o f Sal e m , that state, a n d of New E n g l and a n cestry . T homas M . l'11l cs t o n gradu a te d fro m an Tllin o i s cn lkge . and soo n a f t e r hi s m a r ri age m o 1 ec\ l o F ort \ V o r t h , Tex a s , and prac t iced law the r e . In J883 , h e ca m e to Flo r i d a , s et t l i n g at M o nti cello, a n d wa s o n e o f t h e acti v e m e m b e r s of the ha r o f J effe r so n Count y un til hi s d eath , at th e age of fif t y s e ve n . F o r t w enty ye a r s o r m o r e h e was co u n t y judge, and at the tim e o f hi s d eath was gran d m a s te r o f th e G r and L o dge of ' M a so n s o f F l o rid a . He w as a l so a S c o ttis h R it e l \lfa so n . F o 1 many !' C a r s h e was a ruling elde r o f t h e Pres b y t e ri a n C h u r c h , a n d h i s w idow, a n a c t i v e m e m b e r of t h e s a m e churc h , i s n o w living a t San fo r d. T wo o f th e ir s ix: c hil d r e n a r e n o w d e ce a se d . Dr. S amue l P u l eston w a s r e a r e d at M o ntice l l o fro m th e age o f tw o y e a r s , atte nd e d t h e J effe r so n Co u nt y Hig h S c h oo l , an d had two ye a r s of p r ivat e ins truc ti o n b e fo r e e n t e ri n g t h e U n iver s it y o f M a r y l a n d at B a lt i m o r e . He wa s g radu a t e d M . D . in 1 9 0 2 , a nd b e f o r e engag i n g in p r ac t i ce h e s p e n t on e yea r in t h e Uni v e r s ity o f M a r y l a n d H o s pit a l a nd o n e yea r in th e hos p i t a l o f th e P l ant Sys t e m of n . a i l wa ys a t \ i\laycro ss , G eo r g i a . D oc t o r P u l es t o n o pe n e d h i s offic e at San fo rd i n 1 90-1, a n d h a s b e e n e n g aged i n s t eady practi c e h e r e . H e ha s ta k e n w o r k in t h e New York Post Graduate Sch oo l o f M e dicin e and i n t h e M a yo C l i n i c s at R o c h es t e r , Minne so t a . H e i s a m e m b e r o f th e M idl and ' M e di c a l S o c i e ty, t h e Oran g e Co unty Soc iety, th e S an fo r d M e d ica l and D e nt a l Soc i e ty, and t h e Flo rid a S ta t e a n d A m e r i c a n M e d i ca l associat i o ns. f\ l a r ge pa r t of h i s w o r k in r ece n t y e a r s h a s be e n gen e r a l surge r y . Doctor Pul est o n i s v i c e p r eside n t o f t h e P eoples Ban k o f Sanfo rd. H e i s a l so pr eside n t o f R ose Court, Incorpo r a t e d , a r e a l estate o r g a niza t i o n . H e i s a Maste r Mas o n, a m e mber o f t h e E lk s . t h e R o t a r y C luh, C h a m b e r o f Co m m e r ce and t h e P r esbyterian Churc h . In r 90s h e m a r\ i e d Mi ss C a milla S h aw. a na t i v e of A l a b a m a . T h e i r t w o c h i ldre n a r c 1la r y Elizab e th a ncl Ca mill a . GORDON BELDO N T 1 so N h a s p ractice d hi s profes s i o n as a d o cto r o f d e n ta l surge r y a t Gai n es v ille fo r n earl y twe n t y yea rs, and i s a r e cogn ized l eade r in civ i c a ffa ir s t h e r e . H e w a s b orn a t Prov i d e n ce , Bradf o r d C o un ty, Flo ri d a , D e c e m b e r 3T, 1 8 7:;, so n o f \ V illi a m Orso n and Martha ( H o d ge s ) T ison. His father was b orn a t N ewnansvill e , t h en t h e c o u n t y seat of A l a c h u a C ounty. whe r e th e g r an dfath e r Tiso n w a s a pi o n eer. T h e moth e r i s a n a t ive of Ham ii ton C o un t y , F l o rida. Since r 88 7 D o ctor T i so n' s p a r e n ts hav e l i ved a t Gai n esv ille, w h e r e h i s fath e r ha3 s up e r v i s e d 1 1 i s i n t e r es t s a s a farme r , s t oc k r a i se r a n d t rader. Go n i o n B . T i s o n g r e w u p on a farm, atte nd e d c o m m on schoo ls, t h e p11blic sc h oo l s o f Gai n esville . s p ent th r ee year s in th e Eas t Flo rida S e mi n a r y at G aine s v ille , a n d during 1 893 atte n d e d bu s i n ess c olle g e at L e xingto n , K entuc k y . Soo n afte r w a rd h e e n t e r e d t h e B a l t im o r e College o f D e n t a l Sur ge r y , wh e r e h e w a s g r a duate d D octo r o f D e ntal Surger y i n 1 8 9 7. F o r five years afte r g raduating D oc t o r Tiso n was engaged i n op erati v e d e n t i s t r y in N e w Yor k C i t y . H e r eturnee\ t o F l orida, and for a y e a r p oo r h ea lth p r e v ente d h i s r es uming hi s profe s s i o n , but since 1 905 h e has l o oke d after a larg e and prosp e r o u s private prac t ice at G ain e s v ille , a n d h i s work h as brou g h t him a s tate w i d e r eputa ti o n i n d e ntal surge r y , and th i s r eputation e x t ends t o many oth e r s t a t e s . D octor Tiso n k e e p s i n t o u c h w i t h t h e rap i d l y adv anci n g knowl e dge of d e ntal prac ti ce, an d h a s attended m a n y c li n i cs and d o n e muc h p os t -graduate work, taking so m e t i m e n e a rl y e ve r y year fo1 t h i s p u r p ose . He wa s fo r fo u r years , fro m 1 9 r7 to 1921 ,

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20 H ISTORY OF FLORIDA r eco r d i n g sec retar y a nd fo r 1 922 w as p r es i d ent o f t h e F l o r i d a Sta t e D ental S oc i e ty . H e is a l so a m e m be r o f t h e Dis tri c t a nd Nat i o na l D enta l so c i e ti es. D octo r Tiso n se rved as m a y o r o f G a i n esville in 1 9 18, and in i 9 1 9 w as e l ecte d t h e se c ond pres i dent o f th e Gainc ville Rotary C lu b . H e i s a pa s t -exa lted r u l e r of G ainesv ille L odge N o . 990 , B e n evo l ent a nd Pro t ect i v e O r d e r o f E lk s , a n d a m o n g hi s h o bbi es are hunti n g, fishing a n d go! f an d h e i s a m e m be r of the G ainesv ille G o l f a n d Co u ntry C l u b. In r 8g8, a t Ga in esv i l le, D oc t o r Tiso n m a rri ed M i ss Cora E. H y de, a nati ve o f Indiana, da u ghte r of Geo r ge 'vV . Hyde, w h o was fo rm e r l y a m e r c h a n t o f Gaine v ille, F l orida, and n o w lives in H e nd e r so n v ille , North Ca r o l in a . D octor and Mrs. Tiso n h ave o n e daughte r , Martha Elizabe t h . n o w th e wi fe o f Ri c h a r d B o ri n g, o f Gaines v ille, a n d t h ey arc t h e p a r ents of o n e c hi ld , Co r a Elizabet h . JoE O s n o RNf: was e l ec t e d c h ief o f t h e p o l ice de p a r t m e n t o f t h e C it y o f Day t o n a o n t h e m un i c i pa l refor m ticke t , a n d in his admin i stratio n h e h as s h ow n that h e kn o w s what t o d o a nd p ro c ee d s to d o it v igorou s l y a nd effect ively, with t h e r esult t h a t hi s work h as ampl y j u s t ifie d th e pop u l a 1 confide nce th a t l e d t o hi s e l ec t i o n . ' M r . O sborne w as bo rn a t h i s t o r i c I r ving t o 11, o n th e H u d so n River , New York, a nd t h e d a t e of hi s nati v it y wa s S e pt e m be r 9 . 1 868. H e i s a son of J o hn a n d .Ma r g a r e t ( \.\T a t so n ) O s b orne . eac h of w h o m d i e d a t t h e age of fiftyni n e years th e forme r in 1 88 0 a n d th e latter i n 1 887. J o hn Osbo rn e w a s bo rn in t h e C it y o f G l a sgo w , S co t l a n d, a nd hi s wife a t Pai s l ey . J o hn O s b o rn e wa s r e a r e d i n hi s n ative c ity, w h e r e h e learne d th e tra d e o f s h i p j oine r , a n d it was i n the y e a r r865 th a t h e a n d h i s yo un g wife ca m e t o t h e Unit e d S tat es , t h e ir h o m e h a v in g b ee n est a b l i s h e d i n New York S t a te, whe r e as a s ki l l e d carpe n te r h e gave s pecial a t t enti o n t o t h e e r ectio n o f hi g h c l ass g r ee nh o u ses o n va r i o u s fin e es t a t es a l o n g t h e H u d so n R i ve r. Later h e h e l d t h e p os i tio n o f sext o n o f th e F ourt h Av e n u e P r esbyte ri a n Churc h i n New York C ity, o f whi c h R ev. H oward C r os b y was th e n p as t o r , bo th h e a n d h i s w i f e h av i n g bee n r ea r e d in th e Pres b y t e r i a n fai t h , un d e r t h e r i gi d Scotti s h d i scipline, a n d b o t h having co ntinu e d earn es t m e mb e r s o f th e church unti l th e c l ose o f th eir l i ves. He w as affil i a te d wit h t h e St. A nd r e w 's Soci e t y a n d t h e C a l e d o n i a ns. Two o f th e so n s are r es i d ents of F l o r ida, J o e , t h e s u b ject of th i s s k e t c h , a n d R o b ert \ V . , w h o i s e n gaged i n the p lumbing b u s i n ess at Co c o n u t G r ove, Dade County. T h e p r esent c h i e f o f p olice o f Dayt ona at te nd e d th e pu b l i c sc h oo l s o f t h e n a t i o na l m etro p o l is, and w h e n a lad o f twe lve year s h e w e n t t o sea, a s m ess b oy o n s t e a m e r s p l y in g a l o n g t h e Atl a n ti c Co a s t o f th e U nit e d States . H e was in service o n s hi ps ply i n g b e tw ee n New York C ity and H a van a, C u b a, a n d wa s empl o y e d o n the vesse l " Rapida n " at th e ti m e o f h is fathe r 's death , wh e n h e left th e sea a nd fo un d e mploy m ent in t h e M o r g an I r o n W orks , w hi c h later beca m e th e R oac h S hi pb u i l di n g Co m p any and whi c h co n struc t e d man y v esse l s o f th e Unit e d ta t es T a vy . . 'vV hil e Mr. O s b o rn e w a s in th e e m p l oy o f th i s co n ce rn i t b uil t t h e b attl es hip "Ch i c ago," th e n o n e o f th e fines t i n t h e U ni t e d Sta t es l avy. : Mr. Os b o rn e co n t i n u e d hi s se r v i c e with th e R oac h S h i pbuildin g Co mp a n y fro m i 88o t o 1 884, a nd a t th e expir ati o n o f th i s p e ri o d o f f o n r yea r s h e e n t e r e d t h e e mploy o f F-T. P. S l a v e n . a contrac t o r fo r th e Fre n c h governme n t in co n n e ct ion wit h canal work o n th e I sthmus of Pan a m a . In :\l a r c h , r 889 . r . Osb orne was e m p l o y e d b y a m ahogan y-pro d u c i n g co mpa n y in P orto R i co, a n d h e th e n ce m a d e h i s w a y t o th e C it y o f Boston , w h e n ce h e we n t t o P h i lad e lphi a a nd e ntered t h e e m p l o y o f th e fir m o f Pancake & Ken na, the n e ngaged in contract w o r k fo r t h e Bal dw i n L oco m otive \ N o r k s . Fro m P hi l a d e l p hi a M r. O s b orne r eturne d t o New York C ity, w h e r e h e wo r k e d three yea r s as a p l umbe r as d i d h e t h c r e a ft e r in C h i cago, O m a h a, D e nver , ' L os A n ge l es, a s w ell a s a t Phoen i x, A rizona . I n 1 8 9 6 Mr. O s b o rn e ca m e t o Fl o r id a a nd e n gaged i n co n s truc t i o n w o r k i n co n n ec t i o n wit h t h e e r e ct i o n o f t h e g r ea t Royal Pal m H ote l a t Mi a mi . La t e r h e w as id entifie d w i th co n structio n w ork o n t h e East Co a s t , w i th h ea dq u arte r s a t Key \ V es t . and j n July, r 896, h e establis h e d hi s r es i d e n ce at D ay t o n a, w h e 1 e h e h as bee n activel y concerne d with d eve l o pm e n t a nd co n struc ti o n e n t erpr i s es of va r i e d orde rs, i n c lu d i n g t h e im provin g o f th e T ri p l e C i ty, Seabr eeze a nd D a y t o n a B eac h . H e r c h e was fir s t e mpl oye d as a p l u mber in t h e se rvi ce o f Geo rge B allo u g h , a nd t h e r eafte r h e was fo r t we n t y tw o y ea r s e ngaged ind e p e nd entl y i n t h e p lumbing b u s i n ess, as o n e o f it s l eadin g r eprese n tati ves a t D ay t o n a. 1n 1 908 C hi e f Os b orne beca m e a m e m be r of t h e C i tv Co u n cil a n d c h a irm a n o f t h e Boa r d o f P u blic w o r k s , w h i c h l a tt e r p os i t i on h e r e ta i n e d fro m 1 90 9 until t h e co mp l e ti o n o f the l oca l wa t e 1 a n d se w e r age sys t e ms. Jn thi s a nd o th e r co n n ec t i o n s h e prove d alik e h i s integri t y, hi s p r o g r ess i ve n ess and h i s c i v i c loyal ty, a n d thus h e h e l d sec u r e pla ce i n p o pula r co nfide n ce a nd es t ee m w h e n h e w as m a d e t h e ca n did a t e fo r th e office o f c hief o f p olice, of whic h p os i t i o n h e beca m e th e i n cumb ent in M a r c h , 1 922 . C hi e f O s b orne ha s t w i ce se rv e d as master of Day t o n a L o d ge No. S r , A. F . and A. and has se r v e d a l so as h i g h priest o f t h e l oca l C h a pt e r o f R oy a l Arc h Maso ns. a nd as e m i n ent co m m a n d e r o f D ay t o n a Comma nd e r y o f Knig h ts T empl a r , hi s Masonic affiliat i o n s b e i n g ext e nd e d t o :\l o ro cco T e mp l e o f t h e My s t i c Shrine i n th e C i t y o f J ac k so n v ille. H e ha s b ee n fo r m a n y yea r s a trus t ee o f t h e Maso n i c L o d ge a t D ay t o n a, i s a m e m b e r of th e b u i l di nrr committee of th e Masoni c T e m p l e i n hi s h o m e c ity. a nd h o l d s m e m b e r s h ip i n th e l oc a l Mason i c T r o w e l C l ub, be s i d es w hi c h h e i s affilia t e d w ith t h e K n i g h ts o f Pythi as, i n c l ud i n g t h e D ramat i c O r d e r o f th e Kni g h t s o f Kho r a ss a n . H e i s a n a c tive m e m be r o f t h e Ki wan i s C lu b a t Dayton a, a nd in full ac cord wit h i t s p rogr ess ive c i v i c a nd b u siness p olic i es. H e was r ea r e d in t h e faith of t h e P r esbyt e r i a n Churc h , a nd h i s wife i s a communicant o f t h e Protes t ant E p i sco p a l Churc h . The mar ri a g e o f Mr. O sbo rn e was so l e m niz e d i n 1 899, w h e n Mi ss Ame lia P arki n s b eca m e hi s wi fe, s h e h av i n g b ee n b o rn at Carlis l e, E n g l a nd . T h ey have n o c hi l d r e n . C 1 1ssr E B . \ ' V INGATE i s se ni o r m e m be r o f t h e fir m of vVi ngat e & S haw, w hi c h o w n s and o p e r ates t h e San Juan Ga r a ge in t h e C ity o f D ay t o n a a nd w hi c h figures a l so as t h e l o c al r e p r esenta t i ve agen c y fo r t h e ce l ebrate d Packard and Stu d e bak e r a u t o m obil es . M r . 'vV i n ga t e i s kn o w n as o n e o f the progr ess i ve b u s i n ess m e n o f th e yoLfnger gen e r a ti o n i n hi s native county, hi s birth h a ving oc cn r r e d a t th e family h o m es t ea d o n th e hank s o f th e T o m o k a River in V o l u s i a Co un ty. Fi1c mi l es n o r t h we s t o f Ormo nd , a nd th e d a t e of hi s n ativity w as O c t o b e r 29, H e i s a so n

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H I S T O R Y O F FLORIDA 2 1 of T h o mas Frankl in and Geo r g i a A nn (Smi t h ) Wingate, th e forme r of w h o m was born in the S t a t e of Geo r g i a a n d t he latt e r at L a k e City, Flo r i d a, to w h ich state he r parents ca m e from Geo r g i a. T h o mas F . \,Yingat e accompa nied hi s pa r en t s o n thei r r e m ova l from G e o r g i a t o Flori da, se ttl e ment bcin fir s t m a d e in Manat ee Co un ty a n d t h e famil y h o m e h av in g later bee n est a b lis h ed i n Volu s i a Co unty, o n t h e banks of t h e Tom o k a Ri ver. Thomas F . \,Yi n ga t e beca m e a s uccessful expon e n t of farm in d u stry in Volu i a Co un ty , nea r 0 1 m o n d , a n d w a s int e rested a l so in t h e g r o win g o f oranges and othe r c i trus frui ts. H e fin a l l y removed from h i s farm lo Ormo nd , and later h e establ ished h i s resi d e nce a t D ay to n a, in 1 903 -Her e h e passed the r e m a ind e r of hi s life , and h e was s i x t y -o n e years of age at t h e t im e of h is death, in A u g u st, 1 921, hi s w if e h a v i n g passed away July ro, 1919, at t h e age of fifty four yeai-s, t heir two surv i ving c hi ld r e n a r c Cassi e B. a n d : M i n ni e . The yo uthful e du catio n of Cass i e B . Wingate was acquired in th e sch oo l s of O r m ond a nd Day t o na, a n d a fter l eavi n g school h e became a clerk in a grocer y stor e known as the Teapot and ow ned by J . E. R u s h , a t Dayton a . Later h e was in th e e mpl oy of t h e Conra d Grocery Comp a ny, and finally h e e ngaged in the bicyc l e b u s in ess, w i t h stor es at Ormo n d a nd Dayton a . F o r ten s umme r season s h e gave effe ctiv e se rvi ce as a s kill e d cha u ff c u r in t h e northern s t a t es, w hil e i n t h e intervenin g w int e r seaso n s h e was fo r t h e m os t part s im i l a rl y e ngaged a t D ay t o n a , F l o ri da . He passed fou1summe r seaso n s at C h autauqua, New Yor k ; one at Co r ry, Penn sy l va nia; a nd four at St. J ose p h , Michigan , on the s h o r e of Lake :\ifichiga n . In 1914 M r . "Wingat e purc hased a half inte rest in t h e San J uan Ga r age, a n d t h e fir m o f w hi c h he i s seni o r m c m be 1 i s now p r e p a rin g lo e r ec t o n t h e s it e o f i ts ori gina l establi shment i n D ay t o n a o n e o f t h e finest garage b u i l dings i n F l orida, t h e sa m e to b e l 65x210 fee t i n dim ens i o n s a nd t o be eq uip p e d w i t h the most m o dern i m p r ove m e n t s known to the b u si n ess. M r. vVingate i s a p o pu l a 1 m embe r of t h e Dayton a M o t0t C lu b and t h e C h a m be r of Co m me r ce, a nd h e is a n e n thus iast in co nnecti o n w ith t h e auto m obil e bu s i n ess and ser vice. h e having t a k en live l y inte r es t i n t he ce lebrated a utom obile r aces h e ld a t D ay to n a Beach . H i s n a m e still appear s o n the list of e l ig i b l e yo un g ba c h e l o r s i n hi s nati ve co un ty. ALSTON REYNOLDS H A ILE is o n e of t h e pro g r essi Y e a nd r ep resentative b u siness m e n o f D ay tona, Vol us i a Co un ty, w he r e h e i s pres id e n t of th e Haile G r oce r y Co mp a ny, w hi c h conduc t s a s u bsta nti a l and p ros p e r o u s who lesal e g r oce r y b u s i ncs., w ith establis hm e n ts at bo th Dayton a and D e Land . Mr. Haile was bo rn at Ocal a , Mar ion Co un ty, F l o r ida, o n th e 7t h of J a nu a r y , 1 889, and i s a so n o f Geo r ge Reyn o ld s H aile a nd M a rgar et (Alston ) H aile, t h e forme r of w h o m was born at Kanapah a, near the C ity of Gaines v ille, A l achua Coun ty, this state, and t h e latter of w h o m was born i n t h e State of A labam a . F o r full y twen ty yea r s pa s t Geo rge R. Haile h as bee n a t ravelin g sal e m a n fo r th e G l obe Soap Compa n y of C i nci nn ati, Ohi o, a nd h e a n d h is wi fe m a in tain t h ei r ho m e at Jack so n ville, F l o 1 id a. T h eir c h i l d r en a r e four i n numbe r , and th e s ubj ec t of thi s r eview is th e o nl y son. Geo r ge R. Haile i s affiliated wi th the M aso ni c fra t ernity and th e Kni ghts of P y thi a s . a n d h e a nd hi s wife h o ld memb e r sh i p i n the P resbyteri a n C hurch . The p r e lim i n a r y e du catio n of A l sto n R. H a i le w as ob t a in e d i n th e publi c sc h oo ls, inc ludin g th e hi g h s ch oo l a t L a k e C i ty, a nd th e reafter h e at te nd e d t h e Univer s i ty of F l o rida until h e h a d at ta ined t o t h e age of n i n e t ee n yea r s . H e th e n e n te r e d the e mpl oy of t he Con so lid a t e d Groce r y Co m pany in t he C it y of J ac k so n ville , hi s o ri gina l wo r k h aving b ee n in t h e co mp a n y' wa r e h ouse, a nd t he following t wo yea r s h av ing been ma r ke d by hi s effective se n i ce i n th e offices o f t h e co m p a ny. H e next p asse d a year in t h e offi ce of t h e Bak e r H o lm es Compa ny, lik ew i se e n gage d in t h e w h o l esa l e g r oce r y t r a d e at J ac k so n ville, a nd for t h e e n s uin g te n yea r s h e was a s u ccess fu l a n d valu e d trave lin g r ep r esentati ve o f Strin g f ellow, P a d g ett & Compa ny, h i s ass i g n e d territo r y being Eas t ern Flo rida . \ , V h e n thi s co n cern ope n e d a b r a n c h es t ablishment a t P a latk a, t hi s sta te, M r . H a i le was p l aced in c h a rge of t he s a me, a nd in thi s con n ec ti o n he continue d hi s act i ve a nd s u cce ss ful a dministrati o n until h e ret i r e d t o e ngage ind e p e nd e ntl y i n b u siness . In t h e sprin g o f r921 h e o rgani ze d th e H aile Grocer y Co mp a n y , of whi c h h e has since co n t i n u e d p r esi d e n t a nd m a nager and wh i c h under hi s v igorou s a n d well o rdered regim e has m a d e a sp l e n did r eco r d, t h e e qu ip m e n t of t h e co mpany' s estab l is hm e n ts at D ayto n a a nd D e L a nd being of t h e best orde r , an d t h e fac ili t i es being a d eq u a t e t o meet th e d e m a nd s of th e co n s tantl y expandin g b u s i n ess . Mr. Haile is a K ni ght Templ a r Mason and affilia t e d a l so w ith t h e 'Mystic S hrin e, bes id es h o ldin g m e mb e r s hip i n t h e Knig h ts of P yth i as. In hi s h o m e C it y of Dayton a h e is a n ac ti ve a nd v a l ue d m e m be r of t h e C h a m be r of Comme rce a nd t h e K iw a ni s C lu b . H e a n d hi s wife ho ld m em be r s hip i n t h e Presbyteri a n Churc h . Jul y r2, 1 92 1 , r eco rd ed th e m arriage o f M r . H ai l e a nd M i ss Emma L. G u thrie. of J ac k so n ville. a nd th ey ha, e a fine l itt l e so n , \,Yill ia m G. JAJ\IES Russn.L F o wLER. O n e of t h e r eprese n t a t ive c iti ze n s a nd p ro min ent bu s in ess m e n of F lorida is fo un d in J a m es Russell F o wl e r , of Gain esville, fo r m a n y yea r s a power i n t h e l umber industry a nd l a t e r co n cerned with railroad constructi o n , b a nkin g a n d imp orta n t au t o m o bi le i n te 1 es t s . An ab l e and alert bu siness m a n him self, w ith a n inh erita n ce of b u siness acume n , M r . F ow l e r has b ee n ve r y s u ccessful in t he p r osec u t i o n of l a r ge undert a kin gs th a t have n o t only bee n profitabl e to h i m se l f and his assoc i ates, b u t have b ee n of vast b e n e fit t o m a n y commun i t i es. J a m es Russell Fowl e r was born on a far m near \,Yhitesv ill e, Co lum b u s County, Nor t h Carolin a , M a y r2, 1871. H is pa r ents w e r e Giles and A n na D ebo r a ( Hichma n ) F ow l er, both n a t ives of Columbus County, North Carolina , and b o th n ow d eceased, hi s m ot h e r passin g a w ay o n June 21, 1 89 r , at the age of fortyseve n yea r s, an d hi s fath e r , in 1 909, a t G r ee n ville, Flo rida. Giles F owler was b orn i n Columbus Co u nty, N orth Carol ina , in 1835 , a so n of G ilb ert F ow l e r , of an o l d fam i l y of that sec ti o n , a l a rge p l a nter and a ve t e r a n of t h e Ind i a n War of 1 856 and of t h e war between the stat es i n 186 1 -5. A m o n g t h e m a n y nota ble m e n of h i s t im e t h e l a t e Giles F o wl e r , throu g h a v igorou s p e r so nality and un erring fo resight, ac hi eve d m o r e in th e b u siness wo rl d th a n many of hi s co n te mp o r a ri es who, lik e himse lf, had s uff e r ed in es tate from th e acci dents of war. A fter r eturning to private life , following four yea r s in t h e Confe d e rate a rm y i n t:he war b e t wee n th e s t a t es . as a m e m be r of t h e T e nth So u t h Ca r o lin a Infantry , he turned hi s a tt e nti o n t o t h e l11m be 1 b u s in ess, and co n t inued i n

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22 HISTORY OF FLORIDA the s ame in North Carolin a until 1885, wh e n he came to Florida. F o r four yea r s h e engaged i n the manufacture of pin e l umb e r on Ora n ge L ake in A lachua County, during thi s tim e a l so co n ducting a co mmi ssa r y s t o r e at that p o int, th e n t r ansfer r e d hi s lumb e r int e r es t s to C itra, in Marion County, Flo rida. From the1e in 1 890 he w e nt t o A s hburn, G eo r g ia, w h e r e fo r o n e year h e operated on co n t ra c t th e sawmill s of the J . S . Betts Co mp a n y m anufacturing s hin g l es, lath s and s t aves . H e then went b ack t o Citra, but s ub se qu ent l y return e d to A shburn, w h e r e he continue d in th e lumb e r bus i ness unti l 189.+, wh e n h e r e m ove d t o Newberry, Florida. Th i s was l itt l e m o r e than a railroa d d e p o t at that time, h u t within a year Mr. Fowl e r was ope rating th e l a rgest l umb e r mill in t hat sec tion . In th e m ea n whil e h e was ac quirin g timber int e rest s . From Newberry his next m o v e was t o Lochloo s a , whe r e h e con tinu e d in th e lumb e r bu s i n ess from 189 7 until 1900. H e m oved th e n to another p oin t and nam e d t h e sett l e111ent L enno n , where he con duct e d a la rge co111missa 1 y store and o wn ed 2 9 ,000 ac r es of va l u ab l e pi n e timb e r until 1905. R e111oving then to J ac k so n ville h e r etired from ac t i v e l ife, an d hi s death occurred i n 1909. For four years aft e r l oca tin g at Jac k so n vill e h e handl e d r ea lestate to so111e exten t , large l y hi s o wn property , a nd e r ec t e d a numbe r of s ubstantial buildings in that c it y. H e wa s a memb e r of th e Meth odis t Episco pa l Church. Sou th . The c l osing yea r of hi s l ife was r es t fu l l y s p en t o n hi s small farm n ea r Gr ee n ville, Flo rida. J a m es R u ssell F ow ler h ad n o exce ption a l educati o na l privil eg e s in boyh oo d , but h e h a d the co mp an i o nship and exam p l e of an h o n orable, thornughgoing, practi ca l bus i ness 111an in a sc h oo l of ex p e ri e n ce. H e was admitted t o a partner s hip in the f 1nn of F ow l e r & S o n at Newberry in 189.;. In r903 M r . F ow l e r c a m e to Gaines v i l le, and in rgo6 h e o rganized th e Gree n v ille Y ello w Pinc Comp a ny, b eco min g v i ce preside nt a nd ge n e r a l 111anager, a ft e r which h e s pent muc h time tra v e lin g ove r t h e stale to ins p ec t t h e best mil l s in o p e ration in o rd e r to find th e best mill equip111ent t o p u t i 1 1 th e G r ee n v ille 111ill s in th e wa y of m ac hin e r y . H e bui l t th e g r ea t 111ill at F owler, n ea r Gree n v ille, at a cos t of $285,000, and also built tw enty-seven mil es of th e Gree nville S o uthern R a ilr o ad . In l 9TI Mr. F ow l e r di s p ose d of hi s v a riou s busin ess int e r es ts, with a v i e w of t aking a r es t, b u t n eve r the l e ss fo r a noth e r year befor e g ivi n g hi111se l f thi s ben efit h e se r ved as gene ral m a na ge r fo1 th e Upchurc h Lu111be 1 Co111pany of J ac k so n ville . In 1 9 I 3 h e returne d to Gainesv ille . H e op erate d a 111ediu m s ized sa wmill at Newber r y for one yea r , a nd th e n embarke d in the auto m o bil e bu sines at Gaine s ville und e1 t h e n a m e of t h e F ow l e r A ut o Co mp a ny, in 19! 5 b eco min g a ge nt s for th e Bui c k ca r s and es tab l i s hin g th e Star Garage, th e lar gest e s tab l i s hm ent of i ts kind and th e b es t equipp e d in Centra l F l o ri da. In May, i 922, h e change d fro m the Bui c k to th e Stude baker a ge n cy as a distribu to r in a territ o r y consisting of St. J o hn s , Putna m , Di x ie, T ay l o r , L evy, Mario n , Lafayette, Citrus, Sumpte r , U nion and Bradford co unti es, and o th e r points. H e i s a director in the Firs t Natio na l Bank of Gain es ville . In 19T2, in partners hip with his fath e r-in l aw, h e erect e d the Pickett & F owle r sto r e and office bui l din g, a two-story structure roo by JOO feet in dim ens i o ns, and in 1921 h e built th e Jus t Ri g ht fill ing s tation , but h as so l d thi s interest. At Newberry, F l o ri da, D ece mber 5, 1 8g8, Mr. P o w l e r married Mi ss Mary Adal ine Pickett, and t h ey have s i x children: Bertha Elizabeth, a g r aduate in mu s ic from th e Southern F lorida Co l l ege fo r W o m e n , wh o i s th e wife of T ull y H. Carl to n , an atto rn ey at P l ant C ity, Florida; :Mary L ee , wh o was a student i n the vVes l eya n F e ma l e College, Macon. Geo r g ia. i s th e wife of harles \;v'e ir , of A s h v ille, North Carolina; Gil es Pic k ett, who i s a s tudent in Castl e Heights M i l itary A ca d e m y, Lebanon, Tennessee ; Wil liam E m ory, a stud ent in tl1e G ainesv ille High Schoo l ; a nd M arjorie and J . R., Jr. B o th :Mr. a n d l\.frs. F ow ler a r e activ e m c111bcrs o f th e M e thodi s t Episco pal Church, South. and h e b e l o ngs t o th e Business Men's Bib l e C l a ss and ha s bee n a steward fo r thirtyfive years in that church. M1s . F owler t a ke s mur : h int e r es t i n the Sc ho o l In vest m ent Improve m ent A ssoc iation and t h e Twe nti et h Century C lub , and i s a m e mb e r of th e Eastern Sta r . Mr. F o w l e r i s v e r y acti ve in the Chamber of Co mm e rce and, in fact, it i s difficult t o name any phas e of civ i c ente 1 pri se o r usefu l n ess in whi c h his int e rest h as not been d e m o n strated. In as so c i at i o n with M ayo r vV. R. Thomas h e fathere d the m ove m ent whi c h , throug h the C h a mb e r of Com111ercc, m a d e a s u ccess of b ea u t if y ing the c i ty during his five yea1s e n th e c it y council. H e ha s l ong bee n a p atron of athl e ti cs, i s presi d ent of a bas eball club a nd in 1 905 was manager o f the famou s Oak Hill Base b all Club , the cham p i o n bal l team of Gaine sville. H e i s a di r ec t o 1 of th e Gain esv ille G o l f and Count1y C l ub and of th e R otary Club , and i s chairma n of th e Rotary C l ub Goo d Roads Committee , a nd fills the sa m e office in the Chambe r of C o mm e rce . H e i s very mu c h in ea rn es t in r ega rd to thi s s ubj ec t , and at h i s ow n exp e n se ha s h e ld good roads me etings all ove r North F l orida a nd South G eo r g ia. H e i s a Knight T e mpl a r M aso n a nd Shrine r , and i s a past chan cello r commande r of Bro n so n L o d ge, Knights of P ythias. For hi s u n tirin g e fforts in all l oca l dri ves during the \;v'orld war h e was awarded a gol d m e d al. HEN R Y U. \ ;v'nrPrLE , pr o pri e t o r o f th e Magnol i a Novel t y vVo rks, o n e of th e imp ortant indu s tri a l con c e rn of th e C it y of Daytona, V o l u s i a County, contro l s in thi s en t e rpri se a s ubst antia l a nd v a ri e d business i n th e m a nufacturing of d oo r s , wind o w fra m es, floori n g a n d interior h o u se firni s hin g pr o d ucts, and in ge n e r a l con tractinrr and b ui l ding. Mr. vVhipp lc was b o rn in the City of Brooklyn, New York, o n th e I S th of Septe111be1, 1872, a n d i s a so n of Nelson M . and A g n es (Swimmerto n ) \;v'hip p lc, th e fo rm e r a n a tiv e of the tate of ew Yo 1 k a nd th e latte r o f New J e r sey . A s a s u c cess fu l arc hit ec t a nd contracto r . N e l so n M . \ Vhippl e gave s pecial attention t o t h e e r ect i on of chlllc h es a nd t h e fine r type of h o u ses, a nd h e d eve l o p e d a p rospe r o u s bu siness a l ong thi s l i ne in B r oo k l yn and th e o ri g ina l N e w York C i ty, both b e i n g n o w included in Grea t e r N e w York. Bo t h h e and hi s wife continu e d th e ir r eside n ce at Broo k l y n u ntil th ei1 d ea th s . The ir chi ldre n w e r e seve n in number, s i x so n s a nd one d aughter. The pub lic sc h o ols of th e nati o nal m etropo lis affo rd e d Henry U . Whipple hi s early ed u cation , a nd i n th e m ea nwhi l e h e began to assi s t in hi s father's building operation s , when he was a lad of fourteen yea rs. vVith th e passing of time h e fa mi l iarized him s elf with a ll d e tai l s o f a r chitec tural, bui l din g and contracting enterprise , a n d he continued to be assoc iated with h i s father's b u sin ess un til h e h a d attaine d t o hi s l ega l 111ajority, w h e n , effe cti ve l y fo rtifi e d in technica l knowledge a nd pracf"ic al experi ence , h e initiated i n depend e nt

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HISTORY OF FLORlDA 23 bu s in ess as a contractor, with r es ifacton ' was hi s first term of office that h e was clectcc l t o a seco nd term in the same p os iti o n , whic h will expir e i n i 924. 1[r. Price has a l read y accomplis h ed much i11 t h e b etterment o f the sc hool sys t e m a nd in fosterin g a spirit of pride in tlte county in stitut i o ns. He has always IJee n a supportc1 o f c i v i c organizatio n s a n d has wor k e d t o p ro mote ci1i c pride al ong a l l lin es. He was th e o rgan i ze r o f th e S u burban C l ub of Palatka, and i n additio n t o b c l o n gi11g t o ci1 i c b o d i es , h o ld s m e m be r shi p in the K11igh t s of Pythias. A fa ith ful m embe r o f t h e ).[cthodi s t Churc h , h e teaches th e ''i.",>u11g Me11's Class in t h e Sunday s chool, and fo r so111e years act e d in t h e capac i ty of s t eward. PETE R 1ro;-.;1wE IL1 t;Ax . Pro min e n t a m o n g tlt c c i t i ze n s o f P utn a m Co1111ty who have the right t o b e kn oll'n a s self-made m e n i s P e t e r 1{ o m oc Haga n , of Palatka, s h e riff of P utnam Co u n t y s in ce 1 9 1 6 . L o11g befor e the publ i c a s a law e n forccme nt: office r i11 o n e o r anothe1 ca pacit y, h e h a s establis h e d a s p l e n did 1 c co r d fo r co n s c i e nti o u s a nd effec t i ve work and fo1 ach i eve m e n ts and ac-compl i shments e n t ir e l y self-gai n e d . Sheriff Hagan was horn O c t o b e r i 3, 187 1 , in B r a d ford C ounty, F l orida, and i s a so n of J. C. and Annie Jane (Swindle) Hagan . T h e Hagan family of which h e i s a m embe r o ri g inated i n Ire land , whe nc e th e progenito r in America im mi grate d to thi s co u11try at an ea rl y date. H i s g r andfathe r , J o hn \ ,V. Haga n , s p ent hi s life in Virginia, whence ca111c J. C. Hagan at an ea rl y date to F l orida, settlin g at Melrose in Bradford County, whe r e he e ngaged in the pursuitsof far m in g a n d s tock rais ing. During the active years o f hi s life h e continued to follow these pursuits with much s u ccess, b e i n g a man of in
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24 HISTORY OF FLORI D A Baptist Churc h , and live d hi s faith ever y clay and was a r-egul a r churc h attendant. He was a m a n prominentl y known, and, posses sing supe ri o r judg m e n t, was co n sultee! b y hi s n e i ghbors freq u entl y upo n bu siness s u b j ects. His w orthy wife di e d in F ebrua r y, 1 9 14. T hey w e r e the parents o f s i x teen childre n , e leven so n s and five d augh ter s, and of these seven a r e n o w l i v in g, six being son s : B . H., a rai lroad m a n of V a ldos ta , Geo rgia; T . iVL, e ngaged in bus iness at Hampto n , F l orida; J. D., a b u s iness m a n o f S outh Jackson v ill e, l ' l o ricl a : S . H., o f P a l atka, Florida ; and P e t e r M., of P al atka. J ohn W. Hagan , a n othe r brother, now cleoeasecl, was c hief o f p o l i ce o f P a latka for three year s and was the n e lected s h eriff o f Put n a m County and continue d t o sen-e in t h a t capacit y for e i g h t years, o r until hi s resi gnatio n. \Vere h e ali, e today, and w i s h e d it, h e c o u l d b e occu p ying the s h eriff's office, a s h e was w e ll like d by all and had proven hi msel f one o f the best sheriffs t h e S tate o f Florida ever had. H e di-eel w h e n s i x t y -five years o f age. T h i s family was 1earecl in B r a d ford and Putna m counties a n d went to sc hool in th e forme r. It was brou ght up and r oc k e d in t h e c r a dl e of d e mocracy, and the c hil dre n have a l w ays bee n loyal to th e d e mocrat i c p a r t y . The fourteenth in orde r o f birth o f hi s fath e r 's l a rge famil y, Peter M onroe Hagan e nj oyed o nl y limite d educational advantages. H o w eve r , h e made t h e most of hi s opporhmities: and i n subsequent year s has exer c i se d hi s p o w e r s o f o b se rvati o n and has clo n e muc h reading, t o s u c h effect that h e i s accounte d o n e of th e w e ll-educa t e d m e n o f the c ommunity and a man w h o possesses what h e does be c a use of hi s own exertio n s . H e was h u t fourtee n year s of age whe n h e l eft t h e paterna l roof to m a k e h is own way in t h e w orld, a n d h is fi1st exp e ri ence was secure d in a grocer y s t o r e a t Palatka , w h e r e h e worke d for about o n e year . H e th e n was m a d e a ni g h t p olice m a n . a n office in w hi c h h e ser ve d fo1 a bout four year s , fol lowi n g whi c h h e was e lected c hief o f p olice of Palatk a, and ser ve d e leven y e a r s and seven m onths in that c apacity. H e was nex t a pp o intee! c hief d eputy, unde r R. L. K ennerly, the n s h eriff, and sen ecl as s u c h for five year s , afte r whic h h e was a p pointe d d e p u t y U n i t e d States mar s h a l for t h e Sou t h ern Distri c t o f F lorida . After se r ving o n e year he was appointed d eputy c o l l e ct o r of interna l revenue, an incumbe n cy whic h h e occ upi e d for two year s. A t that time h e had t e nd e r e d him the a pp ointment a s Unite d States m a r s h a l for the S outhern District of F l orida, b u t did not a cce pt , as h e had d ecide d on bec o mi n g a candida t e for the office o f s h e 1 iff o f Putnam County . H e la t e r did so, and in 1 9 16 was e l ecte d h y a large majority over four othe r c andidates fo r t h e office . His fir s t t erm w a s charact e rized b y hi s u s u a l effeotiv e and e n e .rgetic di scharge o f his duties. and in June. 1 920, h e was e lect e d t o s u cceed himsel f, recei, in g a l a rge p l u r a l it y o v e r thre e o th e r candi d a tes. His admini stratio n o f the affairs of hi s office has proved g reatl y grat ifyin g t o th e law-abidin g p eo pl e o f Putn a m Cou n t y, and S h e r iff Hagan i s jus tl y acc ounte d o n e o f the m os t c apable and co n sc i e n t i o u offic i a l s the county has known. Mr. Hagan is a s t a nch a n d undeviating democrat in hi s p o liti ca l v ie ws. H e has b ee n a ctive l y e n gao-ecl in ci, i c affa i 1 s for m a n y y ears , and has a lways t a k e n a pride in lit e w e lfare and d e v e l opment of th e interes t s of b o t h c it y and county. Fra t ernally h e i s id e ntifi e d with P a l atka L odge No. 82, F . and A. M., the K ni g h t s of Pythias and t h e Imp r o v e d Orde r o f R e d M e n , and a l so b e l o ngs t o the Kiwa ni s C lub, while his r elig i o u s faith i s that o f th e B a pti s t Church. His dive r s i o n s and r e c reatio n s co n s ist largel y o f fishing, hunting , h o rse-bac k riding and swimming. A t P a latka, l\la1 ch 2-1, 1 89.=;, Sheriff Hagan w a s unite d in m arriage with M i ss S a lli e :Mary Gumo n , a daughte r o f R eddic k Canno n , who li ve d s i x miles fro m I a!atka, at P e ni el. She was educate d in t h e public grammar and hi g h s ch o ol s o f Putna m Cou n t y, and i s a w oman o f supe ri o r intellect, but n aturally d o mesti c in h e r tast es. T o t hi s unio n the r e has been born o n e d a u g hter , 'Mrs . Gertrude Blac k , who had th e advantages o f a hi g h sch oo l educa ti o n and n o w makes h e r h o m e with h e r parents. S h e i s the m o th e r of one so n , H a r o l d Lama r Black. LESLIE C. FIS HER, l\I. D., w h o i s o n e f the r epresentative ph ys ic i a n and s u rgeon s in C la y County, i s establi s h e d i n s uccessful general prac tice at Gre en Cove Springs, th e county seat , and i s o n e of the p opula r and progressi ve c itiz e n s of this count y . Doct o r was born in Cumbe rl and Cou n t y, North Caro lin a, i\.fa y 2 1 , 1 88-1, and i s a son o f th e late Emmett Fis h e r , who passed hi s e nti r e life in North Car olin a, w h e r e h e was o n e o f the substantia l farme r s and h o n o r e d and influ e n t i a l c itiz e n s o f Cumberland County a t t h e time of hi s deat h in 19 19. D oc t o r Fis h e r o f this r ev ie w was th e fir s t b orn i n a famil y o f seven childre n . D octo1 F i s h e r i s indebte d t o th e public sch oo l s f o1 h i s eady educa ti o n , and in 1 902 h e graduate d fro m th e hi g h sc h oo l a t M o u ltrie. Geor g i a. In preparati o n for hi s c hosen p rofessi on h e entered the m e di ca l d e p artment of Emo r y U ni ve r s it y . o n e o f the leading institutio n s o f t h a t stat e, and in th e sa m e h e was g r adua t e d as a m e mber of th e c l a ss o f 1 909 . Prio r t o thus recei v in g hi degr e e o f D octo r of Medi c in e h e h a d served for a time as bookkeep e r in a ba n k , and had been for two years m anager of a turpentine plant in Flo ri d a . Doct o r Fis h e r initia t e d t h e practi ce o f hi s p r o fessi o n by establ i shing hi s resid e n ce at Gree n Cove Springs i n May, 1 9lI, and h e r e h e has built u p a l a rge and representative gen eral prac ti ce that bears evid e nce alike o f h i s technica l abilit y and hi s p e rson a l popularity . H e i s o n e o f th e leadi n g physi cia n s and surgeon s of C la y Co u nty, i s a ffiliat e d with th e Mason i c f raternity . and i s a n a c ti ve m e mber of t h e Southern ' M e dical Associati o n , th e Florida Stat e M e di ca l Socie t y and the C lay Cou nty M e di c al Society. The Doctor i s most l o y a l and p u blic-s pirited i n hi s c i v i c altitude, a n d takes deep interest in all that con cerns t h e w ell-bein g of h is h o m e c ity and county. GEORG E R. BREWE R , o f Miami, who h andle large co n t ract s in the l i n e o f structura l s teel m a t e ri a l and building mate r ial of all kinds w a s b orn i n Opel ik a, Ala b a m a. A s a youth h e learne d the buildi n g m a t e ri a l busi ness, a n d has ever s ince b ee n id e ntifi e d with this line. F o r a number of year s h e was in b u siness a t Birming h a m , A la b ama, a s se ni o r m embe r of t h e firm B r e w e r & Scanlan. While a t Birming h a m h e had contract s for all the fir eproo f meta l d oo r s, and g lass and g lazin g in the twenty -seven s t o r y J e ff e r so n B ank Buil d i n g. His firm a lso h a d t h e g lazin g contract for t h e L y ri c Theat e r and carrie d out a numbe r o f contrac t s for furnishing the g lazin g and s teel s a s h m a t eria l for som e of the la rgest industria l p lants o f the T ennessee Coa l , Iron and R a i lroad Compa n y in t h e Birming h a m d istrict. Mr. Bre w e r ca m e t o Miami in the spring of 1 919 itnd h e has establis h e d a very s uccessful busi-

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HISTORY OF FLORIDA 25 n ess . He handl e d the s a l e o f structural s teel a nd e rection for the Wilso n & Carruthe r s office build ing designed fo r fi ftecn stories; the s te e l fo r th e n e w city clocks;, structura I stee l e r ectio n and ste e l floor jois t fo r R yan and Knight; Ford and Li11-c:oln Garage; structural s t ee l erec ti o n a nd s t ee l j o i s t floo r co n struc tion fo r Centra l Arc ade; stru c tural stee l a nd e recti o n , also th e metal do o rs and wind ows for th e Fairfax Theatre; metal doors, window s and Wilson Diffu se lit e blinds for the Firs t Nati o nal Bank B uilding; and ma te ri a l fo r Halston office a nd s t o r e buildin g, th e McAlli s ter H o tel and man y other m ode rn stru ctures. vVhile m os t of Mr. Brewer's experience has been in large j o bs, he t a k es particular pride and sati s faction in handling every contract, l a rge o r s mall , acco rdin g t o th e high es t ideal s of expert se r vice . He a l so d oes a large busine ss in the sale and contracti ng o f metal d oo r s and window s a nd oth e r fireproof work qf thi s kind . He kn ows every a n g l e of the b u i l di n g construction indu s try, in fact i s an expert in everythin g that ca n b e don e w ith th e materia l h e sells . Mr. Brewe r i s a n act ive m e mb e r of th e Miami Chamber of Commerce . His office 1 s at 244 Co lumbia Building, Miami, Florida. A . B. GEIGER. T h e attr active littl e city of G r ee n Cove Springs, judicial cente r o f C la y County , clai m s Mr. Ge i ge r a s o n e of it s m ost vigorous and r esource ( ul bu siness m e n a nd most progressive a nd publi c s pirit ed citi zens. Mr. Ge iger w as bo rn in C lay County, Florida, October r r , 1 865, a nd i s a so n of E li W. Geiger, who w as b o rn a n d r e a r ed in that co unty and wh o became o n e of it s repr ese n tative fa rmers and h o n o r e d a nd influ e nti a l citiz e ns, h e havin g th e r e co ntinu e d hi s r es id e nc e until hi s d eath, i11 1 891. E l i vV. G e i ge r wa s a stal wart a dv oca t e o f the principl es of th e d e m o c ra t i c party, a nd was in flu en ti a l in its l oca l cou n cils and campa i g n activ-1t1es. He served tw o t e rm s a s coun ty com mi s s ioner of C lay Cou n ty, a nd o ne term as co unty s up erinte nd e n t of sch oo l s . The fa mil y na:me of hi s wife , wh o i s lik e wis e d e cea sed, was Francis Dre w , an d of th eir ten c hildr e n the s ubj ec t o f thi s review wa s th e forth in orde r of birth. In hi s boyhood a nd ea rly youth A. B . Ge iger att e nd e d sc h oo l only during the wi nt e r t e rm s , hi s father having b ee n an invalid and th e so n having thus found it incumb ent upon him to d o productive w ork whil e still a m e re lad. By clos e application to priv a t e stud y h e so advanced himself as to prov e elig ibl e for p edagogic h o nor s , and h e made a s u cce ss as a tea c h e r in th e rural sc h oo l s . The r ea f te r h e w as e mpl oy e d o n e yea r as clerk in a ge n e ral store, and h e next to o k a s imilar positi o n in th e sto r e of J. F. T o wnsend, Duval Co unt y . He continue d t.his co nn e cti o n until 1 888, a nd h e th e n t oo k a c l e rical posi tion i n the general m e r c handi se es tablis hm ent o f \,\,Tilso n Brothe r s at Green Cove S prin gs . \".'h e n the bu sine ss o f thi s co n ce rn wa s inc o rp o r ated in 1892 Mr. Geiger b e came vice presid e nt o f t h e co mpan y, and after th e Wilson Brothers r etired from busi ness Mr. Geiger initi ate d an ind e p e nd en t en t e r prise along the sa m e lin es . Fro m a m o d es t in cepti o n his general merc hand ise busine ss ha s been d eve l ope d to o n e o f broad scope and importance . With the c o ns ec uti ve expan s i o n of th e busi ness he require d large r quarte rs , a nd afte r one previou s r emova l h e t oo k in r9Q6 hi s pre sent ampl e quarters in the Masonic Building, where h e co ntrol s a s ub s tantial a nd prosperou s e nterpri se that marks him a s one o f the l ea din g m e r c hants o f thi s sect i o n o f the state . Mr. Ge iger h a s s h ow n hi s pr ogress i veness a l so i n other co nn ectio n s . He h as assis t e d in the organization a nd deve l op m e n t if sc, era l o th e r b u siness c o ncern s in C l ay Co unty, including t h e C la y Co un ty Ic e Company , whi c h n o w h as a m o d e rn plant with a rapacit y fo r th e produc t i o n of te n tons o f ic e d ai l y, water fo r th e purp ose being drawn from a w ell 800 feet in d epth , a nd ice d e liv e ri es being m a de by th e com pany 's wago n s throu gho u t th e different parts of C l ay County . Mr. Geige r i s a loyal s upp orte r of the ca u se of the d emocratic party, he a nd hi s w if e a r e co mmunicant s of t h e Protestant Ep i s co pal Churc h , and h e i s affil iated with the 'Masonic fratern ity, in co nn ec ti o n with whi c h he was one o f t h e o r ganizers of the B lu e Lodge at Midd l e burg , thi s co unt y . T h e year 1 890 Pecord ed th e marriage of Mr. Ge iger and Mi s s Alice P ierce, a nd the y have three c hildr e n : Gray L., Eth e l a nd Clifford . REV. J. F . S AVELL, pasto r o f t h e First Bap ti s t Church o f Pal atka, i s a nativ e o f F l o r ida, and fo r ove r tw e nt y year s h a s be e n e ngaged in a b u sy p rog ram of useful w o r k as t e acher, s t ud e n t a nd pa s t o r. H e was born in Santa R os a C ounty, F l o rid a , so n of M. J. a nd Ma r y Elizabe th (Parker) Save ll. T h e Sav ells a r e of Hugu e not a n cest ry, and ea rly es tablis hed hom es in t h e m o untain r eg i o ns of North Caro lin a . Two b r o th e r s ca m e to F lorida in t h e fifti es, l oca tin g in t h e wes t e rn part of th e stat e . T h ese two br o th e r s wer e separa ted durin g the C i vil war, one of them n eve r r eturning . The o th e r , g randfathe r of R ev. Mr. Sav ell, put up a sa wrnill twe l ve fro m Milton, F l o rida . H e r ea r ed a large family of dau g ht e r s and o n e son, M. J. Save ll. The latter wa s b o rn and r eared in F l o rida, spent his e arly I i fe in sc hool, o n the farm and about an o l d fa s h ioned water sa wmill, and was a pion ee r in San ta R osa Co un ty. H e die d at Mobile, A l abama, in r 902. 0 f his t hirteen childre n five sons a nd three d a u gh t e r s a r e n o w living, J. F . Sav ell being s ixth in o rd e r of birth. Hev . ' Mr. Savell left h o m e at t h e age of fifteen t o m ake hi s own way, earning th e m ea n s to achi eve the e du cation that sati sfie d his ambition for a thorough a nd effect i , e work . He h a d a co mm o n sc hool ed u catio n , a nd after a peri o d o f w ork he e n te r e d Bagdacl Acad e m y in F l orida, spe nd ing tw o years th e re. He a lso attend ed Rich mond College in Virgi n ia, a nd graduat e d Maste r of Arts fro m Howard College in A l abama. H e attend e d the South ern Bapti s t T heol og ical Se m i nary at L o ui sville, Kentu c ky, a n d about that tim e was m ade pas t o r of t h e Seco nd Baptist Clmrch o f Birmin gham, A l abama , a nd while t here wa s o rdain e d t o t h e full work o f th e mini stry. S ub s eq u e n t l y h e we n t t o Roc hest er, New Y o rk, t o co mpl e te hi s educati on, atte nding th e Unive 1sit y of R oc h es t e r, a nd gradu ated i n 1 905 fro m the Baptist Theo l ogica l Se m i n a r y of that city . While a student i n th e seminary h e wa s pa stor o f th e University Ave nu e B ap ti s t Churc h . After l eav ing R o c h ester Hev . Mr. Savell wa s pastor of t h e First Bapti s t Church of P o plar Bluff , Mi s so uri , a nd in r 909 r e m ove d to Fayetteville, Ten n essee, a nd in 1912 t o Nas h v ill e . In D ece mb er, r9r7, h e b ec ame pasto r of the First Bapti s t Church o f Pala t k a, and h i s work wit h that congr e ga ti o n has been exceedingly fru itful durin g t he past five yea r s . H e fo und a m e mb e r s hip of a littl e more than two hun d r e d , a nd during his pasto r a te ha s r eceived into the church 455 m e m b e r s . The church at th e corne r of Oak and Fifth streets w as b uilt about fo urtee n yea r s ago, and ha s a sea tin g capac ity of about 500. Plans

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26 HISTORY OF FLORIDA h av e b ee n a cce pt e d b y t h e trus t e e s fo r a larger a n d b ette r bu ilding, wit h a seating capacity of Soo. Rev. 1Jr. Sanll ha s a lwa ys c o mbined a d eep int e r es t in educatio n w ith the acti , e mini s try, and has taug h t a s s upply on many o cca s'io n s in pla c es wh e r e h e h as liv ed. At o ne tim e h e was co principal o f o n e o f th e three fir s t g r a d e h igh sc h oo l s in T e nn essee . \,Yhil e i n th e mini stry h e a l so a c t e d a s reporte r for a daily n e wspape r and for a time wa s edit o r in ch ief o f a s m all p a per. F o r o v e r tw o years h e h as h ee n h oy s c o u t m a s t e r at Palatka, a nd r ece n t l y wa s e l evate d t o deputy s c o u t c o mmi ss i o n e r. G o v e rn o r Hardee appointed him probat i o n office r o f Putnam Co unt:v, F l orida. R ev . Mr. Savell i s a K ni ght T e mpla1 'Maso n . Rev. Savell o n D e c e mb e r 2 9 , 1 8 89, married \ Lary B. Cambrom, of Fluit,ille, Tenn ess ee, daughter o f E. J . and 1Iartha Cambrom. Their children are : 1iiatt i e B u e na, Li o n M o r t o n , James M e rae, J os eph F a y r o n, A lili B enjamin, Qui l a V i sta a n d Sipt a V ir g i n ia , a l l o f wh o m a r e living. JOHN ANDREW BoSTIW M , o f Ormond B e ach. i s p rob ab l y th e o ldest se ttl e r s t ill livin g on t h e c oas t of Flo rid a . ..In a brief bio g raphy it i s not p os s ible t o r e c ount a n d in fact l i ttle m o r e than s u g ges t hi s g reat range o f e xperience s ext ending bac k to Ci,il war tim es in F l o ri d a . F r o m e a rl y youth h e w as familiar with t h e s ea a nd th e se a wa s practi cally th e o nly app roach to F l orida until within c omparatiYely r e c ent yea r s . H e wa s h orn o n th e T s l a nd o f G o ttland in the B a ltic S e a , a S w e d i s h s ubj ec t , Octobe r 9 , 1 8 36, so n o f L a r s and Anna J o h a nna ( V e din) Bostrom . ' Hi s fath e r wa s a farme r and s up e rvi so r o f r e lig i o u s aff a ir s o n th e hland o f G ottl a nd . The V e din fami l y w e r e se a f aring p e ople . John Andr e w wa s th e fift h in a fami l y o f twe l v e c h i l d r e n , nin e o f wh o m r e a c h e d m a t u r e y e a rs, and h e and hi s b r o t h e r Charles have for many y ear b e en c l ose l y a ssoc iat e d ;rnd l i,-e o n adjo inin g pla ces in F l o rida. and the_, . ha\C' a s i ster Ji, ing at D e Land. J o hn A. Bostro m at te nd e d sc h oo l in his lwme c ommunity until h e wa s f ourte e n , a n d h a s been a t o f b oo k s and experie n ce e v e r since . H e wa s e mpl oye d a s c l erk in a country s t o r e until he wa s twe nt y , wh e n. t o s ati sfy a lon g in g fo r f o reign l a nd s . h e embarke d a s a s a i lor, hi s fir s t v o yage carryi11g him t o t h e Brit i s h Isl e s a nd t h e M editerrane an S e a . Late r h e w ent t o C hin a , a nd i n 1 8 S 9 s a i led fr o m C h i n a t o N e w Y o rk. F o r two years h e wa s o n y ess e l s e ngaged in t h e co a s tin g tra d e al o n g th e Eas t e rn S tates . .After a brie f v i s it t o hi s o ld h o m e in Swe den h e a g ain r eturne d t o Ame rica . The fir s t tri p that b r o u g ht hi m to J a c k so1wil l e wa s in 1860. The n, in 1 8 61. h e was at th e Barbadoes a nd o t h e r \,Yes t India J s l and s . Stro n gly o pp o s e d t o s lave ry, h e ente r e d th e O ni o n se n-i ce i n th e n ;wy a s quarte r ma s t e r o n a t r a n s p o rt. \\'it h h eadquar t e r s at Hil t o n H e ad in South Caroli11a. Soo n a ft e r w a rd h e wa s shipwrec k e d o n St. J ohns Bar n e a r J a c k so nville . That w as th e th ird shipwreck in hi s expe ri e nc e . T h e fir s t occurre d in th e China Sea and the seco n d i n th e Gu i f Stre a m . The third achentur e d e cid e d h im t o l ive on l and. During th e c l osing m onth s o f t h e C ivil war h e wa s a m e r c hant a t Hilt o n Head. 1 \ifr. B ostrom h a d s e e n o ranges rip e n in F e b ruary on th e Co a s t o f F l o rid a . and h e dete rn1in ed t o c o m e t o thi s land o f s u n s hin e and s emi t r op i ca l c limate. At Hilt o n Hea d h e b o u ght a G overnment launch. u sing army t e n t s f o r s ai l s , and in thi s boat c am e d ow n th e co ast t o St. A u g u s tine. He l eft hi s boa t th e r e and th e n procee d e d clo wn t h e coa s t to M osquito Inlet, and w i th th e help o f a c o l ored m an , I srae l McKinney, carrie d a s m a ll boat ov e r land t o th e bank o f Hal ifax Ri,er. H e went clow n t hi s s t r ea m explo rin g and th e o n l y s i g n of white se ttl e m e n ts o n th e wa y w e r e at F o r t O range a n d New Smyrna . H e th e n w ent back t o St. A u g u s tin e , w h e r e th e r e wa s o n e little h o t el, secured hi s o wn b oat and sailed clo wn th e coas t a nd up th e Halifa x Riv er. H e name d th e b oat Anna in h o n o r o f his m o th e r . It wa s i n 1 8 66 that \1r. B ostrom f i r s t se ttl e d o n l a nd now includ e d in th e C ity o f D ay t o n a . In r86 8 h e h o m es t eade d a nin e t y a c r e stri p o f l a n d ex t ending from t h e 1 i ve r t o th e oc ea n , a n d on th i s land h e s t ill h a s hi s h o m e . J-1 i s broth e1 Charles homes t eade d adj o inin g land e n th e n orth. It i s o n a p o r tion o f thi s tract that t h e Ormond H o tel wa s afterwards built, and al so t h e \\'int e r h o m es of Judge Shira s a nd o f J o hn D . l { ckefeller. The fir s t h o m e o f 1Ir. B ostrnm wa s b u i l t o f palm ettos . Later a sa wmill was es t a b l i s h e d b y D octo r Hawkes, wh o had c o m e from New Ham p shire and org aniz e d th e Flo rid a Land and Lumber C o m pany. This mill wa s bui l t n ear M os qu i t o Inlet. In 1 86 8 Mr. Bostr o m se cu r e d lumbe r fro m t hi s mil l t o e i ec t a t w o s t o r y fra m e r es i dence. T o the o ri g i n a l build i n g Mr. B ostro m added in 1902, and n o w h a s a h o m e in k ee pin g w i t h t h ose of the community , a n d ha s hi s g r ounds adorne d with fruits and flo w e r s , and fo r many yea r s has g r o wn oranges a n d grape fruit. M r. B ostrnm in '187 5 m arrie d Mi ss 1Iary Bake r , wh o was b o rn in Sale m , M a ssachusetts, i n 1 8 38 . She di e d in 1 90 3 . The r e w e r e tw o childre n , Lars Edward and Hele n E s th er. The daughte r mar r i e d J a m es P. Stanton, and i s now d eceas ed, l ea v ing a d aughte r , E dith 1\l a y . w i fe o f J. F . Paffe . r epresenting one o f t h e o l d Spa n i s h families o f F l orida. A s o n e o f th e 0 1iginal settlers l\[t-. Bostro m h as wi tnessed e , e ry pha se o f d e ,el opmc n t in and
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HIS T O R Y O F l
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28 HISTORY OF FLORIDA m a ny yea r s wa s a m erchant, dealing in fe rtili ze r s, grain and feed. A t th e t im e o f th e C ivil war h e e nlisted with a Geo r g i a regim e n t, and was wounded at Appamattox. F o r thirty-three year s h e was a m ember of th e Masoni c Order, the Knights T e mpl a r s and Shrine, a nd h e and hi s w if e were b o th Meth odists. H e di e d in 1 902 . , at t h e age of fif0litical allegiance has ever bee n give n t o t h e d e mocrati c party, and h e and hi s wife are active m e mbers o f the Meth o d i s t Episcopal Church in Daytona, o f whi c h h e i s a s t eward. H e i s a m e mb e r of t h e l oca l K iw a ni s C lub and th e Dayto n a Lodge o f th e Benevol en t a nd Prntective Orde r o f E lk s . O n th e 23rd of S eptembe r , 1903 , was so l e m niz e d the m arriage of Doctor O'Neill and M i ss Luella Morrow, daughte r o f Willi a m B . Morrow, of Midl and Park, New J e r sey, and th e childre n of thi s unio n a r e four in number. HowARD T. McCLELLAN, a lumber manufacture r at Kingston, an industrial s uburb of Day t ona, i s o n e of the p i o n ee r s o f Volu s i a County and has s p ent all hi s life in F l orida. H e i s now se rvin g hi s fourth term as a m e m be r of t h e Volu s i a County Sch oo l Board . . Mr. M cCl ellan w as born o n a farn1 near Lake C ity , Columb i a County, Florida, June 29, 1857, so n of Samu e l R and Margaret (McCl a r en) McCl ella n , hi s fath e r a na-tive of Georgi a and of Scotch a n cest r y, and hi s m o th e r a native of North Carolina and of Iris h l i neage His pare n ts were marrie d in Flo rida His fathe r, wh o di e d in 1 867, at th e age of forty-five, was a farme r , and a s a boy lived in J effe r so n County, near e n o u g h t o the battl efie ld of Natura l Bridge to hear the roar of th e canno n s Late r h e moved t o Columbi a County, and finally to Mari o n County. H e was opposed t o secessi o n and s laver y. He was a m e m be r of the M e th od i s t Churc h , whil e hi s w ife, wh o di e d in 1 899, at the age of seventy-three, was a P r es byt e r ian They had four childre n , o n e of whom di e d i n c hil d h oo d. H oward T . i s th e o ld es t. M rs. M. 0. H e r be r t liv es a t Dayt o n a Beach. N . vV. McCl e ll a n i s a carpenter o f Tampa. Howard T . M cC l ella n as a boy attend e d a log sc h oo l h o u se, and h a d t o walk five mil es t o reach t h js t e mpl e of l earning. During 1 869 70 for a fe w m onths h e was a student in t h e Peab o d y Academy at Lake C ity . While hi s forme r school a d vantages we r e limi ted, h e has really bee n a student and 1 ca d e r a ll hi s Ii fe. H e was te n year' o f age wh e n hi s fa th e r die d, and b e ing th e o ldest so n h e w as calle d o n t o h e l p s upp o r t hi s m o th e r and t h e younger childre n . T h e rnutin e o f hi s work and e mpl oy m ent was o n the home farm until he was twenty-o ne. The n f o r three years h e w orke d in a cotton gin a t Lake City during th e g innin g season , a n d s p en t two years in a sa wmill at M ount Car y, close to th e lin e o f Baker and Columbia counties . For two yea r s h e opera t e d th e o ld h o m estead farm s i x mil es west of Lake C it y. The n followed a brief exp erience in a mill in Nassau County, Florida, and in 1 888 h e b ecame a r esident of Volusia County . A t that ti me, thirtyfive y ears ago, few people li ved in Dayt o na, and th e r e w e r e no har d surface s id e walks i n the town, walks and stree t s being cov e r e d with l oose sand. Here h e worke d in a

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HISTORY OF I •LORlDA 29 sawmill a11d cut ha l f t h e lum be r e11teri n g into th e constructio n of th e Ce11tral Bridge across Halifax Riv e r , a nd he also c u t much of th e mate ri a l fo r th e b uildin g o f t h e h o m es a nd o th e r s t ru ctures in th e Tripl e Cit i es. A t Dayto n a h e first work ed fo1 J o hn M anly fo r fou r yea rs. and fo r nin e yea r s wa s with th e Dillingham Novell y \ Norks, seve n years o f that t im e as fo r e m an . Thc11, in 1<)05, Mr. McC l e llan establ i s h e d his l umb e r a n d w oo d w orki11g p lant a t Ki11gston. Known a l way s as an hones t an d publi c s pirit e d c itizen, 1 1 r . M cC l ella n has ne ver d es ir e d office, a11
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30 HISTORY OF FLORIDA c innati , a nd wa s a ver y abl e man in his profes si o n . H e practice d at Dayto1:zi Ohio, until 1883 , and th e n brought hi s family to Hlorida , locatin g at Altoo na in L
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I -IISTORY FLORIDA 3 1 Geo r ge A. Carleton was e ducat e d i n t h e Groton Hig h Sch ool. an d as a yout h learned the ca r penter ' s trade . A l o n g w ith th e practical w o rk of bui l din g contracti n g h e h as st udi e d a1Hl acquire d a broa d knowl edge of t h e architectural profes s i o n , :rnd h e pl;1ns 111any 0( the h o u ses h e liuilcls . J\[r. Carl e t o n i s affiliat e d w ith the K nig h t s of Pythias a t Miami . a nd i s president of t h e Ormo n d Yacht C lub. He ha s b u ilt a nu mb e 1 of b
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32 HISTORY O F FLORIDA His g r andfather, David Ca mpb e l l , was a n a tt o r ne y by professi011, one of th e p ro min ent m embe1-s o f th e bar of Jackso nville, a n d an ex-confe d e rate soldier. C. H. Ca mpb ell, S r., was b orn in Geor gia, a nd was a chil d w h e n hi s par en t s 'l ocate d a t Jackso nville. H e beca m e a t ravel i n g s al es man, a nd es tab l i s h e d his home at San ford before th e railr oa d was constructed. For many yea r s h e w as o n th e r oad f o1-J o hn G . Chri s top h e r, and was widely kn ow n a mong b u s in ess m e n as U ncl e C harlie. H e con du cted th e Valdez Hotel a t Sanford , a nd co ndu cted th e :\1ontezuma at the t im e o f hi s d ea th in 1922, o n Octobe r 3 rd. H e w as a l so a pio neer in cel e r y cu lture in Flo rid a. F raterna:ly h e was a Knight of Pythias a n d a n E lk. Mr. an d M r s . Ca mp bell had two childre n , C ha.d es K., ] r., a n d Ire n e . T h e latter i s t h e wife of Captain Hugh El m e ndorf, of th e A, i atio n Corps w h o saw se rvic e o n t h e hattl front in France, and i s n ow stationed at E l ling t o n I'iel d in Texas. Char les H . Campbe l l , ] i-., wa s e du cate d i n S an f ord, an d for a time pursued t h e law course in J o hn B. Stetson 'Uni v e r s ity of D e Land. H e left schoo l t o e ngage in t h e automobile b u siness in 1 909. Mr. Ca mp bell ha s a l ways b ee n int e r es t e d in s p cxts. a nd while in co l lege t } layed quar t e r back o n th e football team a nd a s catc h e r fo r the baseball team. H e establis h e d the first automobile se r v i ce b e t ween De L a nd , Lake Hel e n a nd O r a n ge C i ty, and t his was t h e fir s t motor transportation lin e in V o'.us ia Co unty, and hi s eq uipm en t t o start w ith consisted of a n an c i ent Cad illac a nd a Reo cai-. Jn 1 9 1 6 h e bec a m e Ford agent fo r this d i s tri ct, and he i s al so interested in the F ord agen cy at Daytona. His handsom e ga rage was o n l y r ece ntl y completed . Mr. Cam p bell h as been active in th e civ i c affairs of D e Land, ha s se rved a s a m e mb e r of the Co un cil and i s t h e p r ese n t mayo r , havin g been elcc:e d t o that office in 1920. He i s affi l iat e d with t h e Knights o f Pythia s a nd E l ks, i s a m e m be r o f the Comme r cia l C lub. and h e and h i s wife belong to th e Firs • t Ba1}ti s t Church. He m arri e d in 191 3 Crystal Dav i s . daughter o f Doctor G. A. Davis, o f D e Land. They h a,e one so n , C h a r l es D . GrnR C l c A ucusTus DREKA. O n e o f the m os t n o t ab l e careers i n th e business I i fe of Florida has h cc n that of Geo r ge A u g u s tu s Dreka, th e vete ran merohant of D e Land, t h e o l dest m a n in active busin ess in that city, he havin g opened a s t o r e there in 1 878. H e h as a lways exem1} l ified a hi g h degr ee o f progress i 1 ' C spi1-it, k eeping h i s bus i ness in advan ce o f the g r o wth of th i s sp l endid city, and h e now has o ne of th e larges t and most co m plete departme nt s tores in the state. M.r. Dre k a was born at Sassafras in Kent Co unty , 1-[ar y l an d , o n th e Eastern sho re, Novem be r r S , 1 857, son of Augustus and The r esa Dreka. lJis fat h e r was eighteen yea r s of age wh e n with t wo brot h e r s h e ca m e fi;o m Germany t o esca p e t h e Prussian mil itar y syste m . His wife, Theresa, ca m e o v e r from the o l d country w h e n about the sa m e age, an d they we r e m arrie d in Maryland a nd lived in that sta1e m os t of thei r years. After 1 -eti rin g fro m b u s ine ss Augus t Dreka mov e d t o v \Tashington , D . C. He had l earne d the mille r ' s t rade in Germany, and in Kent County , M aryland, h e built a flour mill , which h e operated fo r a l o n g p e 1 i o d of y ea rs. He was well educa t e d , a co n stant read e r , did much to s hape p u blic opinio n in hi s l oca lit y and was a n active democrat. H e w as a m embe r o f n o church, whi l e hi s wife was a C atholic. S h e di e d at th e age of seve nty . A u g u s tu s D1eka at the t i m e of hi s death was the o ldest m e m ber of th e Odd Fellows in Eastern Maryland. Of t h e two brothers that accompani e d him o n e went to t h e Ca l i fo rni a gold field s a nd the o th e r es tab l ished him self in Philadel1l hi a, where h i s son i s now head o f the g r ea t e n g r avi n g a nd stat i one r y company that bears th e famil y n a me. Geo rge A. D r e k a i s o n e of three liv in g childre n . His s i s t er, Eva T., i s liv in g at v\Tas hi ngton , widow of t h e lat e Godfrey Ki l k off, of D e Land. L. II. Dreka i s s till ope rating the Dreka Mill s in Kent County, Maryl a n d. George Augus• t u s Dreka acquired a techni ca l training in ma.nu facturing an d m ec hanical lin es in t h e R oc k H ill College at Ellic ott, Ma1yland . t h en E llicott C ity. He left there at the age o f twenty, and i n 1 878, whe n a yo un g m a n of twcnty o nc, arrived i n F l o rid a . At t hat time l ess than ha]( a d oze n famil i es h a d es tabli s hed their homes at De Land. T h e J orda n s had pre , i o u s l y o p e n e d a store, but h ad g i ven up the b u siness, a nd Mr. Dreka undertook to suppl y t h e o n l y m e rcantile faci l iti es of tihe community. That pio neer stor e wa s l oca t ed o n what i s n ow Indiana Avenu e, o n the present s ite o f t h e Volu s i a County Bank . F our year-s late r h e m o , , e d to the present locatio n of t h e business, W oodland Bou l evard and N c w York Avenu e . In 1882 a tw o-s t o r y frame bui lding wa s bui l t h e r e, and in 1 885 it was e nl a r ge d t o four stori es, th e uppe r part being occ u pie d by th e Carrollton Hotel. The b uildin g that n ow h o u ses th e G. A. Dre k a a nd Co m pany is of r ein f o r ce d conc rete a nd is a combination stor e and office buildin g, e r ected in l 9Q9. Mr. Drek a in r92 r e rect e d the Dreka TheatJe . His act i , e partne r fo r a numbe r of years in G. A . Dreka a nd Co m pany wa s h i s broth e r in law , Godfrey Kilk off, a nd th e active partne1s now a r e h i s so ns. T h e busines s i s s till co ntinued as G . A . Dreka and Compa n y . His s uccessful r ecord as a m e rchant has it s counterpa r t in th e enterprise a nd publi c spirit h e ha s di sp layed in e very mat1ter affecting the co m munity at l a r ge. H e wa s a membe r of th e C it y Co un cil wh e n th e 0 1 d inance was pas se d t o remit taxatio n o n city prop erty in pro p o rti o n t o the numbe r of shade trees pla nted o n the parkways . \ V hi l e the town treasury suffered from thi s o r di n a n ce, it r es u l t e d in stimulating tree p lantin g until D e Land is o n e o f t h e most beautiful cit i es in t h e s t a t e . Mr. Dre ka i s c h a i rman of th e Bo nd Trus tees o f D e Land a n d Lake Hel en Special Road and Bridge Dis trict. He ha s b ee n a n ea rnest w orke r in behalf of a b ond iss u e f o r pa ving, sa nit a ry sewage and inc r ease d wate r facilitie s . At o n e t i me h e was a m e m be r of th e Board of Directors of the V o lu sia County Bank. and is o n e of th e governo r s of th e Commer cia l C lub . For a great m a ny yea r s he ha s been in t er<'s t ed in o ran ge culture, ha s o wn e d a number of g r oves, a nd now h as o n e i n Huntoo n I s l a nd in St. J o hn s River. In 1884 Mr. Dreka married I a • t harine }.fa l s be r ge r, daughter of Augus tu s Malsberger, o f Kent County, Maryl and. She di e d in 1 897. a nd i s snn ived by three c hi ldren. A u g u s t F., the o ld es t so n , i s now a s h oe merchant o f A t l anta, Georgia. J e r o m e G . i s manager of G. A. Dre k a and Company . Geo r ge Raymond i s m a n ag e r of th e Piggly \ Vigg l y S t o r e ait De Lan d. The son , R ay m o nd , se r ve d with th e Naval R ese r ves a n d was o n duty a yea r an d a h a ! f during t h e \ Vorld war, first s tati oned at C h a rleston and then at Berke l ey. n ear Nor fo lk , V i rginia. In 1901 Mi. Dreka married 'Mrs. Anna E liz a Hixon, daughte1-of Philip N. B r ya n , o f New Smyrna, Flor ida , w h e r e s h e wa s h orn. Mr. Dreka is a Ca th o l ic .

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HISTOR Y OF FLORID A 33 HoN. D. TUART G 1LLIS. During the pas t sev eral ge nerations t here have been few w h o l eso m e movements on foot in \ i\Talton County, for eco nomi c a nd intellect ual de ve l op ment, that have n o t commanded the s up port of o n e o r more m embe r s of the G illi s fami ly. T h ese men have always been noted fo r t h e firm grasp th ey have maint ained o n t he large essential s o f human progress and b u s i n ess a nd professional advancement, and H on. D. Stuart Gillis has proved n o exception to thi s rule. He has developed int o o n e of those broad-gauged r epresentatives of the best e l ement of D eFuniak Springs, w h ose standing in t h e ' l egal pro fess i o n i s high, and w h ose co mp etent discharge of t h e duties of seve ral hi g h offices has b ee n i n perfect co n formity with his publi c spirited d s ir e to witness furt h e r progress. Judge Gillis \\as born November 5, 1 879, at Freepor t, \ Vallon County, Florida, a nd i s a so n of .An g u s Mcintosh and Nanni e ( M c Lean ) G illis, nati\ es of Florida. His father , a wellkn o wn ph y s ician , practiced fo r many yea r s a t Ca mpb e llt o wn , \i\Tashington County, a nd Freeport, vValt o n County, and was a man wh o was h e ld in th e highest es tee m. During the war between the states, when his father was calle d into the Confederate e rvic e, Doctor G ill is se n ed as hi s s ub stitute, as a priva t e i n a Florida volunteer infantry regimen t. He was w o und e d during hi s service , but r ecove r e d an d r ejoined his regiment, and w as later captured and h e l d p risoner for so m e time. .At t h e c l ose of the \\"ar h e r e turned to the practi ce of his profess i o n and continu e d therein during th e r e m a inder of hi s life. D. Stu art G illi s r eceive d hi s early ed ucatio n in t h e pu b lic sc h oo l s of Walto n Co unty, followi n g which h e purs u e d a cour e a t th e state n ormal sc h ool at DeFuniak Springs. vVhil e attendin g th e normal sc hool h e a l so t a u ght sc h oo l in \\Talton County . In 1902 a n d 1903 Judge Gil l i attended the Boston Conservatory of .Music, where h e took voca l l esso n s, with the inte n t ion of entering upon a mus i ca l career. However, throat troubl deve l o ped and h e was forced to g ive up hi s c h e ri s h e d a m b i t i ons as a singer. Returning to DeFuniak Sprin gs h e t oo k up the study of Jaw and in r 904 was made deputy clerk of the court. This position h e also h e ld in r 905 and J 9o6 a n d at t h e sa m e tim e ser ved as town clerk and town t reasure r , and during all thi pe riod was also app l ying him self as siduo u s l y t o th e study of hi s professi o n in t h e o f fice of Judge L. ]. Reeves. llc then attended th e Cumberland Law Sch oo l of Cumbe rl an d , T e nn es see, g raduating therefrom in 1908 with t h e degree of Bache l o r of Laws, and look hi s examinatio n before th e Supreme Court o f Florid a, bei n g admitt e d t o th e ba r in the same yea r. H e be ga n prac tice at o n ce at DeFuniak S prin gs, a nd in 1 9 09 wa s appointe d judge of the C rimin a l Court of R eco rd by t h e govern or. Resigning f r o m thi s office in 1 910, h e resumed his law practi ce, but in r912 was e l ected to the office of j ud gc of the C rimin a l Court of R ec o rd, and occupied that posi ti on until the court was abolis hed in 1913 by an ac t of Legi s lature. ] udge Gilli s was e l ecte d to the Legislature to serve hi s district, and was a member of that body at the specia l session called by the g overnor in 1918, and a m ember of th e regular sess ion o f the Legislature of 1919 . In 1912-13-1 4 h e was mayor of the Town of DeFuniak Spr ings. From June, 1919, t o J anuary, 192r, he wa assistant attorney ge n eral of the State of Florida. In a ll hi s offic ial ca pacitie s h e has di sp layed a high orde r of abi lit y, unswerving fide l ity t o the duties of hi s positions and marked energy in their disc h a r ge. On April 3, 1 912, at D eFuniak Springs, Judge G illi s was un i ted in marriage with J\fi ss Bernice Morrison, daughter of Malcolm M . and Chrissie (Bowers) M orrison, the latte r of whom still surv i ves. Mr. Morrison, w h o was engaged in the r ea l estate, sawmill and timber business, is n o w d eceased. Two childre n hav e b e en born to Judge and Mrs. Gillis: Lucy, 1born in August, 1913, who di e d in .April , 1919; and Catherine Stua rt. Judge and Mrs . Gill is a r e members of the Presbyterian Churc h , in w hi c h he i s serving as d e acon. P o lit ically, he i s a democrat, and h is fraternal affiliati o n s are with the Maso n s and the Knights of Pythi as. ROBERT NAUDATN ELLIS. A resident of Jac k so n ville a lm os t half a century, Robert Naudain Elli s ha s bee n distingui s h e d as o n e of the l e gal c ivil and mec h a ni ca l engi n ee r s of the S outheast. H e de s i g n ed and built J ac k so nville's water w orks and seve r al other publi c utilitie s, a nd a numbe r of co n structive ente rp r i ses stand to the c r edit of hi s p a r t i cular ge niu s . H e was b orn at Frede ri cksburg, V irgini a, J a n u a r y 6, 18 43, so n of James E. and Elizabeth (Nau dai n ) Ellis . His mothe r was of a French Hugue not fami ly, a nd h e r fath e r , Arno ld Naudain, was at o n e tim e a m e mber of the United States S e nat e . The Elli s fa mi l y was establi s h e d in North Carq lin a in the latter part o f the seve nt ee nth century, a nd many ge nerati o n s of t h e family liv e d in Vir gi nia. Dr. James E. E l l is was a success ful p h ys i c ian of Fredericksburg. \V'hen R obe r t N. Ell i was a boy his p a r ents r e m ove d t o New York State, a nd h e was educated i n t h e public sc h ools a nd in th e acade m y of Fergu so n v ille. H e began the stud y of c i vil e n ginee rin g und e r pri va t e in struction, co mpl e t e d his cou rse in 1858, a nd in 1859 began a se 1 vice of n ea rl y two years as a drafts man w ith th e Baldwi n L oco m o tiv e W orks a t Phila d e lphi a. .About the beg innin g of th e C i vi l war h e was appo intee! a 111cm ber of the E n ginee rin g Co rp s of the U nit e d States Navy, and h e saw a c tive se rvi ce during th e w a r under Admira l s Farragut and Porter o n both th e Atlantic and Gui f coas t s . H e was capture d at Ga l v sto n in January, 1863, but was soo n exc h a n ged. Mr. Ellis r es i g n ed from the navy in l 67 , a n d hi s fir s t int e rest in Florid a was o r ange g r owing at O r a n ge Mill s . In 1872 h e m ove d to J ackso nvil l e and r es um ed hi s p rofession a s a civil a nd m e ch anica l e ngin ee r , bein g associa t e d in partnership with A. E. McClure from 1873 until 1888. This fir m handl e d a large number o f a r c hit ectura l and enginee rin g contracts througho u t Flo rid a and adj o inin g stat es. T t was in l8i8 that Mr. Ellis was e ngaged by th e board of trus t ees o f J ac k so n ville to draw th e plan s fo r th e waterworks and drainage sys tem. He was s u perin t en d e n t of construction in ins t a llin g bot h sys t e ms, and continue d as s up e rint e nd ent of t h e works until 189r. In 1 886 h e wa s th e first sala ri e d c ity engineer appointed for J ac k so nville. After resig nin g these c it y pos iti o n s in 1891 Mr. E lli s was interes t e d i n the phosphate ind ustry, d e s i g nin g, bui lding a n d o perating the Natio n a l Peace Riv e r Phosphate Plant near Bartow. In the latter part of 1894 he returned to Jacksol1\ille and o pened a n office as consu lting en gi n ee r. On July 1, 1895, h e was again called t o serve as engineer for the Board of B ond Trustees t o p lan and s uperintend the exteri o r of the water w orks, sewer s, and drainage system of the city. On May 1 , 1 899 , the ci t y e lectric light plant,

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3 4 H ISTOR Y OF FLORIDA ori g inally u n d e r th e co n t ro l of th e Board of Pub l i c \ Vorks, w as tu rn e d over t o th e B oard o f B o n d Tru stees a nd ca m e unde r hi s s u pe r v i s i o n and was in a f ew yea r s o n e o f the • b es t p a yi n g mun i cipa l p l ants i n th e county . H e co n t i nu e d i n t h i s p os i t i o n until N ove mb e r , 19II, w h e n nume r o u s c h an ges we r e m a d e in t h e c ity go v ernment a n d h e was a ppoi n t e d c it y pu r c h asing agen t , and fil l s that p os i tio n a t th e prese n t time. M r. Elli s fo r m a n y ye a r s h as b ee n me m be r o f t h e J ac k so n vill e C h a mb e r me r ce, fo rm e r l y t h e Boar d of T racie. m e mb e r of the St. J o h n 's P r o t es ta n t C hurc h , a nd i s a d e mo c r a ti c v o t e r. a n active o f Co m H e i s a Episcopal D ece mb e r 3 1 , r 873, Mr. Ellis marrie d Miss Frances : McClure, w h o was b o rn in vVisco n s i n , Novemb e r 5, 1 852 , d a u g h t e r o f R e v . E dw ard a n d Sarah M c C lure . Mr. and Mrs. E lli s have a fa m i l y o f s i x so n s a nd o n e daughte r : H o b ert N . , J r. , w h ose ca r ee r i s bri efly s k e t c h e d o n a n o t h e r page; Cla r e nce H . , living a t \ V es t Pal m Bea c h ; James E . , assoc iat e d with h i s b r o t h e r in business at Havan a, C u ba ; A rn o ld Wrig h t , a ca pt a i n in th e United Sta t es a r m y l oca t e d o n th e Ca n al Z o ne; Fra nk L. , of H a vana; D o n a l d R., wh o d i e d at the age of twe lv e yea rs, F ebrua ry 15, 1 9 04 ; a nd Flor e n ce M., wife o f F r e d : M cC u e n . R o nrnT N A U D A l N ELLIS, JR., h a s e a rn e d di s t i n c tio n in t h e s am e profess i o n as hi fath e r , w h ose ca r ee r h a s b een g i ve n in t h e p r ece din g s k e t c h . T h e so n w as b o rn a t J ac k so n v ille, F l o r id a, Oct obe r IO, 1 8 74 , o l d es t of hi s pa r e n t s ' c hildre n . H e was ed u cate d in t h e p u b l i c sc h oo l s a t J ac k so n ville, att e nd e d th e Bet h e l Mil it a r y Acad e m y a t \ 1 \!arring t on, Virgini a, t a k i n g th e c i v i l e n g i n ee rin g course, a nd afte r co mp l e ti n g hi s e du catio n wa s [or seve ral yea r s co n n ec t e d w t h th e N a ti o n a l P eace RiYer Phosp h a t e Co mp a n y a t J an ejay, F l o r ida, as dre d ging s up e rint e n de nt. H e left th i s w ork ea d y i n r 898 t o j oin th e a rm y a t t h e t i m e o f th e S pani s h -Ame ri can wa r. H e b eca m e a me mb e r of Co mp a n y A o f th e fi1s t F l o r ida R e gi m ent, Li g h t In fantry, a n d wa s m u s t e r e d int o t h e F e d e r a l A r m y o n April 23, r898, at Tam pa , a s m e m be r o f Co mp a n y E. L a t e r h e was s tatio n e d at Fern a ndin a, F l o ri da, a t Hunts v ille, Alabam a, a nd at T allahassee, F l o r i da, a n d w as m u s t e r e d out as a q u arte rm as t e r se r gea n t , D ece mber 3 , 1898 . Afte r p e r fo rmi n g th i s military duty Mr. Elli s r eturne d t o J ac k so n ville a nd was assoc iat e d w i t h t he F l o rid a H .a i l w ay Co mpa n y o n i t s survey tnro u g h a country L i v e Oak a n d P erry. L a t e r h e w as c hief e n g i n ee r fo r t h e co n s truc t i o n of thi s b r a n c h of th e r oa d . In 1 9 0 8 h e again l oca t ed a t J ac k so n ville, a nd with T. H erd Kook e r a n d E rn es t v V . C u r ti s es t ab l i s h e d t h e firm o f E llis, Curtis a n d Kook e r, c i v i l e n ginee r s and s u r veyo 1 s, a firm w i t h es t a blis h e d bu s i n ess co n n ec t i o n s a nd a h i g h r e putati o n i n t h e i r fie l d throug h o u t F l orida. E llis i s a m e mber of t h e F l orida E n g i neer i n g Soc i e ty, i s a d e m oc r a t and atte n d s t h e Epi s copa l C h u r c h . D ece mb e r 25, 1 9 02, a t M o r ganfie ld , Kent uc ky, h e m arrie d C aroli n e Penti ce. They have o n e so n , R o ber t Nauclain , third. HoN. ] A MES M c N AIR B A K E R , who ser ve d as a me mb e r of t h e S e n a t e o f t h e Co n fe d erate State a nd fo r many yea r s w as a m embe r o f the Circ ui t a n d Sup r e m e Courts o f F l o rida, i s o n e o f th e first n a m e d a m o no-t h e g reat publ i c m e n of thi s s t a t e in th e l ast ce ntury . H e w a s b orn in R o b eso n County , North Ca ro lin a, Jul y 20, 1822, the s i xth so n and e i g h t h c hi l d o f A r c hib a l d a n d Ca th e ri n e B a k e r . H e w a s th o r o u g h l y prepare d fo r hi s c h ose n professi o n , g rad uating in 1 8 44 fro m D av i dso n College in lorth Ca rolina. H e p racti ce d fo r a t im e at L u mbe r t o n , N orth Carolin a, bu t o n account o f fa i ling h ea lth , du e t o a n attac k of t y ph o i d fever, h e so u g h t t h e mild e r c l im a t e o f Flo rida. H e ca m e t o Fl o r id a o n h o r se b ac k and fir s t p racti ce d a t o l d Co l u m bus, t h e n a t the h ea d of n a vi ga ti o n on t h e S ewan n ee R i v e r . A s h o r t t i m e l a t e r h e r e m oved t o a t o wn t h e n kn o wn as Alli ga t o r , and h e was l a r ge l y instrume nt a l in securin g i ts c h a nge of n a m e t o L a k e C i t y . H e r e hi s w ork as a lawyer b r o u ght hi m a r eputatio n t h a t r a pid l y spr a d ove r t h e s tate, a n d h e b eca m e a r ecog ni ze d l ea d e 1 o f th e bar. About .1852 h e wa s made s t a t e's atto rn ey f o r t h e S e w a nn ee C ir cuit, a n d in th e sa m e year h e wa s d e legat e t o t h e \.Yh i g Nati o n a l Co nven t i on a t Bal t i m o re, w h e r e Wii1fi e l d cott was n o m i nated for p r es id e n t. This n o min a ti o n was str e n u o u s l y o pp ose d b y th e F l orida d e legat i o n . Ge n e r a l Scott h a d b ee n in comman d i n F l o r i da fo r a tim e during t h e Indi a n w a r a nd h a d m a d e h i m se l f extr e m e l y u np o pu l a r w ith the p eop l e of the state. Up t o th a t t i m e F l o r id a h a d b ee n o n e of the do ubtful states, but th e n o mi n a tion of Ge n e r a l Scott turned i t d e finit e l y fro m t h e w h i g party. I n 1 856 Mr. B a k e r was n o minated b y th e w hi gs fo r Co n g r ess, a n d h e s t u m pe d th e e n t ir e state, trave lin g o n ' h o r se back. In 1 859 h e was e l ec t e d judge of the S ewann ee C i r c uit. In the yea r h e was e l ec t ed t o t h e benc h h e m a r ri e d , a t Fayettev ille, Nor t h Ca r olin a. M iss Fan n y G i lc h ri s t , d a u g hter o f A d a m a n d l VIary G i lchrist. During th e h eate d p olit i ca l contest of 1860 J ud ge B a k e r s upp o r t e d t h e B ell a nd Ever ett ticket. vVhil e o p p ose d t o sece s i o n , h e went w ith t h!:' s t a t e, a n d i n 1 86 1 wa s e lc c tecl by t h e Legi s lature as a m e mb e r o f th e Co n f e d e r a t e Stat e Senate fo r th e s h o r t term. In 1 863 h e was ree l ected, a n d se r ve d thro u g h o u t t h e w a r a se n a t o 1 fro m F l o rid a , hi s h o m e b e i n g in Ri chmo nd , Vi r gi nia. S e nato r B a k e r r eturne d t o F l o rid a afte r t h e wa r and i n 1 8 66, u p o n t h e e l ec ti o n of Da"i d S. \ '\Ta l k e r as governo r, h e wa s appo int e d assoc iat e jus ti ce of th e S u p r e m e Co u rt. H e w as o n th e ' u p reme B e nch unti l 1 868 , whe n as a resu l t o f r eco n s t r uc t i o n m eas u r es h e r es i g n e d and t oo k u p p 1 i1.-ate pra c ti ce. I n th e following yea r h e ea rn e d h is g r ea t es t r e put a ti o n as a lawyer in t h e l i tigation g r o win g o u t of th e di s p os it i o n o f th e l a nd s of t h e i n t e rn a l i m p rove m e n t fund o [ F l orida a n d t h e b o n d s a n d oth e r i n d e bt e dn ess contrac t ed by t he r a ilr o a d s b u ilt unde r the t erms of the act of 185 5 c reati n g tha t fun d. Afte r th e w a r Judge Bak e r wa s a democ rat, a n d h e se r v e d a s a m e mb e r of t h e exec u t iye co m mittee o f t h e s tate i n 1 8 7 6 . lie was promine n t in r e d ee m i n g th e s t a t e fro m t h e t erro r s a n d mi s governm ent o f t h e r eco n struc ti o n p e ri od . In r88 t , at t h e a l m os t u n anim o u s r eq11cst of th e bar of h i s c i r c uit , h e accepte d the appo i n t m ent of j udge of t h e F ourth J udi c i a l C ir cu it. He w as appo inte d by Go 1 erno r Bloxh a m , and i n 1885 was r eappo inted b y G overno r P erry. A s a r es u l t of fa i lin g h ealt11 J ud g e Bake r r es i g n e d fro m th e b e n c h i n 1 890, a n d h e l ived qui e tl y u n ti l h i s death o n Jun e 20, 1 892 , w h e n a lm os t se v e n t y yea r s of age and a fter n e a rl y fif t y yea r s o f ac t ivit y as a c i t i ze n , lawyer a n d s t a t es m a n of F l o rid a . He was a n elder of th e P r es b y t e ri a n Churc h . vV1LLIA M H . BAKER , o l dest so n o f t h e dis t in g ui s h e d Judge J a m es M . B a k e r , has bee n a prom i -

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HISTORY OF' FLORID 35 n e nt 111 mber of th e J ac k so 1 wil l e bar for a third o f a century. He was bo rn at Jack s o m i l lc, M a r c h 2 r , 1868 , and a . a b oy h e cam e t o appr ec i a t e t.l1c di g ni t y and s p l e ndid a bilit y of his h o n o r e d fa t h e r , th e n a t th e h e i ght o f hi s G 1 1ccr as a l a w ye r ; rnd judge . \<\T i!liam l r . B a k e r was d11catecl in t h e public sc h o o l s o f hi s n a ti ve c ity, g radua t e d A . B . i n 1 888 fro m DaYiclso n College o f North a r o lin a , of which h i s fa th e r was a n alumnus, a nd h e co m p l e t e d hi law co u r se in \<\T a hingt o n a nd L e e n i v e r s i t y a t Lexing t o n , V ir g ini a. H e was gradua t e d i n 188 9, admitte d to th e ba r s o f Flo rid a and Vir g inia , a n d since th a t year has b ee n a pra c ti cing l a wy e r in Jac k so m ille . For m a n y yea r s he was a ssoc i a t e d with his br o th e r un de 1 th firm n a m e of Bak e r a nd B a k er. \\Th e n h e was tw enty -four yea r s of a g e h e w a s e l ected co unt y j udgc of Duval co unty, a n d wa s r ee l ec t e d in 1896 , se r ving o n t h e county b ench until r9or. Outside o f se r vi ce in th i p u bli c office h e h a s d evo t e d m os t of hi s tim e t o t11c strict sphere o f hi s profess i o n . In 1 9:l h e w a s o n e o f th r ee appoi nt e d un de r a n ac t of S tate L e g i s lature t o es t a blis h th e u stra l i an ballo t system in Jack so n v ille. Judge B a k e r is a m e m be r o f th e J ac k so n ville Bar A ssoc iati o n , th e Boar d of Tracie, a n d has b ee n int e r es t e d i n a numbe r of civ i c m ove m ents and orga niz a ti o n s i n hi s c it y a nd s t a t e . H i s a ffiliat e d wit h the Ind e p e n d ent Orde r o f Odd F ellow s and t h e \ V ooclme n of th e \ V o r lcl, a n d is a m e mb e r o f t h e P r es b y t e ri a n Chmc h . F ebrua r y 12, 1 895, \ Vi l l i a m H. B a k e r m arrie d J\-Ii ss K a t e L. Grav e s, o f L o ui s ville, l e n tu c k y . The only . o n of th e ir mar r iag e i s James J\L Ba k e r , n a m e d i n h o n o r of hi s grandfathe r . HENR Y LAY MnC IIELT,, A n efT1c i c n t a nd p o pu l a r m e mb e r o f t h e offic i a l exec utive co rp s o f S a n t a Rosa Co unt y i s S h e r iff ).1it c h cll, wh o i s g i ving a v i go r o u s a nd effec ti ve adm i n ist r a tion as h e riff of hi s 11ati,e county . .l-ie was b o rn at l\Iilt o n , th e county scat o f a nt a .lfo sa o un ty, a nd th e ela t e o f h i s birth was F ebrua r y 14 , 1 89s . a nd h e is a r e p r ese nt a tiv e o f old a n d h o n o r e d f a mili es o f thi s sec ti o n o f F l o r ida. H i s p a r ents. B e nj a min and Emma (Amos) i\[ i t c h cll, s till r es i c k a t Milt o n , t h e fathe r ha ving b ee n born i n thi s co11nty in 1 8 6 8 a nd h a\'ing l o n g b ee n iclc ntif1ed w i th a g ri cultura l and liv e -s t oc k i n du stry in S a nt a R os a ounty, w h e r e hi s p a r ents, vVilli a m and M arga r e t CJ e r n iga n ) : Mit c h ell, r e m aine d until th eir death, a fam i l y trad iti o n b eing t o t h e effec t t h a t in th Mitc h ell a n cestry i s a stra in o f India n b l oo d . The mate rna l grand p arents of She riff Mitc h ell w e r e Harry and ).fa 1 y ( R obinso n ) Amos, t h e form e r h a ving b ee n a so n of Dr. M i lt o n Amos, w h o ca m e t o f\ m c ri ca fro m hi s n a ti ve Sco tl a nd a nd w h o was a le a di n g p h ys i c ian a nd surgeon of hi s clay in Flo ri d a . H enry C. Mitc hell is i n d e bted t o th e p u blic ' C h oo l s o f S anta H .osa o u n ty for hi s ea rl y e d u catio n , w hi c h was s u p p l e m ente d b y h i s ;itt e ndin g , fo r tw o t erms, th e norm a l i n stitute a t J\Iadi son. thi s s t a l e . F o r three years t h e reafter h e was s u c cess full y e n gage d in t eac hi n g in th e sc h oo l s o [ hi s native c o un t y , a n d h e was the n a pp int ecl d eputy s h e riff , und e r J . H . Harvell. H e r e t aine d t hi s p o s iti o n thre e years, 1918-2 0 , and i n th e autumn of 1920 he wa s e l ec t e d co unty s h e riff, w ith J o hn H. C o llin s as h i o pp o n e n t His regula r fou1-yea1 term a s s h e riff b ega n J anua r y 4 , 1921. The s h e riff i s a v ig o r o u s a d voca t e of the pri n ciples f t h e d e m oc r a t i c p arty, is a m e m be r of t h e J\[ th o di s t Epi co p a l Churc h , outh, is affil ia ted with t h e co t t i s h R i t e bod y of th e : Ma so nic fra t e rnity, a s \\'C l! as w i th t h e M ys ti c Shrine, a nd h e h o ld s m e m be r s hip a l o in th e K nights of Pythias, in c lu ding it s adjunc t organ i za ti o n , t h e Dra m a ti c Or d e r o f th e K nights o f Kho r a ss a n . She r iff Mitch ell i s o n e o f th e p op u l a r yo un g b ac h e l o r s o f hi s nati ve county. T. ' . HAUGHTON. vVhen , a t th e midni ght hour o f April 15, r893, d eath set it s s e a l up o n t h e m o r tal lips of Judge T . S . Haughto n , t h e r e p ass ed fro m th e s ta ge of life a m a n w h o. e di s tin c ti o n r es t e d up o n p a tri c ian ins ti n c t s, fine per so na l s t e w ards hip a nd l a r ge a nd w orthy a c hi e v e m e nt. H e w as a pi o n ee r lawye r a nd juris t o f Flo r ida , a m a n of exce pti o n a l abilit y a nd exalte d charac t e r , a n d h e w as o n e o f th e m os t h o n o r e d a n d influe n t i a l c i t i ze n s of P a l atka, thi s tate , at th e tim e of hi s d e mi se . Judge H a u ghto n was b o rn a t Ede n ton , orth C arolina, o n th e 9t h of Novembe r , 1825, and t hu s h e was s i x ty-sev e n years i f a ge a t the tim e of hi s death . O f him a n d hi s lin eage the follo win g p e rtin ent es timate ha s been writte n : " H e was a w orthy cio n of a w orthy s ir e, hi s fathe r having b ee n the H o n . M a l ac hi H a u ghto n , a pro m inent law ye r o f Torth C a r o l i na , a nd hi s fa mil y wa o n e o f icfine m c n t a nd c ultu re. Judge Haugh t o n r ece i ve d a lib e r a l educa ti o n and w as a stude nt a t C h ap e l Hil l U niver s it y in North Ca roli n a, and P rince t o n ollege, N e w J e r se y . Afte r l eaving co l l e g e h e studi e d law i n t h e office of hi s fath e r , a nd a t th e age o f twe nt y-two years h e w as admitte d t o th e N orth Ca r o lina b ar." In his nati ve s t a te Judge Haughto n co n t inu e d in th e pr ac ti ce of hi s p r o fe ss i o n until r85 2 , w h n h e came t o Florida a n d se t tl e d in it s capita l cit y , Tallahass e e . Her e h e wa s s oo n called t o a n i m p orta n t executi ve p os iti o n un d e r State Co mpt r o l l e r Bre \ ' a rd , during t h e a dm ini s t r a ti o n o f G o v e rn o r Broo me. H e r e t aine d thi s p os t se v e r a l yea r a nd th e n r e m o v e d t o I a l a t k a. i n w h i c h c ity h e p asse d t h e r e m a ind e r o f h i s life . \;v'he n t h e C i vil w a r w as preci pitated o n th e n a ti o n Judge H a u g h t o n g ave e vide n c e of hi s un qual ifie d l oyalty t o th e Confederate ca u s e b y e n l i sting i n th e V illipi g u e ba tt e r y o f F l o r ida tr oo p s . with w hi c h h e was in ac tiv e se r vi ce a r o un d a nd n e a r harl es t o n , S o uth Ca ro lin a , "durin g the dark clays if t h e s i e g e o f t hat ill fated c it y ." Of hi s serv i ce i n thi s co n necti o n t h e follo wing s t a t e m e nt s h a ve b e en w ri tten : " H e re, a s at all o t h e 1 tim es a n d in all s ituati o n s d u rin g hi s life, h e did hi s d uty, a nd l o b e ab l e t o say o f a n y m an that h e did his duty i s t o s a y o f h im a l l that th e s um o f a n oble lif e requi r e s . " After th e c l ose o [ t . h e wa r Judge H a11ghto n put f orth e v e r y p oss i b l e effort to aid in ih e r e vivi n g of th e p r ostra t e .'outhl ancl, a nd r cs11me d a l so the pra ctice o f hi s professi o n at Palatka . H e wa s twi ce e l ec ted judge if th e C o unty C ourt o f Put nam Co un ty, a n d w h e n t h e C rimi n al Co u r t o [ H ecord w as es t ablis h e d h e bec a m e it s fir s t j u d g e . a n office of which h e co nti nu e d t h e i ncumbe n t se v e r a l y e a r s unt i l a stroke of par a l ys i s m a d e it n eces s a r y fo r h im t o r es ign. Of hi s se r vice i n this capacit y t h e followi n g a ppr ec iativ e e s t i m a t e ha s b ee n g iv e n : "On thi s b e n c h Judge Haughto n di s p l a y ed g r e a t legal acume n a nd a thorough knowl edge o f human nature. His judg m ents w e r e firm but j u s t , a n d w e r e t e mpere d with that m e r c y w hi c h fo un d it s promptin gs in hi s kindly a nd ge n e r o u s h e a r t." F ro m the sam e source fro m w hi c h w e r drawn th e fo r egoing q u o t a ti o n s a r e tak e n the followin g

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36 HI TORY OF l"LORIDA a n d eq u ally ap pr ec i a t ive t a t e m e nt s : "Judge H a u ghto n lived a quie t and unobtrus ive but u se fu l life . H e was a m a n o f stro n g co n v i c ti o n s a nd h e h a d t h e coura e of hi s co n v i c ti o ns. A tal e nt e d lawyer , a jus t judge a nd an exempl a r y C hri stia n , hi s d ea th was a a d l oss t o th e comm nnit y in w hi c h h e lived." H e b o r e with c h a r acte risti c fortitud e and pati ent p o i s e th e ph ysica l infir miti es and th e s uff rin g of hi s lat e r year s, and in thi s p e r i o d th e s ub lim a t e d qualiti es o f t h e man fo und th e ir perfect exemplifi ca ti o n . O n th e 2 1st of D ecembe r , 1848 , wa s so l e mn ized th e m a rriage f J uclge H a u g ht o n a n d Miss Eli zabe th i\I osc l ey, e ld es t d a u ghte r of H on. vVil lia m D. l\[ ose l ey, F l o rida's first o-overno r a ft e r it s a dmi ss i o n t o s t a t e h oo d. the nu ptia l ce r e m o n y having occurre d at M ose l ey H a l l , th e fin e o l d h o m estea d of t h e bride's paren t s in J effe r so n County, thi s t a t e . After hi m arriage Judge H a u ghto n r eturne d t o North Carolin a , where h e continue d i n th e prac tic e o f hi s profess i o n until 1 852 , w h e n h e es t ab l i s h e d hi s p erma n ent r es iden ce in Flo ri da, as n o t e d in a prece din g paragr a ph . 0 f Gove rn o r M ose l ey a m e m o ri a l tribute i s e n t e r e d i n the s ketch follo win g . The g r a ciou s a n d c u ltur ed yo ung gent l e w oman w h o thus beca m e the wife of Judge Haughto n co n ti nu e d a hi s c h e ri s h e d and devoted co mpan ion and h elpmeet un til the close of hi s lif e, and s h e survived him a numbe r of years, sus t ained and co mforte d by t h e g raci o u s m c m o ri c of th e ir idea l co m p a ni o n s h ip, as well as by th e filial l o \ , e and so.lic i t ud e o f h e r c hilclr n a n d th e affectio nate regard o f a wid e c ir c l e of fri e nd s . Judge Haughton was survived by o n e clan ghte r , M r s . \V. 0. \ 'Voltz, a nd by five so ns: \>Villia m M. , i\I a lachi , A lex a nd e r M. , J ose ph H . a n d Matthew H. His name and m e m o r y r es t secure in th e annal s of Flo rid a hi s t o r y, w hi c h h e h o n o r e d a nd dig nifi e d by hi s c h a racter a n d h i s achie1 e111c nt. \ Vu.LIAM D . lVfosELEY. Co n spic u o u s a m o n g t h ose stron g a nd r esource fu l m e n wh o hav e h o n o r e d th e State o f Flo rid a by th ei 1 lives a n d se r v ices wa s th e late H o n . \Villiam D. M ose l ey, wh o h ad the distinc ti o n f being e l ec t e d the fir s t gov e rn o r of thi s co mm o n wealth aft e r it s adm iss i on to stateh ood. At fine o ld M ose l ey H a l l , t h e f a mil y h o m es t ea d in th e Stat e o f North Ca r o lina , William D . Mose l ey was bo rn and r ea r e d to m a nh ood , a nd i n th e Unive r s it y of North aro lin a, a t C h a p e l Hill, h e was graduate d as a m e mb e r of th e same c l ass as was James K . P o lk , wh o later b eca m e pres id e n t of the U nit e d S t a t es. H e beca m e a c iti ze n o f pro min e n ce a nd influ e n ce in hi s native s t a t e pri o r t o his r e mo1al to Flo rida , as ev id e nced b y hi s having se r ve d nin e yea r as a m e m be r o f th e S t a l e e n a t c of North Ca r o lin a . The r e a r e avai l able b u t limit ed da t a co n cerning t h e d e t ails of th e ca r ee r of Gove rn o 1 l\[ ose l ey, but t h e follo w ing r eco rd w ill measurabl y i ndi ca t e th e great se r vice whic h h e r e nd ered t o th e s t a t e of hi s adoptio n . The fir s t s t a t e e l ectio n in Florid a was h e l d o n th e 26th of l\fay, J 845, and t h e r es u l t o f the sa m e p l aced Willia m D. M ose l ey in th e execu ti v e c h a ir as fir s t gove rn o r of th e n e w commo n wea l th . As ma y we l l be unde r s t ood, hi s a dmini stratio n was marke d b y h eavy r es p o n s ibiliti es and mu c h w ork o f a co n struc t ive orde r . vVithin hi s regime mu c h pu b l i c l a nd in th e s tate w as so ld and th e r e e n s u e d a s t ea d y increase in tlt e popu l a ti o n of F l orida. Muc h int e r est was mani fested in th e pr ov idin g of a d equate e d u ca tion a l ;-idvantage , and in t h is i mp ortant work the Governor t oo k a l ea din g part . In hi s m es age t o th e Legi slature of th e new s tate h e urged the es tabli s hing of sc h oo l s a nd se m i n a r i es, es p ec i ally th e commo n sc h oo l s " th a t s h ould brin g in structio n to eve r y man's d oo 1 ." It was in th e fir s t yea r of hi s administration th a t the stat e cap it o l was co mpl eted, th e corne r s t o n e o f th e a m c h avi n g b ee n l a i d , und e r th e terri t orial go v ernment, t w enty yea r s prev i o u s l y . The Gover n o r al so t oo k prompt action in co nnection with India n affairs in th e s t ate, and i n thi s co nn ec t ion th e f llo win g qu o t a ti o n s a r e w orthy o f pe r pet u a tio n : "Ther e w e r e n o w seve r a l hund1 ed India n s in th e state, 1 5 0 o f wh o m co ul d b ea r arms. Tho u g h so f e w i n numbe r s . it was r c m e m l e r e d th a t in th e S min o l c war a g r ea t h arm had been clone by s m all bands o f Indian s wh e n our fo r ce w e r e in th e fiel d . C i t i ze ns, es p ec iall y th ose n ea r the Indian r ese r va ti o n , did not fee l that life o r prop erty were safe, fo r t h e India n s d i d n o t co nfin e th e m se l ves t o th eir p r esc rib e d limits but would make excurs i o n s int o n e i g hboring co un t i es . som e tim es a s fa r as roo mil es. One of t h ese out br ea k occurred in r 8-19 a n d was promptly s u p pr esse d by th e acti o n of th e Gove rn o r in se ndin g s tate troo p s t o q u ell th e outbrea k. " The d e p a rtme nt of ge n e r a l hi s t o r y i n thi s p u b-1 icati o n g ivPs f 11 r t h e r inf ormatio11 co n cerning Go,e rn o r M ose l ey a n d h is effec tive administrat i o n , a nd that h e wa s " n o t w ith o u t h o n o r in hi s o w n count r y " found notew rthy evi d e n ce i n the yea r 1 9 0 8, wh e n hi s native s t a t e of orth Caro lin a, t hrough it s Leg i s lature, a pp o i nted a co m mittee t o th e r e c reate a new county fro m t erritory drawn from G r ee n e , L e n o ir and \Vaync co unti es, a n d to give t o the n e w county th e name o [ M ose l ey, a s a tribute t o t h i s distin g ui s h e d na tiv e son. The d ea th of Gove rn o r l\fo sc l ey occurre d a t P a l atka, F l o rid a, i n 1862, at th e h o m e o f hi s d a u g h t e r Elizabet h , wife of th e la t e Judge T . S . H a u ghton. t o w h o m a m e m o ir i s d e d icated 111 th e prcce dinos k e tch of thi vol um e . :\fAJ. GEORGE R A lKSFORD FArnTIA 'KS. In a n age that i s decide dl y comme r c i a l , it i s 1 efres hin g t o r eco rd the names of a fe w wh o e li ve w e r e s p ent in sc h o l a rl y purs uits, a n d w h ose p l easures ce nt e r e d in d ee p and productive studies. Such m e n in dyi n g l eave b e hind th e m wo r k whic h will stimula t e o th e r s to follo w in t h e ir foo t s t e p s and emulate th e ir example. The r e arc few wh o have e ith e r th e inc linatio n o r abilit y t o devot e them selves , t h eir t a l ents and th e ir yea r s t o th e writing o f hi s t o ry , but Flo rid a c l a im o n e who m easure d up t o th e hi g hest s t a nd a 1 cls of l i t e r a r y produc ti o n a n d hi s t o ri c acc ur acy, and u se i n her pub l i c sc h oo l s hi s histor y of t h s t a t e a n d of t h e Antiquities o f aint Augustin e a s t andard boo k s o f refer e nce. This h o n o r ed hi s t orian and n o b l e gen t l e m a n o f th e o ld sc h oo l of the South, M a j. Geo r ge R ainsfor d Fairbanks, h as passed t o his l as t r eward, having writte n finis o n the page o f hi s life hi s t o r y many years ago, 1 ut hi s b oo k s l ive aft e r him , a n d hi s d esce ndants, a m o n g w h o m o n e o f n o t e i s hi s g r a nd so n , Dr. H o race Rains iord Dre w of Jac k so n v ill e , carry out in th e ir l ive s th e l esso n s t a u ght by hi s fine c haracte r and pra i se w orthy w o rk. Majo r F a ir banks was born at vVat erto wn , I e w Yor k, July 5, 18 20, and h e was educat e d in hi s n ative state, securing hi s degr ees o f Bach e l o r o f A r ts and Mas t e r of Arts at U ni o n ollcge, Sch e n ectady . Followin g the

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HI TORY O F f<'I O RIDJ\ 37 co mpl e ti o n o f hi s l i t e r a r y tra inin g h e r ead law a n d was a d m i tt e d t o th b a r i n 1 8 4 2 . S oo n aft e r s curi n g hi s a d m i ss i o n t o the legal pro f ess i o n \Iaj o r F a i r b a n k s m ov e d t o Saint Aug u s tine, Flo rid a , a n d r e c e i v e d the a p p oint m ent of c l e r k o f th e Unite d S t a l es Distri c t ourt, a n d he ld t h a t office until 1 8 4 6 , w h e n h e r e tire d f r o m it a nd t oo k u p t h e p r a c t i ce o f t h e law, r e m a ining i n i t u ntil 1 859 . In t h e latte r y e a r h e m o ve d t o T alla hasse e and s p ent a year i n t h e s t at e c a p i t ol. k:a1ing i t t o accep t the offe r o f a trus t e es h ip o f th 1 1i1 e r s it y o f t h e uth a l Scwa n ce, T e n n essee. Scar ce l y h a d h e b eco m e se t tl e d i n w h a t was 1 e ry co ngen ial w ork w h e n the w a r c l o u d burs t , i111 o l vi1w the N orth a nd th e Sou t h in wa r . and h e . a l t l10\ 1 g h o f Northern birth, h a d live d loo l o n g i n t h e outh t o i g n r e it s c l a im s, s h e e n lis t e d i n t h e .'\rrny o f t h e onfecle r a cy, se r v i n g in i t w i t h t h e r a n k o f a m a j o r o f the qu a r t erma s t e r d epar t m e n t. \ Vit11 t h e defe a t o f t h e c a use h e h e l d so c lose t o hi s h e art M a j o r F airba n k s bega n l o d e v o t e m o r e o f hi s a tt e nti o n t o hi s hi s t o r i ca l r esea r c h es, a nd r eturne d l o t h e Uni1 e r s il y of t h e Sou t h , w hi c h h e se r ve d a s t r c a surc 1 u n ti l 1 R o. w h e n h r es i g n e d a nd m o v e d l o F erna ndina , b u t h e co nti n u e d l o m aintain a summe r h o m e a l Sew a n ec , a n d t h e r e h e d i e d i n r 906 , aged eighty-s i x ye a r s . H e was a m e m b e r f t h e U p per 11 o u sc o f t h e Stal e A ssc m b l y o f Flo r i d a dur i ng 1 4 6 a n d r 8 4 7 , was a pre s id e nti a l e l e c t o r in 18-18. a nd in 1 857 s e r v e d a s mayor o f S aint A u g u s tin e . All h i s lif e . \ lajo r F ai r ba n k s was a c l o se ;;t u d c n l o f t h e mast erpie ces o f E n glis h , a nd h i s co n v e rsat i o n a n d writ i n g s w e r e ti nged wit h l o f t y t h o u g h t s o f a s piritua l t o ne. His c h a r a c t e r was broad a n d s w ee t . a nd hi s innuc n ce fo r good upo n t h e yo un g was m arke dl y s t r n g a n d a l ways direc t e d upwa rd. 01.c;\l BU. DRE W , R . In e v e r y community, 11 h cthc r g r e a t o r s m a ll. t h e r e arc t o b e found famili es whose m e m b e r s ha1 e h a d a d e t ermi nin g inn u c ncc upon i t s hi s t o ry. a nd whose w h o leh e a r t e d and p u bl i c -s pirite d efforts have b r o u ght a bo u t th e c h anges w h i c h have r e sulte d in t h e d c 1 e l o p m e n t o f th e pla ce . P erha p s n o n a m e i s as,oci a l ecl with 111o r c co n struct:i 1 c w o r k t h a n tha t o f D rew. a nd a m o n g those b e a rin g i t was C ol11m b\1S D r w. who fo u nd e d t h f a m i l y a l J ac k so n 1 ill e in 1 8 4 8 . Co lumbu s D r e w was b orn o f E n glis h pare n t s, nati1 -es o f Cornwall, E n g l a n d , w h o es t abli s h e d the m scl1• es in the U nit e d S t a t s during the e a rl y p art 0f th e l a s t c entury. o lu 1 n l rn Dre w s p ent hi s boyh oo d a n d ea r l y m a nhood a t Vlas h i n g t o n C it y , a nd quite ea r l y i n hi s ca r ee r b ec a m e proo f n•ad c r o n th e Nati o n a l Tntc lligen ce r , o n e o f the m os t f a m o u s j ourna l s o f i t s times , o w n e d a nd e di t e d b y C a l es a n d c a l o n . Jvs sesse d a natur e t h a t was gentl e , affabl e a n d u naffe c t e d. a nd h e 1 a s l o 1ed b y all w h o h a d t h e h o n o r of hi s a c q u a inta n ce. A n i n c e ssant r e a d e r , h e k ept h im sc l f abre as t o f th e b e s t t h o u ght of hi s t i m e s , and was h i msel f a c o n t ri buto r f n o l e t o magaz in es, a n d a n a r l c r it i c o f a h i g h o rder . H e wa s a p oe t w hose Ycrse s howed genius , hi s p r o d u c ti o n s w e n t th e r ounds o f the A m e ri ca n P r e ss. O n e w hich i s k n o wn a l l o ve r the South wa w ritte n a f t e r th b l oc k a d e o f Sou t h ern p o r t s 11as effec t e d , w h e n t h e C o n f e d eracy was u n able t o b n y c l oth t o c l o t h th e s o ldi e rs, a nd was w it h out fa c t o ri es, o r spin d l es t o s pin, o r l oo m s t o weav e i t, a nd th e s p i nn i n g wheel s o f anothe r gen e r a ti o n w e r e broug h t out o f the attic s and u s e d . T h e fir s t v e r se o f th i s rhy t h m i c , s win g i n g p oe m i s a s fo l l o ws: " O u t o f t h e garre t , o u t o f the barn Summo n e d a m I t o m y duly ; Lo n g se t a s i d e with m y lu s t e rl ess yarn, H o bb e d f m y fab ri c o f b eaut y.

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38 HISTOR Y OF FLORID A l'm S \lmm o ned l o co m e with a whir a nd a hum, With a vo i ce lik e the flyin g of c haff Fro m so m e mighty ma c hin e that th e grain m ay b e c l ea n , -'Ti s bu t m e a nd my mighty di s taff . " Co lumbu s Drew continlled t o be a l iving fo r ce at Jackso n v ille until hi s demi se in 1891, and with liis pa ssing fro m th e sce ne s of hi s former activ iti es, a trul y good man we nt to h i s Maker, a nd F l o ri da lost o n e of its mos t wo r thy a n d u seful citize n s . H O RACE H A TKSFORD DREW, M . D . Co nn ec ted w ith th e m e di cal profess ion of hi s n a tive city, Dr. Horace l
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lJJ TOR'i' OP FLORIDA 39 any way associated , and he is a worth y so n of a disli11guished fa th er. P. CARTEH, l\I. D. The biograph e r i11 writi n g o [ men whose na m es stand hi g h in t h e records of the medical prnfession , naturally i s allracted toward those who through haracte r and achievement ha1 e o u td i s tanced their associ ates, and borne their part in the upb11ildi ng a n d dc Yelop ment of their h o m e c it y . Viewed acco r d i n g to this standard Dr. Edward F . arler, of Tamp a, is worthy o[ much more than pa sing mention . [d e ntili ed with the m e di ca l profe sio n s inc e 1 907, he made a name for him self elsewhe r e in Fl o rid a, prior to his settlement in Ta111pa in 192 , a nd since then has justified his reputati n f r profess i o n al ability of a hi g h order and for the individualit y of a personal character. Doctor arter was born al llanla, Georgia , D ece111ber IT, 1884, a son of Benja111in F. and Hattie B. (Turner ) Carter, both native of Ohio. B e n ja111in F. Carter was a rai l r oa d 111a11, a nd was r egar ded as one of the mosl trus l ecl e m ploye of hi s road . He and his wife had s i x c hild re n o{ whom Doct?r Carter is the e ld est. T h e p re limin a r y tra1 n111g of Doctor Carte r was acquired in the high sc h oo l s of hi s native city, and his professional ed ucati on i n the Medical ollege of Atlanta, now Emory U niv e r . it y, from which he wa g1acluated in 1907, with the degree of Doctor of Medicine . Subsequentl y D ctor Carter look up post-graduate w ork in ad vane cl 111edicine a nd surgery, at the New York Pol yc lini c in th e winter of l9IO-I9II, and again in r912 . Immediately after his graduation he es tablished hi111self in a general practi ce at Mulberry, Pol k ounty, Fl r_ida. Not o nl y did he ri se rapid l y in hi s probut h e also look a very ac tiv e p art in poltt1cs, and served as mayo r of Mulberry for tw o . On January r , 19:?0. h e ca111e to Tampa a nd s111ce then has bee n s pe cia lizin?" o n di seases of children, in which branch he is s u ccess ful, and prepared for it by courses at e w Orleans undc1 Docto r Bloom. A lir111 belie v r in t h e efficacy of co n certed act ion o n the part of the medical men, h e has lo n g been a m e111ber of t h e different medical organ i zatio n s . and is n ow a m e mber of the Hillsborough County Medical Society the F l orida State Medical Society and the A m e r ican Medical Associati on . H e i s a Knight Templar and Shrin er, belo ngs to the Ben evo l e nt a nd Protective Order of Elk , the Knight of Pythias . the Independent Order of Odd Fellows . a nd th e Modern \ Voodme n of A111e rica, a nd i s d ese rvedly popular in all of these fraterni ties. In 190 Doctor Carter was u nit ed in marriage with Miss Clara Lee \ Vebb, a daughte r o f P . P. \ Vebb, of Atlanta, Georgia. Docto r a nd l\frs. Carter have fou1 childre n , namely: E l i zabeth . atherine, Edward and Sarah F1ances. T h e Ca r ter arc Baptist in their religious bel ief a nd pr o fessio n , and belong to that deno111in ation. Known ove r a wide territory, Doctor arter i recognized as a man of earnest purpose a u d d ee p sin erity . He has always maintained a hi g h t andard of profession al ethi c , and n o man of Ta111pa h as in l a rger measure the es t ee m of h is fellows, no r exerts a stron ge r i nflu ence fo r securing the advan cement of good citize n hip or ecuring a m o r a l up lift. Tatura lly he is interest ed in th ose measures whi c h pertain to modern progre s and 111ateri a l improvem ents, and his influence i s exerted t o secur e them. His charities a 1 e many and generous, although the majority never come to light, for he regards his kill and training as a trust lo be used fo r the betterm ent a nd relief of humanity regardless of remuneration. J oJtN P. B1: KWITll is o n e of lite wide!) k11ow11 railroad m e n o[ t h e South east, with a r ecord of m o r e th an forty year s of se r vice in capaci t ies ranffing [rom clerk in a way st ati o n lo rifficer i n so m e of th most i mportant tra n spor t a tio n sys t e m c r ving lhc S t ale of Florida. Beckwith, whose h o m e has b ee n i n Jackso11 1 ille fo r a number of yea rs, was born al l. l y m o u t h , North Carolin a, J une 2 4 , 1858, a son of Tho ma s a nd Lina (Phe lps) Beckwith. 11 i s pa r e nt s we r e also born at Plymouth, where his father practice d law until t h e 011lbreak of the C ivil war, whcu h e joined the Confederate army a nd lo s t hi s life in battle when o nl y thirty years o [ age. His widow sunived hi111 t o the age of sc.:, enty. Of t he ir lwo ch ildr e n J o hn P. is the only urvivor. J o hn P. Beckwith , owing t o the ea rl y death of h i s father, had to achi eve hi s ow n opportunit ies a nd make hi s ca r ee r un aided. H e r ece ived mosl o( hi s sc h oo l e du catio n at Smit hfie ld , North arolina, a11cl at th e age of fourtee n h e we n t l o wo rk. H e was e mp l oyed at different jobs until 1 867, earning a livin g a n d accu mul ati n g so me experi e n ce valuable t o him later. Then, in 1867, he went lo work with the o r th Carolina Railway at Durham, North Carolin a, as clerk a nd ticket agen t. In 188o h e joined th e Cinc inn a ti South e rn Rai l way as rate clerk in the offices of Ci n c inn ati. His int rod u c ti o n to the railroad and transportat i o n se r v i ce of F l o rida began Septc111ber 15 . . 188;>, w h e n h e ca m e l o J ac k sonville a s slate and freight a gent for t h e Ci n cinnati Southern. ln 188.:; h e was m a d e gen eral agent for the \ V eslcrn Atla nti c R a ilw ay a nd th e Central Rai lw ay o[ Geo r gia a l .lackso n villc. a nd i n 1890 was made a gene ral freight agent for the Jackso n ville Tampa a n d Key \ Vest H . a i l way in Jac k so n ville . In 1895 1lr. l ec k wi th removed t o New York C it y . where for abo u t a yea r he wa s gene r al fre i ght and passenger agent for the Ocean Steamshi p Linc. eptembc r 13, 1 896. h e returned l o Flo ri da as freight tranic manager fo r th e Florida East Coast lfailway Co m pa n y . J a nuary T, 1 909, h e was e l ected fou r th Y ice p r es id ent o f this r ai lr oad . a nd since J a nuary 1. r 910, has bee n vice pr esident in charge of o pera tio n and traffi c . Mr. Beckwith i s a d emoc r a t in po lit ics and a m e111be r of th e Episcop a l Church . O n September 25, r883. h e m a rri e d Sa di e Nagl e Boy e r, who wa s bo rn i n R e ad i ng. P nn sy l vania . They h al'e lw o c h ildr en. Tho ma s L .. w h o m a rri ed H e l e n J(enworthy; a nd Floren ce l\I a rie. wife of \ Villiam G. Lockwood. a nd m othe r of a daughter, F l orence B eckw ith Lockw ood. ] OHJ\" \V. D BosE, county judge of Duval County and o n e o f th e r ep r esen tative m e mb r s of the ba 1 of the City o f J acksonville, was born at \\'illi a111sburg, South Carolina, on lhe rith of October, 1882, a nd i s a sc i o n of o n e of the old a nd h o n o r ed fa mili es of that hi t o ri c so uthern co111monwea lth . H e i s the e ld es t of the five childre n of Edgar . and Ellen (Johnso n ) DuBose, w h o are n ow r eside n ts of J ac k so nville, where they es tablis h ed th ei1 h o m e i n I 84 and where the father wa e ngaged in the retail grocery busi n ess until r9r7 . s ince w h ic h year he has lived virtually retired. He is a d emocrat i n po liti cal al legi a n ce, a nd both he and his wife are me111be 1 s of the M e th od i s t Epi copal Chmch, _ oulh. John \V. DuBose was two years of acre at the

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40 JJ L TORY time of th e fa111ily r c111ova l fro m South Ca r o lin a l o Jack so n ville, Flo rid a, a n d i n lit ' publi c sc h oo l s of thi s c it y h e gai n e d h is early e du ca ti o n , whi c h wa effec tivel y s u pple m e n ted h y his d e t ermine d a nd ass idu o u s s tud y in a p rivat e way . His a mbi tio n l o e n t e r th e lega l pro f ess i o n was s h ow n in hi s c l ose a ppli cati o n t o th e s tud y of l a w at eve r y p oss i b l e h our, 'both d ay and ni g ht. a nd hi s excellent power of a bso rpti o n a nd ass imil a ti o n e n able d him t o m a k e s ub s t a nti a l pr g r ess i n hi s s tudies, with t h e r e ult tha t in Octobe r , 1 9 1 8, h e p asse d a most c r e dit able examin atio n and was admitte d t o th e Florida ba r. T h e r ca f te r h e w as e n gage d in th e ge n e r a l pr ac ti ce o[ hi s p ro f ess i o n a t Jac k so nvil le until Nov e mb e r 6, i 920, w h e n h e w a s e l ec t e d co unt y judge of D u va l Co unty. a n office in whi c h hi s a dm i ni stratio n i s f ull y jus tify i n g th e c o n s i s t e n cy of th e p o pul a r Y O l e th a t mad e him th e incumbe nt. Judge DuBose i s a n acti, e member o f the J a k so nvill. e B a r ssoc iati o n , th e Duv al County Bar As oci.-itio n , th e Fl o rid a State B a r A s oc iation a nd th e Ame ri can B a i A ssoc i a ti on. H e i s affili a t e d in hi.s h o m e c it y with Ioni a L odge N o . IOI, Free and A cce pt ed M aso ns. H e ga v e m os t effec tiv e and l oy al se n-ice as p r es id ent o f th e c ity co un c il o f J ac k so n ville . and r e tain e d f o r five years th e office of jus t ice of th e p e a ce. In th e vVorld war p e ri o d J ud gc Du Bose w a s sec r etary of th e Duva 1 County Draft B oard, a nd w as otherwise ac ti ve in th e furt h e r a n ce o f l oca l patri otic s ervi ce . H e i s a stalwart in th e camp o f the democratic party, i s a membe r o f the Y o un g M e n ' s Chris tian Assoc i atio n , h e and hi s wife h o ld m embers hip in th e M e th o di s t Episco p a l Churc h , S o uth , a nd hi s fra t e rnal affil iati o n s furthe r inc lud e m e mber s hip in th e P a trioti c Orde r o f So n s of A m e ri ca , the L o yal Orde r o f M oose . th e Inde p e nd e n t Orde r o f Odd F ello w s . th e B e n e v o l ent and Protec tive Orde r of Elks and th e Knights o f Pythias , t o g e th e r w ith it s adjunc t o r g ani za ti o n , th e Drama ti c Orde r o f Knights o f I h orassa n . The judge i s m arrie d a nd h as t wo childre n . ANFoRn STONE r o N . M . D. , i s h ead o f th e Si sso n C linic, Incorporate d , a t Jac k so nville. This i s a n o rganizati o n for the prac tic e of group m e di cine, b eing an assoc i a ti o n o f phy s i c ian s and d e n ti s t s r eprese ntin g vari o u s d epartme nt of m e di c in e, d e nti stry, surger y a nd th e s p ec ia lti es, practi cing t ogether a s a g r o up. The ba s i s of a n treatme nt i s a th o rou g h dia g n os is, and th e treatments that f o llow r e pr esent th e co mbined and individual skil l o f th e men co mpri s ing th e c l inic, man y o f th e m s p e c i ali s t s in their fie l ds. The fac i l iti es inc lud e eve r y thin g fo r t h e applica ti o n o f ge n e r a l m edicine a nd urge ry, a nd a l so s u c h s p ec i a l d e p artments as X-r ay, r a dium , and e l ectro-thera p y . D octor S i sso n w as b o rn o n h is fa th e r 's farm n ear Mayfie ld in G ra ves ounty, I e ntu c ky, Nov ember 2 r. 1877 , and i a so n o f O sca r M. and Mattie (Hobso n ) S i sso n , w h o were a l so nativ es o f G r aves County. His fathe r w as b o rn in 184 8 and di e d in 191 0 , and hi m o th e r w as b o rn i n 1858. D oc t o r S i sso n w as th e seco nd o f nin e c hil dren, five so n s a nd four d a u ghte rs, se v e n of w h o m a r e livin g . O scar S i sso n w as a fa rm e r a nd to bac co growe r , o n e o f th e ver y s ub s tan t i a l c iti ze n s o f Graves Co unty, w as a pe r so n a l frie nd o f t h e lat e Henry v\Ta tt e r son. was a cti ve in th e Ma so ni c Orde r a nd Inde p e nd ent Orde r o f O dd F ello w . . was a d e m oc r a t and a m e m be r of th e Chris ti a n Chmc h. D oc t o r Si sso n ac qn i r e d a g-rammar and hig-h sch oo l e du ca ti o n in Kentu c ky, a nd a t th e ag-e of F FLORTDA e i ghtee n b eg:111 leac hing-. T h ro u g h teac hin g h e paid th e exp e n ses o[ !tis 1nccli ca l e du catio n . l •o r sc , c ral years h e atle n c kcl tlt e Uni, c r s it y of l. ouis , ille sc n::n m o nllt s a nd l a n ghl th e r est of th e yea r . H e wa s o nly se v e n yea r s of a ge wltln h e d e t ermine d lo becoinc a phy s i c ian , a n d o[ that a m biti o n h e n e v e r lost s i ght. H g r aduated in m cli cine in r 9 02, and firs t l oca t e d in th e s m all T o wn of C ub a, K e n tu c ky, wh e r e h e r mainecl a b out se , e n years . \Vhil e t h e r e h e m a rri e d Miss u c Coulte r. The ir h n e ym oo n was a lri p t o E u ro p e . In L nd o n D oc t o r S i sso n atl nd ed t h e R oya l Opht h a l mic H os pital , fr o m whi c h h e r ecc i, ecl hi s dipl o m a '\Tove mb c r 14. 1 9 10. H e did furthe r w ork i n t h e P a t eur In stitute a t P a ris, a n d wa g r aduate d fr o m M oo r efie ld ' H os pit a l of L o nd o n o n J anuary 2, 1 9 1r. On r eturning fro m ab r oa d D oc t o r i s so n l oca t e d a t J a c k so n ville, a nd hi s s u ccess ful prac ti ce a nd !ti s a ssoc i a ti o n with o th e r phys i c i a n s brou ght ab o n t lit e o rganiz ati o n o f t h e S i sso n Clini c . Since A u g u s t 2 7 , 1 913, D oc tor S i sso n h as bee n U nit e d S t a t es p e n s i o n examin e r at J ac k so n vill . and since 1 917 h e h as bee n ph ys i c ian a nd surg o n t o th e Old Co n fed e r a t e Soldi e r s a n d ailo r s L-'[o m e . H e i s a m e mb e r o f Russell L o d ge 1 0 . 1 2 1 . F. a nd A. M. , th e Tnde p e nd ent Orel r of Odd F ello w s . B e n evo l ent a n d Pro t ec tiv e Orde r of E lk s , i s a m e mb e r o f th e I a pti st Churc h a nd in p o l iti cs i s a d e m oc r a t . J A MES E . BATES, t h o u g h b o rn in outh arolin a, has liv e d pr ac tically all hi s life i n Flo rid a a nd h as h a d m a n y interes t s t o m a k e him o n e of t h e pr o min ent m e n of th e state. J-[is h o m e fo r ove r thirty y ears has b e en in T a mp a, whe r e h e was a bui l din g contrac t o r and i s n o w sec r e t a ry, treasure r a nd m a n a ge r o f th e Bates -HudnallJ etto n Co m p a n y, lumbe r and mill w ork m a nu facturc r . Mr. Bates w as b orn a t Kingstree, \Villiam sburg County, South C arolin a, D ece mber 3 1 , i863, a so n of Baz z e l and L aura (Brow n ) B a t es. Hi p a r ents w e r e al s n a tiv es of S o u t h Ca rolin a a nd 0 f pr o min e n t o l d famili es of that state . Bazze l B a t es and wife have liv e d in Flo rid a befor e th e w a r , a nd three yea r s after th e b irth o f th e ir so n James E., they r eturne d to the s t a t e in i 866 a nd l oca t e d a t Hawtho rn e in Alac hu a County . O f t h e ir nin e c hi ldre n se v e n r eac h e d m ature years a nd all w e r e b o rn in Flo rid a except James E . , w h o was th e third c hild. James E. B a t es acq u i r ed a pub l i c sc h oo l e ducati o n a nd liv e d at h o m e until h e wa s tw entytw o . In 1890 he r e m ove d t o T a mp a and e ngaged i n J)lls i n es as a bui l din g contrac t o r a nd did muc h of t h e co n struc ti o n w ork o f th e c it y during th e n ex t fi [t ee n y ears. The Bates-HudnallJ etto n Company was organi z e d in 1916 , a nd h e was fo r a time it s pres id ent, but s ub se qu e nlly l o k up hi s duties a secretary, treasure r a nd manag r. T hi s i s o n e of th e imp ortant indu s tri es of T a mpa , manufacturing l a r ge qu a n t iti es of lumbe r and bui l din g ma t e ri al. B es id es th e office fo r ce about forty per so n s a r e e mpl oye d in th e mill s a nd s h ops. :Mr. B a t es m a rri e d i n 1 888 Ella J . J ordan. h e di e d Marc h l, r92r , th e moth e r of five childre n , three o f w h o m a r e living : Mild r e d , w i fe of J . J . Mill e r of Tampa ; Lilly, wife of J. A . Googe of T a mpa; a n d E dn a, w ife f \V. . Callas of Tamp a. On 1\Iar c h 25, i 922, Mr. Bat es marrie d l ice B ell o f L ouisville, Ken t u c k y. Fra t ernally 1\[r . Bates i s a ffilia te d with T a mp a Lodge No. 708, R e n e v o l e nt a nd P ro t ect ive O rd e r of E lks.

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11 LSTOIZ \ ' Ro1:rn T H . Axoimsox a s umcd o n th e first of Oct ober, 1921, th e duti es o f the oni e of general so lic it o r o ( the Flagl e 1 s y s te m , w h i c h represents so m e of the most imp o rtant r ailroad, industri al a n d general ca pital i>li c intcn:sls of th e S t a t e of Flor ida , a n d h i s ach-anc c m cnl l o this i m p orta n t p os t \\"as made by the trus tcts o [ t h e Flagl e r es ta t e, up o n the recomme n da t i o n o f coll 1 L Loftin , general co un se l for lhe system and the s ubject o i i n divid u a l r ecord o n oth e r p;igc s of thi s p u b l i c;ition. From a newspape r a rtic l e 111aki n ;: announ cement of hi advancement l o this p o s t arc taken the follo\\"in g quotatio ns: "Th e news o f :Mr. A n d e r s n's promotio n in the kga l d e pa rtment of th e Flag l e r syst e m will h e r ccc i,ed with pica . ure b y hi s many frien d s throughout th e state . The new gen e ra l so licitor i s a yo un g l a wy e r who ha s made a b r illiant r eco r d s in ce hi admission t o the bar in 1 9 13. and h i s ad,anccmen t co m es as a recogn iti o n f hi s ;ibil i ty a n d h i s ac h i e v ement in hi s p rofc s i o n . Mr. , \ndcrso n i s a native Fl o r i dian , having been b orn at P e n sacola. ugus t 12, i 890. Jlc was educated i n t h e public schoo l s of E scambia ounty ;rnd in Stetson Uni,• ersity at l eLan d . i P ndin g most of hi s time in th e Sc h oo l of the Univer s i t y of V i e nn a, A u stria. D octo r M o r ri s l oca l e d fo r pract ice a t Jacksonville i n 1 898 . a n d h as gi,• c n hi s atte n tion t o general m e di cine w ith out s p ec ial i z ing i n a ny particular lin e . H e i s a m ember o f th e Duva l Co u n t y , F lorida . 'tatc a n d m e ri ca n 1 [ c di ca l s soc iati o n s . He b e l o ngs lo Temple Lodge No. 22, F. and A. 1L, the Uni, c r s it y C lub a nd in polit i cs is a d e mocrat. r n Sept ember . 1 893. h e 111arricd f.[ary :NL Youn g, a nati, e o f New Orlea n s . They have o n e so n , Ken n eth A lcxand e r. w h o graduated fro m P r in ce t o n College i n r9 18. a n d i s now in hi s third year ( 1 923) as a m e dical stude nt in Tulan e U n i,•er s ity a t New Orlea ns. HAl
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1 2 p o r t a nt. w h o l e s al e co11ccrn s of J ac k s nvil lc , ha bce11 acti ve l y a nd pro m i n e11tl y id e n tified with bus i n ess affairs in thi s c ity fo r the p a s t th i rty-f1"e yea r s . .He w a s born a t Pittsbo r o, North Car Jina, D ece m be r 4, i8;=;2, a n d i s a so n of J ohn Jack so11 a nd J o a n n a E l i zab eth (Lutter I o h ) Roger s, bo th l ikewise 11atives o f Nor t h Car J i n a, w h e r e t h e rcs pecti"e fa m i l i es w e r e fou nd e d i n a n earl y day. J ohn J. Roger s ow11ed a n d oper a ted o ne o f t h e excellent p l a11ta ti o n s i n hi s n a tive s t a t e at th e t i m e w h e n t h e ivil war b egan, but h e p r o mptl y subordi nated all p e r so n al i nterests and e11lc r ed t h e se r vice of the Co n fe d e rate t alcs. I f c c11l istc d i11 a ca , alry regim e11t. a n d w i t h th e sa m e ente r ed i11t o acti , e se r v ice i n Vir gi11ia. H c t oo k p a r t in man y e ngagem e n ts. a11d whi l e w i t h h i s co m ma nd in front of Pet e r s burg, in 1 864. h e wa s captured by t h e e n e m y a n d was taken t o t h e F e d e r a l p rison at Poi11t L oo k o u t, w h e r e hi s death occurre d p r i o r to th e c lose o f th e wa r , h e ha,ing bee n detailed a s a caval r y scout a11d ha\'ing m a d e a r ecord of galla11t se r vice. C h a r le s Lutte r l o h , m a t erna l g r a ndfath e r of the s ubject o f thi s r e \'i c w. was a n officer i n t h e \Var of 1812. C h a r l es B . Roger s w a s the fir s tb o rn a n d o nl y so n i n a f a m i l y of four c h il d r e n . H i s thre s i ster s a r e s t ill l iv i ng. H e gai n e d h i s youth fu l educati o n i11 t h e sc h o l s of hi s n a ti ve t o w n a n d i n a sc i e n t ific acad m y. At the age o f seventeen year s. in 1 869 , h e cam e to Flo rida and took a c l e ri ca l p os i t i o n a t Ced a r K eys . in t h e e m ploy of t h e Flo r i d a R a i l road . H is s a l a r y was $2.i a m o nth, and after a se r v i c e of a b o u t eigh t m o n th s he e ngaged i n the gen eral m e r c h a n di s e b u siness at Ced a r l ( eys. About 011e yea r l a t e r h e t h e r e establ i shed h im se l f i11 t h e w h o lesa l e g r oce r _ v b u siness. a nd i n 1 . 886 h e cam e to Jack so n v ill e a11d estab l i s h e d th e w h o l e sal e g r oce r y h o use of t h e C. B . Roger s Company. K c devel o p e d a s u b s ta11tia l a n d pros perou s busin ess . a n d i n 1 899 h e b ec a m e also o n e o f t h e o r gan i ze r s of t h e F l o r id a l\aval Stor es & Commiss i o n Compa n y , o ( w h ic h h e was p r es i d e nt. In 1 902 h e effected a co m bina ti o n o f hi s o wn a n d o t h e r s imil a r i n t e r es t s by o rganizing the Co n so l id a t e d Grocer y Co mpany, o( w hi ch h e has s i nc e co 11tinu c d th e pres id e n t. and h i s abl e a n d progr cs s i , e executi ve p o l i c i es have inu r e d g r e a tl y t o t he upbu i l ding of th e l a rge a n d prospe r o u s b u si11es, o f t hi s r epresentati ve w h @ l csa l e h o use o f t h e F l o rid a m etro p olis. H e i s a d ir ec t o r o f the F l orida )Jati o n a l B a n k , i s o n e of t h e i11A u en ti al and hono r e d m embe r s of t h e Jackson vill e hambc r of Comme r ce, o f w h i c h h e was o n e o f t h e o r g a nizer s. a nd h e i s a m e m b e r a l so of the l oca l boa r d of t r a de. 1Ir . . Roger s i s a l oya l s u pp orte r of t h e pri n c i p l es o f t h e d e mocr a ti c party. i s a me m b e r of t h e Sem i n o l e C l ub , the F l orida Countr y Clu b a n d t h e F l o r i d a Yac h t Club, a n d he sen e d t w o t erms as exalt e d rule1 of Jac k so n v iii L o d ge. Benevol e n t a n d E rotect iv e Orde r of E l k s . H e a n d hi s wife a r c e arnes t co m m u nic a n t s o f th e P r o t es t a n t E p i sco pa l C h u r ch. ).lr. Roger s has fo u n d time a n d o pp ortunity t o exer c i se i nAue n ce i n con necti o n w ith ci,ic affairs of loca l orde r a nd lo tak e pa r t i11 th e co uncil s of h i s p o l i ti ca l p a r ty. In 18g8 h e wa s elec t e d t o the S t a t e Senate, w h e r e h e mad e a c h a r a teristic r eco r d o f loyal se n i ce i n t h e prom o ti o n o f wi:,c a nd construc ti v e l e g i s lation, h e having refu se d t o beco m e a c a ndida t e fo r r eelcc tio11 a t t h e expira tio n o f hi s term. . H e has served a a m embe r of t h e boar d o f e l ec t i o n co m m i ss i o n e r s of Duva l ounly, a n d i n I91 7 h e was elec t e d a m embe r of t h e c i t y co u n cil, a n office of " h i c h h e co n t inued t h e incumben t fou r yea r s. 11 the fir s t of June, 187_;. w a ' solen111izcd th e m a r riage of Mr. Jfoger s and J\1 i ss l\l a r y ! \ . Coachma n , wh o was born and r ea r e d i n t h e State o f Sou t h Carolin a. Of thi s u n i o n have be e n born e i ght c hildre n : l\l a r y F . i s t h e wife of R. F. r..J it c h e l l , of P e nsacola , tli i:, s t a t e, a n d t hey have thr ee childre n : Fra n ces. h a d es B. and l\lary B. C h a r l es 13 .. J r., r es i d es at R i chmo11d . [ndian a, and ha s one so n . h a r lcs I L 111. a r o line is th e wife o f J . D . 13 wer, of New Y ork C it y . a nd they have fi, e c hi ldre n . Edgar H., of J a c k so nv ille . married l"'l o r e nce His h ce. and th e ) ha1 c five childre n . Frank r es ide s at Jackso111• i llt:. th e m a id e n name of hi s wife lta , i n g b ee n Flo r e nc e S t oc k t on . Joa1111a E. r emai n s at the pare n tal h o m e. Alon zo ., of Jack s on vii It:. married l\ J i ss n n a Budd. \\'in ifred is the w i f e of J ohn L. H o lm es, of Jacksonvill e. \\' 11.1.1 1 \ .. B.11L-.: "TT. 1 > r o mi n c ntl y i d c n tili c d with t h e busi n ess a nd financia l i11tl'rests of Jackso n v ille i s \Vil l i a m S. 13arn c t l , p r es ident o f t h e [deal HimT oo l ompan y and vice p r es id e n t of t h e Guarantee Title and ortgage Company. I le comme nced hi s c a r ee r as a n ofT1ce boy w h e n he was e J e , en years o f age. but s i nce co ming t o Jac k so n ville, in r8 98, hi s climb has been a rapi d o ne, a n d today h e n o 1 only occu p i es a hi g h p os i t i o n in business circ l es. but wields a d i tinct a n d h e lpful influ e n ce i n civ i c m atte rs. 1 J r. B a rn ell wa s horn at ape l\l ay, New J e r sey . 13, 1 866, a nd i > a so n o f Furman and arah ( H o llin gs head ) Barne tt . l l i s fa th e r was born i n Cap e May o un ly. New Jersey, :Novembe r 5. 1 83 4 . a nd as a youth learned the trade of car p e n ter, g r adually developing into a co ntrnctor a nd b u ild e r . H . e gave up t h i s l i n e o f e n deavor t o 11-i n th e , as wa s also ;-L r s. Harnett , w h o was b o rn i n Cape l\lay County . October 3. t 838 . a nd died October 19. t912. Of their three childre n \\'illiam ., the yo u ngest , i, t h e o n l y s urvi vo r . \ \ ' illiam S. Barnell atte nded the public sc hool s of 'ape ).lay. a nd when on l y eleve n years of age " as g i, e n hi s i ntrod u c ti on l o bu siness m e t h o d s i n t h e ca pacit y of offic b y in a hardwa r e e tablishment. Gradually he worked hi s way up t o th e pro p ri e t o r s h i p of a grocer y and meat marke t busi ness at ape , l ay. bu t after four year disposed o f h is i n tcre:,ts there and \\ e n l t o \\'ashi11g t on, i) i s t r i c t of Col11111bia, w h e r e ltc accepted. th e m a nagem ent of the Palace l\larket. an establishme n t with w hi c h h e was identified for eight v a rs. Co mi n g t o J ac k so n vill e i n 1898. h e took ;l positi o n w ith the tirm of Adani:, & Ri c hardson. \\'ho lesal prm isions a n d m ea t s, as m a nager of

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O F J 7 1.0R I D . \ 43 the r e t ail m a rk et. and rem ained with that co n cern 11ntil lJo. 30, F. a nd . 11.. o f ape M ay . New Jersey J ac k sot1\•ille C h apte r No. 12, R :\. 1L; Hallmark Coun c il To. 3, H .. a nd S. J\f.; Damasc u s Com mandery No. 2, K. T., a nd Morocco T e mple, A. A. 0. N. 11. S.; i s a thirty-seco nd degr ee 1\Iaso n of Florida Co n s istory; a nd h o l d s membe r s hip in J ac k so nville L o d ge, B e n evo l ent and Protective Order o f Elks. l l c also h as numerous soc ial and c i vic co nn ect i o ns. On March 3, 1 889, • fr. Harnett married Mi ss l\Jadelin e L ee, w h o was b o rn al Cape 1\Iay, cw J e r sey, 1\lar c h r , 1 86 4 . S h di e d Fcbrnary 25, 19II, l eav m g o n e so n , Osca1 -F. On J un c _ , TQlS, 1Ir. Barnett was united in marriarr e with :'IIrs. Carolin e Tarri n g , a nati1 e of Delaware. RrcrrARD FLEMCNG Bown1rn i s tax collect o r o f Duval County, this bein g o n e of vari o u s office s of public trust conferre d upon him in hi s native city an d county. The B ow d e n fa mi l y has b e n in Florida fo r cve r a l ge n eratio n fr o m pio neer times. The birthpl ace of Richard F. B owden was the o ld family h o me that s t oo d a t tlt c co rn e r of M o n r oe and ecla r streets, J ac k so n ville . H e was born t here June , r86 6, so n o[ Uriah and Sar a h Ann ( Hogan ) Bowd en. Uriah B wdcn an d hi father were b oth b orn at M a ndarin in Duva l County . arah Ann H oga n w a born and rea1ed a t Jackso nville , and liv e d there al l h e r life. S h e had 1.he disti n ction of being the fir s t white child b orn at Jack so nvill e . H e r birlhplac \\'a s a house that o n ce ccup i e d the prese n t sil of th e Duval Hotel a t the corn 1 of Hogan and F o r sythe str els . Both l fo ga n Creek and Ho0 a n lrect w e r e nam e d for h e r father. h.. Fleming Bowd e n allended lh e public sc h oo l s, but r ccei 1 ecl m os t of hi ed u catio n in private sc h oo l s at J a k so n v ill . His fath e r wa s for m o r e than twenty year s h e riff of Duval o un ty. Thu s as a boy h e became famil iar with tl1c varied d e tails pertainin g lo the a dmini l1a tion of thi s office. Eventua lly he became deputy s h e riff unde r hi s fath e r, s ub sequently was app ointed s h e riff t o fi II a yacancy cau eel by Lhe r e m o 1 al of Napoleon B. Broward, and s till later was c l cclecl s h e riff l o fill out th unexpired t erm o f S h e riff Pic kett w h o di e d in office. At the next e l ect i o n 1\[r. B o wden \\'as c h ose n ltc riff , h o ldin g that office co n s cu-til'c l y for eight years. 1 \ m o n g th s h e riff s of Dn ya J Co11nly it \\'a s ltis di s tin c ti o n l o h e t h e only un c eke! ' d \\'ithuul oppos iti o n . J\rr. llowdcn was abo ;L m e mb e r o f th e 'ity C"un ri l s i , yea r . a nd a m o ng o th e r o rdin ances pro p ose d and a c h anccd h y hi m w a s th e J im C row law o [ wlticlt h e i s lite fath e r . l fot ir i n g fro m th e office o r s heriff Mr. H o wd e n l oo k up t h e r eal esta t e b11siness. ] I c h as been s ucc es ful in hi s bu siness affai r s a nd is o n e o f l h e co unty' s largest individua l ta x p aye r s . H e is int e r es t ed in the civ i c welfare of th e city a nd county, i s r ea dy to r espond t o a n y publi duly, a nd ha s m a d e a sp l e ndid r ec rd a s tax collccl o r. 1fr. Bowden i s affiliated with lh e 1\fasonic fraternity an d Mys ti c Shrine. t h e I mproved Order o f R eel M e n , I nights of Pythias a nd Loyal Order o f :\[ os , and i s active in the affai r s or th e Jack so nville Humane oc iely and th e Dani I :'lle m o rial Orphanage. llis fir s t wife wa 1\Ii ss arric L Tweed le of Penn y l va ni a . he is sun iv ecl by lwo childre n , James Uriah a n d M ay. A few yea r s afte r 1.he death of hi s first wife Mr. B owde n marrie d 1\r i ss Flo r a 1\L Ge nth , a fo rm e r J ackso 1will e gi rl who had r e m ove d t o N e w York. They lta 1 e a b ca u t i f ul h o m e, P o int LaVi s t a, three mile s south of Jac k so nville, on th e so uth ba nk of th e l. J o hn s Riv er. 111rnR Y IJAC ON, 1\L D. , has b ee n e ngaged in the practi ce o f hi s profess i o n in the C ity o f J ac k so n ville fo r ne arly forty yea rs, a nd has secure vantage-gr o u n d as o n e of the representative ph ys i cians and s u r geons of th e S tate of Flo rid a . JT c is of the fourth g c n eratio n of th e Bacon famil y in t h e m e d i ca l profess i o n , and is a scion o f fin e old Co lon i a l New Eng l a nd anc es try. Docto r Bacon was b o rn at St. Marys, Camde n Co nnly, Georgia, o n th e 2 7th o f 1\l a r c h , 1858, and is a so n o f Dr. l lcnry Sadl e r B aco n and Annie 11. (0' eill) Baco n . the fo rm e r of whom lik e \\ i sc wa s a native of l. 1\[a r ys, G eo r gia, where h e w as born Nov mbcr 28, 1832, a nd th e latt e r o [ whom wa s bo rn o n h e r fath e r's plantati o n , New H o p e, Nassau o u n l y . Flo rid a, November 12, 1834, thi s o ld pla n t a t ion h avi n g b ee n familiarl y kn ow n a s the O'Nei l l Grant. The marriage of the parents was so l e mni zed Nov mb r 28, 18_;3, a nd t h e y b ecame lite parents of four childre n , tw o o f wh o m di e d in infancy, D oc t o r Bac o n or thi s r evie w haYin g been th e seco nd c hild, and a s i l e i-, Mi ss F l o r e nce Ire ne, lik ew i se being a r e iclcnl of J ac k so nville. 1{i ss B aco n wa s educa t e d i n th e femal e co l l ege m a int ai n e d und e r th e au spices of th e Pro l csla nt Episcopa l Church a t \ Vin c h es t e r , Virgini a, in which institution s h e was a m e mb e r of th e c l ass o f 1 880 . Site i s n ow lit s t a t e co r r espo nd ent of th e Co l o nial Dames o f F l orida, a n d h as trace d her ancestry o n th e s id e of h c 1 paternal g r andfather t o J a m s Bl o unt, who was b o rn i n \Va le s and who cam e t o J\ m crica in 1 635, hi s d eath havin g occurre d in 1 685. lt i s through thi s ancestor that 1\li ss Baco n i s elig ible for affiliation \\'ith the Col nial Dames . Dr. H enry . Bac o n r eceive d a thorou g h pro fe ss i o n a l e d ucat i o n , as ga u ge d by th e s t a nd a rd s of hi s gen erati on, and wa s e ngaged in the s u c cessf u l practi ce of m ed icin e at S L 1\[arys, hi s n a tiv e tow n in Georo i a, a t the tim e when the C ivi l war was p r ec ipitat e d o n th e nation. H e beca m e a lieute n ant in a Georgia Co nfederate regiment, a nd wa in active se n icc fir s t in Florid a a nd n x t in Virg i nia . H e was eventually tra n s ferred l o the M e di cal orps, wilh thr rank of cap t ai n , and lat e r was a d va n ced l o lhc 1 ank ot

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!llajor. .'\ fter th e c l o:;c of th e war h e e,t a\Jli shcd t he: f a111i l y l111111c at l ; lorida , w l 1crc h e e n gage d i n t h e prartirc of hi s profc" i o n IH1t h is ea n 1c,t oCrl'ires were soon k rminatcd h1 h is d ea th , o n t h e 12t h of J\ug u s l. 18Ciri. llis 11:idow l o n g surv ived him, s h e havin g p a sse d t o t h e life e t erna l o n t h e 2 n d of October. 1 917. and bo t h w e r e earnest communicants o f th e P r otes tant l :pisco p al C h u r c h. D oc t o r Baco n o f this rcYiew i s a lin e al d e scendant of Nathaniel Bacon, wh o was born a t Stra tt o n , Hutlands h i r c . l<'.nglan d , and who ca m e t o A m e rica about 1 6 4 Q . H c joine d hi s u n c l e. . n d r e w Bacon, at Hartfor d , Con n ec ti cut. and i n 1 6 .10 h e becam e a m ember o f th e com p any o rganize d fo r th e p lattin g o f the Town of Mat tascck , now known a s Middle t o w n , ' o nn cc ticut, w here h e becam e a prominent and i n flu e nti al c i tizen a n d extc11si1 e landho ld e r . L l is name ap p e a r s o n a bron z e plate that i s attach e d t o a l arge g r a nite b o u l der a n d t hat g i ves t h e n a m es of t h e fo un d e r s o f l\f idd l c t o w n , this m e m orial bein g one of s pecial hi s t o r i c interest in tha t thri1 i n g c ity. Dr. H enry Bacon acquired hi s ea rli e r educati o n u n d e r th e effec tiv e and solic it o u s direction o f h is d e voted m o th e r , s h e ha v in g been a woman o f s u p e rior e d ucati o n . h e r hi g h e r e d ucati o n havi n g be e n gained in La G range ollcge. a l L a (;r a nge. Georgi a. Doctor Ha co n attende d the h igh s c hool i n t h e C it y of Niles . and therca f tcr co n ti nu e d hi s studi es unde r pri va t e tuto r ship at Gosh e n . :\e11 Y ork. I n preparati o n f o r h i s c hosen professi o n h e ente r e d th e ce l ebra t e d B ellevu e H os p ital . \ L c dical ollcgc i n th e Ci t y o f P:c w Y ork a n d in t h e same h e was graduated as a m e m b e r o f t h e c lass of 1&q3. a n d wi th t h e well earned degree of Doctor o f }.l edicine. J l e furth e r fo r tifi e d himse l f by a p e r i o d o f se n i ce a-, a n i ntcrne i n t h e C i t y I L os pit al o f ?\cw York, a n d in 1885 h e e ngaged in the active ge11c r:1l p ract ice o f hi s p rofessi o n in t h e it y of Jackso1 w illc, F l o r ida. which has si11cc co n ti nued t h e s tage of hi s able and s uccessfu l se n i ce as a p h y s i c ia n and surgeon. I l e served a numbe r of year s a s a membe r o f th e s t aff of _ l. L uke's 1-fos p i tal . a p os iti o n which h e fin a l l y r es ig n e d . T h e D oc t o r was a va lu e d m e mber o f th e Duval County Board of F [ ca l t h during th yellow fever e pid e mi c of 1 88 . and al this time. as a l all o t h e r s tages i n h is ca r e r. h e m a ni f es tccl a high id ea l of pro fe ss i o n al and p e rson a l s t ewar d s h ip . H e has se n •ecl b o th as p resid ent and secretary o f the Duva l ounly U eclical Society. of which h e is now o n e o f the 1 e t e r a n m embe r s . a n d i;acti vc l y id e n tifie d a lso with th e Florida S tale M e di ca l Societ y a n d t h e ount y M edical Societ y . 1 n 1 889 the Doctor r ece i ve d f r o m Governor F. I'. F l e m in g comm ission a s surgeo n genera l of t h , tale of Fl o r ida. with the rank of col o n el, < i ncl h e hel d th i s office con ti n u o u s ly under six diffe r ent g ub erna t orial admini strati o n s . L-fe was retired with the r a n k f brigadier gen eral after n e a rl y t w enty-five years ser v ic e in t h e F lorid a Nati o n a l G uard. H e h a s l o n g controlled a large a n d r e p resentative n racticc in Jac kson v ille . a n d is o n e o f t h e leadin g phys i c ia n s a n d s u rgeon s of Duva l County. The Doct o r i s a stalwart in t h e camp o f th e dem o ralic party . and i s an earnest communicant of the Protestant Episcopal Chur c h. S11F.1.DOK STR INGE R. }.[. D. A r cord of the prof css i o n al career of Dr. S h e l d o n St ringer of Tampa s hows that h e ha s been a n honor t o hi s railing a nd a 1a l 11ablc addition lo the r anks of 11111, e ll'h o a r c laho ri11g t o b r i n g about n ecessa r y changes i n the: 1 na nag•111c n l of ci 1 i a ffai r s . . \ 111an of dee p learning, pn1found in hi s ideas, prac t ic;tl in his s uggest i o n s , l )oct o r Stringer has 1 1 a t11rally tak e n a n o t abl e place amo n g hi s associ a t es fo r man y y a r s, and has figu r e d pro m i nentl y in t h m e di c a l pro fessi o n of H illsborou g h Cou nt y and the ity of T ampa. Throughout his entire ca r ee r he has maintaine d a hi g h s t a ndard of ethi cs a n d h o n o rabl e practi ce. Ile is a worthy m embe r o f the d i ffe r e n t m d i cal ass c iations, and is look e d upo n as o n o f t h e ablest physi c ian s a n d s u rgeon s of Tam pa . The spi ri t of progress wh ich has been th e d ominant fact o r in the p e n ing years o f the twen ti eth century has b ee n man i f es t i n n o con n ec t i o n m o r e slr ngly t han in t h e me di ca l p rofession. wlte r e inv es t igati o n and resear c h have brough t f orth m a n y scientific facts and prin c ipl es . soh i n g nature's sec r e t s . lep by s t e p Doc t o r ! r i nger lta s k p l pace wi t h the marc h of improvem e n ts. and ha s been c hosen by a num b e r of concerns t o serve th e m in a professional ca pa c it y . D oc t o r . tring r was h orn al I rooksvi l l e , F l o r i d a. June 23. i8 3 . a son of D clor Sheldon a nd J\la rgaret E l i zabe t h ( l , y kes) Stringe 1 , n a t ives o[ :\o rth a n d South Caroli na , respectivel y . Th father was a p racti cing ph ys i c ia n a n d surgeon fo r man y year s, and a graduate of Tulane Uni1 e r s i t y. X cw O rlean s . l , o ui s iana. c lass o f 1c 59. Ile becam e a surg on of t h e Regul a r Army. and sen •cd as such u n til t h e secessi o n of th e Southern :.tatcs . whe n h e re i g n ccl and offered hi s ser vice;: t o Presi d e nt Davis. Th sc were accepted. and h e was s t a ti o ned al aint u g u s t i n e, F l o rida. w it h t h e ran k o f majo r , in the ca pacit y of c hief surgeon of the F l orida Di1 ision and in charge of t h e 011 f ederate H ospit a l at that locati o n . : \ ft c r th e c lose of the war h e m o 1 eel t o Brook:;1 i l le. F l o rida. a n d th e r e continue d in practice until his death . w h ich occurre d i n 1903. L-l is w idow s ur1• i 1 c d him until 1 908. They had three c hil d r e n . o f w h o m Doctor Stringer of t hi n o tic e is th e youngest. R ea r e d i n a n i n t ellectual atmosphe r e, Doctor Stringer attended the local sc hool s of Broo k s 1 illc a n d t h e :-l c d i ca l o l lege o f Virgi ni a, and was graduated f r o m t h e latter i n 1 905, with t h e degree o f Doct o r of }. I cd i c in c. For t h e first three m o n t h s th e r ca fte r h was in practic e a l B r oo ksvill e . a nd th e n s pen t s i x months at l{ey \ V st. Fl o rida. followin g w h i c h. in i 906, h e local e d p erma nentl y at Tam pa. whic h has continue d to be th e scen e of hi s professional w rk. In addi t i o n lo h is m e m b e r ship in th e va r io u s soci e ti e of h is prof ssi<'ll lte i s a n honorary 111 mbcr o f the !Tew Y ork a nd New England Associati o n o f Railroad Surgeon s. a n d of the J \ soc iati o n o f ilita r y . u rgcon s of the United ,'talcs . At o n e t i m e h e wa s p r esi d e n t o f t h 1-1 illsborou g h ounty ,\.l e d ica l Soci e t y . and also serve d it as secret a r y and treasure r. U n til th e T ampa North ern R ai l road was absor bed bv the caboard ir Linc h e was it s c h ief s urgeo;1. W hile li1 in g a l Brooks ville lte was loca l surgeon for t h e t lantic o ast L in e R a ii road. a n d was ch icf surgeo n o f t h e Brooksvill e & 1 Ludso n Railroad. During Gov erno r Gi l c h r ist's admi ni s t ration h e was a m ember o f th e State Board of Regular 1f dical Exam in r s, and al o n e time was surgeon -in-charge o f t h e Cord o n l(ellcr M e m o r i al I fosp i tal, which p osi t i o n h e h e l d f o r te n years; u n d , -}.J :-iyor D . B . :-lcKcy's admin istration h e was city h ealth office r f o r Tampa: a n d at present i<; actin g assistan t sur-

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geon fo r the U n it e d S t a tes Pub l i c l k alth Sen ice f o r the T ampa D i strict. D uring the per i o d of t h e w a r h e , ,as surgeon of • . 1 I cal examining board , and a t presen t is presid e n t of lite local boa r d of suroeon s for p e n s i o n examina t i o ns. J le p resen t e d hi mself fo r d11Ly and cxa111i1i;1 t i o11 a l the r m y : d e d i c a l College a l \\'ashit1"t o11, D i s trict of C lumb ia, ;l!ld was o r d e r e d l1J r e p ort l o ,\[aj. H . . C. Hr yan at l {i cl11no n d . \li r gi11ia, for e:-.amina ti o n . Doctor Stri11ger was accepte d . b u t the com111iss i o11 was hel d up t hrou g h s m e d e lay, so h e di d n o t r c'cc i 1 c his n o ti f i catio n u f accepta n ce until a few days fo llowin g the ;,i g ni n g of til e armistice. The gen e r a l order cancel ing all com m i ss i o n s prl'l cn l e d !ti s r ece i v in g the o n e l o w hi It h e was e n tit le d . Doctor Stri11ger i s a l. l ;iso n a n d bel o ngs lo T ampa Lodge N'o . 7 08, I ' . 0. E . I n 1 9 1 2 D oc t o r Stringer marrie d J \ l iss C c n c 1 i c 1 c Ciclclc n s . a daug hter of T. S. and l\11b i ; 1 X. (;iclcl c n s . Doct o r Stringer find s p le a sure a n d rc1 reat i o11 thro u g h hi s m e m be r ship with lite T a mpa Y a c h t Cl u b . tile Tampa Cou ntry Club and the T ampa C o l [ Cl ub. . '\ w ellread m a n. Doctor tringer e n joys h i s f u rthe r :,luclies 111 m e di cine a n d ;,urg r.1'-I l e h o l d s to hi g h i d a l s i n hi s p rofessi o n. and i, C • Jn s t anlly seeking t o b roa k n hi s lrnowkdge that his l a b o r s may he m o r e effecti1 ', and ll' i t h cli' crimina t i n g int c lligcnce select s tile best m ctl1o d s f o r t h e t reat m e n t o f i n clil'id u a l c a s l'' t h e 'ound ness of hi s judg m e n t be ing manifest i11 the excellent resu l t s w hi c h follow hi s labors. J o 1 1 x \ \ '. Cox1: . a1turncy-at -l:1w ;rnd l..initc d S tates com111iss i o n e r al T a rnp a. i s ci1 1 c o f the ables t m e n practi c in g a l t h e b a r o f 1 1 i l l s h oro11g h County, and a c i tizen w hose s t anding r e n l'c l s credit alik e u p o n him sci f a n d hi s calling . Con e i s ; 1 man w h o i n h e r i t s fro111 hi , p a r ents a r11ggccl ancl h o nest charact e r , and has clec i , i l'e n n l io n s abou t the d u t ies of a c i t i z 11. H e is pl a i n in h is tastes. h o nest in h is beliefs. m ock;,t in hi s a m bi ti o n s . ancl clecicledly p ract ical i n all o f hi:; met h o d s . l n h is office h e meets with a cordi a l a p prol'a I o f his methods and of hi s p u b l i c ca r ee r . \io t o nl y clors h e posses,; the co111 111encla ti o n of the J H : o p lc of hi s own cli,tr ic t. b ut from t hose thrn11g h o u t t h e s t a l e, a n d this con di t i o n of pub l i c a tt itude i g r atifyi n g and well 111eritc d. I n cver.1 lhn g h e u n d ertakes h e i s apabk. h o nest and in d u s t r i o u s . i t b e in g h i s m o tive l o se r l'c we l l and acceptably, and l o d o h i s ditt y h a s al w a ys been hi s pa r a m ount purpose. liv his industrl' ancl hi;; c lose a t t entio n lo hi s ofr1c i a l d u t ies sim:c h is a p p o i ntme n t h e has become recogn i ze d as o n e o f the most u seful m e n in the e mplO\' of the Go1 ern111e nl. and lw reason of hi s abili t l' , sound judg m e n t and fear lessness h e i s 111akin g record f o r hi mscJ f and his off ice ll'hich w ill el'er S l ane! t o hi s creel i t. T h e b irth o f J ohn \\_ Con e occurred a t \\' hite Spr ings, l l amilto n. Flo rida. Sepl c111bc r .!3. 1 889, a n d h e i s a son of Capt. C. J<. a11d Josi c L (Qua r l e r111a11) C-on e. 11;1ti 1 • c,; o f :111c1 1 . ib erly cou nt ies. Ceor g i a . respecti1-el_1. w h o c a m e t o Flo rida i n r839. C F . Co n e was a capt a in i n t h e war with the Sc111inole T ncli a ns. ;rnd held the sam e r a n k i n til e war o f the ' G us. I l e is still l i v i n g, :::dth o u g h n ow e i ghty-e i g ht ye cam e to .\rnc r ica a n d ioca t ecl i n Ca n a d a. From Canada they subseque ntl y r e moved to H i s fath e r 11'3 S a t o n e time recognized a,; o n e of t h e lea d in g a u t h orities o n t h e textil e a n d dye industry in Swed e n and i n the New England slat es. H e r e mol'ed l o F l o r id a in 1897 t o s p e n d h i s decl i n ing years, a n d i n ve s tee! h e a v i l y in clevcl o pm e n l projects a roun d including Hallancla l c . P. E o b c r L C . Sjostr o m r ccci 1 ecl h i s ea r l y e d u cati o n in a n a d a . alte ncli11g S h erbrook e ! \ c aclc m y . and a t the age of f ourteen began a t ec lrni c a l a n d pract ical course in the m anufacture of 1 \ool c n s . l n i88.r h e was g r adua t e d from the law clc pa 1tm ent o f M cG ill nivers ity a t l. l onlrca l , and w a s adm itte d lo t h e ba r of Q u ebec. 1 \ year l a t e r h e accompa ni e d hi s pa r ents when they r e moved to La w r e n ce, Massacltusells . J n 1 882 h e est a blislte d h i s head q u a rter s in ::\cw Y ork 'ity. a n d becam e activ e in m e rcan t i le accountin g a n d fin a n c i n g . t o n e time h e was t r e a sure r and fin a n c i a l cxec11tive for sc1 e r a l la rge co rp oratio n s , w ith f a c t o r ies in New E n g land and the S t a t e o [ N e w '\' o r k . Dmin g twen ty -nine yea r s of r es i d e nce i n Yor k City . S jost r o m occupied m a n y resp o n s ibl e posit i o n s as c hief accou ntan t and d i rect o r in m e r ca ntile and ban ki n g i n stitutio n s . a n d was associ a t e d \l' i l h som e o f the n otab l e m e n o f fin a nce and bu si ness t h e r e . .. jostro111's f athe r di e d al ).li a m i a t tile r ip e age of e i ghty year s , in 1 914. T h e so n \\'as cal l e d l o Florida to settl e the est a t e and hi s resid ence h e r e has been contin u o u s s ince t hat t i m e . l\l r . S jost r o m i s a n indefatigabl e ll'Or k e r . i s a 111a n of r e m arkable plt ys i ca l e n e rgy a n d has a r a re: g i ft o[ co mbin in g physical e ndura n ce w it h m ental resourceful ness so a s t o accom p l i s h a11 i m111 e nsc l'!Jiu111e o f w ork. i t i s !ti s habit t o a r ise a t f uur o ' c lock in t h e 111o r ni11g,
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l i s h c d a n o t h e r office a t 1lia111i , a n d h a s a n e labor a t e s ui te o f ro o m s 111 th e 1 l i a m i Natio n a l B a n k Buildi n g . \\The n Ame r i ca e n t e r e d th e wa r w ith G erma n y h i s s o n yo luntc e r e d , a n d 1 1r. S j os t ro m h im se l f t oo k the civi l sc n ice exam inati o n . p a ss in g w i th t h e h i g h e s t grade a m o n g t h e a ppli ca n t s fro m Florida. H e w a s se l ected a s d e pu t y collcc t o 1 of int e rnal r e ve nu e u n d e r J. 1L Ca t h cart, wa s m a d e c hief of th e inc o m etax di v i s i o n a n d h e l d that offic e unti l th e cl o se o f th e w a r . Jn t h e m ea n tim e h e h a d b e e n admitte d to th e ba r a ft e r e x a min a ti o n befor e th F l o r i d a Supre m e Court. \Vhile s t ill i n t h e G o , crnm n t w a r se r v i ce h e wa s c ommis i n e d by th e c ommiss i o n e r o f in t e r n al r e v e n u e t o g o t o \ • V a h i ngto n t o a u di t e x cess pro fit tax r eturns . a n d wh i l e t h e 1 e was in c h a rge o f o n e o f t h e units o f audit o r s fo r t h e b oard o f tax r e v ie w e r s fo r s i x m o n t hs. A f t e r hi s p e c ial war sc n i ce 111-. Sj os t ro m , in 1 919, o p e n e d h i s offic e a t J a c k so n v ille fo r t h e p ractice o f J a w a n d a cc o u n ting . . H e h a s s p ec i a l i z e d i n i n c o m e t a x pr oce d u re, and hi s p r a c t i ce in th a t fie l d co ve r s t h e e ntire s t a te. H e o rgan ize d th e J ackso n vill e udit Compa n y, w hi c h h a . s i n ce b e e n s u cce e d e d by t h e S j os t ro m udit Co m pa n y , s p e c i aliz in g in c orpo ratio n l a w a n d accoun t i n g . B y exact kn o w l e d g e and all arou n d r e sourccf u l n css t h e r e i s pro ba b l y n o s p ec i a l i s t i n F l o rid a bette r equippe d for se r v i ce as a fin a n c ial a n d l ega l ach-is e r i n e \ c rythin g affe c t i n g c o rp o r a ti o n s a n d i n di v i d u a l s th ro u g h t h e i n co m e tax rul e s . :Mr. Sjo s t ro m i s a m e m be r o f th e 1\a t i o n al A sso c i a ti o n o f Ce r tifie d Public A c c ounta n ts o f Washin g t o n , Dis t r ict o f Co lumbi a , a nd a F ello w of t h e Ins titute o f C h a r t e r e d A ccounta n t s . 1-1 e i s a m e mber of t h e J a c k so n v i l l e C h a m b e r o [ Co m m e r c e , in nati o n a l p o liti c s a r e pub l i c a n , a nd i s a ffilia t e d wit h th e M a so n i c frat e rni t y, . l d o r occo T e m p l e o f t h e 1 l y s t i c Shri ne, a nd t h e B . P . 0 . E . H e i s a m embe r o f t h e C i v itan Clu b a n d o th e r r epres enta t ive c i v i c a nd so c i a l o rgan i zati o n s a t Jack s o n v ille , a n d i s sc n i r w a r d e n o f th e ,-est r y o f S t . : Ma r y ' s P ro testa n t Episco p a l Churc h . In 1 88 3 a t Eliza bet h , New J e r s ey , Mr. j os t r m m arri e d Mis s E m m a I r c n e \Vrig ht. H e r d ea t h oc c u r r e d i n I 9 1 2 . a nd thre e childre n s u r v i, c, t w o being r eside n t s o f th e S t a t e o f N e , Y o r k , w hil e t h e o l d e r so n , Paul K G. ' j os t r o111, l i v e at .\Ii a m i . In 1915 S j ostro m m arrid 1li s H.el e n .Ida F l a n agan at M iami . They ha, e t w o c hi ldre n . 1-IE.-.:R Y H . Co rn. The law i s k n o\\ n l o b a s t e rn mi s t r e ss , d e m a ndi n g of h e r d e v o t ees co n s t a n t a n d unre m itti n g a t t e nt i n a nd l eadi n g h e r f ollowe r s t h ro u g h man y m a z e s a n d intri c a c i es b e f o r e s h e g r a nt s th e m s u c c e ss a l h e r h a nds. This i11ce s sant d eman d fre q u entl y p r ec lu d es th e idea o f t h e s u c ces s ful lawye r indulg in g in a tiv itic> outs i d e o f t h e stra i ght p a th of hi s pro f ess i on. esp ec i ally if hi s \'OCat i o n a l duti es a r e o f a l a r ge a n d important natur e . Howeve r . th e trai n in g thro u g h w hi c h h e h a s pass e d and th e d eve l o pm e n t o f h i s int ellec tu a l it y w h i c h h a s 1 cstil l c d m a k e t h e law y e r peculi a r ly fitte d fo r p u b l i c se rvice. a n d if c a l l e d u p o n h e ca n r e s p o n d w ith a mazi n g r esult " T a111p a i s th e sce n e o f th e p rofess i o n a l l a b o r s o f s u111c o ( th e m os t effi c i e n t nicmbc r s o f t h e l e g al profes s i o n , and many of th e m arc al th e ver y flo o d -tid e o f s u cce ss, fo r t h e clc , e l n pm c n t o f th i s s ectio n h a s b r o u ght h e r e a n u m b e r o f yo u th f u l a s p ir a nt s w h o bri n g l o t h e ir \\ork t h e cntl1u;,i a ,1lil a nd ze a l n o t fo u n d i n th ose o f middle Ii fc. O n e o[ t h ese yo u n g 111cn i s lknry 1r. Co le, s u ccess fu l l a wy e r a n d ve t e r a n cif t h e \\"o r iel war. H enry 11. o l e wa s b o rn ;it Wint e r se t , 1fadi so n County, l o w a, July 9 , 1891. a so n o f l a r e n ce a n d B e r tha E l i za b e t h (O'r c a l ) Co le. n a ti v es o [ O h i o a n d l'eutu c ky, r e p cc ti , e l y , b o t h o f who m surv ive a n d a r c l i v i n g a l L a k e l a n d . Fl o ri da , w h e r e t h e y l oca l e d i n 1 9 1 o. The fa th e r i ' a j c w c l e r a n d m e r c h a nt , a n d a m a n of p1o min 11ce i n h i s co m mu n ity. 1 cre a nd h i s wife had but t h e o n e c hi l d . G r o w i n g to m a nh oo d . 1 -lcn r y l J . Col atte n d e d th e l oca l sc h o l s thro u g h t h e grad e d a n d hi g h sc h oo l co u r ses, a nd was g r adua t e d f r o m t h e l a t t e r al th e age o f se , • e n t ce n years. I l e th n w e n t l o th e S t a u n t o n Milit a 1y .1\cadcm y a l taunt o n, Vir g i nia, f o r o n e year. f o l l o wing w h i c h h e m a tri c u l a t e d at Northwes t e rn U niv e r s it y. E, a n s t o n . Jll i n o is, fro m which h e was g r adua te d w ith t h e d e g r ee o f Bach e l o r o f Arts, and h e ob t ai n e d h i s d eg r ee of Bach e l o r o f Laws fr o m th e legal d e p a rtme n t of t h e same ins t it utio n . J n l 917 h e ente r ed th e ni t c d t a l es rmy f o r se r v i c e d u r i n g t h e \ V orld w a r , was commi ss i o n e d ca p tain in t h e Thrc Hund r e d a n d F orty-fourth Tnfantry, E i g h ty-si xth Div i s i o n . a n d was h o n o rabl y d isc ha rged fro m th e se r v i ce in 1 9 1 . n .cturni n , l o C h icago, Il l in o i s , h e was a dmitte d l o th e ba r o f ll lino i s imme d i a t e l y t h e reaft e r , a n d was e n g a ge d in acti ve practi ce in th a t city u ntil t h e fall o f 1920 . w h en h e ca m e l o T a m pa. .-\s s o n as h e \\"as l oc a l cl in t h i s c it y h e took t h e n eccssa 1y exa min a ti o n s a nd was a d mitte d t o p ract i ce at th e b a r o f F l orida . a nd o p e n e d hi s offices a l N u m b e r 3 0 l S toval Buil ding, w h e r e h e i s c arry i n g o n a ge n e r a l practice. H e i s a Knig h t T e m p l a 1 , thirtyscco n d d cg r ee and ."brin e r 1 1 ason , and h e b e l o ngs t o t h college fra t ernities D e lta T a u D e lt a and Phi . l ph a D e l t a. L n r92t 1 1 r . olc marri ed 1 largarct P erry. a daugh t e r of Fra nk \ V . P erry, o f New Y ork. 11'r. Co l e i s a zea l o u s m ember o f th e .Am e ri c a n L eg i o n . a nd i s a capta in i n t h e R e . c n cs and Regi m e nt a l .Adjuta n t o f t h e Three Hundre d a n d T w e n ty-ei ghth l n fantry Rcgim n l. \ Vhile 1 l r. Co l e's attenti o n is now full y occ upi e d with hi s p r o fessi o n a l duties, h e regards himse l f as a sc n ant o [ th e p eople . a n d i s a n x i o u s t o d o hi s ful l d u t y as a c iti ze n . T l i s l i f e i s g u id e d by hi g h pur p ose and m ark cl b y s i n ce r it y . F l e is a n i d eal atto rn ey. learn e d and profound, a n d hi s abil it y i<; eve r at th e se r v i ce of T ampa, fo r whic h h e h a s a lr ea d y ac quire d a d ee p affectio n , a nd fo r w h ose p rog r ss h e i s m ost a n x i o us. R . E . L. 11AxCJC\'. T o s u ccee d as a m e m be r o f th e Tam p a b a r r equires m o 1 c th a n ordinary a bilit y w h i c h h as b ee n carefu l l y t r a i n e d al o n g th e lines of th e l eg a l pr o f ess i on, as w e l l as a va s t f un I o f gen e r a l i nform a t i o n a n d k ee n j u d g m e n t w ith regard l o m e n a nd th e ir moti ves. In a c it y of t h e imp ortance o f Tampa t h e r e is. of cour. c, !llu c h co m p e t iti o n : e , cnts crowd ach o t h er: c i r c um s t a n ces pla y !-.O imp orta n t a p art i n t h e shap i n g of C \ ' e n l s th a t a lawyer has l o b e a m an ca p a b l o f g rasp i n g aff a ir s w ith a compe t e n t h a n d to effec t sat i fac t o r y r esults. . \ m o n g th ose w h o h a , e w o n e n v iabl e dis t i n c t i o n as a m embe r o [ t h e legal pro[e s i on h e r e i s L . h a n ccy, w i t h ofT1 ces i n t h e . p a rkman I l e wa s h orn in P i e r ce Co unt y . C en r gia. D cc e 111b c r 1 6 , i 88 o . a so n of Lewi s \ \ ' i llia111 a n d Is a bell ( l kn11l'lt ) ' h a n cey, bo th o f w h o m ll"C r c abo h o r n i n Geo r gia. w h e r e t h ir families settle d o , c r 100 years a go. They w e r e th e pa r e nt> o f , i x t cc n c hi ld r e n , e i g h t so n s a n d e i g h t daughte r s . . \II of th e d a u g h -

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11 LSTOIZ \" O F 1,.1 , 1\.1 D , \ 47 ter and six o[ the so n s a r c still lil'i n g. One ;,on, Dr . . \I. C . Chance, . wa> a p r actici n g phy s ici a n a n d surgeon of Ta;1 1 pa f o r a b o ut. fourt L'Cn year s, and di e d January 8. l9 18. The thi rd daug h t e r , , \ J r,; . .'\ nn a 1 3 . 13ass . r esi d es a t Ta111pa, a nd h o ld s a n officia l p os iti o n under th e rnunt y governme nt. Two o ther daughte r s a l so r ,,:;i d e at Tampa . Chri s topher L Chancey. t h e fourth so n, i s al so a la\\' ye r . w h o is e n gage d in an a c tive pra c tice at 1 -ort J,aud c rd a l e . F l o rid a. Of all o f th e c h i l dren R . I .. Chancev . w h ose name h eads thi s rt.'\ ' il '\\ . is th e fourth c l;il d a n d seco n d so n . Cnl\\ ing u p in hi s n ati, e s t a t e . L . Chan ce, attended ih commo n sc h oo l s , ;111d t ook t h e high-sc h oo l cour,e at .I cs up. C co r gia . F ollo wi n g hi s cn111plctio n of that co m sc h e t oo k a t eac h e r trainin g at t he C co r g i a S t a t e l\'o rrnal Sch oo l a t . \ th e n s . Ceorgia. a nd th e n for three ll'rms was engaged in teaching sc h oo l i n G eorgia. I l e then took a :-cicnlili c co t!l'sc a l th e Georgi a X o r mal Co llcg-c a t .\bbcville . Geo rg-ia. from w hi c h h e was graduat e d a t th e yo uthf.ul ag-c o[ t we n ty years . 1-1 i s l egal train in g wa s r ece ived in th e lrtw clc pa rtrn ent oi ,\l c r ce r University . al :\ ! a eo n . G co r g-ia. a nd in 1902 he \\ as a d m itt e d t o t h e b a r a nd located a t l {lac k s h ear. t h e co un ty scat of Pie r e Co u n ty. hut only r e m aine d ther e u nti l 190.:;, w h e n he lcit it for Tamp a. : \ l o n e l ime l\l r . C h a n cey ,:as a candidate ior th e ' t a l c sse m b l y o f Fl ricla . a nd \\as defeated I n o n k th irtee n Y O l es. H c was appoint ed county ,oJ ;c itor .o ( H ills b o r o u g h Count, in 1<11 6 h1 ( ;ovcrn o r Catts. and \\a s cl cted l o it in 19!7, and h e ld it until Jul y 10, 1920. "'he n h e was r e moved. I l e wa s 1 cin t a t cd i n January. 1921 . by Governo r T l a r de c . a nd was reimburse d lw th e t a t e e n a t c f o r lh e tim e h e was out o f office 011 a ccount o f hi s r m ov al. F o r e i ght yea r s h e was in p artn e r s hip \\' ith M .. H . \I acf a rl a n e . an d whe n th i s associati o n w as cl i s sn l vcd h e e:-lablis h cl an orlice by h i m self and h a s had n o other p a r t n e r. During t h e Lim h e has hccn in prac t i ce h e has been co nn ec ted w ith so m e , cry important juri,pruden e, a n d h as h a nd le d hi s case;, with abilit y and r e o u r cefulness. ' IVhi l e county solicitor h e p r osecuted. co m i t d a nd sent to th e penite ntiary th e tax collec t o r f o r embezz lement of fu nds. H b e l o n g l o th e J ni g h ts of Pyt hias, and i s a past chan cello r comma n d e r o f lfay L o d ge, the la rgest i n f < l o ricla . l\fr. h a n ccy also belo ngs lo Tamp a Lodg-e T o . 70 . B . P. 0. E. O n October io, 1906. ).fr. h a n ccy m arried knnie I i . Co rti n o . a n ativ e of Fl orida . a nd a (Jaug-hlcr o f C harl es A . a n d T e ressa ( G e n o ne) ' orlino, o f Orlando. F l o r id a. l\11'. a n d :\ f rs. C hancey had two children b o rn l o th e m , bul 1;:. J ,.. Junio r. \\'as kil l e d by a n auto m o bile, so that \\'il liam He nn ell i s th e only . univor. l\lr. C h a n cey hol ds lo high id ea l s in hi s pro fessi o n . and hi s \\'Ork is c h a ract e ri ze d by a d evotio n t o dul\ that is so mewhat unus u al. A man of broa d iniormati on a l o n g m a n y lin es, i n his pro fessi o n he ha s kept i n c l ose tou h with a l l pr cedurcs b o th of a local a nd a nalinnal c h a radcr. His professional sc n i ce has e\'cr been discharge d w ith a kee n se1be of co n sc ienti o u s o bligatio n , a n d h i \\'ork ha s b r o u ght him t o a pro mi n ent p ositio n . 1-1 i s p e r so n a l a cq u a i n ta n ce w ith th e l e adi n g c itize n s of n oll' i s a broa d o n e . a nd hi s spirit o f goo d f.>llo \\' s hip 111akes Ii fe b ri ghter f o r th ose w ith whom he corn es in uintact. Enclo\\' ecl ll\" n a t urc with s t ro n g m e t ali t y . h e has so u se d hi s t i m e a n d talents in th e practice nf law that he has n o l only "1J n a material success. h ut a recogniti o n which redoun cb to hi, la,;ting c r edit a nd es tab l i s h es hi s pr es tige a m o n g th e leade r s 111 hi s profess ion througho ut t h s t a te. Gt-:01< C E H . 0 1<:-;1:L 1 t:s. Of th e e min ent lawyer s o f Hill s b o r o u g h Coumy n o n e i s m o r e g e n e r ally admire d and es t ee m e d [o r p r o f ess i o n al abi lit y a1tcl p e r so nal c h a ract e r th a n George H . o rn c liu s o f Tamp a. 1-Jis broa d r e putatio n as a n atto rn ey res t s n o t only o n t h e masterl y conduc t o[ importa n t cases wh i c h have b e en entrus t e d t o him a s a pri, a t c pra titi o n c r , b u t a l so o n th e splendid d i schar ge o f publ i c duties as w ell, b th at Tampa a n d hi s form r h o m e in Ge o r g i a. H e was b o rn a t H o men ill e . !in c h ounty, G eo r g i a, J un e 2 0, i88o , a so n o f J a m es B . a n d M artha Elizabeth ( G i bb.) Corn l iu s . b o th o f wh o m w ere b o rn in Ccor g i a . \\'h e r e they a r c s ti l l r es iclinrr . They had ten c hil d r e n , of who m n i n e survive, and three o f th e so n s a r c law ye rs, G eo r ge H . a n d A . F .. who live a l Tampa. and B . \ V., w h o lives in V ir g i n i a. Of all th e c hildre n Geo r g H . was seco n d i n order f birth. After r ec i v in g a pre liminary training i n th e pub l ic sc h oo l s of hi s n a t i ve city Geo rge H . C o r n e l iu s b ca m e a student of th e Geo r gia Sta t e N o r m a l c h o l , a nd th e n , e n t e rin g l\{ercer Unive r s it y, studio u s l y l a id t h e ground wor k of hi s pro fe ssio n in the law d e partment o f t hat in tilutio n . f ro m w hi c h h e wa g-r aduatecl i n I 903. and that s a m e \\'a s admitte d l o practi ce at th e ba r of Ge o r gia . F o r thr e years th e reafter h e wa s e ngaged in a gen e r a l pract i ce a t H o m e n ill e . but i n 19o6 ca m e t o Flo rida a n d s p ent a year i n prac tice al Saint P l 1 sburg. In 1907 , h e per m a n e ntl y l ocale d a t T a mp a, w h e r e h e ha s buil t up a ver y Yaluabl c co nn ec t i o n . \;\Thil c at H o m e rvil l e h e was ap p oi n t ee\ jud g o f th e County ourt o [ C lin c h Co un ty. and serve d a s u c h for two year . a1td fo r o n e year h e was mayor of H o m e r v ille. Si n ce co mi n g t o T a mp a h e was e l ec t e d mun i c ipal j ud g o [ th e c ity, and se rv e d fo r o n e term. rend ring-a much-apprec iat e d se rvi ce in all ofti ces . L r c i s a :.raso n and be l o n g t o the l nights o f P ythias, Caribous a nd o lumbi a n \\' ooclm n . In p o l iti cs he i s a d e m oc r at. On O c t obe r 3r, 1 903. l\[r. Co rn e l iu s 111arriccl :\nnic Jack. a daughter of J . \ V . and L o u Jac k , o f Kno xville, G eo r g i a. l\[r. and :Hrs. Co rn e l iti'i ha,e th followi n g c hil d r en: Geo r gia G r ace, U n a , O s\\alcl a n d Ivan . s a c itiz e n l\Ir. Co rn e liu s has \\'Orke d h ard t o bring abo ut bette r co ndition s . a nd is ,cr y proud of th e wond erful d e v e l o pm ent of T a m p a. a nd i s enthu sias ti c wi t h r e f e r e n ce l o it s futur e . a nd co nfid ent that only t h e beginning h a s ,et be e n m a de, a n d that eac h year will see furthe r ;mpro , e m cnt a n d g-r ea t e r pros p erity . . . . . ANOFORD . • T o o th e r p rofessi o n aff o rd . it s m embe r s s u c h excellent o pp ortunities l o ri se a1td be o f be n efit t o th e ir kind as d ocs t hat o f th e l a\\'. a nd es p ec ially i s th i s true at T a mpa. wh e r e th e b n ch a n d th e ba r h a , e l o n g comman d cl t h e utrn os t r es pect a nd admira ti o n fo r t h e ir di s tin rrni s h ecl r cprcsc n tali,cs of hi g h es t . t a nding. n o t through u l 11 ill s b o r ough. b u t o th e r co unti es. N o r e , ' i c w o f th lawyer s of Florida wo uld 1 c com p l e t e w ith out m e nti o n o[ S. S. S a n d fo rd. w h o h a s attain e d t o n o tabl e di s tincti o n , a nd s t a nd s o ut p r o m i n e ntl y a m o ng-th e m e n of hi s prof e ss i o n a s a n :ihl e atto rn ey a nd n m e mb e r o th e dcp e n clah l e kl!:a l firm of Sancl forcl & H a m pt o n. .The bir t h o f . fr .. a ncl ford to o k pla ce in Co l u 111-hia County . Flo rida. O c t o b e r 2 . 1 8 72, a nd h e i s a . o n of l\'rathcw J. a nd ;_[ary A. (_ parkm a n ) . ancl ford, n ati,es o f . o uth Ca r olina and Hilb-

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O l ' l ' L R ll). \ b o r ough County, r cs peeti\ely. From oulh a rolin a Mathew J. Sandford came t o Florida in r856, and co ntinu e d his occ upati o n o f l e achino-th e rem a inder o f hi s l i fe . B o th par nls a r c n o w d e c eased. The y h a d c l ' \ 'e n children, ten o f whom g r e w t o maturity, a nd of them all S. S. S and ford i s th e se venth in o rd e r o f birth . Growing up in hi s native cuunly, S. S. Sa n d f ord atte nd e d it s publi c ,chools and the Xorma l S c h oo l a t \ V hil e S prin g , Fl o ri da. the Jasper Nor mal Sch ol a nd th e o n e a t Abb ev ille. Georgi a . a nd was graduated from th e scientific course at th last-name d institution. H e th e n t oo k up his lega l training i n t h e law d e p artme nt o f lhc L 'ni \ e r s it y o f G eo r gia, and was admitte d t o th e bar in r9 o r, a nd immediately lh e r e a fter l oc ated a t P e rry. Flo rid a. w h e r e h e was e n gaged in p r actice for se ven yea r s . l.l e th e n went to Jas p e r , Flo rida. and r e main e d th e r e fo r e l even yea r s duri1w which per i o d h e w as e no-aged in a a n d Yaluab l e practice . a nd th e n , in l 9 l9 , came t o Tampa. D u rin g th e lim e h e lived in I L ami ll o n County h e served fo r four years as co unt y judge, a n d was a membe r of th e state a nd county committee s o f hi s par ty. Since co min g lo Tampa h e has b ee n a m e mb e r f th e firm of Sandfor d & 1 famp to n , and m a intain s o flices a l 1615-16 C itiz e n s Bank Buildin g. Fraternally h e b e l o ngs lo the T Znights o f Pythias, U odern \Voodmen o f . \meri c a and \Voodme n o f th e \ Vo rlcl. On A ugust 4 , 1904 , Mr. Sandford was united in man:iage with 1Iiss Janie M ays , o f Live Oak. Flonda. w h o died in 1918 , l e a ving five childre n : Elizabe th, Mays, A nn a Mar y, Ste1 ) h e n an d J a m es . ".\! r. Sand ford b e l ongs l o the Meth odist Epi sco pal Church, and is yery active in il s goo d wo rk. hard w ork r , a dili g e n t stud n t and f o rceful a nd able s peaker, ::\ft-. Sandford be l o ngs l o that c lass o f m e n wh o a r c p o t ent factors in a n y co m mu n it y in whic h they may be found. His personal achance ment h as a l ways been k ept s u bse n ienl to ac co mpli s h th a t whic h w o uld j u stify hi s ocrnpancy o[ publi c oflice a nd bring about a betterm ent o f exi sting cond iti o n s. H e has been wise and judicio u s i n hi s handling o f m atte r s o f a di versifie d natur e . n o t al o n e in h is priva t e prac tice . but a l so w hil e o n th e be n c h. and i s a m a n wh ose name wil l go d o wn in the hi story o f Tampa a nd Hills b o ro u g h o unt y as o n e o f t h e abl es t attorn eys a nd goo d c itizens o f hi s tim s . J. \V. B. S ll. \ \\' w as b o rn in Osceo l a Co u nl \', Flo rid a. Aug u s t 2 6 . 1890. a so n o f D. J. a nd f \ lan (Up son) S haw. The fath e r was bo rn in Tndia , but wa r eare d in E n g land , and th e m o th e r was horn a l A k r on. Ohio . The y h a d five c h ildren. o f wh o m J. \Y. B. Shaw i s the e ldest b o rn. H e was admitted l o th e bar in 1917, and e nlis t e d in th e L Tnited late army f r se n i ce durin g t h e \\'orld w a r . CARL ROSH\". _ \ 11ati1e of pr og r essi\'C. 'tirring, \\'alto n ounly , arl Crosb y has t h e d i s tin ctio n o f being the yollng s t c l erk o f the co urt in th e State of Flo r ida, a pos t which h e h o lds at D e Funiak Sprin gs. His career ha been a s o m e what va ri ed a n d active o n e and i n cludes acliYe se rvi ce in Fra n ce w ith th e m e ri ca n E x p editionary F o r ces . Mr. Crosby was h o rn al D c l. ] l e joine d the Division a l J leadqu arlers al " a mp J a ckson, and after lea1 ing that ca mp went t o ' a m p 'evier, South aro lin a, fo r t wu weeks. This was follo wed b y twenty clays at Camp .\I i lls. L o n g l s lancl , following which h e embarked for o v e r seas duly, s ailin g from .ll.o bokcn. , \ ftcr a b o u l three weeks i n Engl a nd , ha\ i n g lan d e d at Liv erpo l and going th e nce to Southa mp to n , his co ntingent c rossed to L e T Ja1 re, Fra n ce , a nd o n to Tonnerr c, where l he division spent about sixty days in training . They were then ordered L o L h e front lin e tre n c h es a t St. Die . where th ey s pe n t J e yen w ee k s und r Col. Kent 1 c l on . During this time th e c\me ricans were under fire muc h o f th e time a nd J-1.r. 'rosby was badly wounded by a s h ell fragment, which tore his s ide, necess it a tin g hi s r e m a inin g in the hospital for f orty-two d ays . O n hi s r ecove r y he rejoined hi s command o n th e front lin e , and w ith th e m went into the Verdun sector, where the command was und e r fire almost continuously u n til th e s ig nin g of the a rmistice, and t ook pa r t in th e e ngagement a t \ ' osges .\lounta in. His h o pita! confinement was al Field llos pital Ko. 6 4 , h a tillo n , Fra nce . J\ ftc r Verdun, th e comm a nd was i n a r es t camp fo r so m e L ime , then going t o Brest , Fra n ce, where lhey spent aboul two w ee k s , a(le r wh i c h they s a iled for home, landin g al Ne\\" Yl>rk about June 25, 1919. The} th e n w enl t o C a mp 1 1 ill s, a n d lat e r to Jack s o n, w h e r e they receiYecl their hon orable disc h arge. . \Lr. rosby, o n co mpl eting hi s military s el"l ice, l oc att;cl at D eFnniak Springs a nd resumed hi s duties as a sc h oo lleacl1er, t eac hing l wo eightm onth terms w ith out a n interrnption. Jn J unc , i920, al the prima r y fo r the o ffice of clerk of th e court, h b ca m e a candid a te fo r t he ofticc aoainsl two of t h e slrongc s l men in the county, of w h o m had b ee n ' c l erk o f lite c o u r t for twe nt y -two year s and one tweh e )Tars . lie wo n the e l ectio n b y a l aro-e m ajority, and as before n o t e d i s th e younges t man to h o l d this kind o( an office in the stat . His term commenced J anuary 4, 1 92 r , and will c o11li11uc u ntil J a nu a r y

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I l l . OF F r . 1<11 , \ 49 r , 192.=:;. ]Ji;, rcrurcl th11s far ha;, bee n a n excelle n t 011 • a n d h e has full y 1 i11dicall'cl th e iai th placed i11 him by t h e vot e r s of the rn1111ly. ,\Ir. C r os b y was 1111itcd in marriage Ja11uar y 30, 1922, at P e n sacola, Fl orid::t. wi th 111 iss lfos a L ee St. ::\,far y, daughte r o f Frank a nd Lizz i e ( ' a l laway) St. M a r y, nati ves of f l o r ida , I v l r . St. :\[ a r y being id e n tified w ith th e U n it e d Stat es F o restr y D epart m e nt. :\ 1 r . and 111 r s . Crosby a r e ver y pop ular in th e ir community, a nd Mr,;. Crosby i s w e l l known as a n acti ve wo rk e r in th e ll l e thodi s t Episcopal Churc h. Sou th. of w hich s h e has bee n a m e mb e r si n ce g ir l h oo d. i \ l r. C r osby owns allegiance t o th e d e m oc r atic p a rty, a n d in f ratern a l a fTiliati o n i s a n Odd F e1Jo w . L. B. :\[ 1TCllELL. :\f. D . The d ebt owed by hu m anity t o th e medical profession is o n e t hat can not b e ful l y di scharged. n o r o ught i t lo be rcga rclccl lightly, f r from m e n co nn ected with it ha1 e come t h e most illuminatin g truths regar di n g the rac a n d th e meth o d s t o be followed in c u rativ e a nd p reventati1 e m ea ures. The !if o f th e physician is o n e o[ co n s ta n t se lf-sacr i fice. lJ nlik c a lmost e v e r y othe r man, h e ca nn o t e n d hi s day' s w ork with th e setting o f th e s un , n o r c an he l o k forward t o night s of untroubl e d s l u m ber. Jn hi s hands rest bot h Ii f e and death , a nd t h e summo n,; a r c l iable to corn a t a n y m o m nt for hi m t o assist i n b rin g in g i nt o the wo r ld a new so ul , o r t o snatc h from th e grn1 e o n e whose sa nd s of Ii fe a r e runnin g l ow. It is little wond e r t h a t a p h ys i cia n i s r ega rd cl w ith s u c h affecti o n b y h i s fellow-citi ze ns, o r that h e comes t o hold a l ead ing p os iti o n in hi s community. The m e di ca l frat ernity ha s writte n a few m r e p
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I I I STOR '{ O F F f _ RLD , \ was e ngaged as a typewriter sale. man, but lat c1 bec a m e a so l i c it o r in the passe n g r departm e n t o f the F. C. & R. Railroad. Coing into the a uto m o b i l e busine ss, ;\\ r. Owen fir s t handl e d l •o rcls, l 1 u l is now the rcprestntati1 c in t his loca l it y for th e F r a n klin cars. a nd has been s ince 191 9 . ss i ling i n l hc organ izatio11 o [ t he of Con1111crcc o f Tamp a, ,\Lr. 011 e n was o ne o f the o rigi n al s t ockh o l d e rs, a n d is deep l y inter es t e d i n it s wel fare . H e i s a 1nc mbcr o f the Tam pa H o a r d o f Tracie a nd the Tampa Aut o mobile O uh, a11d ass i s t e d i n o r ganiz i n g th e l a t t e r. In 1 9 08 l.lr. Owen 1mirricd J\I iss Al m a Nan ce , o f B . i pley, . \ l i ss issippi , and t h ey l ia1 c o n e so n, 1\la r c u s N., a b ri g h t lad o f thirt e n years. Occas i o n allv there co m es int o the worl d a modest but int e nsel y e a rnest m an , who w res t s f r o m h i s e 1 c ryday surro und in gs the v icto r y of n o b l e a c hi e 1 e m e nt, a n d J\rr. Owen be l ongs t o th i s c l ass . F ro m e a rl y boy h oo d he has been vigo r o u s and h ea lth y , b u t the fami l y circumst a nces we r e s uc h , o wing l o hi s father's earl y cl m isc, t hat hi s sc h oo l i11g was rath r desul to r y, s o t h a t h i s devel o pm e n t has b ee n entirely o f his ow11 creation , a nd beca u se o f t hi s h e i s e nti tle d l o t h e credit accorde d him b y th ose w h o know him bes t , and to t h prosper ity w h i c h i s n o w his. HoN ALEX.\KDER R CA11PnEr.r.. Duri n g a p e r i o d of th ir ty-five ye a r s H o n . ! \lexand c 1 H.. a mp bell, o f D cFuniak p r ings . has been befor e th e p eople o f hi s co mmun ity in o n e o r a n o th e r p u b l i c ca p a ity, a n d as the i n cumben t o f Yar ious p u blic p os ition s has discharged co m p e t e n tly e ve r y trus t r e p os ed i n hi m . S inre 1917 he has o cc upi e d th e p osi ti o n of county j u d ge of \ Va ll o n a u n ty . a n d in c a ring fo r t he duties a n d r espons i bili t i es o f t hi s o f fice has established a s ple n did record fo r fairn ess, dign i t y and fir m nes s . ] ud gc C a mpb e l l was h orn ::\Toi e m b e r r7, 18.:;.:;. o n a f a r m i n \\'alt0n Co unty, and is a so n of 1 cil P. a nd Nancy ( lfay) C a m pbe ll. His g r catg-r a n d fa th e r o n the paternal s ide, a nati1 ' C o f S c t l a n d , immigrated lo the l ' n ited S t a t es in yo un g m a n h oo d a nd first se t t le d i n ::\for t h Carolina, when ce he came w it h h i s so n lo F l orida. f\ l e x andcr a m pbcll, the pat e rn a l g-rand fa t her o f J udge a mp bcl l , was horn in " orth Ca r o l i n a. a nd a b o ut 1 830 m o 1 c d lo F l o ri d a, l o ca tin g al th e o l d S co tc h se t tle m e nt , a l ] ( noxhil l a nd E u c h ec a n a, th e latter-named p l ace havi n g been th o ld co un t y seat o f \ \ ' a l t o n Co un ty, where t h e Scotch c l a n s of th e e a r ly days congregat ed. A lexan d e r C a m pbell marr ied Nancy McPh erson , w h o was b orn i n North Caro lina a nd ca m e t o F l o rid a a b out 1832. Nei l P. Ca mp be l l was ho rn in ?\or t h Carolin a a nd was a c h i l d w h e n brough t to F lo r ida, wher e h e e n gaged i n far m i n g a nd s t oc k r a i s in g . H e a l s o s e r ve d as s h e riff o f \ Va llon Co u nty, a nd at th e outbrea k o f the \Yar between th e states oc c upi e d th e positio n o f p ostmas ter. 1 c re r es i g n e d hi s office a n d e n li!:>lcd in the Co nfederat e army as a c a valryman , wi t h the rank of !:>Crgeant, bei n g lat e r pro m o t e d t o lie utenant. B e had a s p le ndid war r eco r d. and a t the c los e o ( hi s . e n i c r eturn e d t o \\'alt o n Co un ty, w here he resume d his fa r min g and s t ock raisingo perations, in which he co n t i n u ed lo be engaged durin g the remainder of hi s life . l.Ir. Campbell m a rried J\[ iss Nan cy Ray, who was born in Florida, a daugh te r of J o h n I. and F l ora (Gu nn) R ay . J ohn P . Ray was born i n North Caro l ina, and after his m a r riage m o ve d to F l o ri d a and loca t e d in the o l d cat c h sett l e m e n t. His wife's pa r ents we r e na-til'CS o f Scotland, who o n their i mmig-r a lio n to t h e Uni te d S tales se t tled i n North Carolina. L ike o t h e r farmers' so n s o f hi s clay ancl lo c a l i t y, i\lcxa nd r I\ . Ca n 1 p h ell paSSl'cl hi s boy h ood and you th in a ill'rnall'i) a ttcncling the dist r i c t sc h oo ls dur ing the wi11tcr krms a n d helpi11g his fat h e r durin g the ;u111rne r month s o n t h e farm, co ntinuin g th u s until he 11;1s twcnlys i x year s o f age, w h e n h sec u r e d hi s ce rtifi cate a n d bega n t each i n g sc h ool. .'\ fter fi1 c yea r s as a n e d u cator h e transferre d his ac ti1itie s to farmi n g o n his o w n accou nt, a n d h e was t h u s e mploy cl for te n years, during " -hich time he a l so o p erate d a sawm ill a n d di d loggi n g .• \bout 1 8 98 h e was appointe d s upcnisor o f regi,tra tio n for \ \ a l to n Co un ty a n d he l d that positinn fo r s i x years. 11.c was th e n e lected town clerk o f D e F uni a k S p r i n gs, a pos it i o n which he hel d for five ye a r s , an d duri11g t hi s time was also e l ected c l erk o ( th e r i mi na l Court of \\' a llon Co unty a n d fo r so m e time occupied bo t h posi t i o n s and di sc h a r g e d t h e ir dut ies c f T1cicntl). ! \ f t e r h !clin g t h e positio n of clerk of the ' ri m inal Co u r t fo1 two year s . he was e l eclt! d j u s t irc o [ th e peace for th e E i ghth D i s t r ict and hel d th a t o11ice unti l l9r 6, when he 1rns a ppoin t e d co un t y judge o f \\Tal lo n Co u n t y t o fil l the l'acan cy ca u se d by th e d e a t h of .I udge \ \ ' . E. Parish. J n t h e fall o f t h e s a m e 1ear he was e lected t o t his ofT1ce , fo r a t e r m c;r fou r years, starting J a n u a r y J, 1917, a n d in t h e fall o f 1 920 was r e elec t e d t o s u c cee d hirn sc l f , his te r m expir in g J a nu a r y I, i925. I. l e has clisp laycd judici a l abil i t y o f th e h i g hest o rder a n d has es tablish e d an excellent repu tatio n . J u dge Ca m pbell i s a stan c h dem oc r at. s a f r a t rn alis t he holds me mbershi p i n th e l oc a l l o dges o f th e ?I I a so ns , Odd Fcl IOll'S a n d \\'ooclmc n o f t h e \\0 rl cl. llis re ligiou s fa ith i,; that o f t h e Presby t e ri a n C hurch. O n l o ve mb e r 1 , J 880. J udgc Ca111pbe l l was unite d in m arriage a t l ( noxhi ll, \ \ 'alton ' a un ty, t o , \ L i ss Ta1111ie C illi s , daughter o[ John a nd Chris tin a (l\Jclnto,h ) Cil lis, t he former o f whom " as born in Scotla nd and sctt.lccl in l\ur th Carolin a, where h e followed fanning ancl was an e l d r i n th e Presbyt e r i a n C h urch. c h i l d r e n have bee n born to Judge and J\lrs . Campbe ll, o f whom four a rc living: Flora w h o marr i e d H . F . P o ll'e il, of ' rc st1 icw , F l o ri da, a n d has four so ns a n d o n e daughter: Ada bccc a, who is unmarr ied and resides with her p a r e nts, fo r m e r ly fo r seve ra l year s a teacher in t h e rura l d i stricts of \\' a lto n County, and now c l erk in th e p os t o fhcc al De Funiak S pri ngs; L o ui s e Chri tin a, w h o is t he wife o f 0. l.l. Cox, o f Quincy, Fl orida : and I l cnry . \ lexa ndcr, a p h a r maci s t al D cFuniak S p ri n gs. SuMTER L. r .oWR\' , )R. \'cr y few lin es of busi l lCSS have s h o w n the d el'ciopmenl attained in the in sura n c fie l d, a nd muc h of t hi s a dl'ancc has been bro u g h t a bout by educating th e public w it h 1 cfcr e n cc to th e n ecessi t y o f protecting themselves again s t death , o ld age, s i cknes s, a c idcn l a n d a l l losses th ro u g h adequ ate i n s u rance taken oul with o n e o r o th e r o f t h e old-Jin insuran ce companies. Thi act i 1 ' il y h a attracted to it not o nl y men o f m iddle age, bul th ose ju l entering upon a bu i ncss career , who, bringing lo i t the enthusiasm of youth , have ach ieve d a s i g n a l s ucce s s and found in it s u fficie n t rewards for their efforts and the r aliza t io n o f th e i r f n d cs l d r eams. S uch a man is umtc r L. L owry, J r., o f Tampa, who not o nly is a successful in sura n c e m a n h im s elf, but comes from a lin e o f m e n e n gaged in the same busines ,

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MRS. A. R. CA::.'IPBELL

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Suntkr L . L o ll'r y, Jr., \l'aS born a t Sain t Augustin e , l , 'lorida, . \ ugust .!./ , t 893 . a so n o [ Sumte r I ,, a n d \\' illi e UJillcr) L owry, th e f o r m e r o f l\'lto m ll'a> born at Y ork. South Caro lina , a n d lite la tt e r al Haleigh , )for th Ca r olin a . In 1 8 90, ltc ca m e lo l.' alatka, Flo r i da, and w a s t h e r e e n g aged i n th e drng b n s i ness unti l 189-J, w h e n lte settle d a t T ampa a nd engaged in th e i n s u ra n ce bu s i n c:;s . whi c h h e i s s till co n ti nuing, b o th h e a n d hi s wife m ai n tai ning th eir r es id e n ce at T ampa. The paternal g r a n d fathe r , L owry. 11as born at \'or k, South Carolin a, and li\'Cd l o a1t unu s ual old age , passing away a t th e o f n i n ety f i ,c \ ' c • a r s. I l e was th e fath c t o[ t hi rt ee n c hil d r e n . :.i1 1 l f wlto 1 n g rew l o m aturity, and o f th e m a l l Suntter I ,, l,owr.v, S r .. was lite lwc l ft.It i n rde r of birth . l ' i\ e of these children s t ill s m v i v c . Cro wi n g up al Tampa, . umtc t L . L O \\Ty , Jr., allc' n r lcd it:; publi c sch oo l s, a nd lat e r th e Vi r g i n ia \filitary I n s t itute . fr o m whic h h e was gTad11a t e d i n 1 91-J, a l td was awa r d e d the i\l e d a l o f t h e Society or Cinc inn a t i fo r gen e r a l effic i e ncy i n militarv malle r s . a n honor h e c h e r i s h es. H cturni1tg lo. Tampa , h e organize d Compan y H o f the Second Fl orida l n fanlr y. t \ L th e s a m e time h e ente r e d t h e in sura n ce b u s i n c s . a nd was d oing well with it when h e was calle d int o th e se r v i c e o n the 1\fcxi can B orde r in 1 9 1 6 . and r e m a i n e d th e r e unl i i j\. J a r c h , T 9 r7. w h e n h e was sent ba c k to T a m pa. 1-1 had sca r ce l y resume d h i s ins11r ance w o r k wh n h e was nee m o r e calle d i n t o th e service . commissi oned a ca pt ain. and assigne d t o t h e Thirl_\-first Di\ i s i o n. and was n o t di scharged until in Februar y. 1919. F o r the third time h e back t o T a mpa. a nd t oo k up the dutie s o f civi lian I i f e o nce m o r e . o n e o f the c n lh11s iasls w ith r e f e r e n ce t o t h e f\1n ' r ica 1 t Legi o n . h e was com m i ss i o n e d by th e l\ali o nal Hoard of that o r d e r t o o rgani ze t h e . \ m c r ican L.::gi o n for the S t a l e of Flo r i d a. and did so with m arke d ca pabi l it y . H e wa s e l ec t e d stale adjut ant al the fir s t 111 c ling h e ld a i Jack so nvil le. in Jun e . 191<). and h e ld t h i s oflice until \la_v. 1 92r. w h e n h e w a s e l ec t e d department co m man d e r o f Florida. H e o rgani zed t h e Fi r s t Bat tali on. One l lundre d a n d Si x t ee nth : Fi e l d . t.\r til ! e n'. Flo rida Kati o n a l G11ards . o f w h i c h h e \\'a s co m t{1ission cd major . and i n S pte m bc r . 1922. h e \\'as p r ornokd to th e r a n k of l ie utenant co l o n e l , w h i c h r ank h e now h o ld s . i\fr. Lowr y s h o w s in hi s imurancc bu s in ess th e same zeal a11CI th o r o u ghness w hi c h m a d e hi tn s u clt an efficient office r a n d s uccessful o rganizer. a n d i s d i stri c t agent f o r th e 1\a tional Life T1tsur a n cc Compa n y of Chicago. lllino i s . and a l so r epresents the .'Elna Casu a lty and Security Company. ' Il e has twenty agents unde r h i s supe n i s i o n . Frater n ally Mr. l _ow r y belongs lo the K n i ghts of P1,thi as. l n 1 9 1 6 i\l r. L o \\'r y marri e d [lizabeth Parkh i ll. a daughte r of Judge C h a r les U. and H e l e n \\' . Parkh i ll. \Ir. a n d :\I r s . L o w r y h a \ e o n e daugh t e r . Elizabeth P. :\ I r . L w r y i s s till a yo11ng man. n o t ha\ing yet passed h is third decad e . and \ 'Ct his life has bee n f11ll o f notable ;ic h icve;ne nts. H i s r emarkab le s uccess may in part b e la id t o the fact th a t h e n c \ e r 11nclcrta k cs a n v thing until lte i s fu l l y pre p a r e d , but whe n lie o nce cotnmenc c's. a llows n othing t o int erfe r e un til h e ace mpli s hes what h e se t out l o do. A n a t u r al leader of m en . h e i s a b le t o sec u r e f r o m those u nd e r him a c h eerful ;incl cffecti\ e co -o p eratio n that b r ings a b o u t Yerr accept able re:rnlt s, a nd i t i s sa f c L o predict t h a t h e w i l l t ravel far o n th e ro;id which leads t o fort11n c, and th a t h e will 5 1 n o t un l y secure f o r lti111scl f lit e cnto lu1ncnl s o f s u ccess, but will aid o th e r s l o earn a fair co m p eten c e . .IL is s u c h m e n a s h e w h o a r c the na t i o n ' s b ul w a r k s in tim es of war and during t h e p e r i o d s o f peac e . 0. K. REAVES. Possessed i n m arke d degree o f t h ose q11ali t ies w h i c h e n able a ma1 t to s e r ve with dign ified ca pabi l it y upo n th e ben c h , it was n o sur prise t o t h e friends a n d fellow pract i ti o n e r s o [ Judge 0. K. Hca\ •Cs wh e n h e was a pp ointe d l o th e circuit be n c h o f th e S i xth Judic ia l Distric t o f Florida. D11ri n g hi s s ix-yea r s ' occupan cy o f t hat. exal ted p os iti o n h e f ul l y jus tifi e d the trust p laced in h im , and wltc n a t it s c lose h e settled p erman e ntly a t T a111p;i, th e bar associa t i o n o f JTil l s boro11g h County recogni ze d the important additio n L o it numbe r s. J udgc Reaves was b orn a t a r a so l a . ?lfanalcc Co unty, F l orida , Oct o b e r 16, 1877 , a so n o f C. L R eaves, w h o was b orn i n Florida i n 1 8 47, a n d had th e misfortune t o Jose h i s fathe r w h e n h e was ver y youn g. H e i s a [ arme r a n d fru i lgrower l i v in g at B r a d ento wn. His wi f e, w h o \\'a s b o rn i n outhern Geor g i a i n i 85 2 . a l so s urviY es . They had two sons and two d a u ghte r s, al l o f w h o m sur \ 'i\e . J11dge Rea\ es b e in g the e ldest born. G r owing up in hi s n a tiYe county, Judge R ea\ e s • s p ent hi s boyhoo d i n th e woods . and acq ui r e d t h e fundamental s of a n educa ti o n i n t h e publi c sc h oo l s. Subseque ntl y h e attende d Mossey ' s Bus i ness o l lcge at Jack so nvill e, Flo r id a , and t oo k hi s legal trainin g i n th e law d eparlm nt of S t e t so n U niv e r s it y, fro m whi c h h e was graduated in 1903, wi t h hi s d e g r ee o f Bach e l o r o [ L a ws. Tmmedi a t e l y thereafte r h e was admitte d t o th e bar a n d began h i s professi o n a l ca reer at Bradcnto wn. H i s keen T a s p o f t h e l a w . h is unders t a ndi n g o f it s princ ipl es and th e ir appl i catio n , a nd th e s k ill with whic h h e conducted hi s cases b r u ghl h im t o th e attenti o n o f th e p u b I ic. and w h e n , in J 9 1 :;. h e \1as appoint e d circui t judge o f h i s d istr i c t b y t h e go\ e rn o r , u n i\ e r s al s a ti s fa c ti o n was felt. H e r emaine d o n t h e b e n c h until J u l y 1 , 1 92 1 . and t h e n r e turne d t o p ractice and l oc ;it e d at Tamp a , f o n11i n g a pa rtner s h ip with i\labry & C a rlto n . tmd e r t h e firm s ty le of Reaves & Carl t o n . wi t h ofliccs o n t h e fourth floo r o f th e Stovel l Building . This i s o n e o f th e stro nge t combin a ti o n s in South\\'CSL e rn Florida , and the firm i s co n n ec t ed w ith som e o f t h e most important litiga ti o 1 t s in the s tat e .. 1 udg e l ' c a \'es has a lways tak en a \'Cr y impo r t ant pa r t i n publi c affair s, s e r v e d Bradc n t o wn a s c ity atto rn ey for so m e year s, and r epresen t e d :\[ana tce o unty in the S tate A ssembl y in i91 r. Frate rn ally h e m aintains m e mbersh i p wit h t h e \lasoni c order a nd the Inde p e n d e n t Orde r o f Odd F ellol\'s. 1 [ e b e l o ngs l o t h e Baptis t Churc h . a l td has bee n YCr y active i n t h e wor k o f hi s d e n o mi n a ti o n. and a m e m be r a nd pres id e n t o [ i t s stale o rgan iza ti o n. In 1 909 Judge R ea1 es marrie d w h o 11as b orn in South Ca r olina. a n d thev have a so n. C harles 1-;-.. who is e l c 1 e n yea r s o l d. \Vhile Judge ' ' c a ves wa s regarde d a s o n e o f th e best m e n o n th e b n c h . it is recognize d that h e i s e v e n m o r e 11s ef11l w h e n e ngaged in t h e acti1 c prac t i ce of h i s pro f ess i o n, for hi s knowledge of t h e law, hi s r e lentless p rosec u t i o n a nd hi s d e t ermine d stand in m atte r s affecting the masses r e nder him i n va l u able a s a la\\'ycr. ll'hil c hi s uprightness. hi s publ i c s piri t and l oc a l pride have d eve l o p e d in him a desi r e fot service of th e hi g h es t c h a racter, a n d hi s exa mple i s o n e w hi c h has great wei g h t in h i s ommnnity.

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52 JllSTOR 't O F l•'L OLUUA \VILLIAM E . DUNC A N . S u ccess o r failure can n o t a l w a ys b e d e t ermine d b y th e a m o un t of a man 's worldl y possess i o n s, but r a th e r b y th e s um o f h i s acco mpli s hm ents during th e tim e h e h a s b e en ac tiv e l y e ngag e d in a b u siness o r profe s s i o n a l lin e . A cco rdi n g t o th i s s t andard vVilliam E . Dun ca n , cit y c l erk o f Tampa, h a s l e d a ve r y u seful life a nd mu s t b e c on s ider e d as o n e of th e s u c ce ss ful m e n o f hi s l o c ality, for i n eve r y thin g h e h a s u nd e r tak e n h e has r endere d excelle nt s e rvi c e a nd a ided in brino i n g ab out man y mu c h n ee ded im pro v e m e n t s . Di sco urage m e nt s ha ve b e e n h i s , but h e h as n o t p ermitte d t h e m t o hind e r him in th e d ev e l opme n t o f h i s p l ans, but rathe r has gain e d th r o u g h th e exper ie n c e h e has r ece i ve d , a nd pres s ed forward t o more strenu ou s effo rt. The birth o f Will i a m E. Dunc a n took pla c e at Mad i s on, Flo r ida , Augus t 29, 1 870 , and h e i s a s o n o f H.cv. E . B . a n d Sarah ( W es t ) Dunca n , nati ves o f Co l umbia, T e nn essee, a nd H.i c hm o ncl, V ir ginia, r es p ec ti v e l y . H.ev. E . B. Dunc an wa s a c l e r gy m a n o f th e Methodis t Epi sco p a l Churc h , w a s in a cti ve se rvi ce fo r forty-three years, and durin g a porti o n of th a t p erio d was missi o nary t o th e C h oc taw , Chic k a s a w, C h ero k ee a n d C r e e k Indians in India n T errito r y . I n 1 8 7 2 h e wa s s t a ti o n e d a t K ey W es t , Flo r i d a . His wi fe h a d t h e only c ook s t ove i n that r eg i o n , and it w a s r egarde d a s a g reat c uri os ity. S h e w a s hi s second wi fe, h e ha v in g been marrie d first t o a lad y w h o b o r e him two daughte r s , name ly: Li zz i e , w h o m arrie d Dav i d S. W a lker, a n d o n e w h o die d yo un g . David S . vVal k e r w a s a very p ro m i n e n t man , s e r v in g a s c i r c uit judge a t th e ti m e of hi s d ea th , a nd l1avin g b ee n at o n e t i m e gove rn o r o f F l o ri d a . M r s . \ Valk e r die d i n 1 9 09, and in her h o n o r t h e fla g was l owe r e d o n th e capito l bu i ldin g, th e o n l y i n s t a n c e o f s u c h a n h o n o r b e i n g pa i d t o a w o m an b y th e S t a t e o f Flo rid a . H.c v e r e nd Dll n ca n die d a t Lawtey, Flo rid a , in 1878 . H e a nd hi s se c ond w i fe had t w o c hildren: Willi a m E., w h o w a s t he e l d e r ; and E dw a rd P., w h o i s v i ce pres id e nt o f t h e B a nk o f Bay Bi sc a y ne, Miam i , Florida. H e wa s b o rn in vVes t V ir g ini a, w h e r e hi s pare nt s w e r e t h e n s tati o n e d . William E . Dunca n s p e n t t h e g r ea t e r part o f hi s b o y h oo d at Tallahassee, Flo r ida, and was a s t ud e nt at th e W es t F l o rid a S e min a ry, w hi c h s ub se que ntly beca m e th e Unive r s it y of Flo r i da . F o r o ne y e a r h e s tudi e d m e dicine, a nd th e n , i n 1 88 7 , w h e n only se v e nte e n ye a r s o ld , h e b eg an r a i . l r oa d work a s a clerk a nd tel eg r aph o p erato r at M a d iso n , Flo r ida , a n d c ontinue d in thi s lin e unti l 1916. In I889 h e was o n E g m o n t K ey , i n th e e mpl oy of th e Go ve rnm e nt , h aving c h a rge o f all of t h e c l e ri cal work fo r ab o u t two years , o r until th e con s truc tio n o p e r ati o n s we r e c o mp le t e d . H e was th e n made tra i n di s pat c h e r o f th e Flo rid a C ent r a l & P enin s u lar fro m 190 2 to 1 9 0 6 h e was wit h th e Geor gi a So uth e rn & Flo rid a H.ailr oa d . :.fac o n , Geor g ia , l e a v in g i t in 1906 t o go w ith th e S e a Board Air L i n c . wi t h w h i c h he r e main e d un til 1910, in th e lattc 1 : year comin g to Tampa. Mr. Dunca n th e n i m es t e d his m o n ey, bu t w as 1111-fo rtun a t e in hi s c h o ice of a n e nt e rpri se, a nd l o s t all h e had , a nd fo r two yea r s was i n th e e mpl o y of Ge o r ge A . : M c l oud in t h e naval s t o r e s bu sin e ss, t h e n fo r a yea r h e ha d c h a r ge o f th e n ew bui l din g of th e Kni g h t s of P y t hia s . F ro m th e n un til April 30. 1920 , h e w a s wi t h t h e D e p artment o f Sanitatio n , wh e n h e w e nt i nt o th e insurance b u s i n ess . On M a r ch l , 19211 h e was appo i nted c it y c l e r k o f T a mp a, a nd i s ver y effic i e ntl y dis charging t h e duti e s of t ha t offic e . :rvir. Duncan h a s a lwa y s bee n a d e m oc r a t , a nd ca s t hi s fir s t p r es id e ntial v o t e fo r G r o ve r C l e v e land . Ile i s a 1Iaso n . In i8g1 h e m a r rie d Sarah V . :Hiller , o f Ll o y d . J effe r so n Co u nt y, Flo rid a , a nd t h e y hav e o n e d a u ghte r , Annie E., w h o i s a t h o me. A daughter , }.. [ a r ga r c t , die d in T a mp a i n 1 9 13. PERRY C. v V ALL, m a nage r o f t h e i mp ortan t h o u s e of T a mp a o p e r a tin g und e r th e nam e of th e ! (nig h t & \Va ll Co m pa n y . i s o n e o f t h e m e n o f thi s p art o f th e state w h o i s attracti n g n o t i ce w h ich far outruns l oc al confin es, a nd i s b r i n ging him t o t h e atte n t i o n and a pproval of th e pe o p l e of t h e s t a te. H e i s de s c e nd e d fro m a l o n g line of h o n o rabl e a n cesto r s, wh o h ave p layed an i mp ortant p art in th e h i s t o r y of t h e cou n t ry, a s w e l l a s that of t h e ir seve ra l c ommuniti es a n d inherits hi s k ee n bu siness s e n se , goo d j a n d sterlin g h o n es t y fro m hi s fath er. The bir t h of P erry G . \ V a l l o c urr ecl in Her na nd o County, Flo r i d a , a nd h e i s a s o n of \ V illi am \ V . and Minni e May \ Vall, a nd g r an d s o n o f Perry G. \Vall , the l a tt e r of w h o m wa s b o rn i n L ibc r tv C o unt y , Geor g i a , November 2 , 1809. H e h a d th e mis fortu n e l o l o s e hi s father wh e n h e was b u t a child, a n d hi s w id o w e d m o t her m oved t o H a mil to n Co unty, Flo rida , and fro m th e r e h e r s on , th e c id e r P erry G. \i\T a l l , m ove d to H e rn an d o C o u nty, Fl o rid a, wh e r e s oo n aft e r t a kin g up his r es id e nc e i n it h e beca m e judge of p robat e whi c h office h e con tinu e d t o fill unt i l th e o ut br' cak o f the war h e l w c c n th e t wo s ect i o n s o f th e count r y . In 1871 h e cam e t o T a m pa, and c o nti n u e d to make this c ily his b orne until h i s dea th, wh i c h o cc ur r e d July 8 , l 8g7. H e was ea s i l y o n e o f th e b es t kn o wn m e n of S_outh e rn Flo r i d a i n h i s da y, a nd in w a s appo111tc d pos tm a s te r of T a11111a a n d se rved as s u c h fo r four yea rs. Tudgc \ 1\Tall wa s thrice m arri e d . lh e fir s t time , Novemb e r 1 8 , 1830, t o Hunte 1-, w h o di e d F eb ru a r y 28, 1845. On D ece m b e r II, 184 5 , h e m arrie d B a rbara Bai s d e n . Hi s third m a r r iage occurre d D ece mb e r 4 , 1883, t o Sa r a h \ Vatlington , o f K ey v V e s t , Flo rid a . \Villi a m \i\T. vVa ll, fa th e r of Perry G . \\'all, the yo un ge r , a n d s o n of '.Perry G. \Val l , th e elder, 11 a s horn in H a mil t o n Co unty, F l o rida , N o\'e mber 2 9 . 1834 , and hi s wife wa s b o rn a l G r eenobo ro , . 1\la b a m a , A u g u s t 1 4 , 1838, a n d d i e d F ebrua r y 161 1 89i. Co min g t o Tampa at th e close of th e war o f th e ' 6o s , v Villiam \V. \i\ T all e mb a rk e d i n the m e rca nti le b u s in ess o n l h c n orthwes t corner of \ V as h inglo n and Mar ion s t re e ts. A 1 1 o \ e r t he t e rri to r y tributar y t o T a mp a l h c n am e o f "Billy" \Vall, a s h e w a s affcc ti o na l c l y c a l k", s oo n came to b e acce p te d a s l h e sy no n y m of h o nest g oo d s and stra in-ht dealin g , a n d hi s s o n has l i ve d up l o thi s r e p utati o n in all of his trans a c t i o n s . \\Tith C a pt. J o hn :rviill c r a nd \Villiam B. H c n d c1 so n he he lp e d to es t a bli s h t h e Tamp a S t ea m s hi p Co m p a ny, o p e rating s t e a m e r s betw e en Tamp a, C e dar K e y s and Key \ Ves t , a n d g ivi n g t o thi s secti on th e firs t r egular ste a m tran s p o r t a ti o n to outs i d e markets. P e r r y C . v V a ll, th e yo u n ge r , fir s t atte n d e d th e Ea s t Flo rid a Semin a r y at Gai n esv i l le, F l orida, a n d l a t e r b ec a m e a s t u d e n t o f C o l o n e l Bing h a m ' s Milit a r y S c h oo l al s h c vi l le, o r t h Caro l i na . \i\Thc n bu t s i x t ee n ye a r s of age, i n a ssoc iat i o n with H . L. Knig ht , h e es t abl i s h e d lh e bu s i n ess of t h e Knight & \ Va l l Co mpany, o n J a nuar y 19, 1884 , befor e t h e r e wa s a r ailroa d , a brick buildi n g o r a h ank in T a m pa. Thi s b u s ine ss, n ow rated am ong th e m o s t s u bsta nti a l m e r ca ntil e o rgan izatio n s of th e entire So u t h . i s the o ld e s t in s titu t i o n of it s kind n o t only in T a m pa b u t i n 011lh F l o rida.

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1 l J TORY O F F l,ORID, \ 53 111 additiv 1 1 t v Iii, p r "> na l Jrn,i 1 1css i n t e r es t s .\Ir. \ \ ' all has en: r Ivund ti1ne ;11 H I v[lJHll't11nity l u d e v o t e tlt a l 111casm c of a t te n ti o n tu p1dilic and c ivi c affai r s co n s i s k11t witlt good c i tizen slti p . J Ii: lta s l ong bec11 a11 ; 1ctin: f o rce in loGd ;incl s tale p o litics . and ha s gaine d f ; 1 l'o rabl r ccu .. ni t i o11 " ' a pu b l ic o n soc ial and p o lit ica l qu es ti o11s . At vario u s times h e lias .,en etl as c h airma n o f CongTcssi o n a l a n d a u n ty D e m oc r a ti c ommittees. and i s n o w c h airma n o f tlt e Executi ve ommittee o f the \\'hite Muni c ipal J > arty, w hi c h , as a 11011nartisa n o rgan iza ti o n , co n trol s th e p o liti cs o f the C i t o i T ampa . Jn 1 890-91 , and again in 1894 -95, h e sc n c d a s a m embe r o f t h e C it y Coun c i l , a nd a l so a s a m embe r o f t h e C o unty School B oards o f 1897 and l 898 . H e se rvc' d a s treasure r o f tlte R elief Committee durin" tlte yel l o w f ever epi d e mi c o f 1 87 . Tn t h e campaiO'n o f 1 9 1 6 , inAu e nced b y th e crit i c a l conditio n s pre , a iling-during th e \\' o riel war, he became a candidate for t h e Unite d States Sen a t e fro m F l o r i da, bul wa s clef e a tecl, r ecci, i n g. h o w e , er, a , c r y Aalt e rin g s u pp ort. From the time o f it s i nceptio n Mr. \\'all h a s tak e n an a c ti ve part in th e workings o f t h e Tampa 1 3oard of Trade, a n d as a subs t antial and progr c s ' i vc c i ti ze n h a m a t c ri allv a id e d the advancc m c n: o f h i s community a n d his-s t a t e . H e marr i cl Mis> Mattie H o u s t oun, of Talla h assee, F l orida, and th e y have t wo c h i l d r e n , H o u s t o un and }.f artha. FRED \ V . \ rAXDERl'OOL. The n a m e Vanderpoo l i s a i g nifi can t and h o n o r e d o n e in outh ern Florida. I t wa s b orne b.\' o n e of the pio neer s o f Orange County of whic h the C ity o f O rl ando i s th e co u n t y scat , who h a d t h e courage and pe r s i s t e n ce t o bear and d o i n pite o [ adve r s i t y a11d v i c i ssitude . a nd continue a progr a m o f devel o pm e n t u n til th e modern e r a o f prosp erity , ertook the tatc. Fre d \\'. Vande r p oo l , son of t h i s p ioneer , has h a d a s uccessful ca r ee r at J \ 1 i a mi for a n u mber of years. where h e co nduc t s o n e o f th e largest gen e ra l and loca l in surance agen c ies i n the s late. Freel \,Y. Va n d erpoo l wa s born at Maitland. O r a nge ounty , Florida . o n cpte m bc r 25, 18 87. S 11s i 1 n :ss ;ind was o n e o f t h e fir o t s11c l'e:
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5 4 111 TOR\ ' O F F L ORIDA a 1 1 effecti \ e part in many of tile i111po r tant im p rovem ents unde rt a k e n to arh a11ce t h e w elfa r e of T:i111pa a n d it s sect inn . Llc is also co nn ec t e d with tli oulliern J lard\\'ar c J ohhc r s' 1 \ ssoc i :tlio n , w hi c h h e cd frn four year s a s prc;i c lc n t , and nf which he i s now a di rector ; i s presid e n t of the T:1m p a C r e d i t J\ssociali on; p r esi d e n t o f tile T a m pa 1 \dju,t111c11l J ]u rcau ; :rnd a director o[ til e T a mpa ] ; oard of Tracie. J\f r. Thomas has b ee n reared in the hardwar e bu s i n ess, ha\ing e ntered it as a lad of fourtee n yea r s , w h e n lie began workin g i n hi s father's hardwa r e s t o r e at Val do s t a , Geor gi;i. I n y o un g manhoo d h e c;i n 1 e w ith h i s fa111i l y l o Tampa , ::iml th e l i ttl e party w:cts acc ompan ied b y a n cgTo p orte r , .Jo h n Hudso n , who i s still in i\rr. T h o m a s ' m ploy , g i v i n g him a se n i ce which h a s al l o f the 1Jid -time l oy a l l y a n d devoti o n of t h e subo r dina t e t o t h e supe ri o r , and \\in ning i n r turn th e kind l y affecti o n so ofte n found in th e Sout h be t ween th two races. A t t h e time o f th e ;id ve n t o I t h e T h o m a s famil\ t o Tampa co n d it i o n s wer e n o t YCr y farnrablc fo. r th e ca r r ying out o f th e idea h e has b ee n fonnula t ing, but i n r900 h e l oo k the initial s t e p and o pened a s m al l r e t a i l s lor . S p ea ki n g o f this y e nlmc a n d i t s devel o p m ent in a n addr ess l o t h e Tampa E otar\' C lub. :'\Ir. Tho m a s said in p art: " M y associates i n the c o m pa n y and m y sc l f set o u t t o eithe r b ui ld up a c r e d itable b u s i ness o r go b r o k e i n t h e attem pt. In clu e t im e we f e l t w:i r r a n t ccl i n assuming the th e n formidable expense of o n e t r aveli n g man. It was w ith m a n y fear s a n d misgi vings tlrnt we re::ich ecl o u t for a s hare o f t h e tra d e of . outh F l o ri d a . But the r ea l growth of Tam pa a n d t h e surrounding-terri t o r y l1ad jus t begun , and we wer e f orl11natc in begi n nin g w h e n t hat g r owth began, a n d we were not co n t ent t o m e r e l y kee p pace w ith t hat g rowth , but wer e b o ld e n o u g h t o k ee p a Jillie in ac h a n cc of it. A t t im es our s t eps had to b e so ca uliom that I freq u e ntly foun d it n ecessa r y t o sell good s be f o r e b uying them-on many occasi o n s I h a , c p c r so n a l l ) ' so l ici t e d orders , wai ti ng-u n t i l I h a d th e o r d e r s a f e l y i n h an d fro m tile r e t aile r be f o r e orde ri n g good s fro m the 1wu n 1 fa c l m c r . i.::rrorts w e r e m a d e t o b o t h c r ippl e and kill the i nfan t ent e r prise-bu t it had th e \'ilal ity of u n l i m it e d e n ergy t h e g rowin g s t r e n g th of deter mi n a ti o n t Q s u ccee d a n d til e uns t i nt c d n o u rishment of hard wor k. Tt Ii \ eel a n d th r i \ 'Cd. " A s J\[r. Tho m a s i ndicates in t h a b o ve wor d s . t h e T ampa H a rdware Company g r e w r a pidl y . ancl t h e o r i g i n a l t ra veli n g nia n \va s g ivcn associ a tes unti l t o day th e compan y maintain s a large co r p s of as efficie n t and exp e r i e n ce d sa l esmen obtai n a b l e, who c o \ c r ;ill o f South F l o r i d a a n d r each out int o o th e r se ct i o n s o f th e state. T h e retail s t o r e i n th e m ea n whi l e was m o \ cd from the o r ig ina l l oc a t i o n in th e \ V . A. J\Iorri so n Building . co rn e r o f Fr::in k l i n an d l. fadi so n stree t s . l o the Fricblc B u i l d in g, corner of Fra n k lin and P o lk s t reets. The b u s i ness o f this d epartmen t \\"as expa nded unti l i t reach e d '200. 0 0 0 annua l l y . b u t i n 1 9 '-l was c l o s e d o n th e grou nd s that it was not fair t o the j o bbe r s to se l l dire t l o the trade. Sin ce then t h e Tam p a J l a rdwar c Compa n y h a s carrie d n ;i s t r ictly w holesale bus i n ess, and i s t h e o nl y exc lu s ive w h o lesal e hardwar e h o u se i n Florida tod a y . In 1 9 1 2 t h e T a mpa Hardwa r e o mpan y e r ec ted it s m o d ern fi\ e-sl o r y buildin g, which, although ample at t hat t i m e, is now scarcely la rge e n o ugh for t h e d e m a n d s of the busi n ess, a n d the co m pan y u tili ze s n ea r by b ui l di n g . as war e h o u ses . New d e p a rtment s have b ee n adclccl as the d e m ands o f the trade j u;,lil1ccl such x p a n s ion, and at p resent the compa n y i s d oi n g a business annua ll y of in h o t e l supplies; $200,000 i n sporting goods; 2.:;0,000 in automobi l e tire casings; in accessories; $250,000 in l"<>l111111Jia C:rafuno l a s in ; 1 cldition l o til e ; l ; 111dard k1rdwarc lin es . The o r igi11a l cap i t a l o f , 15,0 0 0 has bee n inc rea se d l o $ 1 00 ,000. capi tal and s11rpl11s. Sc\cntyli\' C p c r s n s arc e m ployed at Tampa, fif tee n lra\clin g m e n a r c on the road, and the retail stor e has b eco m e a pow rful \\"h o lesale con cern. . \ssrn: i a t cd with ]\[ r . T h omas in this icmarkabl c rnlcrprisc i s P e t e r 0 . Knigh t, president o f the c ompa n y, n o w gen e ral counsel for t h e Southern I fardw::ir c Jobbers' A ssocia t i on , and a n attorn ey of n a ti o nal r e p u te, a banke r and p u blic-spirited rili zcn. ::'l[r. T h o m a s i s a man of r e markable attributes and co lllp c l lin g p e r s o nality. H e is pos:-csscd of a \ \on d erful abilit y t o judge m e n , a n d seld o m makes a llli slakc i11 h i s selecti o n f the m. L t is a fact \\"Orthy of m enti o n t h a t many of t h e m e n n o w 11 ilh t h e Tamp;i H ardw a r e Compan y have b ee n \\"1l11 11.r. Tho mas for year s, ri s i n g in the con ce rn , a n d reapin g be n efi t s fro m their association 11 it11 hi m a n d the r::ipid l y expandin g bu in css. l)uring th e la t e war J\lr . T h omas sen ecl as presi d e n t o { t h "ou tli crn H ard\\'arc Jobbe r s ' ssocia 1 i o n , a nd a s s u c h r e n d e red a ver y valuable ser vice t o til e c 11ntr y, for h i s associ::itio n accomplished a n e n ormo u s a m o u n t of co nstructi ve wor k . J \ s a d i r ec t o r a n d m e m b e r of the d\' i sory Board o f thi s p o w erful organizati o n Mr. Thomas is con tinuing his co nn ecti o n with i t , and has pro\'cn c 'qua l l y usefu l during th e tryin g p e r iod of r eco n s lrnc t i o n . Mr. T h o m a s i s a firm beli c \ e r i n ad , c rti s in g, :lnd attributes m u c h of t h e s uccess of hi s co111pa n y to Lhc fact th a t fro m th e incept io n u f th e hu s i11 ss h e h a s 1 la cc d hi s affair s befo r e th e p u hli in well writte n and p laced ::ich crti:-e m cnts. A s o n e o f the l oc a l n w s p a p c r s !:.aid of l. f r . T h omas in a recent e d ition : r n s pit e o f hi s multifar i o u s ::icli\ itie s in h i s b u s i ness ;111d th e Sou t h ern Hardware J ob b e r s' . \ssoci::it io n. T h o mas find s t im e t o serve hi s O\\"n c it y a n d communit y w h c n e \ c r there i:; n ee d for hi s a r h icc a n d services. "":'\[r. T h o m;is i s p r es id e n t of t h e Tampa rcdit H e n ' s s>oc iation , w h ich i s composed of C\'Cry \\ h o lcs;ilc i mtitutio n ;rnd al l th e ban k s o f Ta111pa . I l e i s a l so pres ident o f the Tampa , \djus t m cnl a n d in both ca p a c i t i e s hi:; guid i n g h;rncl a n d h e l p ful ad\ icc have r(;n d c r c d i rn a luahk sl' nicc t o these b o d ics. J-1 i s a b o a d ircctor o [ the T a111pa B o ard o f T r acie. ""Then. l oo, there i s n C \"Cr a 1110\c m e n l of any so r t t endi n g toward til e Ci\ i c, industrial 0 1 co m m e r ci al b c tt c r1ne n t o f Tampa that d ocs not !incl :\I r. T h omas a cl i v c l v ide n tifi e d with it a n d work i n g w i th ile a rt ; rn d so ul for tile acco111pl is l 11ncnt o f a h cllc 1 and trnly g rc;it c r T;irnpa . " T l i s S lll:ctll w o nd e1 t hat a bu sinc s of the mag -11it11clc o f tile Tam p a J [ arclwa r c Company under th e guiding genius of s u c h a dynam o of e n ergy, si 1cl1 a s u cce ss f u l o rgani z r and s u c h ;:i thorough l y capabl b u siness 111a n i n eve r y respect h a s grown by leap s and b ounds Ir m il s \ ' Cry in fa n cy. " I.f 1RAM G. TuR1'rn. Of the rn n promi n e ntl y i c k n tificd with t h e bu s i n s i nteres t of Tampa, few have gain e d a higher rep11tat i o n for ability and integrity th a n h a s H iram • . Turne r, pres id ent and gcn cr;il 1na nag-cr of t h e T u rn e r JV[ a rbl c a n d G ranit e 0111pany . J\1J"r. Turner b c a m e a re ident of

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Ill. TORY O F FLORIDA T a mp a i n 1909 , and in lhe i11lerv e11i11g t e ri o d has s u ccess fully d e m o n s trnt e d what ca n he accom pli s h e d l11rn11g h ind11stry , applicatio n a nd h o nest 111e thocb . J\lthrJllg h lte has 11e 1 l-r so11ght t(l co m e befor e th e puhlir except in a hu:
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III. TOR\' H e i s a sple ndid ty p of the b usiness m a n w h o has 111adc Tarnp;i. o n e o f th e leading comme rcial ce nters of the Sou t h , a n d yet h i s interes t s in b u s in ess arc not of that absorbin g kind w hi c h pr ecludes acti1,ity al o n g lin es which rnak c f o r well-round ed charac t r a n d de1• c l o pm e nL H e i s a m a n of b r o ad i nformatio n in 111any dir ctio ns, His p e r so n a l acquainta n ce w ith l ea din g c it i zens of n o t e is a broad o n e a n d hi s spirit o [ good fellowship makes Ii [ c bri ghte r for tho se with whom h e comes into contact \\"1LJ, TAM JOH:"< HARKI H E IMER, Altho ugh m o r e than t we nt y -three years have pa ssed s in ce th e death of Willi a m J ohn Harkis h e im e r , h e i s till remembered by th o ld e r resi d ents of Jack o n vill e as a valiant so ldi e r during tim es o f war, a publi c s p i r it e d c iti ze n during days of p eace, a bu s ines s m a n o [ i ntegri ty a nd probity a n d a ca pab l e finan cier w h o g:we o f his abil it y t o t h e foundinrr and ci1'vel op111e n t of se 1 ,e ra l l a rge ente r prises, :\Ir, Harkis h ei1ne r was 1 orn January 1 r , 1 838, a t Philade lphi a, Penn sy lvania , a o n o f \ \ ' illiam and l\fa r ga rct D o uglas (McL ea n ) H a rki s h ei m c r , the former o f Gcr111an a nd th e latter o f Scot c h ancestry , IIe was th e second in a family of fi\' C children, a n d after attending th publi c sc hool s of P hil a d e l p h ia until r eac hin g the age of sixtee n yea r s was appr e nti ced l o his un c le, D anie l J , ]\[ cl.c an , l o l ea rn t h e trade of m a kin g watch cases, That h e mast red this d ifficult occ up atio n i s found in the fact that at th e age of e i ghtee n Years h e made a watc h c;ise that t oo k t h e fir s t i)ri ze at th e F r a nklin Institute Fair, h e ld ;it Phil a d e lphi a, a n d w hi c h wa fo r m a n y year s ca r ri e d by it s maket ' wi th muc h pride, The pani c of 18_:;7 threw th e youn g m a n out of e mpl oy m en t, but a fle r a few month s of icll e n cs h e was offe r e d a nd accepted a p os iti on as c l e r k unde r the commis:,ioncr of public hi g h ways. H e l oo k a n active pa r t i11 th e first Lincol n p r es id e ntial campa i g n , being secretary of o n e of t h e Philadelphia executive committees. t th outb reak o[ t h e ivil war :\[r. ITarkishcim c r e nt e r e d th e T we nti e th Regi -111c nt , P e nn y lvania Volunt ee r T nfa11lr y, as a pri 1 a t e so ldi e r ; in June wa s pro m o t e d co r poral , in .I ul y was made a se r geant , a nd a t t h e end o f hi s three m onths of e nli s tm ent wa s mus t e r e d out of t h e servi ce . H e ree n te r ed th e se r v i ce in Septe m ber, 186r, as seco nd lie ut enant in th e Eighty e i ghth . Regiment , Pennsy lvani a V oluntee rs, in June, 1 862, was prom o t e d to a first lieute nancy, :incl in 1\'01 ' e mb er, 186.3, was m a d e a ca ptain . In l\farc h , 1863, h e was b r eve tt e d m a j o r for faithful and me rit o ri o u s se r v i ce . During this tim e h e saw much hard se r v i ce in th e h enandoa h Val l ey and with the A rm y o r th e P o t o ma c, bcinobad l y w o und e d at Frederi c k sburg i n D ecembe r , r 862, and rece ivi n g honorabl e m e nt ion fo r gallant co n duc t in t hat battle . fter lwo years of se rv ice a s aide-cl -cam p a n d as,i s t a n t adjutant gener a l o n th e s t aff of Gen. \ V. R. M ontgo m e r y, U . S . . , C en. J o hn :\fan sfie lcl, U . S. V . , a nd Ge n , J . P . S l o u g h, . . V . , h e was orclcrccl t o duty i n 1866 t o o lum b i a, . onth Ca r o lin a, whe r e h e r e m aine d u ntil hi s retir e ment .fro m th e a rm y i n 1869 . His p os iti on und e r Ge n eral : M o n tgo m e r y cl ser ves s p ec ial men tion as it i nv o lv ed a parti cula rl y im portant a nd o n e r o u s trust f r o n e so yo un g, I • ro m Oct o b e r, r8 6 r, until A pril , 1 862, w hi l e th e . i\rmy of t h e Pot omac was b i n g organize d , he. s tati o n e d at lexanclri;i , Vir gi ni a, h ad entire charge of the bu s in ess a nd trafT1c carried o n w ith that :irmy south o f t h e P o t omac , a ll goo ds, stor es or tr:ivelers b e ing allowed t o e nter or pa s thro u g h F FL RJDA th e a rm y only u p o n hi s ofTic i a l orders . The busi-11css invol1• c d in th ese pror c dings :i1nounted t th o u sa nd o f dollar s d aily, thus howin g the honor ;ind r espo n s ibilit y o( t h e office . On leaving th service M aj01 H a rki s h e imer be gan a seven-year r es id e n ce at Philadelph ia, at the end of whi c h tim e h e r e moved t o J::ick o n villc, Fl o ricl;i , where h e es t al lis h c d himself in busines as a w h o lc s al and retail grocer . l [ c m e t with imm e di a t e a n d signa l s u ccess, l a rrr e l y clue l o hi s intro du c ti o n of the be s t modern m e th els. lways :ict i vc in pub l i c affai rs, h e soo n associated himse l f 11it11 th e he t i nt e r s t of hi s adopte d city. The Duval Building a nd Loan Association of Jack so n v ill e was cstabli heel by him in 1882, and h e was it s pre icle nt from it begi nnin g up t o th e lime of hi s d eath. Mr, H arkis h eime r earl y becam e in t e r es t e d in bankin g, and w h e n he di e d was vice pres id ent of th e omme r c i a l Bank and a direc t o r in th e Nati o nal Bank of Jack so n v ille, bo th of thi s city: a direc t o r in both t h e Putn a m ation al Rank o f Palatk a and th e Firs t Natio n a l Bank of F e r nandina, a nd wa co nn ec ted o th erwi e. He was a c hart e r m e mb e r of th e Jacksonvi l l e B oard of Tracie ; a member of th e eminolc Club and P e n nyh-a ni a Commancle r y of the Loya l Legion; a chart r m embe r of . 1L ]\[it c h e l l Post, G r a n d .i\rmy o f th e and a m e mber of th e :\fa so n i fraternity. In Sept mb e r , 18 67, Majo r H arkis h e imer was 1111itccl in m arriage with J e nni e E. C r a ne, daughte r of Judge Vv. E. Crane , o f Y nke r s, New York. Whe n h e died , i n F ebruary, 1899 , 1f::ijor Har ki s h e im e r was surv ived by hi s w id o w and two childre n : M rs. Georg II. R ichards a nd Howar d E. , both of Jack so n ville. ALLEN TANWJX HAY. It w o uld he a l o nrr time t o go back to find th e beginnin g of the knowledge that in certain gums, barks and h erb existed cu r a ti1e properties f r human ills, bu t this knowl e d ge d escended t o yet m ore enlig hten e d ages, when c h e mi stry te l e d th ir pro p e rti es a n d d i co 1 e r ccl and d eve l oped co mbinati on that n o w we call drug , th e inte lligent u e o f whic h i s bene.ficcnt beyond expressi n. The old-time physicians a nd drugo-is ts, with m edica m e n ts o f curious and so m e tim es r cpe l lant ompo ilion, ha1 c pass cl away, and the m o d e rn d ea l e r in drugs i s a r es p o n sible i n dividua l whose scien tifi c training has e l evated his bu s iness t o a professi o n . n c of t h e r ep r e se ntative bu siness m e n in this line at Jac k o n v ille i s Al l e n S t a nwi x Hay, wh h a b ee n a r si dcnt of Florida si nce h was t e n year s o ld . M r, Hay w a s born at Leeds, E n g l a n d, J uly 22, 1 876, a nd at th e age o f t e n year s became a r es id ent o f Flo ! icla, w h e r e hi s inter s t have b ee n ce ntered c 1 e r s1nce. ft r co mpl e tin g th e publ i sc h oo l course l\[r. I f a y b eca m e a c l erk in a drug stor e at Jackso n ville, a n d continued in this lin e until he had lho ro11ghly learned th e b11sine ss. l T th e n turne d hi s attentio n f o r a tim e i n a noth e r directi o n and s h o w e d hi s , e r sa tilit y by learning t h e printer's trade , w ith which h e wa co nn ec ted un til 1 902, a t which tirn h e was r ea d y t o embark i n busin ess for him clL I.le o p e n e d hi pre cnt r e t ai l drug stor e at 901 l (i11gsto11 1 \ vc1111c . Jacksonville. w h e r e h e has continue d c 1 e r in ce . H e handles :ill s ta ndard drugs a n d drug sundries, a n d main tain s :ill t h e pleasant features now f und all over th e co u ntry i11 fir s t c l ass d r u g s t o r es, a nd a a r es p o n s ible, r e liab le b u siness m;in, commands the r es p ec t a nd e njoys th e co nfid e n ce o[ th e community. :\ f r . r ra_v m:irri e d i n 1fa r c h , r 9 t 6, Miss Elizabe th

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B.

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l llSTOR\' OF FLORlDA 57 Smith, wh was bo rn a t R anoke, Virgini a, and they h ave two so n s : Allen tan wix, J r., a nd vVil liam B. f-(r . and Mrs. 1 lay a 1c membe r o f th e Episcopal hurc h . H e i a thirty-second degree J\fa so n a n l brine r and b e longs to o l ornon L o d g , F . a n d A. M.; Jack o nville haptcr, R. M.; Da111;1sc1 1 s o mmancl cry, I . T.; Florida o n s i s t o r y, and M oroc o Temple, Mystic Shrine. h e a nd wife are m e m ber of the Eastern S ta1. MORGAN F. JONES. Pro min ent among the m en wh o a r c ma int aining th e pres tige f th e Jac k so n 1 ill c bar i s M o 1gan F. J o n e , w h o has bee n e n gaged in s u ccessful practice h e r e since r9n. and w h o s i n ce J920 has been a ref e r ec in bankruptcy . l l e wa s born at Oglethorpe . Maco n o un ty. Gco r J:! ia. August 27, r885. and is a so n of N e\v t o n T . and Ruth A nn ( anclc 1s) J o n es. I . T. Jones was born in 18 . 1 0 and wa rear cl o n a farm a nd rccei1 cl a public .ch oo l ducatio n . \;\T h e n th disc u ss i o n between th e states res ult e d in h os tiliti es hi sympathies wer e entire l y w ith th e o u t h , a nd for t h e f ur yea r s of war that fol lowed h e fought valiantl y as a .olclie r of th e Co n fe d e r acy. Tot 1 n g after th e clos of his mil i t a r y c r vicc h e e ngag cl in farm i n g in Macon County, G orgia, whc1 e h e h as si n ce made his h o me, and s till sup r int.c nds o p c r :itio n . o n his pr o p erty th e re. at t h e rip e o ld age of e i ghty two yea r s . A r ep u blica n i n pol itics, h is o n e of the i nflu e n tial m e n of hi s co m1nunit y , and i n former yea r s t oo k a n acti ve part in pu blic affairs, having serve d fo1 nine! e n year s as p os tma s ter a l Ogl e thorpe and fo r e i ght vca r s was the incumbent of th e sa me p os iti n at P e lham, Geo r gia. H e i a m e m bc 1 of th e Baptist hurc h , as is a l so 1 1 rs. J o n es, w h o was born in i8..t6 . T hey have been t h e pa r ents of t we lve children, of w h o m five a r c l ivin g, Morgan F. bei n g th you n gest. M rgan F. J ones atte nd e d t h e public sc h oo l s of Ogl e th o rp e, following whi c h h e pu r s u e d a literar y cour c at M e r ce r Uni1c r si ly. J\fac o n . and th en t oo k up t h e s tu l y of law at t h e UniYersity of K entuc k y . b eing graduated w ith th e c la s of l 910, and r eceiving th e degree of Bachel o r of Law:;. H e was admitt e d lo th e ba r s of Kenlu ky a nd Geo r g i a i n th e sa m e ye;u. and in 1 911 was a d mitte d t o the bar of Florida. Jn the ! alt r year h e l oca t e d a t J ackso n v ille, w h e r e h e h as since been e n g arr e d in a g neral practice. H e h as b11ilt u p a large, rem unerative and r cp r cse ntati1e clientc le. ;rnd has attain e d a deser vedly hi g h p l ace in th e rank of hi s p r o f ess ion. lT e i s a member of th e Duva l County :Har . socia l i on and the Flo rid a S t a t e B a r ssocial i o n . J o nes i s a de m ocrat i n p o liti cs. a nd has intereste d him se H in pol i tical and public matters. H e se rved o n e term as a m e m b r of the Jad:son1 illc C ity o un cil. r e p r c ntin g th e Fif t ee nth \Van! , and , cplember 1 5 . r920. was app ointed a refer ee in bankruptcy, a p os t whic h h e s till r t ai ns. l?ralcrn ally h e be l o ngs l o th e I ni ghts of Pythias; , o lomon L odge, F. and f \ . Jac k so n v i l l e Chapte r, R . J \ . 11.; 1 amasc u s Comma nd r1-, K . T.: and ]\! o r occo T e mpl e, . A. 0 . I . ir. \Vith o l h r ci ti ze n s o f progr ess ive incli n a t ions a11c! farsi g h te dn ess h e s upp orts mov m e nl s fo;,,lc rccl w ith the idea of bc 1 . 1 efiti n g th e int c rc;,,ls a nd institutions of Jacks 111ill e a n d the ll"CI fare of it people. On l\farc h J, i 91.=;, ]\[ r. Jones was united in m arriage wi th 1 1 iss 1\lartina B II, o f Jack. o nvillc, and to thi s uni o n there has bee n born o n d a u g h ter, l\lartina Bell. J LTAN PAUL . The placing of in s uran ce has n o w become o n e of the most i mp ortant branc h es of comme r cia l life as the p eo ple have bee n edu ca t e d t o their duty in thi s r espect. This awak e n i n g lo what i s a n obv i o u s duty h a b ee n accomplished thro u gh a most i n ten sive ca mp a i g n o n t h e part of the progress ive in surance m e n of the country, who have had lo 0 1 • e r o m e man y o b s tacles in th e way of i g n o r a n ce, indiff e r e n ce a nd lac k of apprec i a ti o n o f th e many advantages o[ th i s form of invest m e n t and p r o t ect i on. t p r esent there a r e few ind ee d w h d o not carry orne form of i n surance, a nd th e time i n o t far di stant when the i n tellige n t man and woman will provide for eve r y con tin gency throu g h th e m edium of in s uran ce. One of th e m e n w h o h a bee n co nn ected with the in s m a n ce business o[ Jack so n v ille during a l l o f hi s active career is Julian Paul , with office a t 5 0 6 lfobee Building. Julian Paul was born i n Duval County, Florida, J a nu a r y r, r 887, a so n o f Dunba1 J a m es a nd M a r y (Carolin ) P a ul. Dunbar J a m es Paul was b orn i n Kirkc11dbright. cotland. February 26 . l 8 42, a nd hi wi [ e was bo rn in C h a r leston South Caro lina , i n 1847, and di ed in r9or. T h 'ey h a d e i g h t childre n , of whom Julian Paul i s t h e e ld est. Edu cated at t h e U ni1cr s ity of E din b ro u g h , Scotland , Dunbar J a m es P a ul ca m e t o th e Unite d S tate at th age of e i ghteen years, well ground e d in t h e esse ntia l , and l oca l e d in South a r o li n a, and there h e li1 c d for man y years, being engaged in a who! sal e cotton busin ess . Subsequ e ntl y h e cam e to Jack so n v ille, Florida, a n d i s n o w e ngaged i n a m e r c hand ise brok e rage b11siness . H i s a Presbyteri a n and a cl m oc r at, and a m a n of hi g h standin g i n t h c it y. Julian Paul was gradual cl from th e Mill High Sch oo l o[ Jack so n v ill e i n 190.'i, a nd imm ediate l y t h e r after es ta b l i s h cl h i m self in hi s prese n t gen e r a l in sura n ce bu siness, w hi ch he h a g r adually expanded u nti l h e i s now one o [ the lead e r s in his li ne in t h e c it y, and h e i s a l so e n g aged in pla cing loans up o n goo d security. H e be l o n gs l o Barnett L odge. F'. and .A.. 1 r., and t o a ll the br a n c h es o f Sco tti s h Rite Masonry, in \ hi c h h ha s b ee n ad1' a n ccd lo the thirty-s econd degree, a nd he i s a m e m be r of M orocco Tem ple , A . 0. ]\[. S. L ik e hi s father, h e b e l o n g l o th e Presbyterian Church, but in politics h i s a r ep u blica n . Mr. P a ul marrie d L o ui se hancy, of R o me, Geo r g i a, Jun e 5 . 1912, a n d th ey h ave thr c c hi l d r e n : l\rary Louise. a nd twi ns, John Roberts a nd C harlotte. RAYiltOSD BHLTr 110 1 rns, of Sant a R osa County. i s h e r e g iving-a most progress i ve a nd effccli1e administratio n of t h e office of coun y s up rinte nclent o[ sc h oo ls, a nd in thi s po s iti on h e i s abl e a lik e l o expr ess h i s fin e loyal ty to hi s nativ e c unty and hi s acl1' a n ce d p olic i es i n th e o rd e rin g of th e publi c sc h oo ls. Mr. H obbs was bo rn n hi s fa th er's farm in . anla R osa o unty, a nd th e date o f his nativit y was F ebrnary 27, 1 893 . .I f e i s a so n of th e late J ohn and J. amilla ( R obins n ) J l o b bs, wh o pas eel t heir e n t ir e li1 cs in Florida, the father havin g been a farme r an d s tock g r owc r and h avi n g be e n pr min e nll y connected with the logging a n d gen e r al limber bu siness in t hi s sec ti o n of th e state. .A. ftc r h aving profi t e d by th e a d va ntages of t h e pub lic sc h oo l s of hi s nativ e county Raym n d B. H obbs look an cffec li v course in the Starts t \ ca d m y, at ) l o ntgornc r y, A labama. Thereafter he g;tvc s 1 • c n year s o f adm irabl e se r vice as a

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5 J 11. 'TOJ { \ ' tca chl' r i n lite ch oo l s o f !ti h o m e county , the g r ea ter part of hi s w ork in t h i s p e r i o d havin g been in the g r a d e d sc h oo ls. Upon r et irin g fro m t h e p clagogi c profcs i o n he beca m e a train co n duc t o r on th e lin e of t h e Flo rida & lab a m a J.{ailroacl. lle continue d hi s serv i ce i n t hi s ca pa c it y t hree yea r s, a nd t h e n r es i g n cl, o wino-to hi s app ointment to th e offic of c unty upc rin t cnclc n t of ch9o l s fo r Santa Rosa "aunty, in th summe r o f 1920, a f te r th e r sin-nati o n o f t h e regula r in c umb e nt. In t h e autumn of t h e same year h was e l ec t e d t o thi s office fo r t h e regula r t rm of four year s begi n n i n g in J a nu a r y, 1921 , and hi s a dmini stra ti o n i fully justifying his se l ectio n for thi s importa nt off1c . .\ Ir. H o b bs i found l oy al l y arraye d in t h e ranks o f th e , d e m oc r atic p arty, h e a n d !tis wi f e a r c a c tiv e m e mb e r s o f t h e :Metho d i s t Episco pal C ltur clt, South, and h i s affilia t e d w i th t h e : H ocl c rn \\'oodme n of Ame r ica and t h e [ ( ni g h ts of Pythias, includi n g t h e Dramati c rclc r o f l h e J (nig ltt s o f Kho rassan. .ln July, r9r4, was sole mn ized th e m arriage of :\LL H obbs l o Mi ss L e l i a H s i c S imm o ns, w h o likewi se was bo rn and r ea r e d in anta J.fo s a Co unt y, a n d w h o i s a claugh t e 1 o f 0 . 0. and :\ [argarc t Simmo ns, the l a llc1 of w h o m s t ill res id es in t hi s co un t y. 0 . 0 . imm o n s was al th e ti111 o f h i s d ea th o n e of lhe h o n o r e d and inAu e n lial c iti ze n s o f t h i s co un ty w h e r e h e h a d b e n activ l y co n ce rn e d i n f arming and logging ente r pr i ses , be s i l e having co nducted a e n e1aJ to r e at B o t ts. H e e rv e d as county d e m o n stra t o r a n d agent, as p ostmas t e r at Botts and as a m e mb e r o f tlt c s ch oo l board o f t h a t Yillage, wh i c h last named pos i t i o n h e h eld seve r a l yea rs. :\Ir. a nd H o bb s h a 1 e lwo fine Jilli e so ns, l.Zay111oncl Si111111 ns, and J o hn . J osEPH J . B E KllAM. On o f the o ldest pas se nger co ndu c t o r s i n point of ser v ice i n th e o ulh , J ose ph J . Beckham is widely and fav rabl y known a m tl"' th e travelin g public. F o r th i r ly'e1cn yea r s h e h as l rav.el ecl o n vario u runs, first for lli e Seaboard Railway a n d since 1 905 for th e South e rn R ai l ll'ay Sy>l e m , a nd durin g lit i s tim e ha s 11on th e :frie n d s hip and es t ee m o f m e n in a l l s tati o n s of l ife . During a leav e o f ab se n ce in 1921 h wa s e lected muni c i pa l judge o f Jack so n 1 illc. a position t o wltic h h e was r l cctcd and i n 11hic h h e i s now sc r v inr ' . . \ I r . B eckham was horn a l rlay l r . Lownd es Co11nly, Geo r g i a, 'epl c m bcr 29, 1866, a nd i s a o n of .'\lcxander C. a n d l\fargar e t L. ( B o rinO') 1 3eckham, both o f ll'ho m arc n o w d ecease d . The r e 11c r e but tw o childre n in t he fa mi ly: J ose ph J. a nd o n e who di cl in inf ancy. A lexa n d e r C. B ec k h a m w a b o rn in So uth Car o l i n a, a nd during th e earl y 'sos ca m e t o Flo rid a. H e r c h e saw fl h tin g in th e India n wa rs, in w hi c h he s e n c d a a n ffic r , and t hi s exp e ri e n ce made h im a va lu ab l e additi o n to the Flo rida fo r ces o f t h o n f e d e r a y a t t h outb r ea k o f th war b e t wee n lite s ta tes, w h e n h j oine d lh c Grays a nd fought thro u g h un til th e c l ose of h os tiliti es. H e h o 1 eel him self a ca p able officer and a ga llant a n d faithful lclic r and es tabli s h e d an envi ab l e r p utati o n . \<\Tith the fall o f t h e " L os t Ca use" Mr. Beckham w n t t o l ac hu a Co unt y, F l orida, whe r e h e was e ngaged in agr i cultura l purs u i t s up t o t h e lime o f hi deatl1. During hi s late r year h e did muc h t o ass i st the wido w s and childr n of Con f e d e r a t e sofdi r to cure their pe n s i ns, a nd a n y deserving cau se i n s t a n t l y e nli s t ed his ympath y a nd se c m cl t h e assis t a n e of h i s abi l ity, hi t i1ne a n d F Fl I Z l IJJ\ hi, p e r o n al m ea n J •o r m a n y years t!ti hi g hl y r es p ec t cl 'tizcn sc n ccl in lite capacity of justice of th e p eace, a n d h i s j uclg m cnl was r s p ec lccl b y his neigh b o rs, w h o b r o u g h t th e ir troub l es lo him, urc o f findinrr a way o u o f their diffi u l lies. J n p o lit ic he w as an adherent of th e p rin iple s f the ck111o c ratic p a r t y , a 1 1 d h i ' r e l giou' f;iillt 11a, that of th e i\lcthocli s l !turch, a fai t h w h ich h liv e d l aity. H e b l o no-ccJ l o t h e l\f a onic o rd e r and was a p a s l 111as ter of \ Va l d o L odge No. IO, F . and . M. After a tt e nd i n g t h e publi c schoo l s Joseph J . Fkckh a m was g iven a cours at Gain sville e m inar , th e n r clurni1 w t o hi s father's farm. Lik rna n y o f t h e yo uth s of th .rur a l o mrnu n i li s , h e w as attracted by lit e g lamour and p oss ible roman ce o f th e r a ilr oad, and fin ally secured e mpl oy111 nl a s a b r a k e m a n with lh e eaboarcl Railway Co m pany. 1.n 1 885 h e was acll'a n cccl l o lh c p os t of co nd u c t o r , w hi c h h e h e l d until 1905 , al that time t r a nsferrin g hi s se r vice s lo lh o ulh rn kaih ay sys t e m , a pa sse nger conducto r . being Lil l o n n ccled witl 1 t hi J i n . O n e of th e olclcsl 111c n i n p oint of e r v i ce, h i s l ik c wi s o n e of the most hig hl y es t ee m e d , and hi friends are legi o n . lle b e l o ngs lo the Railway on clucl o r s ssociali on, a nd hi s r elig i o u s o nn ecl i o n i s with th Presby t e r ian C hurc h . Pol iti cally a d e m o r a t . w hi le o n a leave o f abs e n ce h e was l ec t cl municipa l j udge o [ J a c k so nville, a nd , b cino-r ee le c t e d , i s s ti l l acting i n t hat capa c it y. As a fralcrnalist h e i s a ffiliated w ith \ \ ' a ld o L o dge No. 1 0 , F. a n d A. Jack so n v ill e Chapte r o. r z, R. . 1[.; H a l lm a r k 'o un cil No. 3 , R. and . M .; Damasc u s 0111-m a ndcry No. 2, I . T., and M r cco T e m p ! , . , \ . 0 . N . M . . ; and Jack nvill L clge, Benc,o lcnl and Pro tective Orel r o f li:l ks. In O c t ober, 1896, Mr. Beckh a m 111arriecl .ill iss B ertha 1 1[. Furman, who wa s b o rn in Fl o r i d a, and i . worth y matro n o f J acl so nvill e C ha!llc r T o . 15, O rd e r of th Ea tern tar. J. \ V A llREN OTT. How g reatly t h e l o ng a n d int e n se truggl bcl we e n the South a nd th e N o r lh , during th e '6os, d eve l o p e d th e yo ullt of the count r y can. in il s entirety. never be kn wn , hut th e r e a r t ho. e livin g w h o entered up o n lite h ards hip s i n c i d ent t o a so l dier's life when I u t lad s in their early 'teens, and so braYe l y a nd courageou s l y faced c 1 c r y 1 icis s itucl e a n d un c 111-plaini n g l y b o r e s u ffe ring and hard s h ip th a t tltcir 1 a l o r s h o ul d b e r e m e mb e r e d when llt i s u nited country co un t s ver it h r o . The g r ea t co n M i c t bclll'cc n th e states, with lh e important iss u es it r epresente d. ce r t ainl y brought about a c lass of traine d , di ciplinc d m en. who se innue n ce h as been r ecog ni ze d el'c r s inc e . n e of lit e heroi c wearers o [ l h c G ray d u ri n g lit e '6os, w h o i s now a socia cd wi th a numbe 1 o f hi s old co rnrad es, actin g in th e 11ay o f g u a r dia11 over th e ir int e r ests and wel fa r e, is J . \\' arre n Scott. supcrint ml c n l o f lite onf eclc r a t c o ldi c r s ' a nd Sai l o r s' H orn al Jack s n 1 illc , Flo r i d a . :\[r. colt \\'a s b o r n a l Jackso nville, October ,c;, 1 8 44. a nd i s a so n of ). \Varrc n and E l iza J\. ( P y les) colt. H i s f a th e r was b rn at l. . l el'e ns, New l runswi c k , Can a d a, overnb r 7 , 1 8 1 8, and a a you n g man ca m e t o the United Stales and localed in eo r gia, wher lte became a pio n ee r lumb r rn r e liant and awmill operator. L a ter h e cam e t o Jack so n vil l e a n d engaged in the lumber business, but w h e n the F e d e r a l troops ca m e t o thi s city they confi cated his propert y and made 1 f r . colt a p r i s n r of war, a h e had in t11 o n fcclera t c r v i e t wo sons a n d h i b r o ther,

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JI I 'TO IZY O F FLORIDA 5 U Edward D . , th e last nam ed of whom died while e ngaged in milit a ry duty. l the cl9se of the war between the stat s Mr. cott was relea sed from prison, and, later, through the offices of the British Government, h secured from th e Uni t ed State Government r epa rati n amounti n g to , 2 4,000 , which h e i nve ted in the lumber bus ine ss, an industry with which he con tinu e d t o be ide nti fied unti l hi s death in [ ay, r 7. H was a lso interested in th e o rang e grove busines and o wned several valuab l e pro p rties. H e belonged to the English Church, or hurc h of E n g l a nd . Mr. Scott married :Miss Eliza . Pyles, who was born in Georgia and died al the age o f sixty-seve n yea r s , and they beca m e the parent s of nin e children, of whom five survi\'e. Among th ese children was Edward D. coll, who enli l e d in o mpany A, Third Regiment, Flo rid a Volunt ee r Infantry, durmg th war between th states, and died about the close of th e war. The third in order of birth of hi parents' c hil dren, J . vVarrcn Scott, the you n ger, was l a rgely se l f-ed u cate d i n hi yo uth . In the fall of 186I, whe n a m e r e l ad, h e e nli tee! in Company I , Eighth Regiment, F l orida Volunteer Infantry, but was s u bseque n t l y rej ec t ed beca u se of hi s you th and was sent l o th e Ordn ance Department, wi th which he was connected for about 10 years. At the battle of Olu ta he had his baptism of fire as a memb e r of the i xth Flo r i d a Battalio n , co m mand ed by Lieut. Col. Charl es F. Hawkins. Later he joined o mpany I , First Regim e n t. Flor ida Reserves. H e aw active service in th e bat tl e of Otter Creek and Cai n e ville, in u g u st, 1 64, and was at atural Bridge, Marc h 6. 1865. Subsequently he went to Tallahassee, and was par o lee! a t Madiso n , May 17, 1865, havin g par ticipated in all the e ngagem e nt s o f hi co mmand and comported him e l f as a b r a,e and faithful so ld ier. After hi s fa th e r had been pa r ole d fro m pri so n he e ngaged in the lum ber bu iness with th e cide r man for a number of years, o p e ratin g a saw mill in the manufacture of lumber. In 1883 h e e n gaged in the o r a n ge g r owing indu try, a nd re mained in that lin e until 1898, "the year of th big freeze." Mr. colt was then e mpl oyed vario u s ly until 1907, when h e was elc l e d c ity t r e a surer of o uth J ackso n ville, a n d continued i n th at capaci t y until 19 19, es t ablishing a sp l e n did r eco rd. In 1921 he was appointed s uperint e nd ent of th e Con f edcratc So ldi ers' a nd ai l o r s' lT m e a t J ac k so n vil le, a nd this posit i on h e occ upi e at presen t. H e has the affairs of the home running in effic i e nt man n e r , a nd is working e n erge ticall y in behalf of th e interests of th e w ards placed under hi s ca re. . H r. Scott i s a d e mocrat in politic and h as several ci1ic and soc ial connections. On February l, 1870, Mr. Scott was united in marriage with E mm a J . Murdock, wh o was born at Jack onvillc, J unc 12, 1850, a n d was a niece of Col. J. J. D aniel. l k I'. D anie l . Dr . \\' .. \ . Daniel a nd Dr. J o hn . Le Engle. Mrs. colt died June 5, r 915, h avi n g been th e m o ther of th e following childre n : Three who died in infancy; John 1L, \\"ho died at th e age of forty-three years; J a m es, who e nli o t ed in the inct ec n th Coast Artillery during the S pani s h-Am erica n war a n d died while in the service i n Cuba; Warren F., of Jacko nville; Alexandria, who is th e wife of F. Hazelton, of this city; a nd E mm a W., who r e sides with her father at South Jacksonville. CHARLES M. DURRA CE, a leading member of the Duval ou nl y bar, h a since commenc ing practi ce at J ac k so 1 wille in 191 .1 gai n ed a reputation as o n e of the m oot fo r ceful l awyers of t h e l ocal bar, a nd as a c riminal lawyer h as few peers thro ughout th e s t a t e . His k een a n a l ytica l m ind a ffords him unu s ual facility in wo rkin g out the detail s of a case, and it i aid that before goi n g int o th e courtroo m he mu s t know that he is th or o ughly pr e p ared for every d eve l opment that may a ri se during the tri al. Hi co nt e mp o r aries arc q u ick to ack n ow l dge his special abi lit ies a nd hi s high p o it i o n among the lawyers of th e s t ate. Mr. Durr ance was born F eb ruary 26, 1888, at F ort M ea de, Pol k Co unty, Florida, and is a son of J oseph G. a nd Etta ( auls) Durrance. His pate rnal grandfather, J csse Durrance, was b o rn in Geo r g i a a nd was a you n g man when he migrated t o Florida, sett lin g as a pioneer in what is n o w Pol k County. There, while endeavori n g to est a b l i s h a h o m e in th e wi l derness. h e was fo r ced n o t o nl y t o withstand the privations and h a rd s hip s of life on t he frontier, but on numerous occas i o n s fo u ght off th attacks of hos til e Indian s and gaine d a r ep ut ation as an Indian fighter, a r ecognition t hat was a lso granted his s i x broth e rs. His sister married a member of the Tilli family, famo u s in it s day for t h e Indian fig hting procliviti es of its men. In hi s l ate r years ] es e Durrance settled down to the peaceful purs uit s o f agri culture, and developed a productive a n d valuable prop erty. J os eph G. Durra n ce was born in Polk County, l"l o rida, in 1867, a n d was reared on his father's far m , wh e r e he was instructed in all the departm e n t of agricultura l work. H e has k ep t cl ose t o th e i i in th e activities of his caree r , and a t thi s tim e i s o n e of the leading oran ge growers of Flo rida, o wnin g no l ess than eight producing gro,es, se\'e r a l o( which a r e among the largest in Flori d a. H e also owns a large packing house a nd engages exte n sively and profitably in the b u sines o f cattle raising. Politically he is a democ r at, but h as not t a k e n a n active pa r t in p u blic affa ir . Mrs. Durrance, who a l o survi , e , i s a nativ e of Bradford County, Florida. The e ld e t in a family of e lev en childre n, C h a rl es M . Durra n ce securea his ea rl y ed u ca ti o n i n th e public schoo l s of Fort Meade and then ente r e d J o hn B. tctson University at DeLand, F l orida, fro m w hi c h h e was dul y gradu a t e d after takin g a literary cou r se. He then ce ntered his att ention in the s tud y of law at the University of V ir g inia , and was g raduated therefrom in 1913 with th e d eg r ee of B ac h e lor of Laws. Comi n g at <1ncc lo Jackso nville, he entered upon the practice of his ca llin g. This was at first general in its c h a r acter, but g raduall y h e began to g i ve mor e a nd m o r e attenti o n to criminal cases, and at pres e nt i s acknowledged one of the leading legist in this d partmcnt to be found in the stale . He h as b ee n id e ntifi e d , o n o n e or the ot h e r s ide, with m os t of the big case that have com e before the courts in r ece nt years, including the famous h ep h e rd , th e Georg i a P eac h l ing, the J. L. \V est a nd th e H i gginbo t ha m ases. 1 [ r. Durrance is a valued m e mber of the Duval County a nd Florida Stal e Bar associations , and as a fraternalist holds m e m bership i n the Benevo l ent and Protect i ve Order of Elks, the Knights of Pythias, the Theta hi, a nd Delta 'igm a Rho forensic fraternity, a nd others, in addition t o which he has a number of soc i a l and civic connec ti o ns. As a voter he supports the ca nd idates of the democratic party. \YrLEY J . 1IcD .\\"ID is a popular citizen and efficie nt officia l at P en acula, where he holds th e

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GO ILJSTCW\' C W r < L O l \.JD . \ <1i1ice o f la x assessor uf E sca mbia County . H e was b o rn in . a nt a l\ os a Co u nty, F l o r i d a . July 1 8, i874. Hi s g r a ndfather, David 1IcDa,id. \\"as a pio neer se ttl e r and influ e nti a l c i tize n o f Santa Rosa Countr. wh e r e h e b ec a m e a s uccessfu l lumber m anufacture r and al so a g r o w e r of and d ealer i n !i,e s t oc k . T h e fo under s o f th e J\frDavicl famil y in A m e ri c a ca m e fro m ' Scotland and se t tled in th e Caro lin a s in the c o l o ni a l p e ri o d o f o m nati o n a l h i s t o ry. J oe l A. 1JcDavid. fath e r o f th e s ubj ec t of thi s sketc h , was b o rn n ea r F l o r ella , A labama. June JS, 1 831, and d i e d at 1IcDavid, E s ca m bia Co un ty , Fl
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111 ST RY 0 I" FL Rl DA 6 1 l ' l orida, hi s entire prof ess i o n a l l.ife h a be en passed a t Jack so ll\ illc, w h e r e h e has b ee n a part of it s prog r ess i ve life. A l th o11g h e ngaged in pro fe,s i o11a l w i n th e publi c !if o f the s t a l e f o r m a n y year s a nd at o n e time was governo r o f F l orida. H e die d in 1920. Mrs. J e nnings. a nati, c of c n te rville. New J e r sey, surv iv es. The only c hil d of his parents, She rman B. J en11ings r ece i ve d h i s ea rl y educatio n a t Br o k sv illc, r ollowing whi ch h c purs u e d a lit e r a r y course at Stetso n U n iv e r s ity, fro m w hi c h h e wa s graduate d in 19 c5, a n d th e n prosec11te d hi s l egal s tudies in th e law de partment o f the sa m e in stitutio n , r ece ivi n g hi s degr ee of Bach e l o r o f Laws i n 1 9 1 6. In 1920 th e h o n orary clegr e f M as t e r o f A r ts was co n f erre d 11po n him by hi s alma mate r . M r . J e n n i11gs began practice at Jacksonville in 1 9 1 6 , a nd has made rapid strides in hi s ca llin g. H e main ta in s ofTices i11 th e Dyal Upchurc h Build in g, a n d is a member o f th e Duval County Har .'\ ssoc iatio n a nd the Florida late Bar A ssoc iation. 1.fr . J ennings b e l o ngs t o th e Jac k s o n v ille H ea l E state Board. o f whic h h e was forme rl y pres id e nt. t h e Jackson v i l l e Country C lub and the lph a D e l t a a nd Phi Kappa D e lt a fraternities . a nd i s a trus tee o f J o hn B. t c t so n U nivers ity o f D e L and, F l o r ida . His r clig i o11s co nn ec ti o n i s with th.: Haptist Churc h. On July 2, 1 9 18. 1Ir. J e nn i ngs was unite d in marriage with Miss D o r othy Brown . wh o was born at Atlant a, Geo r g i a, th e firs t o f the three childre n o f Geo rge E. a nd L e l ia Bro wn , natives of New York Stale. Three childre n have bee n bo rn t o this 11nio n : L elia 1Iay, S h erman Bryan , Jr. , a n d Dorothy. th e l atter two bein g twin s . JOSEPH 11.\DWlC K :--L\DlSON, j u s t ice o f th e peace at Jack so n ville . has ! eel a n active ca r ee r of a so mewhat di ve r sifie d c h aracter , in whi c h hi s 1er sa til c t a l ents h a v e b ee n b r o ught int o p lay in di sc h a r gi n g th e duti es o f p os iti o n s o f a var ied nature. H e has tra v e l e d e x t e n s i ve l y. is a m a n of m o r e th a n ordina r y learnin g. and in hi s p re,; ent po si tion. in which h e is serving hi s fir s t t e rn1. is full y main taini n g hi s place i n th e esteem a nd confidence f hi s f ellow-c itiz e ns. :--1r. Madiso n was b o rn J an11a ry 3. 1 862. at San F ranc i sco. alifo rn ia. and i s a so n o f P . :--r. a nd 1 -farrie t (Cuti r ) 1 1 adi so n , th e f orn1 c r a na t i v e of o nn ec ti cut a nd th e latte r o f New \""ork State. P. :--r. Madison r cce iv cl a college e d11catio n . and a s a young n1a11 e n gaged in c iv il e n g ineerin g, which h e fol lowed u ntil 1 8 4 9, in that yea r j o in ing the gol d rus h t o California, t o whi c h s tate h e trave l e d via t h e l sthmus o f Panama in a s ai l i n g vessel. 011 hi s arriva l h e first gave hi s atte n tio n t o th e lumbe r b u siness al Sacr a m e nt o, but later s p ent o m e time in go ld minin g. His ven tures, h o w eve r , did not s11ccee d in these d irections, a n d h e r elu rn cl t o t h e v oca ti o n o f c ivil engineer i n g, in whi c h h e passed the r e m ainde r o f hi li fe, bei n g l ocaled in va ri o u s commun iti es. H e was orig i na l ly a whig and latet a r e publi ca n i n p olitics. a nd a s a fraternalis t was affilia t ed w ith the 1lasons, in w hi ch orde r h e att a in e d t o the l(uight T e mpl a r degr ee . H e at t ended and h e lped l o s upp o r t th e Baptist hurc h , o f whi c h 11rs. . H acliso n , w h o is also d ccc a sccl, w a s a cle,11t m ember. Of th e eight childre n b o rn t o P . l\f. a nd Har rict f our a r e li, ing. J ose ph C hadwick .\lacliso n , t h e fourth child in orde r o f birth. al l cnclc d t h e p ubli c sc h oo l s o f vVillia111sb11rg, N e w Y o rk. and Rho d e I s land. a nd in th e latter state a nd N e w J e r sey mas t e r e d the trade of machinist. H e fir s t ca m e to F l o rid a in t 89 2, and spent some tim e c l erki1ig in h o t e ls, following w hi c h h e se cure d a p os iti o n wit h th e C i ty o f Jack so n v ille as a n ins p ec t o r durin g th e r a i s i n g o f $r.ooo . ooo o n t h e fir s t b o nd issue. During th e S pa n i s h !\merican war h e wa an i n s p ec t o r o n publi c w o r k s at Tampa fo r about o n e year, and the n r eturne d t o Jack so n v ille and secure d a p os i tion with th e Compa ny, a whol esa l e d r y goo d s h o u se , with wh i c h h e r e m a in e d fo r f our years a s traveling r e p r ese nt a ti v e . On l eav i n g this c o n ce rn h e j oine d the s a l es fo r ce o f t h e Covington Company, a l so a w h o l esa l e d r y goo d s e nt e rp r i se, and r e m a in ed th e r e with fo r fo u r t ee n yea rs. \\Then h e retir e d fro m th e roa d Mr. 1 [acli so n b eca m e p ri va t e secre ta r y to H o n . J o hn mayo r of Jackso n v ill e, a p os iti o n whic h h e r e tained fo r 3Y, year s, and in November. J 920 . wa s elec ted jus ti ce of t h e p eace fo r a year's t erm, ta kiu g that office Janua r y 4 , 19 2r. Judge :--facli so n i s a m e m be r of Jack so nvill e L o dge No. 44 5 , L oya l Orde r of M oose , a n d i s a past dictato r ther eof. In po l iti cs h e i s a dem oc rat, a nd i s co n s ide r ed o n e of the stro n and ca pab l e m e n o f hi s party at Jack so nvil l e . J:-le h a seve r a l c i vic co nn ec ti o n s of imp orta n ce, a n d in va 1 io u s m ove m ents for th e ge n e r a l w e ! fa r e h a s alig n e d himself w ith oth e r fars i gh t ed a n d pub lic s piri te d c iti ze n s i n forwarding t h e int e r es t s of th c it y and it people. ln r897 Mr. M a di so n was nn i t e d i n marriage ,, ith Miss Mary M atilda M c K ee . o f Ca11ada, a nd to hi uni o n th e r e have b ee n born tw o so ns: Samue l McKee, w h o died i n infan cy : and \,Yil l iam McKee, educa t e d in th e s c h oo l s of Duval County, Florida, a n d th e law depa rtment of th e University of F l orida, fro m whi c h h e was g r aduated as a m e mb e r o f th e c l a ss of 1 921. H e i s now e ngaged in th e p ractic e of law at Jack so n v ille. F 1u:i1E 1 n c L. J Aeon s, sec r etary of t h e South e rn Drug M anufacturing ompany of Jack so nville. F l orida, i s o n e o f th e dependabl e b u s in ess m e n of th i s part of th e state. and o n e o f th e activ fac t o r s in t h e :--raso ni c fraternity in this se ction o f the co untry. H e wa s b o rn a t Columbia , S o u t h Carolin a, D ece mb e r 13, 1862, a so n o f Frederi c C. a n d L o ui se (Lyo ns) Jaco b s . b o th o f who m a r e clccc a sc d . The p a r en t s h a d s i x childre n , al l o f whom a r e l ivin g, a n d Mr. Jacobs o f t hi s noti ce was th e f irst b o rn . The fa th e r was a s teamboat man fo r many years, a n d l a t r h e l d pub l i c office. During th e w a r betwee n th e Nor t h a nd th e South h e \\"as a s taff officer i n th e Confe d erate Army, a nd as s uch partic i pat e d in all of th e battles a nd campai gn s o f h i s command. He wa s a11 arde n t d e m ocra t i n hi s p liti ca l co n v icti o n s . G r o win g t o yca 1 s of u sefuln ess at Columbia. Fre d e ri c L. Jaco b s a tt e n d e d a p rivate sc h oo l of hi s n a tiv e c it y, and wh e n he was s i x t een years o l d h e ente r e d the e mp l oy of th e Columbia Gas Compa n y, wi th w hi c h h e r emaine d for tw o years. Going t o P hil a d e lph ia , Penn s y l vani a, h e beca m e a book keeper for J o hn \\' a nn a make r , a nd h e ld th a t po s iti o11 until h e was twen ty -o ne. At that ti m e Mr. Jaco b s w ent int o the r e t ail drug busi-

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62 ll l Y O F H . R1D n css at ! \ s h e ville, North Car o lin a, a nd was o engaged fo r abo u t eight years. During two years of this period h e wa in business for him se lf. lic th e n became a traveling s al es man , represe nting J o hn W ye th & Brother of Phil a delphi a, Pen nsylvan ia, and after over e l eve n yea r s with that fir m was wi th J . L. Ellwoo dle e & Co mp a ny. Still later h w a e ngaged with Fre d e ri c k Stearn s & Compan y of D e troit, Michigan, and then , in p ril , 1907 , ca m e to Jac;k so n v ill c t o become a soc iatecl w ith t h e South e rn Drug Manufacturing ompany. communicant o r th e Epis copa l Church, h e belongs to Saint M a r y' p a ri ;,h, and i s president of the c h oir. Mr. J acob married Elmira Mae P oe l s t r a . 1 1 c wa s made a :tvfaso n at Asheville, North Car o lin a, by 1fount Herm on Lodge No. 1 c8, F . and A . 1f., ctober 13, 18 4. H e e nt e r e d t h e ppre nti ce F ellow Craft Octo b e r 16, 1 88 4 , and was rai eel t o the s ubl i m e cl g r ee of 11 fas t e r 1Iaso n Oct ober 2 0 , r88. + . From 1884 to 1887 h e co n t inu e d with thi s a nd th e n d emitted. O n ] u l y 5, 1 917, h e was made a m e m b e r o f o l o m on L clge 2 0 , Jack so n ville , Florida. On Novemb e r 19, 188 4 , Mr. Jacobs wa s i n iti a ted in Asheville Chapter To. 25, H. A. 1I., taking t wo d eg r ees o n t h e sa m e date . O n Novemb e r 26, 1 88 4 , he r eceive d the hi g h es t degree i n that bod y . On July 12, 1917 , h e a ffiliat e d w ith Jacko n v ill e hapter No. 12, h. A . 111.. On Novem b e r 26, 1884 , h e was made a J{oya l a n d elect Maso n and a Supre m e Excellent Mas on in Ionic Co un cil No. 9 at Asheville, North a r o lina . He demitted July 19, 1917, and affiliated with Hallmark Co un cil o . 3, R S . 1 L , D ece mb e r 19, 1 917, at J ackso n v ill e . On June l, 1885, h e was made a R eel Cross Kni g h t T e m p l a r a n d Knight of M a lta by Cyr e n e Co mm a nd ery No. 5, K. T., at A s h eville, North Caroli n a , and se neel it as e min ent co mm a nd e r from September 27, J 888, to th e sa m e ela t e th e followi n g year. H e was made g rand junio r ward e n of the Grand ommanclery o f North Carolina in 1889, a n d g rand se ni o r warden in J8go. H e clemillccl J un e 2 8, i 917, a nd affiliated w ith D a mascus Co mm a ndery, J ack n villc, ep lc m bcr II, 1917. The Scotti s h degrees wer e co n ferre d o n :\Jr. J acob by ] . \V. Courtla n d , and h e wa s r ai se d t o th e thirty-second degr ee al A s he ville, North Carolina, D ece m ber 23 and 2 4 , i 8g3 . lle d emitte d from Ash ev ill e L o dge o f P erfectio n Oct bc r 9, r 9r7, and affi liat ed with Orient Lodge of Perfectio n :t\o. 4 at Jack so n v ille, h aptcr R os e C r oix, McLean Council o f Kaclo s h , Flo rid a 11s i s t o r y, November 2, 19 17. .\Ir. J acobs was e l ec t e d ! (night Commander of lh e Court o f H o n o r b y Supre m e o uncil 33 fo r th e o uth e rn J uriscli c ti o n of th e U n ited Stal es, Octobe r 2r, 1919. lic wa s m a d e a Nob! of the .'\nc ient and Ace ptccl Orde r of th e l\Iy s tic brine a t New rl eans, J erusa lem Temple, F ebruary 7, 1 892, a nd d emitte d a nd affiliated with O as i " T e mpl e F ebrua r y IJ, 1895, and a ffiliat e d with l\Ior o co Temple, J ackso n vill , D ece mb e r 14, 19ro. H e was m a d e a m e mb e r of the Order of th e Eas t e rn Star by Jack so n ville C hapt e r No. 15, F e bruary 7, 191 8 . lllr. Jacobs is a l so co nn ec t e d wi t h o th e r fra terniti es , a nd i s a pas t v ice g rand c han cello r o[ t h e G rand L o d ge of North Carolina, K. of P., ;rnd i s pa s t cha n cello r o f P isgah L o dge No. 3L. K. of P . , o f J\she1• ille , Io r lh arolin a. H e i s a m e m be r of . wa nn a L odge o . 56, I. 0 . 0. F., wh i c h h e joined in A u g ust, 1890 . H e was inili;1tecl by Jack so n v i l l e L odge No. 221, D. P. 0. E., f o r Asheville L o d g , North Caro lina , J a 1 1u.-iry 1 6 . 1 90 4 , a nd d e mitted t o Ja k so 1 ll'ill c L o d ge, April 1 1 , J.911, and i s a pa s t exalted ruler o f t h e latter. l'rob ably n o o t h e r rna11 i n Florida has o many f r a ternal co nn ec ti o n as h e. and few have had so m a n y fra t e rn a l h o n o r s b es t w e d up n them. H e i s zea l o u s in hi s w ork fo r hi s orde rs, especial l y all of t h e branch e o f Masonry, a nd h as acco mpli s hed mu c h in a r o u s i n g and m ainta inin g int e r es t a m o n g hi s fratern al associ a t e . GEOHGE l\L RonniNs. In view of th e w ide cli1 e r sity of int e r e s t s h e r cpresc ntccl a nd m a naged . the late eo r e M . R ob bin was one of th e for e m os t lawyer s and bu sine s m e n of th e stal e . H.is h o m e for upwards of thirty year s wa s at Titus 1 ille, b u t h was c l ose l y as oc iated i n many 11 a ys with t h e d eve l opment o f 011th Florida, inc ludin g the country around Miami. :\fr. R o bbin s was a n a tiv e o f Bath , llf ainc. H e wa s fir s t e du cated fo 1 th e e n ginee rin g prof cs s i u n . being a gradu a t e o f th e P o l ytech nic Jn ti lutc o f \Vo r ces l e1, ll1:ass a ch11s tis . s .-i yo un g t n ginec r h e was e mpl oy cl o n co n structio n w rk of the :lvl c xica n Central R ai lway in o l d Mexico. Subse qu e ntl y h e studie d l aw, taki n g t h e full cour c a t th e Albany Law c h oo l in New York . O n co mp! tin g h i s legal educatio n h e came to Flo rid a in 1 85, a nd fo r about a year practic cl at Orlando . The n in 1 886 h e r e m oved to Titus 1 ille. At that time h i s law p r a lic e wa n o t ,;ufficient t o engage all hi ta! nts, and h e co m bi11ecl wi th it w ork a s a n e n gineer. } J e co nduc t e d surveying and othe r e n gineerin g o p e r a ti o n a l o n g the Indian River . In a few year s hi s law prac tice had r e ach e d pr o p ortion s t o absorb all hi s time and e n e r g i es and h e about t h a t ti m e became a sso c i a t e d with th e lat e Dr. \V. . ra h a m , w h o die d at Miami. The firm o f R o bbin & G r a ham has l o n g be e n a pr m i n ent o n e i n th e bar and in business a c tiviti es. R o bbin s & Grah a m co mbin ed w ith an extens i ve law prac ti ce a l a rge real estate an d a b stract bu s ine ss . In tim e D ctor G r a h a m t oo k charge of t h e company' b u sin ss at J\{iami, a nd a b r a n c h office was a l so o pen e d at \ Vest Palm Beac h under a se parate co rp o r a t e o r gani za ti o n . C. C. hillingworth of \Vest Palm Beac h b ecame a membe r of th firm R obbin, G raham a nd C hillin gworth and in c h a rge of th e \\'es t Palm B e a c h office . This firm 1 o u ght, platted a nd pla ce d o n the m arket a la rge b o d y o [ l a nd now inclucl cl in North Miami. vVh e n thi s firm wa di sso h d l\Ir. R o bb i n s res um e d individual law practice al Titus1 illc. I l e was l oca l co un cil f r t h Flo rid a Eas t oast Railway until hi s d eath. H e was a l a wyer and c iti ze n of real di s tin ctio n i n Fl rida, p osse se d of v e r satile talents, a nd hi s d ea th at T itu sv i l l e, Oct b e r , 1 9 12, wa a l oss t o hi s community a well as t o hi famil y . l[e was a .\lason, Shriner and a m e m be r of th e Eastern t a r . Ge rge M. Robbin marrie d i\lis l\[ a r y Paclcli so n , who survives him and r esides a t Titusv ill e . S h e i a d a u ghte r of t h e l a t e 'apt . R I . E add i o n , whose career m a d e him o n e of th e m os t promine n t m e n in the d eve l o pm nt of East Florida . H e was b o rn in North arolina. was a o n fe d erate so ldi e r , beginni n g hi s se r v i ce a t the age of fifteen , s ub scq u e n ty was a s t ea m b at capta in and was a pio neer in th e river a n d coa t tra n spo rtation of Florida. In 1886 h e m o 1 'ecl his fa mil y t o Titusv ille, and wa one of th e f-irs t t o ope r a t e steamboats o n th e Indian R ive r. H e was ca pt;iin o f th e s t a m c r that brou ght part of the

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lllSTOR'{ F l , O Rll);\ mate r ial for the R o y a l I o in ciana l l o t e l a t Palm Heach , befo r e the co111plcli o n of the rail.road. aptain Paddis o n r e tire d in and both h e and hi , wi fe di e d in 1 9 1 i . .'\ o n o [ the lak Ceorgc ).f. i s R o bbi n s , a prominc 11l ;tLl orncy-. 11ow e n g aged in p racti c e at \ V e s t l'a lm B e a c h . I le was b orn at Titus vil l e i n 188 9 . and 11 a s lib e r a l ly e d ucate d. H e attende d lfolli1,,; o llcge al \ \ .inte r l"ark. wa;. a student of both l a11 and a ca d e111ic cours e s at Ste t so n Uni, e r s it y al J)c l ,and, and abo att e n d e d the Univers it y of Fl o rida a t Cai11es1 ille. I le g r aduate d LL H. in 1 9 1 1. and was a ss o ciated with hi s fathe r in law practice fo r about a year bef o r e the latte r's d e ath. H e the n continue d la11 practice at Titt1 s , illc until .19 1 6, whe n Ill' ca111c t o \ Vest Palm R e a c h. !\11 i1np o rta11t ufficial s cr1 ic e that makes hi111 wide l v know11 o , e r Pah11 B e a c h County was 21 2 yc;trs a s c o unty j udge. S in c e l e a v i n g that oflice h e has h cc n asso iated in prac tice with I l n n . • \I. I ) . C arn1i chae l at \\.est P al m Beach. The o ld l a w and r e al <:st a l e o f R o bb in s & G r a h a m i s s till in exis t e nce a s a c o r p o r a ti o n . Hu fu s .\f. lfohb in s i s prL>sid cnl o f th e co111pany . The firm s till wns con s idcrahk l a n d and othe r property in t e rest s o n thL ' Florida Coa s t between Titusvil le a n d , \ I ia1ni . l{u f11s ..\l. l { o bbi n s i s a f\rch ).Jason . a 111e 111hn o f the Jndepcnde11l O r d e r o f Odd l(nights o f P ythia s and Elks , a n d i s . a pas t chancclln r o f the Knights o f P ythias. I l e 111arril'd i's . \ 1l a r y 1 1ar1 e l S heck l e r o f B ucyrus , ()hiP . T. H i.;RD 1' 00 K 1.R , who i s s u ccl . " full y estab lis hed in the p r a c tice o f hi s professi o n , that 0 c i v il e n gi neer , i s a m e 1nh e r o [ t h e representative Jac k sonville engineeri11g firm o ( Curt i s & 1':ook e 1. with o llices in the Realty Building . 1 Li-. Kook e r i s a nalive o f the o l d l (eyst o n e t a t e and a r e p resenta tive o [ f amilies lhe r e llllnded in an e a rl y day. I l e was b orn a l J \ orris t o w n , P e n nsylvania , June 1 9 . 18i1 , and i s a s o n o f J ohn H . and Sar a h Elizabeth ( J o n e s ) K o o k e r , t h e f orme r o f w h o m was b orn i n 1 311c k s County . that s tate, July 3, i 8 4 .. 1, a11d t h e latte r o f who111 was b orn in 1 1 ontgo111e r.v .. ou11ty, P ennsylvania , July 7 , i848 . T h e 1narriage o f the p a r ents was solemni zed at I orris t own .\To , emhe r 1 , . 1869. and the y beca m e the parent s of threl' s o n s and three daughters , a ll b u t o n e of who m arc liv in g, the s ubject of this s k e t c h b e in g the e l dest o [ th m1m ber. J ohn l-l. }Cook e r beca m e a s u cce s s fu l con tra c t o r and builder, and c ntinuc d his o p r a ti o n s in P enns y h ania unt ii 1 882, whe n h e cam e wilh hi s family l o Jac kson ill e . Fl orida. w h e r e h e b e cam e a leadin c ontracto r a11d build e r and c r eeled 111any buildings o f 111a j o r imporla nre. in cludin g the fir s t Hubbard B l oc k. at the corne r o f ; \ lain and F o r s ythe streets. and the S n y d e r ..\l ethoclis t E p i s c opal Churc h. South. I l e h a d superv i s i o n o f the Li, ingsl o n Fund that wa:; 11lilizcd in building churc h e s in yari o u s p arts o f F l orida . H e w a s a , ital m embe r o f the S01" o f T l'i11Jlcrance . was a prohibitio n i s t in p o liti cs, and h e and hi s wife w e r e zeal o u s m embe r s o f t h e Churc h . ..\Ir s . Kooker passed l o the life eternal cm th e 22 d of /\11g u s t , 1888, and h e r hus band lc>1w st1r1i'' L ' d h e r , his d eath hav in g occurre d October 1 0 . 19 1i. 111 the puhli school s o f a nia T . Hurd 1 (ook e 1 gaine d h i s rt1di1n c n t a r y edu a ti o n , and h e was e lc 1 e n y e a r s o ld al the lime o [ lhe fa111ily r c1nova l t o Jac kson vil l e", \\' h e r e h e c ontinue d hi s s tt1dics in t h e public school s until h e initia t e d hi s a s s ,ic i a ti o n \l' ith bus in e s s affa i r s hy beco111it1g a c le r k in a h ook s t o r e . T r e c o n l inu e d h i s cler i c a l s cr1 iccs until t h e spring o f 1 906, w h e n h e e nter e d tla ci vil engineering d epartment o f the C hi arr o 8 : Crcat \\'c s t ern nailroad, w ith whic h h e sen ed ' " chainma n i n surveyin g o p e r a ti n in lllino i s a n d I owa and in w hi c h cot1necti o n h e gaine d technic al kno w l e dge and p ractic a l expe ri e nce that led t o hi,; advan cemen t t o the positi o n o f lransitman. l : l e wntinuecl in this ser v i c e until 1 9 0 8 . when h e r e lmn e d t o Jackso nville a n d beca m e associate d 11itl1 t h e c i vil e n g in eerin g bu s iness c o nduc t cl b y R o la n d \\' llod warcl. On the T s t o f J at1uary o f the f ol lowi11g year h e f orme d a partnership ll'it h N . l ' llis . Jr . . and Erne s t \\T. C u r ti s . and the\' t ook " ' e 1 the b u s iness o f \\.oodward. " hi c h they l1
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64 11.l ' TOH.Y O F l•'L RlDJ\ his profession i n Jacksonville aboul o ne year l Ir. J L o well was, i n 1906, a ppointed ju tice of the peace for the Tenth District, fo r a term of t wo yea rs. 111 1908 he wa e lected to thi office for the regular term of fou r years, a nd he sened a l so as ass i t an l judge of lhe Munici11al Court from o vember, 1906. unlil t he spring of l9II-ln 1910, in a s piri te d con le t with three strong o pponents, 1 r r. 1 Iowcll was e l ected county solicitor of the C rimi n al Court, a nd received a large and gratifying m ajority. Ile rece ived hi commis ion from the governor of the stale i n July, l9II, a nd a t the expirati o n of his term of four yea r h e was renominated, i n 1914, without o pposition, a nd ree l ec ted, his com mission having been received from Go1 rnor Trammell in July, 1915. ln 1918 h e ll' as again renominated ove r two o pponents, a nd t hu he has continued in the o ffice which he has honored a nd dignified by effec tive e r v ice and in which his work has mel wilh unqualified popular a pproval, as allested by h is reelections. Ur. Howell is a vigorous and loyal a dvocate of the pr i nciples of the democratic pa rly, a nd i n a fra t ernal way is a ffiliated w ith lomon Lodge No. 23, A ncient Free and Accepte d Mason ; 1[onlefiore Lodge To. 2, Knighls of Pythias; Palmetto Ca mp o. 3, Woodmen o f lhe vVorld; a nd R oc kbricl e Lodge No. 5 8, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. His na me s till remains enrolle d o n l he roster of el igible bachelors in his nali 1 • c co unty. I!oN. JonN EARLE lIARTRIDGE, of Jacksonville, has long held secure pre Lige as o ne of the di tinguished members of the bar of his native talc, a nd is known as a leading corporation lawyer, i n which co nnection he has bee n retained ince 1 8 5 as co un e l for man y of the l a r ges t and m os t i m portant corporate intere ts in Florida. He is a sc ion of a family that wa founded in the fair Southland many generations ago, the lineage tra -ing back to distinguished English o ri g in , a r epresentative of the Hartriclge family having b en a lord of the admiralty i n England i n the e i ghlee nlh century. John Earle Ilartridge wa born in Madi o n Co unty, Florida, i n ove mber, 1849, a nd is a son o E Dr. Theodore Hartriclge and usan (Living!>lon) Hartriclge, the former a native of avannah, Ceorgia, and the latter a daughter of 1Iadison L. Livingston, a prominent citizen of bbeville, oulh arolina. Doctor I-Iartriclge wa a young man w hen he came to Florida, and he gained high standing as o ne of the representative physician an d surgeons of his day i n Madison o unty, bo th he and h is wife having continued their residence i n lhi s state until their deaths. After preliminary e ducational discip line of e ffective order John E. Hartridge entered t he University of Georgia, and after an e lective academic course entered the law department of this institution a n d was graduated in I 73, with t he clegr e of Bachelor o f Laws. He had given clo e a ttention to the study of law, under e ffective prece ptorship, and was admitted to the Florida har within a short t ime after h is graduation from th e University of Georgia. He has s ince be n continuously engaged in the practice of his profession a t Jac k o nvill and i clean of the bar of Duval Co unty, eve n as he is one of the eminent figures at th e bar of his native s tate. In his graduation in the u niversity he was selected a nn iversarian, the highest honor conferr cl by the literary society of the institution of which he was a member, and i n his sophomore year he was awarded the medal fo r the be l essay p rc,,cnlcd by a ny member of his c lass. 1 l artriclge has been a n in fluential factor i n political a ffair in Florida fo r many years. In beh a l f of t h e demo ratic party he has canvassed t he slate in e very presidential campaign si nce that o f 1 876, when Samuel J . Til de n was t he democratic ca ndid ate fo r Pres id e nt. IIe was a young lawyer in th e period marking the odious "carpetbag "' regime in the outh afler the Civil war. when c itizens all over Florida were being arrested for a l l ege d e lection frauds, and when these citizens 11erc brought lo Jack o nville for trial before the L'n it c d S t a tes District ourt Mr. llartridge Joy a ll) defended them, an d that without compcm,a t i o n for hi> professional services. In 18 8 he rece ived from President C l eve land t he nomination for t h e office of U nil cl S t a tes dis t r ict judge of the Northern Di trict of Florida, to fill the vacancy ca used hy t he dieat h of Judge Thomas e ttle. The U nit e d States cnate at the time had a strong r e publican majority, a nd as eneral Ben j a min H arrison h a d bee n e l ec ted President the n omin atio n f l\lr. J l artridge was permitted to l a pse, in order that the new republican president might have o pp ortunity to 'elect a n a ppointee for the bench o f th e Distri l Court for t he r orthern D i s t r ict o f f'l o rid a . • \ Ir. ] l artridge scncd fro m 18Po to r882. in c lu s i,e. as c it y attorney of Jae'; soil\ ille, and i n 189 4 he \\'as e lected to reprcsenl his d istrict i n th e late Se n a te . Of a n o table phase of hi> political . career th e fo llowing record has bee n gi1en: .. ln f\ 1 1 g u:,t, 1896. he created a sensa tion i n political c ircles hy publishing an ope n letter r pudiating the ;,ih e r platfonn of t he ' lticagn n a tional co 1wention of the democratic party, a nd es pous ing the gold s tand a rd. llc took an ac tive p a r l in th e movement to repudiate 1 L r. Bryan a nd his platform, a movement which culminated in the national de m ocratic co1wcntion he ld at I n dianapo l i s o n cpte mb c r 2cl. [r. liarlridge ll'as a delegate t o t h a t co n vention a nd was one of it mo,ing s pirits, he being co nspi uous o n the fioor a nd in co rnmitl c deliberations. lle it was whJ seco nd e d t h e nomination of Gen. John M. Palmer for Pre ident of the United States as an expon 11t o f lruc democracy." O n the 22cl o f c plember, 1880, was olcmnizcd th marriage of l\Ir. Hartri n villc. The childre n of thi union arc four so ns and o ne daughter. f c KAY. \\' i lh the a chanccmcnt and clc1 clop m nt of eve r y commun i ty arc inscparablv co n nected the names of c rtain families ancl men w ho, by rea o n of l o ng-o ntinuecl residence a nd active participation in p ublic affair , have bco m c contributive factors to their country's welfare. The story of the J ives of successful men is a lways interc tin g and instructive, a nd be co m es more so w hen such lives present in com b ined v iew the c lements of material s uccess harmoniously blend d with completcne s of moral attributes. Such characters stand forth as b aeo n lights a l ong life's pathway, and as fittin<> i llu strations o f huma n dignity and worth. In the stor y of Florida's develop ment, ancl of Tampa as a com munity, the name l\fcl ay finds easy and graccf ul p lace, for more than three-quarters o f a century and through th rec s uccessive ge nerations, this family has bee n prominently identified with t he state's progrc s,

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while ;,till ca rli t:r r eco r d di sclose l h fact lhat thi s ;,arn family w as h o n o rabl y rcpr e enle d in lh c s irring event;, o [ o m nati o n al hi s t o r y at a time a nt e datino-the l{ cvo luti onary war, when lh c first progeni o r of the family in rnc ri ca, Capl. J a mes 1I Kay, b ing th en in the ! Zing's se r vice, had come l o th Co l o nies a nd in lh e Fre n c h and J ndian war comma nd e d an independent co mpan y of yolunl c' r s made up of o l o ni l from Georgia and outh Carolina . I f was g iven a la g e grant of yaluabl e land in Ge rgia i n r e ogni ti o n of hi s e n i ce. lt was h is grandso n who l a tcr b cam e o n e of l h c a rly clllcrs o [ T a mpa . James 1f c K ay, h e r e de. ignalc d as lh e Tampa pion ee r , was a o n of Jame 1\[ cKay, and was born in Thurso, Cou nty o [ Ca1thncss, cotland, , \ lay 18, 1808 . The Counly of a ithn ess had, fo r g en e r a ti o n s, be e n the a n cestral h me of till l ing Sc l c h famil y, w h ose !in age nins bac k , 1 1 1 unbroke n lin e , t o the i111c of lfobert l:)ru cc and Queen of co t s . In 1 828 J a m es M c Kay ca m e l o J\m e r i a, l oc _ a l ing fir s t in New rl ca ns, wher e, for a pe ri o d o f n ea rl y lwo yea r s, h e was e ngaged m carp entry and buildino-. H next l ocate d in SL L u1s, 1, uri and 0t herc in 1837 , married Malilcla C . .t\ a nati1 e o f cotland, born in Edinburgh, May 1 9, 1816. Jn 1838, J a m es 11 Kay locate d i n 1J. bile, 1 \ la b a ma and ther e was e ngaged as a carpe nter a n d ln l84 i h e entere d i11to a parln r s hi p wilh a man named Brighto n , a nd es t a bli s h e d a wil low-ware bu iness under lhc firm n a m e of i \ l IZay and Brighlo n. The yenlure pro 1 ing un s uccessful, h e di;,poscd of lhc bu siness in 1 8 46. l'urchasin"' a mall sc h oo ner, h e br o uffht hi s iarni l y, c n s is ing of hi m othe r , hi wife a nd four childr n , l o Fl rid a, localin g fir s t at a s m all p lac north of T a r po n prings. The locatio n , howcycr, was not a fa1 o r able o ne, a nd h e t oo k hi s fa mil y l o Broo k svill e, wher e h e secure d team s and wag n , and co nlinu cl o n t o Tam pa , arriving at the latte r place in September, 18 4 6 . Tampa, at thal tim e, was littl e m o r e than a 111ililary p ost, occ upi e d b U nited tal cs lroop s , stati o n e d lher for" th e pra t e lion o f lh few ,ettlcr;, arrains t th a ttack and d epredatio n s o ( t h e111i n o l e Indians, wh o refu se d t o r cogni zc th so 1 e r eignly oI th , while man's governme11l , and resent d a ll c n c r oac hm nt s b y the ea rl y se t tl ers. T o t h os lurdy pio n ee r , liie prese nt e d th e rough and seam y side, and it r eq ui red an unbounded piril o [ o plimisrn , a nd an un[allc rin g faith in th future, t o 1 e n faintly 1 i ualize, in lite primitiv e trading po t with its altendan l clangers and limilc d ad1 ;;ntage , lh nucleus 0 th e mctrop lilan cit y o [ today. The fir t hom e of lhe .\ld(ay fa mil y in T a mp a " a a crude st ructure o n th e military r esc n a tion, situate d on l h c ri1c r bank at t.h foot of \ \ ' bitin g trec t. This buil din g, 1 hi c h w a s r e nted from th G01e rn1n c nt , was tolally destroyed in the di s aslr u s hurricane whi c h swepl over lh p(L i n 1 4 . Th next locati o n of lit e family home wa a t th c rne r o [ what i s now Tampa and L a Fayette street s, now occupied b y th e 111 r ran ile c tabli hment o[ lh e Knight and \Vall C,l mpany . H e r c a l o t , representing o n e -half o f lite prescn blo k. was purchased fo r lhe s um oI $.:;o, and a h o m e e r ec t e d thereo n . The b ui lcli1 1 g wa s of log co n strnctio n , and th e lu1 n b c r LI. eel fur Jinishi11g wa s brougltl b y b oal [rom 1 1 bil e . l.ater the bl oc k at the n orlheas l co rn e r of \Va s h ingl0n and Franklin lree l s was purchase d for $100, and a m o r e commo di o u s and m o d e rn h o1n' " a s bui lt lhc r eo 11, whil e i1nmc clial e ly l o lh e soulh and o n th e op p os it e co rner, was l ocated th building utili zed as a wa r c h u se a n d s t o r e bui l din g. whe r e for many year s J a m es McKay conducted his 111 r chan di s i n g a nd oth e r business inte rest . \\'bile lhe limitati o n s of thi s b rief re1 iew permit o f but a gen e ral s nrnrnctry, s uffic e it t o say that apt. James M cKay became a d o m ina nt faclor in lhe upbuildi n g of the community in " lti ch he li1e d . Acti vely espousi n g eve r y goo d cau e for th e advancement o f Tampa and • outh F l orida, h e has l e [t upon lhe pag of hi lory the indelibl im prin t of hi s imp e llin g p e r so nali ty and rugge d harac l r. H es tabli s h e d a lin e of schoo n e r s fro m Tampa lo New rle a ns, thus g ivin g to th e cit y bu iness con n ectio n with 1.hc out ide w orld. H b uilt a a wmill n ea r the t wn , thus s u pplyi n g nee ded lumber and 111ate rial for bu ild i n g purposes. H e accep eel a contract and bui l t the first courtho u se for IIills b o r ouffh County. lJ enter e d into a conlract with t h e Governmen t l o carr y the m ail fro m Tampa lo Gainesv ille. H e b uilt an d o wn e d lhe first a n d o n ly wh arf in th e harbor. ln he se rv ed as mayo r of Tampa, bei n g the thi rd p e r on t o hold th al offic . J\ t t h e ex pi r atio n o [ hi s lc:rrn h e d ec lin e d r eelc li on. Hy p e r so n a l l y g u arantee ing th e company against financial loss, h e ind u ce d l h e 1lorgan l a m s hip o mp a n y to h a , e lw o of th eir ve se ls, o n th route fro m Kew Orlean s to l f a1ana , make se mi monlhly cal l s at Tampa a n d o ih r p o int s in Fl rida. This was in i 856, and lit e a m e yea r h stablishccl a merchandising and t r a din g b u s in e s in F ort M ye rs, a nother p os t garriso n e d by ni tccl tales troops. H e o wned and o p e rated learn e r s and sai lin g yesse ls , and with lh es made large ship111e nt s oI ca ttl e from Flo rid a to C uba . Lic eslablis hecl thi s b u siness in i 855. th e reby putting into i rculat i o n a g reat d ea l o[ m o ney through hi s purchases of ca lll e in South Flo rida . H expan d e d t hi s business until it a ttai n e d u c h prop o rti o n th a t i n r 859 h e f e n ce d off l h e Gadsd e n P oint P eninsula, tit fe n ce ex t c nd i n g fr m wh e r e th e pa nish . a nitarium now stands to a point o n Old Tampa flay about a 111ile n orlh of P o r t Tampa, a nd in t hi s pa sture grazed th o u sands of head of calil e pr eparato r y l o hipm enl t o Cuba. The s hippin g p o int was Ji a llas t P oint wh e re, al Yari o u s tim es. h e e r ec t ed se1e r a l clock a n d o th e rwi e g r ea ll y i111pro 1 e d and cle 1 e l p eel lhe h a rb o r , in fac t it m ay b sai d that ther was sca r ce l y a ;,ing l c undertakin g of gen ral go cl and b e n e fit l o th e sect i o n and lh c com muni t , in which he was nol a n active factor. During lh e lirring lim e of the i vil war, C 1pt. James J\Jc l(ay found many o pp ortunities t o di s p lay hi s s kill and courag , running the bloc kade and otherwise aiding the Con fed e rate ca u se, whic h h e heartil y es pou se d. During ll] !alte r part of lh e year l86r , whi l e e ndca1oring l o run the blo c kacl , h e wa capture d by the Fede ral fo rce.. His s hip was taken t o F'hil aclclphia , co nd e mn e d and so ld , whil he wa . sent as a pri soner o f war l o r ort J effe r so n . I J is s 11 D on ald. wh o h a d be e n caplurcd wilh h i m , was se n to Ne1 Y ork and impri so ned in F o r t L a l'ayellc. A ft r ha1 ing b ee n h eld a pri so n e r for abo u t nine m onths h e wa s r e leased , hi s r e l eas havi n g been o btain e d large l y thro u g h t h e inOn e n ce and intercess i o n of seve r al F e d e ral o llic e r s of hi g h rank w h o had kn o wn him inlimalcl y and fa1or ably pr evio u s l o the begi nnin g o [ lh e war. Jlc w as s uccc,sful in obtainin g l h c reka>e o[ hi so n D o nald , and bo t h were per111iltccl l o return t T a 1 npa . I. r e soo n thereafter " as a pp o int ed

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()6 l!ISTOl\Y O F commissar y agent by th Con fc d rate GO\ ern m e nt. a nd at o n ce ente red t1po n th e dt1ty o f pur c hasin g beef cattle in Sou th Florida fo r t h e armies of Virginia a nd T ennessee . a sen-i ce whic h h e c ontinue d l r ende r unti l the c lose o f t h e war. F ollo win g th e c lo ing of hostilities h e resumed hi s shipping. m e r ca n til e a nd milling b u s i ness, rnn linuing these , a ri o u s acti, i ti es until 1876, i n which year h e met with a n accident from which h e never fully recover e d . 11 is death occurre d a t T ampa. Kovember Ir, 1 876. T o Capt. James .:.rcKay and his worthy wife. had b ee n b orn nin e c h ildre n of w h o m two s til l 'un i,c , n a m e l y . Capt. J a m es M c l ( ay, .Ir., a nd \lrs. Alm r ia B. L y kes. both r esi d ents o f Ta111pa. ] Olli\' . \ . 1Jc i(A\", so n o f James a n d i\f atilda (Alexander) 1lcl(ay. was horn in , \ f ohi l e. ! \ lahama, Septem b e r 22, 1 8 44 . and at the age o f twn year:; was b r o u ght by hi s parents l o Tampa. Fro m early boyhood h e was engaged wit h hi s fa ther in t h e va ri o u s b u s in ess e nterprises es tab lis hed and co nduc t e d h y th e latter. I li s bu s iness ca r ee r was large l y a l o n g t h e sa111e l i n<.'s as fo l l o w e d b1 hi s fath e r . and h e \\'a s a n actil'c f ac t o r in t11 e affair s o[ the c ity and the times. lie , in aclditi o n lo h is o th e r bminess ent erprises. e n gage d ext e n si1e ly in railroad constrncti o n w ork. a a contract o r. l I e b ni lt the J \llant i Coast Lin c bridge o n P olk t r ee t , in T a111pa , a lso the line oi' r ailroad fro m Bartow t o Phosphoria, h a 1in g associated wi th him o n this last m e ntioned contract hi s son , D . 13. M cKay, now t h e owne r a nd e d i t o r o f t h e T ampa Timrs. J ohn . l\[cl\:ay, l ike hi ; fat h e r befor e h i m , h e ld a mast e r ' s l ice n se . o p e r a t e d YCssel s . and engaged in the shippin g and cattle b u s in ess. H e sen'cd as U n i ted tales co l lcrtor o f c u s t o m s. for th e Port of T ampa. f o r many years. l l e m arrie d Mar) Jane McCarty. a dat1ght e r of it c h e l l McCarty, a pio n ee r o f T ampa and o n e o f its ear lv m e r chant:<. . ' h e wa s b o r n i n T ampa. and o n t h e 111a t ernal 'icle was a descendant of th e Simmo n s ia111il l'. ll' hi c h is nu111be r e d a m o n g the ea rl y settlers of the sec ti o n . J o hn A . l\ l ci(ay di e d in T a111pa. :\ovcm h c r 1 9. 1 907. and was f o ll o w e d in death by hi s wi f e l'cbrua r y 15, 1 9 1 2 . T o th e m had b ee n b orn sel'en children. o n e dying in infa n cy. t h e o t h e rs. a ll resid e n t s of Tampa, a r c in t h e urde r o f th eir birth : D onal d Brenham: ;, 1argar e t A .. n o " ;,rr s . C. . \\'oodward: harlc, . \.; ;, 1 itch e l l F .: A d a 1fario n , now l\1 r s . Lawson .:.1 agrudc r , and J enneth I. DoKAJ.D .:.l ci(.11 . o \\ n r and pt1blis h e r of the T ampa Times. \\'a s horn in Tampa. Fl orida, July 2 9. 1 868. midst s u c h s u r r ound ings and li111ite d advantages common t o t h e ynuth of that per iod in th e the n new country . h e grcll' to maturity. vVo r k was th e h o n orable h eritage of all in t hose t im es and when but a lad of f ourtee n years. h e fot1ncl e111ploym11t in th e office o f The T ampa T ri b un e . o n e of th e pio neer ncw'pa p e r s of S uth Florida, and t h e r e began a prn f ess i o n and a bus in ess career w hich, wi t h but o n e h o r t intcrmis i o n , has been hi s life ' s work. and which w ith th e pa ss in g o f t h e year s has kd fron1 the hu1n\Jl c po,ition of gen eral errand h oy, ll' ith t h e hono ral1l e titl e of D e 1 il," t o the o w nersh ip and sol e n1a11age1nc n t o f a g reat dail y publicatio n . \\' h e n th e Tampa Times wemen t the T i m es has beco m e a powerful fac t o r for good and is r ccogni zc d as o n of the mm.t influential j onrnals o f the South. , J n June, 1 9 1 0 . 1 1 r . ;.rcKay was ckctcd mayor o f T ampa for a term o f two year s. was reelect e d i n .19 1 2 f o r a term o[ four _1ears. and again, in i 9 1 6 , for a third s uccessive t erm of iou r years. H e se r ve d a s ma.vor during the ' t renuous times of t h e \\' o riel war, and was an acti1 e factor in all th l'arious local activities inci d ent t h e r e t o. During-h is adminis tration m a n y n f t h e 111casures resultin g i n the rno d ernizati o n of t h e c it y wl:r c carrie d t o completion, i n cl udin g the e r e cti o n uf the 11<.:11• city hall, and the buildin g of t h e L aFayette S treet bridge; a lllllclnn sewerage syst e m was i n s talled . . ; o per cent of l h e s t r ee l p ;11 in g. and 75 p e r ce n t of the :;id ewal k s laid riming t hat t ime. m o 1 T m e11l tendin "' t o\\'ards th e public good and the ci t 1 's ac h a n ce m cnt. found i n him an earnest ad1 - •lCat e and w a r m supporte r. ! \ s a n el' idcnce of th e public appreciation of hi s sen-ices as mayor. it may h e r e be n o t cl, thal upo n hi s retirement from th e office , h e was presented ll'i t h a h and "Hnc sill'er service and a beau t i f ul h ' elllbosscd tes ti1n o ni a l b earing th e s i g natures of a large nu1nbrr o f t h e most r eprescntati1 e citizens of Tampa. irrespec li1 e o f p o l iti ca l affiliations. O ctober 7 , 1900 . .:.1r . • \fcKay married .:.lis, . \ uro r a P . F . Cuticrr cz, b o rn i n P e lham Bay. >:cw Y ork. and a daug h t e r o f Cal'ino ancl !\ellie ( Daley) Cutierrcz . lie r father. Ca, in o Cu t i crrez, becam e an i111porlant. fact o r in the upbuildin g of Tampa and i t s c m-ir o ns. H orn in S p a in. a scion o f t.rial d c 1 eJ...1p111enl of Tampa , as i s a ls o true o f el'cry othe r prug ressil' e co 1 nm11n i ty, has not r omL ' a ' t h e r es u l t of h a nce o r accid n t, hut rt:prc,ents in a s ub s t a n tia l w:I) the p rogressi1' C ne ss a n d ci l'i c lo)alt y of tlHhC men o f Yi, ion ancl e nergy ll' h u k11 e el'<.:r h a d in mind th eir city's ll'clfar c . Standi n g p reemi nent a m ong Fl orida':, lead i n g bu s i ness establishments is t h e widcly k n o \\ n firm of _:.. f aas Hr othe r s, In c., n f " hi h

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Jll T R V O F FL R I DA 67 Charles A. l\IcKay is a n active factor a n d vice pre idenl. harles A. l\JcKay was born i n Tamp a, e p lc mber 16, 1873, a so n f John . a n d M a 1 y J. ( l.lc arty) l\IcKay. harles . l\lcT ay' fir t b usi n ess ven t u r e of not e was w h e n lie, as a lad o thi rteen year , obtained c mpl o y m nl i n th e p rinting office of t h e Tampa Tribune, o f w hi c h journal hi s elder brother, D nald B. , was t h e n e di t o r . He remained a t thi wo r k bul a h o r t t i m e . howe, r, a n d t h n beca m co n n ected i n a cle r ical c a pacity with lhe o ulh Flo rid a D r y Goo d s o m pany , o n e of t h e o ld c lablis h c d a nd leading m c r can lil hou ses of Tampa. From t h vc 1 y begin ninf> he fo u n d a keen sense o f i n lc r es l in mer chandising, and I st n o o p p o r t un i t y lo ll1 o r o u " hl y fa tlli liarize hi msel f w i t h a l l o f t h e d e t ails o f th e b u sinc s . l n t his way h 0ai n e d v a l u able k n o w l e dge and experi e n ce w h ic h , i n t h e lio-h t o f aft e r yea rs, ha,e be e n made the fo u n dation up o n ll'hi c h has been bui l t a upc r stru c lure o f s u ccess. I n J 893, Mr. i\IcKay acc ep t e d a p os i tion w i t h t he J lie Dry G o ds o mp a n y i n J o l i et, Illino i s, and was oo' n advanced to t h e respo n s i b l e pos iti o n as b uy e r of ilk s and d ress goods. He co n tinue d lo reside i n t h e western c ity u n t i l J 898, w h e n h r eturned to Tampa and bec a m e associated w i t h l.faas Brothe rs , later b c ming Yice presi d e nt , i n which capa ity h e t ill o ntinues. July 23, 19 12 , 1 l r. l\lcI ay was u n ited i n m a r riage w ith l\I i Ire n e May M e l eague, o [ I i l l iamspo rt, Penn sy lva n i a , and t h e y have t h r ee c hi l dren , Mary Irene, E l e n o r J\[a y, and h a rl oltc . In addition lo the exa t i n g delllands of h i s per sonal b u inc s inle r e l s l\f r. l\ [cl ay h as ever been an active " boos t r " fo r Flo rid a a nd Tam pa , a nd ha s g iven libe r a l l y , bot h o f hi s tim a n d means, lo\\ard . t h furtheranc o f ev e r y a u se te nd i n g l o\\'ards the a dva n c m c n t of pub l i wel fare. H e " as o n of th o rgan i ze r s of t h e Tam p a . R e t a i l ::-1 erchan l s A s oc iat i n , and ha s e r ve d as its p r es i dent. H e is at p r esent o n o f t h e o-o, e r n o rs f the Tampa Boar d o f Tra d e. H e i a dire c t o r i n th e ,'c1ulh F l o rida Fair A oc iati on, i n w h i c h h e ha s ta k e n active part s i n ce i t i n cep ti o n . I n fraternal a n d soc i al c i r c l es, h is a th i r ly scco n d degr co ltis h R ite l\ lason , and a m e m hcr of the 1 J ys lic b rine: a K ni g h t of Pythi as, a nd an Elk. lle a lso h I d m e mb r hi p in t h e Talllpa Yacht and ounlry C lub. 1 \:1:X:\"ETH 1 . M cKAY, senior m ember o f t h e \\'Cll-known lega l firm o f ]\[ cKay & \\Tith e r s . wa born in t h ity o f Tam pa , Janu a r y 2 r , i 1., a 'on o [ J o hn . \ . and M a r y J. ( McCarty) M c Kay. I le a t ten d e d th e p ub l i c sc hoo l s o f Iii nati" e c i t y , a n d al th age o f twenty-on e yea r s, ente r e d th e law dep a r t me n t o f \Vashin g l n a n d L e e U n i ,er s i t y f r o m whic h he wa r a d11a t e d in 1 904. J l e beg a n t h e p racl i c o f law a t Tamp a, fir s t be i n g assoc iate d w it h l\L l3. l\Iacfarbnc, l a t e r fo rm i no-h i s pr s n l ass c iatio n with I { . \ \I. a nd 11. H. \ ithcrs. ro,cmber 2 1 , 191 7 , he m arri e d :.\[iss O l ive Pett y, o f Tampa. l\ lt. Icl(ay is a mc 1 n b r o f th e i < l o r i d a lat Bar , \ ssoc iatio n , the m e r ica n Bar . \ ssoc iati o n a nd th Rotary l ub of Tamp a. D'HANK J ToKE OwEN, a r e prc,cn la t ivc b u sincs man a n d c itizen of Jack so n v ill , i c h a irm a n o f he Board of ommissiu11c r s of th Flo r i d a metrop olis, and ha bee n id n tified prom ine ntly wi h indu trial a n d co m m rcia1 i nterest o f important o r d e r . , M r. Owen was bo rn a t Ande r so n, o u th Ca r o lina, ugu t 25, 18 71, a nd is a so n o f amu l Hyde Owen a n d Mary E l izabe t h ( H oke) Owen , t h e fo rmer o f whom was born i n Viro-inia A pri l 8, a n .cl t h e la t t e r of . w h o m was in' o r t h a r o lm a , m 1 839, h e bem g now a l o ve d m e mber of family c i r c le o f her e ldest child, Frank H., of th1 s ketch, a n d the o t h e r three c h ildre n bei n g two so n s and one dau ghte r . Sam ue l H . Owen , death oc c u r r e d J anua r y 9, 1912, wa a i e we ler a n d watchma k e r by trade, a n d was e n gaged . i n t h e jewelr y busi n es s a t e wb u ry, outh Carolrn a , at t h e time o f the outbr ak o f t h e Civi l war. He forthwi t h m a nife te d h i l oya lt y t o th e Co n fc d e racy by e n listi n g, at And e r s on ourt H o u e, a a me m be r of Comp a n y D i n O rr's Fir t Regi m ent o f R ifle m e n . H e was made a Ii u t e n a n t o f hi s c o mp a n y, and later h e b ecame a m e mb e r o f t h e Rutle dge M o u nted R ifle m e n with w hi c h h e pa rti c i pa t e d in . many including a n umber o f m a i o : battl es. In J anua r y, 1 865, a t t h e ba ttl e o f v Vh 1 te O a k , h e was capture d b y the e n e m y a n d taken to P o int L oo k o u t pri o n, w here be r m ained u n til he rece ived his parol e, i n July of t h a t year, after t h e close of t h e war . fter t h e c l os e o f h is mili ta r y ca reer he e ngaged i n fa r m e n te r pris e i n bbeville County, outh arol i n a, where he co n tin u e d hi p ro ducti, e activi ties a a n agric u lturi t a n d stock grower until 1882, w h n h e cam e w i th his famil y l o F lo rida a n d e ngaged in o r a nge growin a t F l r al Bluff, D uval Cou n t y. I n J 886 he r e m oved to Jackson v ill , and i n th i c ity he co ntinued to h engaged in the jewelry b u i n ess un t i l the t i m e of hi cl ath, more t h a n a q u a r te r o f a century la t e r . He was a stalwar t dem oc r a t , was affil ia t e d with t h e M aso ni c frat ern i t y, a n d wa a mem ber o f t h e Methodi s t Episcopal hurc h , outh, a i a l o his wid o w, who is now vener able in years. Frank H . we n was a bou t ten years o f ao-e a l t h e t i m e o f t h e fa m i l y removal to F lorid a, a n d her e h i s e d u ca tion al a dvantages i n lude d t h ose of th Jack so nville Hig h chool. I n t h e mean w hi l he gai n e d p r actical experie n ce also, a he so l d n e ws p a p e r s bo th m orni n g and ev e nin g w h i l e att e ndi n g sc h oo l , and at th e age o f fourt ee n years gav ervi e as a m e se nger fo r t h e v es tern 'Cn ion Telegr a p h Company. After leaving s c h oo l h e found wo r k in a saw n1ill, a n d a l so e nt e r e d u po n a n a ppr e n tices hi p t o t h e t r ade o f woo d tu rn e r . ftc r t h e pass ing o f fo u r years he m a d e foreman of t h e hop i n whi ch he had b e n a n apprentice, and he n x t became fo r e m a n o f t h e pla nin g m i l l operated by Hen r y l a r k. Later h e fo r m e d a p artn e r s hip w i t h \\Taller B . D e W itt, and t h e y s u cc cs fully o p rated a p laning mill at Jack s o n v ille u nti l the sa m e wa d estroyed i n t h e d i s a t r o u fire that s w e p t away rnuch prop erty i n th e cit y i n 190I. \Vith i n th r ee wee k s t h e fir m co n structe d a n e w build i n g and r es urn 1 t h e o p eratio n o f t h e p l a ni n g m ill b u s i n ess and n ovel t y ll'Orks. bo u t two years later M r. we n so l d hi s i nte r es t to his partner and as ociatcd hi m self with th 11errillt eve n s Engin ee ring Compan y, of t h outh Jack so n v i l le s h i p b u i lding p lant, o f w h i h co n cern h e was mad e up erinlende n t i n 1915. Thi compan y, with which h e continued his c o n nect ion unti l 1920, was engaged in bui l di n g s t eel and w oo de n 1 esse l s fo r the overnm e n t i n the I , o r iel war pe riod , a n d as s up e r i n te nden t M r. Owen m a d e t h e first s idewise l a un b i n g o f a vesse l i n lh e Sou t h while the co mpany was p r odu ing v e ls fo r the Governme nt. In 191 he had be-

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G ' co m e o n e o f t h e o r gani z e r s o f t h D e kl e Lumb e r Compa n y , o f w hi c h h e b ec a m e the p r e id e n t and a n a cti1 e fa ct o r in t h e conduc tin g o f it s pla11i n g mi l l and r e t ai l lumb r b u s i ness. In 1 90 3 \fr. 011e n was e lected a 111e m b l'r of t h e Ci t y C ounc i l o f Jack so n ville. as r e p r e s enta t iv e from th e Seco n d \ Va rel. a nd h e w a s r c e le c l ecl i n 1 9 0 5 a n d 19 07. fo 1 909 h e wa s again c k c t e d l11 th e C ounc i l , t o se r v th e u n expire d t erm o f \\ . H . C l arkso n. who di e d ll' hil e in oOic e . In 1 9 1 .:; h e w a s again calle d int o s e r v i c e i n th e c o un c i l . ; 1 ml in 1 91.8 . a s a r epre s e ntati ve at la r g e . h e ll'as o n c e m o r e e l ec t e d t o offic e , h e h a 1 in g se n c d two t cnn, a s pres i d ent o ( th e " it y Counc il. and th e year 1 920 having m arke d hi s e le c ti o n t o t h e p ositi o n o [ city c ommi ss i o n e r . h e be in g mack chairma n o f t h e board unde r t h e n C ll' commi ss i o n S\ s t c m o f munic ipal go1 ernmc n t , w hi c h has cffc c tc Z I a g r ea t s avin g in th e admi11istra ti o n o f munic i pa l affairs. Jn t h M a s ni c fral crnitv \lr. O w e n i s affil i a t e d 11 ith Temple L o d g e No. 2J, F. and f\. J a c k s o nvill e C h a pter 1\ . u . f \ . J\f. : D a m a sc u s C ommancle r y N o . 12, Knig h t s Ternplar: and T emple o f t h e ).[ ys t i c Shri n e . Ile i s a m embe r a l so o [ J a c k so 1wil!c L o dge N o . 2 2 1 , [\. P . 0. E. Mr. Owen i s inAu e nti a l in t h e l ocal c o un cils and campa i g n a c t i vit ies o f t h e d e m o cratic party. and h e and h i s wife a n d daughter a r c c o m mun i ca n t s o [ th e Pro t es tant Episco p al Churc h . On t h e 24th o f • u g u st, 1895, was so l c mn izt: d th e 111a r riage o f 111 r . Owe n a n d J\1.iss L eo n o r a Drew, who was b o rn a n d rea r e d at Jack so n v i l le. a d a u ghte r o f Willo11ghby a n d 1\fa r y E dn a (\\' a n d e l l ) Drew. t h e for m e r a native o f Florida and th e latter o f th e S t a l e o [ N w Y o r k . \Ir. and lt m a n ever t o h o l d this posi ti o n . I n 1903 h e was a g ai n e l ec t e d a m e m b r o f the Gen eral . \ ssc m b l y fro n t I [ i l l s h oro Count y .• \lr. .\[c N a m ee i s a d e m o -rat. ca sting lti s lirs t 1 o t c f o r C l e 1 e la11d in 1 8 ' 4 , and for a m1mhl'r o f y ear;; attende d a s a del e g a t e n ea r l.1 a l l the State a n d C , 111g r e ss i o n al Co nYcntio11s . I le se n c d as chairm a n o f the Lake C o un ty 1.;:xec uti1 t• Commilll'C a n d ; b a m e m b e r o f th e S t a l e E x c cu li1c Committc ' . \[r. 1\lcNa mct w a s Oll'11c r and p u bli;;J1e r o f t h e J)ixie . a ll'eek l y m agaz ine ' a nd a n c ll' s papl'r. f r 0t11 ICJl.J l o 1 9 1 8. F r a t erna l l y lte i s a m e m b e r of t h e \ l a so n i O r d e r. h : ni g h b of J' ythias. \\'oodme n o f t h e 'v\To rlcl. 1;:Jks and Odd a n d ih e 0\ll kgc fraternity J ) c l t a J.;; q 1 p a Epsilo n . O n N o 1 e m her 1 7, 1 888. a l Kew O r l ea n s. L o11i s i a n a. h e mar ri e d 1\1 iss !\li ce S a u ve . o f a n o ld Frc n clt C r eole famil y o f t h a t c i t y . The y h a v e o n e son, \\'il l i a m I lock e r . DAi\J Er. T . (;1 ,1<01 1 ' . L:n i t e d S t a t es rnl lccl o r o f inte rn al r c 1•c11ue f o r t h e l)i strict o f Fl r i d a. h a s b ee n a r es id ent of J a c k so n vill e . t h i s stat e . f o r f o r t y years a n d h a s b ee n i n n u ential i n publi c lif e :tncl g e n ral c i 1 i c affai r s i n th e Fl r i d a m e t ro p olis . ll'itc r e h e h o ld s :-in i 1 w i o l ablc p lace i n p o p u la r co n l id e n ce a n d g oo d will. , \J r. C c r o w was born al Titu s 1 i l lc. P e n n s v l 1 a n i a, a nd i s i n d e b t e d l o th e commo n sclto o l s o f lti s 11ati1 • c stale f o r hi s p r e l iminary e d ucatio n. whi c h wa s supple m ente d hy a course in th e P e n n > \' h • a nia S t a t e Norma l Sch oo l a l Edin b o r o fr m ,; h i c h h e 11':1S g r adua t e d. J\ fter four o f cffccti1 l ' s c n ' i c c ' a s a leacltc r i n t h e scltool s o [ the o l d 1 ; ' Y t o n e S t a t e lw \\' a s admitte d t o lite b a r a t 1 \lcaclv i l lc i n 1 881, hi s study of law lta v i n g be e n l':l r ri ccJ f O r II' a rel un d e r privat p r ece p t o r s hip. Jn . \ u g usl t l f th a t yea r , lw11• e 1 e r . h e ll' a S mad e man ager f o r t h e , la ndan! Oil Compan.v a l Col11n1h u s . J\I i ss i s s i ppi , and i n t h e f oll win g year ( i\pril, 1882) wa s t r a nsfer r e d l o Jack s 111"illc , wlte r c h e con ti n ued hi s s e n ic a,; m a nager o f th e Standa r d Oil Co111pan y u n til 1 9 0 ' 1 . I l e a lso b ec a m e F l o r ida s a l es m a nager for t h e C:alcna S ig n a l ii Co m pa n y , a n d continue d his con n ec ti o n w itlt tltal co m p a n y until i 9 1 6 . From an app r l'c ia t iv c es ti m a te app e a r i n g in t h e J < J o r icla 1 \ l e t r o p o l i s of D ecembe r 3 r , 1 9.z[ , a r c take n lit e f o l l o ll' i n g ext r a c t s : "lublic \\' o r ks o f Jack so n v ille, and four . 1 ea r s a s c it y a u cl it o r. I n 1 92 1 Mr. C c r o w was named co l lc c t o 1 oi i n le m a I 1-c1 c n u e . o n e o [ t h e m os t importan t ; q ip oint111c n t s ll'ithin t h e p o w e r n [ tit ad 111 i n i s trat i o n l o g rant. a n cl h e a:;s u m ecl tlt i s ofli c in Jun e of t h a t year . ,\ I r. C c r o w ha s bee n l o n g a n d acli1 e l y affilia l ccl ll' il h th e j\hs o n i.: fra t ernit y , in w hi c h h i s bas i c 1ne 1 n h c r s lti p i s i11 Cm c n ant J,odge No. 4 73. J\ . F . and . • \ l.. al Can i bridgc ' Spring s . P e nn sy lv a n ia . J n hi s h o1ne ci t y h e j , alli l ia t ecl with ] acho n v i l l e Chapte r I o . 12, J\. A L , 1 [ a lhlla r k Counc i l N o. 3 , I { . a llll S . , \ I . . J)a111as c11s 0 1nn1 a n d r y N o . 2, 1 ; 11ighls T c111pla rs: J • Jori d a ' o n s i s to r y K o . 2 , . \ . f\. S. H. , in ll' hiclt ltc has r cce i 1 ecl the t h i r t y se c o n d degree: and A l orocco T e m p le o f th 1\f y s ti c

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. hrinl I l e i s a n1emhe r al,;o of th e Knights o f l'l'lh i a:<. 111 p olitic s l1L' h:1,; l wcn " h;a d c r i n the r l : p n hlic:lll part. 1 f L H . 1 nC1ny yc;1rs , and is n o11 c hainnan t1f th e " cp11hlic;Jll Siak Ccntr;Ji Crn111nittce o f Fl11r i d a. J n 1K87 1 \ l r . l;cruw 1 n ; 1rr i c d L ill i :111 , \ . 1-ly d l'. o f T(t11•n1 ilil'. l ' c1lllsyl 1 :111ia. T o thi s 111ar riage two childre n wer e IJ(1rn: \\lilli: 1 m I'.'.. C e r o11 . d ecca,;e d. and i::. Scre 1 en H ond. :'11.r. C e r O ll' has t11 0 grandc h i ldre n , L i llia n F . Cerow and E l le n ! \ . B ond. \L1R K Bovo l lE 1 i1.o:-1c . D. Th preced ence o f Doct o r H e rl o n g as o n e o f t h e le a di n g p h ys i c ia n s and surgeo n s of th.:: F l o rida m etro p o l i s needs n o furthe r e v id e nce th a n the w ork h e has a c hieved i n h i s professi o11 and th e im p ortant positi o n s w hi c h h e has h eld i n con : 1 edio n w ith pro fessi o n al se r v i ce and civ i c affairs. Jack s o nvill e claims h im as o n e of its loyal a n d progr es s i 1 e c iti ze n s . Doct o r H e rl o n g 1Yas h orn al Edgc:f ' 1 e l d, o u t h Ca r o l i n a , F ebrua r y 1 9, 1 8 7 6 . and al t h e s a m e pla ce wer e b orn h is p;ir ents , D a ni e l H e n r y L{e rl o 1 1 g and Ceur g i a :\I. (Cr ough) J [ e rl o ng. th e year o f th e f orme r s n ati1 i t y hav i n g b ee n 1 4 5 and t h a t o f th e l a tt e r 1850. H e r death ccurre d in 1 89 5 . O f th eir fa m i l y uf se 1 c n son s and three daughte r s f our o f the son s a r c decea se d . D a ni e l H . J lcr l o n g was r e a r e d and educa ted i n h is n ati, e s l a te. a ncl h e w a s b u t fif t ee n year s o l d w h e n h e ente r e d the Con f e d e r a t e sen i cc in th e C i v i l ll'ar. a s a m embe r o f th e Seventh South Carolin;1 J11fa11tr v . H i s fir s t year o f se r v ice w a s virtually in th e c;1 pacity o f s ub s titute for hi s fath e r , a nd h e th e n became e li g ible f o r regula1e nli stme nt. was thus s ixtee n year. o f age whe n h e h cc alll c a m e m ber o f th e : Hampto n Legi o n , ll'i t h whic h h e ser ved as a scout in t h e Gary Hrigadc. ] l e continue d in senice; until th e c lose o f th e war, ;111d was 11 itl1 Gen eral L ee ' s f o rces al .\ppo n 1 atlox just pri o r to t h e fina l ,;urrencle r. . H e C • Jntri1 e d t o make h is escap e th e ni ght befor e th e s1irr c n dL:r , a n d thus n e 1 e r made a d ef i n it e sn1-rc ntkr. a fac t th a t w a s a mat t e r o f n o little s a tisfact i o n t o him thro ug-l:o u t t h e r es t o f hi s Ii fe. I n South Carol ina ,\lr. H e r l o n g late r became a s uccessfu l lumber m a n n fa c turc r . w ith which l i n e uf i11d11stn h e th e r e co11-lin!le d hi s associati(ln until 188Ci. w h e n h ca m e with hi s f amih t o Fl o r i d a and est a blis h e d hi s r s i d e n ce i n Col u . m h i a Cou nt y . 11 h c r e th e s t a t i o n o f r[c r l o n g, o n th e }\ t lanti c oa s t I J ine l\ ailro acl, was !lame d i n h is h o n o r. J l e continue d :t p r omine n t r eprescntali1 c o i t h e lnmb e r m anuf a cturin g i n dustry in that coull t y nn l i l 1K96, s i n ce ll'hi c h l irnL: h e has l i ve d virt u a l l y r etire d . ] l e ser1 e d t w o t erm,; as county co1nm . iss i o n c r of Colurnhia Coun t y and ah c,ut f o ur yccLr s a s a n agr i c u l t u ra l clc111 o n stralo r f o r the Governme nt. l i e i s a s t a l wart d e mocr a t. i s a m e m ber o f th e I \J'cth d is t Episcop;Ji Churc h . S o u t h. a s was also h is w i k. and is affiliated wit h t h e U 1 1iled Confed e r at e Veterans and the H c n e 1 0 J enl and ] r o t cc ti ve Orde r nf E lks. Dr. ,\lark H . H e rl o n g gain e d hi s rudi m entary educa ti o n i n the sc hool s o f hi s n a li1 c s t a t e and was ten year s o f age al the lime f t h e family remo 1 a l t o F l orida. w h e r e hi s educ a ti o n al w ork included t h e di sc i plin e o f t h e h i g h sc h oo l al F o r t \.Yhitc and that o f t h e Stal e f\gricultural College at Lake C it y . Jn 1 908 h e graduated fro m t h e :\1edi ca l College o f the Stale of South Ca r o l in a. fro m ll' h i c h i n stituti o n h e receiv e d h i s degr ee o f Doct o r o [ M e d i c in e and i n which h e look a n effc cti1 e p os t g r aduate course i n 19 1 9. ln the year t hat recorde d h is g r aduati o n Doct o r H e r l o n g estab l i s hed h i m . elf in practice a l Jackso n v i l le, and 60 h e r e h e has w o n hi g h r(;pulatio n as a s p ec ialis t i n the diagnosi s and t r e atment o f th e di ,;eases o f childre n . H e is a n act i ve m elllb e r o f the; Duv a l Cll 11nt, ,\fe d i c al Snc i cil-, th e Florida S t al(; i\kdical s .. , i c t . \ ', lhl: Sontl1en; ,\kdi c al . \;;sucialion, th e .\n1ni'l ; u 1 J\IL:dic:.il .Associati o n and the .Am e rican s .. cil'l y f p r th e Study o f Tnternal SL:crcti o ns. H e is ;1 m e m b e r o f th e s taff o [ St. Luke's H o spi tal. and is physi c ian in c h a rge o f th e c l ini c o f the Du1 a l Count y Anti-Tuberculosi s Soci e t y . ]-le s e r ve d two yea r s ( 1 9 1 2-J 4 ) as c it y phys i c i a n of J a c ksonvil l e, ha s se r v e d a s p r e s id ent o f Duval C • H1111y i\re di c al Soci ety, and in J une, 1921.. h e was P l ec Lcd c it y cummissi o n e 1-, in ll' h i c h ca pa c ity h e has acti 1 e charge o f t h e h ealth and s a nitation d e p artme n t o f th e c it y governm e n t. D o ct o r : H e r l o n g i s a v it a l f i g u r e in t h e local r a n k s o f th e d e mocr a ti c party. and was a m embe r u f t h e d e mocratic e xecutive committee of Du1 a l County fo r f our years, 1 9 1 215. In 1 922 h e is se rvin g hi s third t erm as a m e m be r o f the Jac k so nvil l e B oard o f Educ a t i o n , and in the mids t of th e 111a ni f o l d exactio n s of hi s s u b s t antia l pro fess i o n a l practice h e fin d s t i111e and o pp ortunity t o gi1 e effec ti v e se r v ice and L O exemplify hi s loyalt y and prog ressi ve ness a s a c itizen . In th e Maso n i c f r a t e rnity h i s ba s i c affi l i at i o n is with Sol omun L o dge N o . 2 r , f\. F . and f\. H e is a m embe r a lso o f Jacksom ill e Lodge No. 22 1 , Benevol e 1 1 l and P r o t ec tiv e Orde r o [ Elks . I J c is e l i g ibl f o r affi l iati o n w i t h t h e S o c i e t y o f th e Son s o f th e A m e ri ca n H.e v o lutin n . H e i s a d irect descend a n t o f Conra d H e rl o n g . w h o ca m e fro m H olland t o . • \ 111e rica pri o r t o th e l { e 1 • o l uti o n and se t tl e d at Dutc h F o 1 ks, South Caroli n a. s i x o f h is seve n son s h a 1 in g b ee n patriot sold i e r s in the g r ea t struggl e for nati o n al inde p ende n ce and all hav in g Josi th e i r I i v es in t h e h art le at Co w p e n s . M a y 1 3, 1 900 . r e corde d th e m arriage o f Doct o r I l e r l o n g and Miss l\Jinni e L . R o b inson , w h o was b orn at L a k e C it y, Florida . a n d 11 h o p r es id e s graci o u sly over th e i r a t tracti 1 e h o m e in t h e it y o f Jac kson v ill e . D E L E . is making i n hi s progr essive acti v it ies a s a contractor ancl build e r a clc fini t e co n t r ib u ti o n t o t h e mate r ia l d e 1 e l o p1nc n t a n d ad v a ncem cnt of h is h o m e city. :\Iiami. w h e r e h e h a s bee n prominently con cerne d a lso in th e p l a i t in g a ncl cle 1 ' e l o pi n g o f attracti v e s u bdi v i s i o n s . \fr. c laims t h e olcl Kevs t o n e Stat e a s t h e p lace o f hi s nativi ty . l1is bi'rth hav in g occurre d at Bangor, P e nnsylnrni a. in 1 888 . ancl hi s p a r e n t s . Erwin and Emma C. ( H o llancl) l ik e w is.:: b e in g nati 1 es oE t h ;it s tate. The earh educ a ti o n of Mr. ]\[ errill was obtaine d in t h e pul) lic sc h oo ls and L a fa yette Col lege, a n d a s a You t h h e l earne d th e carpenter's tra d e allcl the d etail s o f gen eral con t r acting and b llildin g unde r t h e d i recti o n of hi s fathe r. w h o h e ld p r es tige a s a contra c t o r and b uil d e r o f the fir s t r a nk. Inc i d ental l y h e learne d a l so th e lesson s o f th orou g h n ess, effic i e ncy a nd good w orkmans h i p that h aYL: contribute d muc h t o h is s nccess i n hi s individua l o p e r a ti o n s a s a contract o r and b u ild e r and a s a r eliabl e and e n terpris in g busin ess m a n . H e wa s id e n t ifie d wi th contractin g a n d bnilding i 1 1 the C ity o [ Philade l ph i a , P c nnsyh ania, a n d ea r l y in i 9 1 9 h e 1 is i t e d :\ [ ia m i a n d becam e so d eeply i m p ressed w i th 1 h e manifo ld attr a c ti o n s and pros p ec t s o f this fine l ittl e Florida city that h e forth w it h sent f o r hi s f amil y t o j o i n him h e r e f o r th e establ ishing o f a p erma n e n t h o m e. S in ce coming t o :\[i a mi ,\[r. \[c r rill h a s 11 ith c h a r actcr is t i c e n ergy and e n t erprise b eco m e a c -

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70 HI TORY ti 1 ely and e x t e n i 1 e l y e n gag cl i n co n struc tiv e b u sine ss as a contracto r and builder, and kt s h ow n c ivi c l oyally in connecti o n wi lh vari o u s d eve l op m e nt e nl crpri se s . l [ e h a s bee n co n ce rn e d in th buildin g 'up o[ s eve r a l s ubdivis i on s lo lh c ily , including lh e b eau ti ful h aclow Lawn s ub di v i s i o n . H e erected lh e fin e r e s iden c e s of L. . Tiffany o n Brickel l venu e , and of Alfre d i\-fitc h ell, a n d h as o p erate d la r ge l y in t h e o n structi o n of m o d e rn residen ce building s in Co ral ,abl es, all o f hi s c ontract work having bee n of th e b etter ty p of m o d e rn c o n struc t i o n w o rk. a n d a good l y number of the be s t homes in i\fi a mi r e pr e s n tin g the r esults of h is enterpris e a nd t h e w ork of hi skilled c o rp s o f a r tisa ns. 1Ierrill i s afTilia ted w ilh t h e Benevol ent. a nd Pro tective Orde r of E lk s and t h e Masonic frat e r nit y , and he a nd hi s w i fe are active m e mb e r s of th e Firs t i\f e th od ist Episcop a l Churc h at J\l'iam i , known as th e ' V h ile Templ e . f t h i . churc h his co u sin, Rev. Rich ard N. i s the pa sto r , his fath e r , : R ev . P h i lip S . M e rrill , D . D., was th e pastor of this churc h at t h ti m e when th e prese n t fin e e difi ce was e r ec t e d , a n d i n ow p as tor of lh e M thodist hurc h at Sebrino-thi s stale. H e p r evio u s l y h e ld a number of l ant pa s tor a l c h a r ge s . includin g that of t h e F ir s t Episcopal Church in th e ity o f O m a ha , Nebras k a. M erril l wedded Mis E l s i e o f Ban go r , Penn y lvani a , and t h y ha1 e two c hil d r e n : \Va lter S. a nd A l fr cl Rowland. ALBERT H AMILTON T. J o n N is o n e of th e s u c cess ful r ep r ese nl ati1cs of the real estate b u siness i n t h e Ci t y of Jack o nvil! e, w h e r e h e maintain ll1ces in th e H erkimer Buildin g, 1 36 Ea t Bay Strc t. Mr. t . John was born a t Lith nia DeKal b County, Geo r g i a, pril 7, 1883 , and i s tl1e fourth i n o rder of birth i n a famil y of ix s o n s, all o f wh o m a r c ! 1 v111g exce p t o n e . H e i s a s o n of Tho mas L. and. Mary A n n (Davis ) l. J o hn , bot h natives of Vir ginia where t h e former was born in l8H and th e lat'ter in 1854 . Tho mas L. t. John was l o n g and promin e ntl y identified wi th t h e flour-millin g industry, besi d e s havi n g o p e r a ted aw mill s and having be e n a s uccessful contractor a n d builder. In his h o m e di strict i n Geo r g i a he wa th e fir s t mill e r l o ins t all in h i s mill the modrn r olle r process system , whi h h e late r in t ro duced in ma n y oth e r l oca liti es as a c ontractor in u c h i nstallati on. He wa a ' taunch democrat, a nd w as a n active m e m be r of the Methodi t Epi co p a l Churc h , outh, a s is a l so hi s w id o w hi s d ea th havi n g occurred in th e year 19or. ' The p ubli c sc ho o l s di sci plin e of Albert H . t. J o h n i n c luded that of th e hi g h s c h oo l , and a a youth h e became associa t e d w it h hi s father in th e millin g busines s and in th equipping of mills with r o l ler proce s outfi ts. Later h e e ngaged in th co l l ecting busi n ess at Memphis , Tenness ee, a n d in 1 9 0 6 h e cam e t o Jack so n v ill e , w h e r e he h a i n ce dcYcl opc d a s ub s tanti a l a nd r e pr ese ntative r eal cs tat bu s ines of g e n e r a l o rd e r , the sam involvi n g th e h a n d ling of both c it y and country properly. 1Ir. t. John i unwavering in hi s allegiance lo t h e cl m o cratic party, and is now ( 1 922) serving a s a m e mb e r of t h e Count y Board of ommi i o n e r s of Duval C o unty, a positi on to which he wa appointed by Governor H ardee in July, 1921, for a t erm of lwo y e a r s , and regu larl y nominated in June, 1922. In the M a so n ic fraternity his fundamental affiliatio n i wilh Templ e Lodge o. 2 3, F . a nd . 1vI., o f which he is junior warden in F FL RIDA 1 9 22 , and in the co lli h Rile o f th e time-h o n o r e d f raternity h e has rccc ivccl lh e thirty-s cone! cl g r ce, al so bei n g h o n ored with th e r ank o f Knight o m -11ta ndcr of lh e ourl of I f o n o r i n 192 1 , b es id es 11 h i h h e is a o bl c o f M o r occo T e mp l e of the :\l'yst:ic Shrine . June 16, 1909 , recorde d th e marriage of 1fr. . t. J o hn and Mi s Hort nse erno n, who was bo rn at R ockmart , Ge r g i a , a n d lit e three c hi ldre n o f thi s union a r e Mary Elizab lh , e ll V e rn n a n d Alber t H . , J r. \Vu.urn PAGE v VEB TER. The 1fa o ni c fra t e r nit y i s po s sibly lhe o ldest o r ani z cl in s li t uli o n k nown t o civi l i z ed man. Its pr sent ritual i only so m e 2 00 yea r s o ld , b u t ba c k o f that the orde r a n be t r aced i n o n e way or ano th e r l o lh e clays o f th ea rl y Egypt ian dynastic . Thro u o h m a n y ce n turies and in many c o untrie s it has b ee n d o ing a ben e ficent work I t i th e only int ernatio n a l s oc i e ty; i t i the on l y human i n stitution that has n o bou nd a r y J i n e s a nd enters int o e v ery co un t r y w h e r e a m e a sure. of ivili z ati o n prevail , nd o n Cod is recogniz cl. Jn o u r own c ountry i l s rn 111h c r s hi p o ( 1 ,000,000 o r m o r e c o mp ri e th e r am of o u r citizen ship. From G eo rge vVa hin g l o n clow n t o our p r e s ent day o u r g reate t and bes t 111e n h ave fe l t h onore d in b e ing affili a t e d wilh lhi . a n c i e n t a nd yet vigorous i n stitution. l ev e r olicitin g m e111bc r hip , n ev e r a n w c rin g critic i s m . , 1Tt01ing a l o n g in th e ev e n l n o r o f it way, d o ing goo d l o huma n i t y . wilh t h e advan ce f c ivili za ti o n it g r w s s t ro n g r yea r b y year , a n d m e n wond e r w hy. T h e r e a s o n s ar n o t fa r t o e e k. In a world o f rapid h ange, it i s co n s rvati1e and unc hangeable. In a w orld o f p o liti cal unres t , n o p l iti c co m es within it s porta l s . In a w orld o f man y ocial lrata, it i s abs lu tcl y d e m oc ratic, a nd up o n t h e D oo r s o f il s l o d ges all m e m b e r s m eet upon eq uality . The wido w a nd h orpha n k n o w it but t o b l ess ; lh e clis t r ssecl bro th e r in a far c untry m eets 'om c l h i n g ve n b e y ond charity. T hat it Jiv es and thrives and waxes m o r e vigo r u s with l h c centuri es i s a jus t tribute l o it s work, worth and 111c ril. [n e v e r y late of o u r U n ion t h e r e i s f und so m e o n e man wh o i s t o the M a s o ni c fraternity o f hi s j uri clic ti n wha a g reat o-en e r a l i lo his army. In Flo rid a lhat man i Wilbe r P. \ Vcb s ler, o f Jack onvill , grand s ec r e t a r y o f th e Grand L odge o f Florida, of the Gran d C h ap t e r , and recorder of th e Gra n d Co m -111ancle r y a nd ;ra n d C o u n c il. M r. \i\Teb ter i a native o f Mass a chu etts, b orn al Ply mouth , April 27, I 5 8 . H e c o m es fro m the ca rli e t Puritan settlemen t i11 merica, and i s descended from that John \\'cb s t e r who came fr o m Ips wi c h , u ffolk o un t y, En land, and se l ll e d at I p s wich , 1Ias achusetts, in 1 63 4 . The gen ea logy of thi s branc h o f l h e \ V eb s l e r fa m ily wa pub l i s h e d at ugus t a, Maine, in J 4 , b cin co mpil ed b y \ Villiam B. Lapham and D r. j . 0. vV b s t cr. lf th vVeb s t e r family had clo n e n othing m r e than contribute to our country Danie l v Veb l e r and Noah vVeb slcr, il woul d have bee n e n t itl e d l o the gratitude o f the n a ti o n . But thi s famil y h a s d o n muc h m o re, and e v e r y gen e rati on from th e old Pur i tan c o l o ni s t down t o lhe p r esent time has furnished th e country with exc ellent and useful c itizen s in vario u s w a lk s of life. Mr. ' V e b ster's fathe r was Dr. 1Torman W eb tr a n d hi m o th e r ' s m ai d e n nam e was Corde lia Town e . Among hi s early a nee l o r m a y b e m n li o n ecl Elder B rews ter, w h o came ove r fro m En g l and t o m r ica in th e M a yfl o w r, and a co l-

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Ill T O R Y OJ< F L O RID 71 lateral relati1 c was Hannah Dus t in, of Massachu sclls Co l on i a l farnc. Tn th e p erio d of th e Revolutionary war one of J\lr. \Vcbslcr's a n ces t o rs, J o n a th a n \ Vcbstc r , was a clclcgalc l o th e Massachusells Convention of 177.i, a nd by orde r of the co nv ention wrote a r e p ort t o the P r ov incial o n g-rcss regarding the bu siness o f o rgani zing the "J\rinute M en." Mr. \ Vebs t c r ' s educatio n was a cquire d in t h e commo n schoo l s and the h ig h sc h oo l at St. ! bans, Vermo nt. bout I 6r h is fath e r made remo1• al from Massachu se tt s and se ttl e d in th e southern pa r t of t h e S t a t e of Vermont, whe r e h e r es id ed u ntil abo u t 1870, w h e n h e m oved t o Gainesville, Florida. In i876 yo un g vVebste r , th n a youth of eightee n yea rs, began active w o r k i n the lumb r busi n ess at J\[ o un t arrie, F l o r id a. Later h e s p nt so m e yea r s in the retail drug business at J ackso n ville, and s til l l a ter resum e d hi s acti v iti es i n the lumbe r indus t r y, being located at Bostwick, this s t a te. In t h e m eanti m e he had beco m e inte r ested in Masonry, and after c l osing out his busi n ess a t B os twi c k h e m ove d to Jac k s n v i llc, F l rida, w h e r e in 1890 h e receive d the degr ees in Lodge, C hapter and Co m mandery a n d became an active w o r ke r i n th ose bod ies. His effic i e n cy and faso i.i c s p i r it led t h e brethren i n l8g6 to e l ec t him secr e t ary of t h e Grand L o d ge, which n ecess it a ted hi s .,.ivi n g up all othe r busi n ess. H e wa grand hi g h priest of the G r a n d Chapte r in 1 898 a n d grand co m m a n de r of the G r a n d ommande r y, I nights Tcmplar, in 18 96. In 1899, t h e G rand C h a pt e r of Royal A r c h M aso n s add e d t o hi s G r a nd Lodge dut i es b y m a kin g h i m t heir sec 1 e t a r y, and in that sa m e year the G r and ommande r y of I night Templar e l ecte d him r eco r d e r. All of th ese p osi tions h e h as since h e ld wi th di tinguis h cl ability. O n Sep t e mber 7, 1893, M r. \Vebster was unite d in marriage with Mrs. Mar y (Vann a h ) Davis, daughter of Fran cis and a th e rin c Vannah. Mr. \\' c b s t e r lakes n o acti ve intc r es t in p olitics. H e votes his co n vic ti o ns, and hi s affiliat i o n s are with the republica n pa r ty. ln c i vic movements h e i s a l ways ready t o l e nd hi s aid and influe n ce i n be hal [ of e nterprises which show the m se l ves worthy. In a d di ti o n t o being a thirty-third d e g r ee Scottish Rite Mason, he is a n active rn m ber of th e Jack o n v ill e Chambe r of omm e r ce. In hi s reli g i o u s co nvi c ti o n s h e i s a Presbyterian, a nd i s a rul i nrr c ider in that church and c l erk of th e sessio n of the Firs t Pres byteri a n Church of Jackso nvil le, to which Mrs . Webs ter a l so b elo n gs. Prominent a m o n g the Maso n s, Mr. W e b s t e r occ upies a pos iti o n of i nflu e nce and usefulness in the tate of Florida. H e co m es of a famil y wh i c h has added lustr e to our his t o ry, a nd it i s but fair to him to say that in h i s hands there will be no dimunition of thi s fam e . ALBERT MACKEY J 1 'ES, w h o i s now a prominent r epresenta tive of th e real-est a t e bus in ess in the City of Jackso n v ille, is a native of F l o rida a nd a sc i o n of o n e of the pio n ee r familie s of th i s fair commo nwealth . Jeremiah h es, g r andfathe r of him wh o e name initiates this r ev i e w, early es tabli h eel hi r es idence at cw myrna, F l orida, whe r e h e be ca m e a s uccessful Indian trade r , 1 esi d es which he was a p ioneer in Florida n a vi ga li n enterprise . H e operated a n o ld tim e sai lin.,. vessel betwee n New S m yrna a n d C h a r les t on, South Carolin a, and on o n e of his voyages h a nd hi vesse l w e r e lost a t sea. the suppositi n b e in g that th e boat was boarclccl by pirat es and that h e was murde red by these m a r a uders of the high seas. After his tragic death his widow found it i mp ossible t o li1 c a m o n g the Indians at New Smyrn a and re moved to St. A u g u stine, w h e r e later s h e be ca m e th e wife of c;ol. John \ i\Tilliarns. Co lonel \ V illiams, a man of m arked abi lity , wa s t h e auth o r o f a hi s t o r y of Florid a, but this valuabl e co mp i l a t ion has never bee n publis h ed. Albe r t Mac k ey I ves was bo rn at Lake Ci t y, Co lumbi a County, F l orida, November 16, 18 49, and i s a on of Edward Rutledge Ives and Mary J a n ( Hogan) I ves, th e forme r of whom was b o rn at C harlest o n, South Caro lin a, in 1818, hi s d ea th h avi n g occurred in 1871 , and th e latte r of w h o m was born at Jac k so nville, Florida, in 1828, th e yea r 1 909 hav in g recorded h e r death . Edward R. I 1 es first m aniecl Eliza Hogan , and they became the parents of t wo sons , bol h of w h o m arc d ecease d . A f t e r the deat h o f hi s fir st w if e Mr. T vcs marrie d h e r younge r s i s t er. J \ lary Jane, a nd of the live c hi l d r en of thi s union the s u b j ect of this s k e t c h was the firstbo rn and the only so n , o n e of hi s sister s bei n g deceased. The Hogan fami l y name has bee n ide ntifi e d with th e hi sto r y of Jack so n v ill e si n ce the ead y pi o n ee r p e ri o d, and a street in this c it y perpetu a t es the n a me. fter th e death of t h e fath e r a n d mothe r of Eli za and M a r y Jane H ogan, I. D . Hart, t h e founder of Jac k so nville, became their guardian. Edwa r d R. I ves recci 1 • ed good educati onal a d vantages, as gauged b y the s t a nd ards of hi s clay, a n d h e p r e p a r e d him self fo r th e legal profess ion . H e se rved as a so ldi e r in th e India n war s of 1835 a nd 1855, a nd in 1859 he purc hased a teamboa t at eclar I ey . H e brought 1.his vessel to Jac k so n ville a n d put it into commission o n t h e l. J ohns R iver, i n o ppo si ti o n t o the vessel o p e r a t e d by aptain Broc k , who was the first 1.o o p erate a steamboat o n thi rive r. _ { r . Ives ran hi s ve s se l between Jack so n v ill e and E nt erprise u ni.ii the outbreak o f th e Civi l war, when he pla ce d the b oat in the se r v i ce of the Co nfederate governme nt , as a tra n s p ort fo r t roops and war s uppli es. Whe n t h e Fede r a l troo p s capture d F e rn andina they ran th e I ves s t eamboat up the St. J\Ia ry's R ive r a nd lat e r th e b oa t was u sed as a b l oc kade runne r . In hi s ea rli e r life Edward R. Ives fo llow e d the trade of carp ente 1-, a nd at the inception of the C i vil war h e was postm as t e r at L a k e City, a n office h e r e t ai n ed m a n y year s, besides w hi ch h e serve d as mayo r o f that city and was one of i t s m os t h onored and i nflu ential citize n s . H e had t h e di stincti o n of being th e first man in Florida t o r eceive th e thirty-third and u ltimat e degr ee in th e Sco tti s h Rite of the M aso ni c fraternity, a nd at the time of hi s death he was g r a n d l ecturer of th e M aso n ic G r a nd L o dge of Florida. H e was o ri g inall y a w hi g and thereafter a d e mocrat i n p o liti cs, and h e held m e mbership in the U niv crsa l ist hurch . A l be r t M . Ives acqui red his early ed u catio n i n th e sc h oo l s of Lake City and Jack so nville, and in 1862 , at the age of thirteen yea rs, he bec a m e a mail carrier in th e se rvi ce of th e Co n feder a t e government, hi s activity in this capaci t y having continued until th e close of the war, and hi s work having been in the carrying of m a i l from Confe derat e army headquarters a t L a k e C ity t o diff e rent p oints in the s tate. He also se rved i n t h e ordna n ce department at Lake Ci t y. fter the war h e h e ld clerical position at Lake Ci ty, and i n l 87r h e beca m e a clerk in a grocer y sto r e a t J acksonvil lc. In 1873 h e took a position as railway m esse nger in the ser vice of th e Southern Expr ess Company, a n d three mo n th later he was

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72 J 11 ' T OR\( I' Fl". OI \ 1 1 ) , \ a d v a n c e d t o t h e p os i ti o n o f r oute a g ent c le rk. I 1 1 J 8 7 6 h e w a s app o i nt e d a g e n t fo r the l'l a n l i l w a y s y s t e m o f l.'J o r i d a , con s t ituting th e presL"nt J \ tl a n t ic 'oa s t l { a i lroa d , and a b out o n e year lakr h e wa s m a d e cil\• ti c k e t a g c n l fo r L h e sys t e m a t J a c kson v ille, i1; w hi c h connec t i o n he b 0 1-e o p e n e d Lhe fir s t c i t y t i c k et. of"li ce, a l i 7 V \ es l H a y Str e e t. H e r e t a in e d Lhis p os iti o n a b011 t c i g h l m onths and the n , in t 8 7 8. was m a d e roulc age n t f o r th e S o u t f 1 ern E x p r ess Co m p a n y , with j uris d i c ti o n over F l o r id a and a p a r t f G o r g ia. H e retain e d t h i s office u n til 1 883 , w h e n h e resume d hi s s e r v i ce a s Jackson v ille agen t for Lhc P l ant lfailroad s y tern, b e id es acting as a.,. c n l for the s l r e e t r ailway s y s t e m o f J a c kson v ille , the m o ti ve p o w e r o f w hi c h w a s a t th a t time the l o w l y b u t efli ci e n t mule . In 1 885 M r. I ves r es i g n e d these p os iti o n s t o a ccept th a t o f g e n e r a l m a n ager a n d t r e a sure r o f the F l o r id a Fruit Exch a n g e, w h i c h w a s o r g a ni z e d by grow e r s o f F l o r id a fruits . Ceo r g e R. F a irba n k hav i n g b e e n pre s id ent o f t h e co r p oratio n , w h i c h co n t inue d i t s o p e r a t i o n s u n t i l 1 89 9, w h e n the bus i ness was di srupte d b y t h e m e m orable destruc ti o n o f Fl r i d a o r a nge trees b y fre e z in g . Jn Janua r y o f t h a t year Mr. I v es ll' a s e l e c t e d c it y tre a sure r o f Jackson v i l le . ancl t h e a d m irab l e admi ni s t r a ti o n w hi c h h e ga\ ' C i s i n -. , , , , d b y t h e fact that h e was retai n e d i n t h is impo r t ant fisc a l office JOY, ye a r s . Jn 1899 a l so h e establ is h e d hi m s e l f i n th e naval-st r es bus i n e ss , i n part n e r s hi p w it h J o h n 11. P a t t e rson . The f"irm o f I v es & P atte r so n con ti n u e d t h i s e n t e rprise un t i l 1 9cc. s in ce whic h yea r I v es has g i , c n hi s attenti o n t o th e b u y i n g and selli n g o f real e s ta t e. H e i s a direct o r o f th Flo r id a Bank and is o n e o f t h e w e ll k n o w n and h i g hl y h o n o r e d c i t i z e n s o f t h e F l o r i d a m etro p o li s . H is p o l i t i c a l a l l e g i a nce i s g i v e n t o t h e cl mocr a t i c p a r t y . and h e a n d hi s " i f e a r communi ca n t s o f the Prote s t a n t : E p i s c o pa l C hurc h. h e havi n g s erve d a s a m c rnb r o f the vestr y o f hi s paris h. O n t h e 1 6 t h o f J un e, i 8 7 4 , was sol emniz e d th e m arriage o f Mr. I v es a n d l\[i ss ](at i e [. Bryson . w h o w a s b orn a t H c n d c r so1wi l l e. N o r t h C a r o lin a . a d a ughte r o f Judge \ Vill ia m a nd E v e lin e ( Plum ley) Brys o n . b o th l ikewise na tives o f t h a t s t a t e. \frs . h es havi n g b ee n Lhe s i x t h of t h e i r c l eve11 c h ildr e n . S h e p assed a way 1Ja r c h 2 4 , 1 922 . \ I r . a n d \,f r s . T \ 'CS h a d n o c h i ldre n . L o uIE 'v\T . . TR U M . A l ea d i n g m e m b e r of th e Jac kson vill e b a r s in ce 1 9 12, L o ui e V v . Strum h a s a l so tak e n a n i m p orta n t p a r t in civi c affairs . ancl durin g the 'v\To r l d wa r r e n d e r e d effic i ent se r v i ce in co n n c c ti n with t h e w o r k d o n e b y th e U n i t e d Stat es n avy. In w hate\'e r wor k h e h a s b ee n e n gaged h e h a g i , e n o f t h e best of h is a bili t i es. a n d 110 o n e h a s e v e r h a d r e ason t o d oubt h is s i n ce r i t y o f purpose o r t o q u es t i o n hi s m o t i ves. \.fr. Strum was b orn a t Val d os t a . L o wndes Cou n t y . G e o r g i a . J anua r y 1 6 , 1 8 9 0. a n d i s a son o f L. H . a n d D o r a ( R a msey) . trnm . Hi;; fa t h e r . w h o w a s b orn i n \Icc k l e n b u r g County. V i r g i nia, i n 1 8 5 7 , r e111 o v e d t o .cor gia i n young m anho o d and t h e r e establis h e d h i m se l r in th e h a r d w a r e bu s i n cs , a l so h andling b i yclcs and s p o r t i n g good s a l V a l d os t a. "In 1 90 4 h e r e m o v e d t o t. P e te 1 sburg, Florida . \\"h e r e h e s till m a k es h is h o m e. H e i s a d e m oc r a t in p o l it i cs . affil i a te, w i t h t h e : M ason i c fr a t erni t y a n d is a n 1:;:pis co p a l ia n i n r e l i g i o u s fai t h . \frs . S tru111, w h o was b orn i n Brook s Cou nt y . Geo r g i a . i n 1 86-1, d i e d in 1 89 6 at V a l d osta, t h a t s t a l e . The o nl y c h i l d o f h i s pare nt;,, L o u i e \V . . trum atte n d e d th e p u b li c c hool s of \ 'aldos t a, (;cor g i a, i n c l ll( l in g t h e hi g h school , ;1n d t h e n p u r s u e d a rnurse al t h e S t . Pekr s burg ilita r y ,chool , w h e r e h e g r adua t e d a s a mL"m bc r o f _ th e c la,s 11f 11; 0 6 a n d scn e d o n e year ; 1 s a c;q l ta1n o f c;1 -ckts . I l e t hl'n e n t e r e d upo n the >tudy of la\\" a t t h e S tetso n U ni v e r sity ' o llcg<.: u f L a w. fro m w h i c h i n stituti o n h e r e ce iv e d the degree o f lfac h lo 1 J o f L a w s in 1912. "i\fr. S trum a l t hat. t i m e t oo k up t h e pra c t ice o f h is professi o n a l J a c k son ville , and has be e n e n gage d t h e r e i n l o t h e p r e se n t w ith th exce p t i o n ( the t i m e that h e s p ent i n the navy. In 19o6 l\lfr. trum j o i n e d th e U n i t e d S t a t es navy a s a l a n d s m a n , a n d made rapid p rogress. H e i s n o w a comma n d e r i n t h e N a va l Rcscr\"C F o r ce and n a v a l se c retar y t o th e gov erno r o f Flo r i d a. Duri n g 1 9 1 8, whil a commande r in t h e n a , y , h e wa s f o r a ti m e governo r o f the Sam o a n l s l ands . H i s se r v i c es w e r e va lu a b l e a n d a p p r ec i a t e d , and h e r e e i v c d th e commenda ti o n o f t h e secr e t a r y o f th e n a vy f o r t h e m a nn e r 111 w hich h e c o m p orte d himself a n d d i sc h a rged J1is duties. O n receivin g hi s h o n o rabl e disch a rge fro m a c ti v e se r v ice i\l r. trum r e turne d l o .Jackso n v i l l e and r esume d h i s professi o n a l w o r k . and a t t h e present time has a l a rge a n d r e m u n c r a ti\"C c l i e n t e l c , i n additio n t o whic h h e i s assi s t a n t c it y a t t orney. H e b e l o n g s t o T rnpl e L o dge, F . and 1 \ . J\1.; J a c k so n v ill e h a p t c r , R. A. \l.; D a m a c u s omma nder y No. 5, K . T . ; F l o r id a Co11s ist o 1y N o . 2, thirty-secon d degr ee , S. L t , and Morocco T e m p l e, A . . 0 . N . i\J.. S . H e is com m a n d e r of the Ame r i ca n Legi o n , a n d h o l d s m e m b e r s h i p i n t h e Fl o rida Y a c h t ' l u b, t h e Sem in o l e C lu b the Florida Countr y lub, th e Churc h Club a n d ' t h e J\lilita r y S e r v i c e C l u b o f F l o r i d a, and i . c mma n d c r o f Jack s o n v i l l e Alumni hapte r of tlu : S i g m a :l\L. P. fraternit y. O n J u n e 6, t 9 1 7 , i\lr. S t rum m a r r i e d Ophe li a W i ls o n Gra y , o f S t. Pet e r sburg , F l orida , a n d t hey have t w o sons: L o ui e \V., j r. , b orn i n L h c am o a n I s la n ds; and C h a rles C r a y, b orn a l Jackson , ii le. FR. \ X K J O H B ROCK p resi d ent of t h e Brock S h o p Machine r y w h i c h r e p r c ents o n e o f th e important i ndustria l ente rprise in the o f Jac k so n v ill e , with head 1ua r t c r s at 3 41 East B a y S t r e e t , i s a n a ti v e o f F l rida_ and has found i n hi s n a ti v e s late a m p l e oppo r t u111ty f o r s uccess i ul b u s in e s achi e v e m e n t. H e i s a sci o n o f a famil y tha t w a s .founde d in New E n g l a n d in the Col o nial p e r i o d o f our nati o n a l hi s t o r y. I.Lis paterna l g r a n d fathe r , Capt. Jacob Broc k , a nat i ve f V ermo n t. c a m ' t o .Ja c kson v ille, F l o r i d a, i n the earl y 'sos and becam e t h e pi o neer o p e rato r o f tcambo a l s o n th e t. J hns Rive r. H . c pur c h a sed t h e s t ea m e r D arling t o n a n d p laced the sa m e 111 commi s i o n b e tween J a ksonville a n d El m i r a . H e placed o n t h e sa m rive r rou t e t h e stea m e r 1 f a t t ic, wh i c h \\"as bui l t f o r h . m b y Th mas H . t c v c n s . apta in B rock thus o p e r a t e d t h e fir s t s t ea m b o a t s o n t h e t. J ohn's Ri v e r a n d a f t e r the c lose o f the C ivi l w a r h e assoc i a ted w i t h Tho mas H . t c v e n s i n s h i p b ui l d i n g ente r p r ise. In t h e earl y ' o s tain .Brock bui l t t h e .Brock J.l o u s a t Ente rpnse, F l o rida a n d t hi s h e s ucccsful h con d u c t e d u n ti l h is d eath in i 8 77 . H e was survived b y fou r childre n Hatti e , J e nn i e, J acob , Jr. , a n d a p t . C h a r les I len ;y Broc k. all no\\" d ecea se d . I n the C ivi l war p e r i o d h e h a d s t e a m e r s in o p e r a t i o n o n the L J ohns Riv e r . F e d e r a l g u n b o a t s purs u e d h 1 s t e a mer Darl in g t o n u p t h e A m e l i a R i , c r. ill' hayin g supposed tha t lhc in t e n t i o n was l o capture

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Ill T l{Y o r • RrD a nd i111prioo11 hirn , whil the real object of t h e Unio n r o r ccs was t o c h arter hi s team e r . \ ' h e n he cl cidc d that t h capture of hi s team r wa inc itable h e 1 a11 th e vc sc i int a d i-aw brid ge , a nd al thi.-poi n t h was perso n ally app r e h e nd e d and was for so m e tim e th reafter co nfin e d in th e Federal pri so n al F ortre M onr e, Vi1gi ni a . Frank: J acob Broc k , w h ose n a m e i nitiat es thi s review. was ho rn at P a latk a, Florida, ?-.far h 25, i872, a nd is a so n of Ca ptain h a rl es Henry Brock and Rhoda Ella ( t ev ens) B r oc k , the fo r mer o[ whom was born at H a rtford, o nn c ti c u t, ; 111d the l atte r a l t e ub e n , Maine, th e s ubject of this sketch I eing the o nl y c hild . ap t. harlc 11. B r ock wa reare d princ ipally in o uth a r olin a, an d when th e Ci vi l war was precipilat cl h e we n t forth a a so ldi r of t h e o n fe d e r acy. H e beca m e as oc iat e d with hi s fath e r in steamboat ope r ations i n Florida and a l so in t h e s hipbui ldin g c11teqi ri sc men tione d in th prece din g p a rao-raph. Ir continued hi s int e r e t in th ese enterprises until the time of hi s death , and hi s wi d ow, now v n e r , . i11 yea r , r esi d es at Jacksonville . I e was a l o yal s u ppo rter o f th e principl es of the d e m oc r a tic party a n d wa affil iat e d with the M aso ni fra ternity . ap t ain Broc k wa a man of s terlin g character and of marke d b usin e s ab ilit y, a nd h e \\'as o n e of th e h o n o r e d c i ti ze n s of Florida a t th e lim e o f hi d e mi e. In the pub l ic sc h oo l of Jac k o n ville Frank J. B r oc k co n t inu e d hi tudi s unti l h e had profited by t h e advantage of t h e hi g h sc h o I , and t h e r e after he co n ti nu e d his s tudie s in the Fl ricla tate . \gri cultural oil ge . t th e age of s i x t ee n yea r s he e n te r e d t h e e mpl oy of the M errill-Stevens o m pany, o n e of the important manufacturing a n d comm e r cia l co n ce rn s o f Jackso n v ille, late r enter ing bu i ness for himse lf. Th cau c of th d emoc r a ti c pa rty fin ds a stau n ch upp o 1 t o n th e p art of J\Ir. Brock, a n d i n the M a o ni c frat ernity hi s a ffiliati o n s a r as here no t e d : Tem p le Lodge To. 2 3 , F. and A . M.; Jackso n v ill h ap t e r 10. 12, h. . M.; Dama cus Com m a n clery To. 2, J nights T emplar; a nd T mpl e of th e Mysti c hrinc . On t h e 14th o f O c t o b e r , 1896, Mr. Bro k wedd e d 1Iiss f[a nn a h Eva trout, who was born al J\l illbrid gc , fai n e, a daughte r of Fr I rick a nd a rah ( K nn e dy) t rout, n o w r es id n t o f Jackso nville. 1Ir. and Mrs . Brock b eca m e the par e n ts of fiv childre n : Ray i d ece a sed; C harl es F rede ri c k married Ruth G r ivin, a nd they have one so n , C h a rl e F., Jr.; N cal Mitc h ell is, in 1922, a student in C u s h ing ca d m y at A hburn ham, Mas a hus t etts; a nd th tw o yo un ger c hil dren are C harlotte a nd Frank J acob, Jr. T110MAS \\"11.UA M liANEY . . r e m a rk able pub lic se rvice ha s been that of Tho ma v\Ti l liam I f ancy, who for ove r thirt y years has been c hief of the J ac k so11ville fir d epar t m ent. a nd ha b e n i n th e fire -fig htin g e rvi e forty yea rs. His fath e r a nd a l 'leas t l\ o of hi s broth r s w e r e a l o fir e fighters , a n d his o wn so n is f r man of talion Xo. 1 at Jacksonville. Chief Haney was born at t lan t a, eo r ia , Dece m ber 31, I 6 0 , so n of Thomas a nd Hannah ( C unn ) Han y. His father, who was born in Ireland, was ix year s of age when brou ht to thi country by his par n ts, who l oca l e d a t Phila delphia. Ile was e ducated in the p ubli c sc h oo ls of that ci t , a nd as a youth learned the trade of black milh in t h e r a mp's s hip yard. In r 56 he removed to tlanta, Georgia, where he foll wed his trad e. During a part of the i i i war h e wa a lo omo tiv e engineer, but o n th ap-proach of h rm a n ' s Army t o Af1 a 11ta h e went n orth t o Phil;icle l phi a, w h e r e b e rem a in cl u n t i l 1 86 7 . returnin g t h e n to Atlanta. For tlwee or four yea r s h e was c hief of the fir e d e par t m e n t or At I an t a, a n d prior t o the ivil war h a d b ee n a m e mb e r of th e City Co uncil. H e was a Maso n in fra t e rnal a ffair s a nd a cl m o r a t i n p o liti cs. Th m as Haney di e d in J9QI, at t h e ag of e i g h ty-o n e . Hi wife w as born in Tew J e r ey a nd di e d in 1906, a t the age of e i ghty-s i x. They h a I a fami l y of three so n s a n d fiv e dauo-hte r , r our oE whom a r e l i ving , Tho m as \ Vill iam being th seve nth in age. Thoma \Villiam H aney wa ducated i n the sch oo l of Atlanta, a nd a t the age of thirtee n bc g an a n apprentices hip at the trade of b r a ss a nd ir o n m olde r in th e h ops of th e W est ern and Atlanti c Railway. H e co ntinu e d hi appre ntice hip a nd th e w ork of hi tra d e until h e was p as t twenty-o ne. t th e aO'e o f eightee n Mr. H a n ey j oined l h v oluntee r fir e se r v i ce at Atlanta. and whe n th e p::tid fir e department was o i ga ni ze d o n July I, 1882, h e beca m e fore m an o f th e h e ad quarte rs, I e ing th e n nly s i x m on th pa t hi s t11 c n ty-fir s t birthday. H e made a fine r eputa ti o n with th e tlanta Fire Depa rtm ent, and after b eing t h e r e fo r t e n yea 1 s h e was calle d t o th p ost of c hi e f o f th e departm ent o f J ac k so n vill , o n S e p t e m be r 5, l 92. In th e thirty yea r s h e h as bee n i n charge o E th e de 1 artme n t the e quipm ent a n d fac iliti es h a , e bee n c h a n eel a nd r o r ga n ized s ev e ral tim es, a nd h e h a a l way s k ept the di sc ipline, t h e p e r so nn e l a n d the fa c iliti es up l o the hi g h es t standard a nd ha won man y triumphs in th e course o f hi s se r vic e a a fir e fighte r . F o r a numb r o [ n•q'i h e wa s president and v i ce p r esi d e n t 0 f th e Internati o nal A sso ci a ti o n of Fire Engineer s . . Chief Haney i s a pa s t exalt e d ruler of Jac k so n \'lll e L o d ge N o . 221 , B e n e v o l ent a nd Pro t ec tiv e Orde r of Elks . a nd i s affilia ted wit h Cou n cil No. 6 48 l (nio-ht oE Co lum b us. H e i a democrat in p olit i cs. D ece m be r 1 2 , 1 893, a t Atlanta. h e marrie d Mi ss B ess i e M e l v ille S m i th . Their two c hi l d r e n a r e H arry a nd Mary Elizabe th . H arry w as educated in th e pa roc hi a l sch oo l of Jac k so n 1 illc and in a mi l i ta r y s chool at Greenville, Sout h Caro lina. a nd wa a s cone! lieutenant i n th e a rm y during th e war. I n 1 919 h e was app intecl t o hi s p ost as fo r e m an of th e :>Jo. I fir e s tation at Jac k so nville. a nd i s thu s a r ep resentative of th e third co n sec u tive g n c rati o n of t hi famil y t o e ngage i11 Lhe pro f ess i o n o f fir fig h ting . ! ;: DWI N D . LurnR1G11T, post m as t r of Tampa, is o n e o f th e s te rlin g men a nd capab l e o fficial s of th c it y of which he i s so import a nt a c iti ze n , and his efforts in it s b ehalf a r e n o t co nfin e d t o th e ser v ic e o [ hi s office, but ext e nd t o ev e r y ave nu e o r progr ess co nn ec t e d w ith it s d eve l o pm e n t. H e w as born a t Brun wi c k , eo r g i a, May 2 r , T 74, a so n o f J ose ph E. a nd Julia S . ( Dart ) Lambright, b o th n a ti ves of G eo ro-ia. Altho u g h h e d i e d wh e n only thirty-six yea r s of age, J os ph E. L a mbri g h t wa s a. very p ro min ent m an, b o th as a m e r c h ant an d in public life, c rvin g as s h e riff of hi cou nt y and mar h al o f Brunsw i c k fo r so m e yea rs. His widow survives him a nd still makes her h ome a t Brunswic k , G eo r gia. T hey had three c h i ldr e n , nam e ly: Hrs. J ose ph P . Bennett, of Savann a h , G e rgia; J ose ph E., editor a nd o wn r of th e Bruns wick D ai l y Banner; and Edwin D. , wh o was the firsth o rn . Growin g up a t Brunswic k , Edwin D. L ambright attended i t public sc h oo ls, and s ub sequently too k a course at Emo r y liege, th en l ocated a t Ox r nrd, but n ow l ocate d at tlanta, Georgia. In

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14 B I T O I Z\ O F F L O R I I . \ . 1 893 h e ente r e d t h e n e w s p a p e r b u in cs a t Brun w i c k a a r e p orte r o n a l oc a l p a p e r , and di s pla ye d s u c h abilit y tha t w h e n o n ly twe nt yt w o ye a r s o f a g e h e wa s m a d e e d i t o r o f th e Bruns w i c k T im es, and r e m aine d w i th t h a t journa l until 1899 , w h e n h e ca m e t o T ampa a nd secure d a p os i ti o n o n th e T a m pa Tribune. u n ti l 1 9 1 7 h e mainta in c d hi s co n necti o n with th i s p a 1ier , fir s t a s city edito r a nd l a t e r a s m a nagin g e clit o 1 , bu t seve r e d it t o assume th e dutie s o f t h e office w h e n h e wa a pp ointe d p ostma s t e r b y Pre iclcnt V,l i l s o n t o fill a va ca n cy, and in J 9 1 8 wa s r eappo int e d t o fill a r e g ul a r four year ter m . H e h a s l o n g been o n e o f t h e leadin g d e m oc r a t s f the s ta te. a n d was a d e l e gate t o th co n ve nti o n at B a l ti111o r e . M a r y l a n d. whic h n o mi nate d \ V o oclro w \ Vilso n fo r th e presid e n c y i n 1 9 1 2 . During the la te war h e was pre s i d ent o f the R otary Club o f Ta111pa , a n d a s $ U C h h a d c h a r g e o f muc h of the club' w a r wo rk. A s c h airma n o f t h e W a r S a v ings S t a111p ca111pa i g n s h e did ex c ellent w ork i n b ehalf o f t h e c a u s e. a n d wa s o t h e rwise usefu l in a idin g th e administra ti o n t o c a rry out it s p o lici e s . inc lu din g an aggr e ss i v e ca111pa i g n a s a F our-l' v[inule S p e a k e r . H e wa s o ne o f th e c harter m c111be r s o f Tampa L o dge r o . 708 , 8 . P . 0 . E . , a nd i s e n thus i a s ti c in b e h a l f o f t hat orde r . In 1 9 0 3 :.rr. L ambrig h t 111arriccl a nni e Fi11 c h . a nati v o f Ge r g i a , a nd a d a u ghte r f J a111cs B. Fin c h. :Mr. and Mrs . L ambright have o n e d a u g h t e r . i \far y Vlalla cc, wh o i s a s t ud ent o f the S t a l e College fo r \>\'om e n a t T alla h as se e. Tilorida. A man o f lib e r a l v i e w s a nd w id e Y i s i o n , :M:r. L a111-bri ght's l o n g a sso c i a t i o n w ith n e w s p a p e r w ork h a s broade n ed h i m a nd 111a d c hi111 huma n e l y t o l e r a n t o f othe r s . Since h e t oo k c h a r g e o f th e T ampa post office h e h a s g r e atly impro v e d th e se n i cc . a nd clur . ih e wa r p e ri o d. a nd t h e equally t r ying e p o c h o f th e r ec o n structi o u clays, prov e d t o t h e p eo p l e o f his h o m e c it y t h a t h e 1,a s exactl y th e r i ght 111a n in t h e ri ght place. I [ a Ying co m e t o Tampa i n 1 igor o u s y o ung 111a nh o o d. h e h a s g r o w n w it h i t. a n d ha s g i ve n t o it and i ts e n t erpris es t h e benefit of hi s enthus i a s m. z e a l a nd effic i ent s u ppo rt . a nd t h e r e is n o m a n in t hi s r ('g i o n 111o r c d cse n i n g of p r a i s e f o r h i s co n s i sten t and pe r,isten t p u bli c \\' Ork. H oi\'. J .1Mr:s P EELER. j u d g o f t h ri m i n a l _ _ ourt. q f R ecord f o r Duva l C ounty, has m a d e a cl1 st1n gu1s h c d r eco r d a s a lawye r o f the Jack so n 1 illc b a r. a nd h a s p racti c ed in t h e courts o f t h e s tate for over t wenty year s. Judge Peel e r 11 a s h orn a l C a i n es 1 i l le. Flo r ida. .Jun e 1 .). 1 8 7 6 . so n of Theo d ore a nd E l i za b e th ' r; ib s o n ) 1 eclc r . J:li s fath e r \\'a s b orn in R o wan o unly, >forth aroli na . Sept embe r 2 2 , i 8-J8. a 11d w a s a c hild w h e n hi s fa th e r , S o l o111o n J . ] ee l r , b r o u g h t th e fa111ilv t o Flo ri d a. o l o m o n J. P e e l e r was b o rn in ::\ orth Car o lin a . ).l a r c h r:i. 1 8 r3, a n d l i ve d t o a ri pe o l d age. H e was a lave o w n e r a n d c otto n a n d t obacco p l ante r . The fa111ily l o cat e d i n A l a c hua C ounty , Flo ri d a . T h eo d o r e Peel e r w a s educ a t ed in the p ubl i c sch o ol s o f t h a t county , a nd s p ent hi ac ti v life i n g e n e r a l farm in g , g r owing c lio n . r ai si11g cattle a 11d h o r ses, a 11d h a nd l in g high g r a d e s tock. H e was a m e m b e r o f th e Episco pal Church. S o u t h , a nd a d e111o crat in p o liti c s. lfe cli ecl D ccc111b e r L . " Hi s w i f e di e d F e brua r y T. i 88 r . T h e y w r 111a r ri c d Janu a r y 5 , 1 871. and t h e y h a d a fam i l y o f tll'o s o n s a nd two daug ht e r s . two o f th e111 n o w li1ing, J a m es i\(.. bei n g th e third c hild . Judge P ee l e r a tt ended p ubl i c s c h o I a l G a ines-1 illc , and wa s a l so educate d i n t h e Eas t F l o rid a S e min a ry. At th e a g c o f t w e nt y h began l e a c h i n g, and continued sch oo l w ork for about s i x y e a rs. In th e m c a n ti111c h studie d law, a n d was a d m itte d l o the bar b y examinati o n i n 1 9or. I n 1 903 Judg e P ee l e r locate d a t Jack so lll ill c , a nd h a d a b usy p r iv a t e p r a c tic e u n t i l h e w ent o n the b e n c h. In 1908 h e w a s c l ctcd m e m b e r o f the J a c k s nvill C i t y o un cil, a nd was s erving hi s t hi r d t erm i n that b ody w h e n h e wa a p po i n ted j u dge o f t h e rimin a l ourt o f R ecord for t h e county by Governo r Park T r amme l l in 1 9 1 3 . Judg e P e ler i s n o w i n hi s third t erm a judge in th e 1 iminal Court, havin g been elc t e d in 19r7 a nd r e e l ecte d in 192r. IT i s a m e m b e r o f th C o u n t y B a r a nd the F l o r i d a S tate Bar A ssociati o n . H e i s a ffil i a t e d w ith I s l a nd Grove L o dge No. i2:; . F . a nd A. M .. a lso the J n i ghts of P ythia s a nd \ • \'oodme n o f th e \,Yor lcl, i s a m cmbe 1 of th e :.{ e th di t E p i c o pa l hurc h , o uth, and i n p o liti cs i s a d e m o c r a t. June 1 5 , 1 9 o s, h e m arri e d l\Jacl g B. Fie ld , a nativ e o f A l a chua a unty, Florida. d a u g h t e r o f C. G. a nd S u s a n E. Fie ld . S h e i s the second in a fa mil y o f thrc d a u g h te r s a nd two s o n s . J uclge a n d Mrs. Peel e r have fiv e c h i l d r e n : Eliza b eth, M a r g a r e t , J ess ie l\f a ric, J a111es 1\L, J r., a nd An d e r so n . P ATLUC K H rrnRY Ooou. \\Th e n i t i s t a k e n i n t o co n i d c r a ti o n that Patri c k H enry Odo m ha s been th e lega l a d v i ser o f th e City o f Jack so n v ille fo r a p e ri o d o f m o r e t h a n lwch-e year . h e will a t o n ce b p l a ce d a m o n g th e e ffici e n t , indll stri olls and v e rsati l e 111e m b e r s o f h i calli n g . Tiir s l e lected c ity atto rney ill 19rn, h e h a s co ntinue d in thi oflic c t o the present. with o u t interru pti o n . i n addi t i o n l o whic h h e co nd u c t s a l a r g e and lll c r a ti v c g e neral pra c ti ce, s p e c i a l i z i n g largel y in munic ip a l a nd c o r p o r a ti o n law, in whi c h h e i s c o n ce d e d t o b e so m e th i n g o f an a u t h o ri t y. M r . O d o m was b orn F e brua r y .). 187 4 , al Lyo n . . G e o r g i a , and i s a so n o E James If. and J a n e (l\J:cNatt) O d o m. l.l c rcccivccl hi s e a rl y educat i o n in th e publ i sch oo l s o f h i s na ti ve p lace, s u b seq u e n tl y atte n ding J;:m o r y C ollege. fro m w hi c h h e was g r adua ted in 1896 with t h e d e g ree o f Bach e l o r o f f\ rt a nd in I 900 with t h e degr ee of .\fa icr o f J \ r t s. H e l h e n enrolle d a s a la w stu d ent al t h e lJn il' c r s il y o f C co r g ia, . the n s . and was g raduate d from th a t i n s ti t llti n i n 1 901, wit h h o n o r s , recei ving t h d e g r e e o f Bach e l o r o f Laws . During the s a m e y ear h r e m ov e d t o P alat ka , Flo ri da, w h e r e h e es t a blis h e d h i m self i n the practic e 0 f law a nd forme d a p a r t n e r ship with the late B e n P. alh un a nd E . ::.I o b l e a lh o un , th e l a tt e r n o w o f . l. Augu s t in e. y e a r later ).J r. d a m 1110 1 cd t o Jack so n v ille a n d j oine d t h e law r1rm o f J. M . a nd I athan P. Bryan. I n 1 903 , a f t e r t h e di s s o lu t i o n o f t h e firm, h e becam e associate d wi l h l\ l r. Barr s, with w h o m h e co n t inu e d in practi c u nti l 19LO, in ::'vJ"a r c h o f w h ich year h e was elec t cl c ity attorn y. s befor e n o t e d , h e has r c lllain e d in th i s flic c t o t h e p r esent, a n d has s h own ze a l and effic i e n c y m b e h a l f o f th e c ity' s inte r es t s c 1 e r s in ce . In 1 915 l\[ r. O d o m fo r m e d a law partne r s hi p w ith J . T . G. raw fo r d , a n d i n 1916 ]. Turner Butle r was a d mitte d t o 111c111be r s hi p in the firm . Jn 1917 1\1 r . Craw f ord withdre w fro m the .assoc iati n a n d 11 r. Oclo111 a n d 1(1 . B u t ler c ontinu e d t o g e t h e r un ti l S ' p l e111bc r , 19 2 r , w h e n t h ci1 co n n ec ti o n wa s 111ullla l l y se v e r e d. 1 [ r. O d o m is j u st:ly co n s id e r e d as o n o f F l o r i da's f o r c111os t a11tho ri tie s o n m1111 i c i p al a n d co r p o rati o n law, t o w hi c h h e h a s d e v o t e d a la r g e part o f hi s pra c tic e , a n d hi s opini o n arc h i g h l y r espec te d a n d h a v e be e n

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Tl1STORY OF FLORIDA 75 repeatedly s11staincd by the courts. l [e is a val ued member of the Jacksonville Bar Association and stands high in the estimation of his fellow practitioners. As a fraternalist he holds member ship in the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the Sigma Nu fraternity, and his social connections are with the Seminole Club, the F lorida Yacht Club and the Florida Country Club . In civic affairs he has alway been constructive and progressive and his support has been withheld from no movement that has promised to be of benefit to the community or its people either of a civic, educational, moral or character. On September IS, l9J7, at the home of the bride at McRae, Georgia, Mr. Odom was united in marriage with Miss Eunice Pitt. They have a charming home at Jacksonville, which is always kept hospitably open to their many friends. Jo11N TnoMAS GAVIN CRAWFORD bas earned dis ti n ction both in the law and i n democratic po liti cs. liis home and the center of his profession for t h e pa t fifteen years have been in Jacksonville. He has made a reputation by his own works and abil ities, apart from the fact that he is a son of one of the state's best known men, Hon. H. Clay Crawford, present secretqry of state, whose life is the subject for another biography e l sewhere in this publication. John Thomas Gavin Crawford was born at Crawfordville, Florida, December 6, I885, son of Henry Clay and Anna (Moring) Crawford. A considerable part of his youth was spent at Tallahassee, where _he attended the public schools, and he acquired his legal education in the University of Vi1ginia. After his admission to the bar he practiced at Pensacol a from I906 to I908, and since the latter year his home has been in Jack. onvillc. He has won a very extensive practice in all local and state courts, and is well known hoth in a business and professional way. Mr. Crawford early began taking the role of a leader in the democratic party in the state. In 1908 he was a delegate to the Democratic National Convention at Denver. Since I9I2 he has had the hea\' Y respon ibilities involved in membership in the Democratic National Commi tt ee. Mr. Crawford is a member of the Kappa Alpha col lege fraternity, the Seminole Club, F lorida Yacht Club and F lorida Country Cl11b. June 20, l9I8, he married Paula Connally, of Jacksonvil le, where she was born. They have one daught er, Katherine Hammond. FR1mrn1CK MILLS VALZ has been established in the practice of law in the City of Jacksonville since the year I914, and the scope and character of his professional work mark him as one of the representative members of the bar of Duval County. Mr. Valz was born in the fair little hill city of Staunton, Virginia, Jul y 29, 1889, and is a son of A. M. and Julia I. (Mills) Valz, the former a native of Switzerland and the latter of Devonshire. England, their marriage havi ng been so l em nized at Staunton. Virginia. The father was survived by four sons and two daughters, his death having occurred in I9I6. The mother survives. A. M. Valz was reared and educated in his native land, and was there graduated as a civil engineer. As a young man he came to the United talcs and in the line of his profession became a contractor in the construction of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad through the Valley of Virginia, a work in which he was engaged with marked suc cess, his activities in connection with railroad con strttction work having continued until his death. I l e was a democrat of well. fortified convictions, he was prominently affiliated with the Masonic fraternity and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and both he and his wife were earnest com muni cants of Trinity Church Protestant Episcopal, in their home city of Sta{111to11. The pub lic schools of the Old Dominion State afforded Frederick M. Valz his earlier education and his higher studies were carried forward til he matriculated in 'Voodbury Forest School at Orange, Virginia, and the law department of "'.asl!i1_1gt?n Ui:iiversity, at Lexington, 111 which mst1tutt0n he was graduated in r9u, with the degree of Bachelor of Law . His initial work in his profession was done at Gastonia North Carolina, where he remained about months. January, I9I4, he .established his permanent residence at Jacksonville Florida where he has ince in successful prac t i ce and has gamed reputation as a resourceful tri al lawyer and able counselor. Ile has been in fluential in the local councils of the democratic party, has served as a member of its executive committee in his home city, and in June, 1919, he was electe? a member the City Council, as representative from the Sixth Ward. He maae a record of loyal and effective service in this municipal office, and the popular appreciation of his work was shown in his reelection in June, I92I, on the 25th of which month he had the further distinction of being chosen president of the coun cil. a position of which he is the incumbent at the time of this writing, in the spring of 1922. He is a popular member of Jacksonville Lodge No. 221, B. P. 0. E .. and he and his wife are commu n icants of the parish of St. Mary's Church Protestant Episcopal. ' February 9, I9I6, recorded the marriage of Mr. yalz and Eleanor Salfelder, who was born 111 Connecticut of the one child of this union be ing a daughter, Marian Elizabeth. In his chosen profession and his civic attitude Mr. Valz has shown a fine sense of personal stewardship, and he is an active member of the Jacksonville Bar Association, as is he also of the Florida State Bar Association. vVILLIAM II. JACKSON is one of the attorneys of Tamp a who, at an early period of his profes siona l career, was fortunate in securing the con fidence and esteem of those engaged in large affairs, and this he has always retained . No in terests are so important that those concerned in their management hesitate to commit them to him when the occasion either for counsel or the assertion or defense of their rights in court. So it be safely that no one of his professwnal contemporaries are concerned in a greater number or variety of cases involving large interests and interesting and important legal ques tions than he. In the conduct of such hardfought and sometimes desperate battles Mr. Jackson's methods are those to be especially commended to the consideration of the profession. He is a hard fighter, but his methods are honor ab le, fair and open. No suspicion of sinister or devious efforts to secure secret or undue advantage were ever harbored by his opponents. In fact his entire professional life is dominated by a fixed and stern integrity which is one of the most admirable, as it is the most commanding, trait in his character. Therefore there is small wonder

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76 HISTORY Ol' l'LORlDA that he has risen to a n enviab le position among those practicing hdore t he ba r of Co untv. a nd is aC\'eptc d as o ne of t he best c 1l1zens o f his. commtmilv. The birth o f \\' illiam 1 l. Jackson 11ccu1-rcd i11 I r ernandn Count v . Florida. July 20. 1886, a nd he is a so n o f \Villiam F. a nd Susan (O'Rery) Jackson. a nd a grandson o f Thnmas B. Jackson. o ne o f the early settlers o f Florida, \\' ho ca me to the s tate in 1842, locating near Tampa, o r what 1s now Tampa, where he e ngaged in farming a nd took a prominent part in local a ffairs. 11 is son. \ Villiam F. Jackson, wa' a lso a farmer. The mother o f \\' illiam H. Jackson was horn in Georgia. but her fa ther, who was a Confederate so l dier, following the c lose o f the war o f the ' 6os came with his family lo l f ernando Co unty, Florida. Thomas B. Jackson was in t he U nion Army during the above mentioned war. hut his brothe1 was e qually zealous in behalf o f the So uth, a nd sened in the Con federate A rm\'. The third c hild in a f a mity of e ight children, \Vil liam H. Jackson was reared o n a farm now included in the cit\ limits of Tampa, to w hich he was brought by 11is parents when four yea rs of age, a n d he attended the Tampa sc hools, including the high-school co urse. Following that he was a student o f Foak Academy. and later o f Emory Colle ge, at Oxford, Georgia, and Rollins o llege. His legal training was ob tained in the law department of Washington a nd Lee U niversity, from which he was g raduated in i 9 08, and that same year was admitted to the bar. Locating at Tampa, he e nte r e d a t o nce upon a general practice, in which he has conti n ued with the exception o f the period when he was in the army dming the \ Vorld war. On Jul y 27, 1917, Mr. Jackson e nlisted, a nd was assigned to the Three Hundl-ed and Twenty-third Infantry. Sent o verseas, he was in command o f Company I of his regiment, and saw active scrv;rp i n the Argonne and Verdun o ffensives, remaining i n France for o ne year. He received his hon o r able cliscf1arge in May, 1919. a nd, returning-to Tampa, resumed his practice. opening new o ffices in the Citrus Exchange Building, where he is now located. 1fr. Jackson is a th irty-sccorid degree l\r ason. a nd has hcen a dvanced lo the , hrine o f that order. 1 n 1911 he married Lutie l\[ote Hansbrough, a daughter o f John A. Hansbrough, o f Tampa. There are no children. For four yea rs Mr. Jackso n served as solicitor o f the Municipal Court. H e hel on
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HISTORY OF FLORIDA 77 Hopkins eventually rose to be colonel, serving under Gen. Robert E. Lee until the close of the four-year struggle between the states. Ile was a member of the Masonic fraternity, and when he died, at the age of seventy-two years, his community lost one of its '!'alued citizens. Mrs. Hopkins, who was a native of Florida, died when eighty-two years of age. Charles Floyd Hopkins, Jr., received a public schoo l education. Later he secured employment as a freight clerk with the Florida Central and Peninsular Railway at Jacksonville, and when he left that position it was to enter the real estate business in the same city. Returning lo St. Augustine from Jacksonville, he embarked" in the same line of effort here, and in 1902 purchased a pineapple farm on the Indian River, which he conducted for some four or five years in conj unc tion with his realty enterprise. On January JI, 1916, Mr. Hopkins was appointed postmaster of St. Augustine by President Wilson, and this post he has since retained, having discharged the du ties of his office in a manner highly gratifying to the people of the city. During his career he has also served as city tax assessor, and as notary public for thirty-five years. As a fraternalist he is likewise well known, having served as exalted ruler of St. Augustine Lodge No. 829, B. P. 0. E., and being past chancellor commander of Mizpah Lodge No. 23, K. P. He is a democrat politically, and his religious faith is that of the Presbyterian Church. He likewise holds membership in the )fational Association of Po tmasters, the State Association of Postmasters and the St. /\ugustine Historical and Scientific Society. On April 6, 1922, amid impressive ceremonies, there was unveiled a handsome bronze tablet which had been placed on the historic old Post Oflice B u ilding, largely through the efforts of Postmaster Hopkins. At the top of this tablet ap pears the Spanish coat-of-arms, so familiar at St. Augustine, and on either side are draped banners, symbolic of the three flags which have floated over the old city. Underneath appears the following inscription: "Spanish Go\'ernor General's Palace Original building on site was of logs. Present structure built by Gonzalo 1\fendez Carnzo, 1597-16o3. Purchased by King of Spain, 1603. As a dwelling for the Governor of Florida at a cost of one thousand ducats. From that time on it was officially recognized and known as the Governor's :Mansion. Under Spanish flag over 200 years. Under British flag 20 years. Under American flag since July ro, r82r." The unveiling was done by the five-year-old granddaughters of
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78 HISTORY OF FLORIDA in the skirmishes and battles of his command, and received his honorable discharge. With its organization, he enrolled as a member of the local post of the Grand Army of the Republic. In politics he is a republican. Early deciding upon a medical career, G. Walter Potter began preparing for it, and after he had completed his attendance in the public schools of Bed ford County he became a student of the Ohio Wesleyan University. He also studied at Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and Heidelberg University, Tiffin, Ohio. His medical training was received at Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from which he was graduated in 1902. For the first two years following the obtaining of his degree Doctor Potter was interne at the National Central Home for Soldiers at Dayton, Ohio, and also served as third assistant urgeon. Returning to Pennsylvania, he was engaged in a general prac tice at Loysburg, Bedford County, for six years, during which time he gained a reputation for ability. In 1909 he came to Florida as local surgeon at Saint Augustine for the Florida East Coast Railway and the East Coast Hospital Asso ciation. In 1917 he was advanced to the position of assistant chief surgeon. Since 1909 he has been a member of the staff of the Flagler Hospital, and he maintains membership with the Saint Johns County Medical Society, the Florida State Medical Society and the American Medical Asso ciation. He is a member of Everett Lodge No. 524, A. F. and A. M., at Everett, Pennsylvania. From the time he cast his first vote Doctor Potter has given his support to the candidates of the republican party in national affairs. On May 20, 1902, Doctor Potter married Laura Bell Gates, who was born in Pennsylvania, a daughter of Samuel F. and Mary (Eshelman) Gates, both of whom were born in Pennsylvania. Mrs. Potter is the elder of their two children. Doctor and Mrs. Potter have four children, namely: Faith, David W., Marian and Samuel S. A man of broad information along many kindred lines, Doctor Potter has kept in clo e touch with all advancement. Essentially a sel -made man, he has not allowed himself to be hampered by the fact that he has had to wjn by hard work every step forward, but rather has so shaped cir cumstances as to make what might to another seem like adversity serve but as a stimulus to his ambition. A man of affairs, he has ever taken more than ordinary interest in local matters, and as his efforts are constantly directed toward prog ress, his connection with any movement guarantees ultimate value to the majority. JOHN POPE DuvAL. Aside from any prestige which may be his because of his connection with one of Florida's oldest and most distinguished families, John Pope Duval is well known to the citizens of Jacksonville because of his connection with the prominent firm of Consolidated Naval Stores Company. while he is still a young man, Mr. Duval's career has been a rather varied one, and has included experiences in various lines and different parts of the country since he started to become self-supporting as a youth. Mr. Duval was born at Jacksonville, September 2, 1888, a son of John Pope and Maude (Fisher) Duval. \Villiam Pope Duval, the brother of Mr. Duval's great-grandfather, was the first territorial governor of Florida, after whom Duval County was named, and Mr. Duval's grandfather, Dr. John Pope Duval, was one of the pioneer physicians of this state. His father, John Pope Duval, second, was born at Tallahassee, Florida, in 1864, and received his education in the public schools of that city, where as a youth he mastered the art of telegraphy. After serving as an operator for ome years he turned his attention to the insurance business, and for a number of years was .identified with the Mutual Life Insurance Com pany at Jacksonville. Eventually he returned to telegraphy. and his last years were spent at ugusta, Georgia, as an employe of the Western Union Telegraph Company, his death occurring in r8g7. He was a democrat politically, and his religious faith was that of the Episcopal Church. Mrs. Duval was born on her father's plantation in Madison County, September 2, 1864, and still survives her husband. Of their four children John P. is the only one living. John Pope Duval of this review secured his education in the public schools of Duval County, and when a lad received his introduction to busi ness affars as a newsboy on the streets of Jacksonville. Later he became a messenger boy for the Jacksonville & Southwestern Railway, now the Atlantic Coast Line, and from that position went to clerking for the building upplies firm of r:eorge R. Foster. Later he was a clerk for the Standard Naval Stores Company and the Naval Stores Export Company, and on leaving the latter became collection clerk and later bookkeeper for the State Bank of Florida. For a time, also, he was bookkeper for the Cummer Lumber Company, after which he spent six months in Arizona and New Mexico with a United States Government surveying party. Returning to Jacksonville, he joined the Consolidated Naval Stores Company as bookkeeper, and has been identified with this concern to the present. Mr. D uval is a man of ability and experience and has rendered his com pany efficient and loyal service. He has few in: terests outside those connected with the business. yet should not be classed as a mere commercial drudge, for he is fond of the companionship of his fellows. His religiou connection is with the Episcopal Church. In August. 191.1. Mr. Duval was united in marriage with Uiss Florence Elvira LeFils, and they arc the parents of three children: John Pope, Jr., Florence Irene and William LeFils. ATIJANIEL SMITH UPCHURCH was a Florida pioneer and a man of prominence and distinction in the Southeastern States. For many years he lived in Jacksonville, where he died. He was born near Raleigh, North Caroline, in 1825, son of Gilbert and Lucretia Unchurch. Both his paternal and maternal grandfathers served as soldiers in the Revolutionary war. Nathaniel Upchurch proved himself a man of self-reliance even in his youth, when by much effort he secured a practical education. On leav ing North Carolina he went lo Georgia, and in 1858 established himself in Nassau County, Florida. He was a general merchant there, and during the war between the states he accepted a contract lo maintain the Cuba telegraph line. He built the first line of telegraph from Doctor Town Georgia, to Live Oak, Florida. In spite of the fact that this line was torn down by the Federal troops he quickly rebuilt and succeeded in maintaining communication during the greater part of the war. He was the first to announce the news of Lee's surrender at Lake City. Following the war he was for twenty years in the service of the old Florida Railroad in charge

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HISTORY OF FLORIDA 79 of its land department, and in that way he became permanently identified with the development work of various sections of Florida and performed a service of lasting benefit to the substantial interests of the state. Nathaniel Upchurch retired from active busi ness about 1900, and thereafter he lived in Jacksonville. In 1858 he married Sarah Eliza Parker, of Florida. She was born in Nassau County, this state. Ten childre n were born to their marriage, eight sons and two daughters: Benjamin, who died at the age of twenty years; John]., a prom inent lumber manufacturer and one of Jacksonville's most prominent and wealthy citizens; Ella Agnes, who died at the age of twenty-four; George W., who also died at the age of twentyfour; Sarah Elizabeth, wife of W. E. Bennett, their home being south of Jacksonville; Nathaniel Smith, Jr., of South Jacksonville; Walter D.; Noble A.; Edward P., who lives at Brunswick, c;eorgia, and is married and has three children; a nd Frederick B., a resident of Jackson County, Florida. NOBLE ALvrn UPCHURCH, M. D. A son of Nathaniel Smith Upchurch of Jacksonville, Dr. Noble A. Upchurch bas for over twenty years en joyed high rank among the physicians and surgeons of that city, and in experience and attainments ranks as one of the ablest men in the profession of the state. Doctor Upchurch was born in Nassau County, Florida, May 31, 1876. A record of his father and the family is given above. Doctor Upchurch was educated by private tutors, and took his medical coi1rse in Vanderbilt University at Nashville, Tennessee, where he graduated M. D. in 1900. Subsequently, in 1903, he did post-graduate work in New Orleans and in 1919 in the Medical Department of Harvard University. Doctor Upchurch for six months after graduating practiced at Kissimmee, Florida, and in October, 1901, established himself at Jacksonville , where he has become known and has largely confined his work lo practice of internal medicine. Doctor Upchurch is a former president of the Duval County Medical Society and is a member of the Florida Stale and American Medical associations. He belongs lo the University Club, is affiliated with Solomon Lodge No. 20, F. and A. M., at Jackso nville, and Hoyal Arch Chapter No. 12. He has se rved as a member of the staff of St. Luke's Hospital, is physician for the Athletic Department of the Jacksonville High School, and is examiner for the Penn Mutual Benefit, Guardian Life, Colum bian National, National Life, Missouri State Life, and Mutual Benefit Insurance Companies. He is a democrat in politics. February 3, 1907, Doctor Upchurch married Susan Culpeper, a native of Thomasville, Georgia, and second of the three children of James P. and Alabama (Reid) C ulp eper, her father a native of Brook County and her mother of Thomasville, Georgia. Her father is a prominent banker, be ing president of the Citizens Bank and Trust Com pany of Thomasville. Doctor and Mrs. Upchurch have one daughter, Susanne. H. GEORGE FINK, A. I. A. A resident of Miami since boyhood, H. George Fink returned to this city after qualifying himself by long experience and study for the profession of architecture, and has performed a distinctive service in expressing the modern ideals of architecture in many of the best business, public and private structures erected in and around Miami. His father, R. K. Fink, has been one of the constructiv e financiers and property owners in Miami, where he has lived since 1905. He was one of the first purchasers of real estate with a view to future development. One of his purchases was the present postoffice building site at the northwest corner of Northeast First Street and Northeast First Avenue. He paid something over $3,000 for this ground, and later sold it to the Government for $25,000. Other investments turned out almost equally well and are evidence of the rapid growth of the city. He built and is owner of the Fink Apartments. H. Georg<; Fink was born at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania , son of R. K. and Tenia (Fisher) Fink, natives of the same state. Mr. Fink finished his public school education in Miami, but his educa tion for architecture was entirely self earned. Until he was twenty he worked as a clerk in the local postoffice, and then removed to Philadelphia, where he found work to support him while getting his higher education. He took both academic and technical courses in the University of Pennsylvania, and studied architecture in Drexel Instit ute. In Drexel Institute he attended almost altogether night classes. For four years in Philadelphia it was literally true that he studied both night and day to fit himself for his chosen career. The subsequent success as an architect that he has won had been richly deserved. Mr. Fink had for some years been a member of the American Institute of Architects, member ship in this organization being bestowed only upon architects of recognized standing. He began his professional career in Miami in 1916. Among the many buildings of tl;le better class designed by him there are the Miami Beach First National Bank, Miami Beach Public School, H. N. Pancoast residence, Columbia Building, the First Christian Church, Del Rio Apartments, the Fink Apartments. He was selected as the designer of the Miami Beach boundary marker on the causeway, and has planned and is the architect for many of the individual improvements marking the develop ments of one of Miami's finest residential suburbs, Coral Gables. He is a master of the style of architecture best fitted to harmonize the topog raphy, climate and other natural conditions of Florida with artificial building construction. Be sides his membership in the American Institute of Architects he is a member of the Florida Asso ciation of Architects, th e Miami Society of Architects, and acted as an advisor to the Park Planning in the development of the Miami's Bay Front. He is also a member of the Chamber of Commerce, the Ad Club, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and the Lodge and Dramatic Order of the Knights of Pythias. Mr. Fink married Miss Josie Hinton, a native of this state, who was educated here and is a brilliant young woman of much ability in literary execution. She has written both prose and poetry, including a number of lyrics, three of which were set to music and played by Pryor's Band. Mr. and Mrs. Fink have two children, Fay C. and H. George, Jr. GRANVILLE DAVIS CoxE. Under modern con ditions and organization the police department of a city like St. Augustnie is one of the most im portant in the municipal service, and its manage ment requires abilities of an executive nature, diplomatic powers, the bravery of a soldier and the broad judgment of an able general. All

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0 HISTORY O F FLORIDA of t hese attributes a re fo und i n the personal makeup of G ranville Davis Coxe, c hief o f police of St. Augustine, a nd a ma n w ho is highly es teemed in his co mmunity. C hief Coxe was born February 26, 1880, a l Lake C ity, Florida, a nd is a so n of Russell Henry a nd Mary Estelle Coxe, natives of Sandersville, Georg ia, where the former was born in 1849 a nd the latter in 1846. Educated in the public sc hools o f Geo rgia, Russell Henry Coxe took up railroading as a you ng man a nd came to Lake City, Florida, where he fo rmed a co nnection w ith the o ld Florida Central & Peninsular Railway, running from Jacksonville lo River Junction. For many years he w as e ngaged in construction work, in the ca pac ity of supe rvisor, with the Florida East Coas t Railway. a nd eve ntually beca me superintendent of the yards a t So uth Jacksonville. During his resi dence at Lake City he sened as c hief of po lice for a bout s ix years. M r . Coxe was a York and Sco t tish Rite Maso n of t he thirty-second deg ree, a;1d belonged to t he B lue Lo dge, C hapter and Co m mandery, in all o f w hich he filled va rious c hairs, in addition lo w hich he held membership in the Knights o f Pythias. He was a member of the Ba ptist C hurch, and in political a llegiance was a democrat. He died in 1922, w hile Mrs. Coxe s till s urvives. Of their six sons a nd four daughters, nine children a rc living, G ranville D. be ing the fifth in onler of b irth. G ranville Davis Coxe attended the p ublic sc hools a nd the U niversity of Florida, at Lake C ity. fo l lowing his graduation from w hich he mastered t he art of te legraphy and was e mployed by the \Vestern Union Telegraph Co mpany at Fort \Vhitc. F lorida. He continued to fo llow telegraphy until 19111 and was then va riously e mployed until 1913, i n which year he joined the police fo rce of the C ity of St. A ugustine. After serving as patrol man and in other ca pacities for s ix years he was promoted c hief of police, a pos ition w hich he holds a t this t ime. C hief Coxe is a man of physical and moral courage a nd strength, is a goo d disciplin a rian a nd a s tern enforcer of t he c ity's laws. having the s upport o f the b usiness men and lead ing citizens of t he c ity for t he manner in w hich he has made a sta nd against crime in eve ry fo rm. He belongs to Ashlar Lodge No. 98; St. A ugus tme Chapter o. 17, R. A. l\L; St. A ugustine Commandery No. 10, K . T.; St. A ugustine Lodge of Perfection, S . R. M.; a nd l\Iorocco Temple, A. A. 0. . M. S., and a lso be longs to the Knights of P ythias. His religious fa ith is that o f t he Bapt ist C hurch. a nd in po litics he is a democrat. On December 18, 19IO, C hief Coxe was united i n marriage wit h l\Iiss Maude Estelle Jones. w ho was born a t Milton. Florida. a daughter o f Joseph B. a nd Mary Estelle ( Carlhey) Jones, natives of Florida, the former of who m died i n 1919, while the latter is s till living. Mrs. Coxe is the s ixth in order of birth in a fa mily of four so n and three daughters, of whom six children a rc living. To Chief a nd M rs. Coxe there has bee n bo rn one son, Milton Russell. AUGUSTUS H. CRAIG. Among the younger gen e ration of business men Augustus H. Craig has firmly es tablished himself i n pu blic co nfidence at St. A ugustine, where he is a member of the funeral directing and e mbalming firm of L. F. Sanchez & C raig. This o ne of t he o ld esta blished houses o f the c ity, formerly known as S anchez & Son, a nd s ince joining its personnel Mr. Craig has n'aintained the policy of the business by his hono rable dealing, infinite tact and sympathetic bea ring. l\Ir. Craig was born in 0 1ange Cou nty, North Ca rolina, October I, 1 884, a nd is a so n of W illiam P. and Mary 0. (Smith) C raig. natives of the sa me slate and co unty. He traces his a ncestors o n both the paternal and maternal s ides to p ioneers o f North Carolina, and his maternal grandfather, ?-Iurph Smith, was a soldier of the onfederacy dming the war between the s lates. William P. Craig was bo rn May 7, 1855, the youngest of t he six children o f Ca meron Craig and his wife. He was o nly o ne year o ld w hen his father died a nd as a result his sc hooling was not ve ry extc;1sive, but he managed to ac quire a goo d practical education. a l the sa me t ime learning habits of industry that have s tood him in goo d s tead. Reared a mid agricultural surroundings, he worked o n the home fa rm fo r a number of yea rs , a nd w hen he came to c hoo e his o wn life work a dopted t he 11ursuits of _the soil, i n w hich he is s till engaged in his native co unty. He is the owner of a we ll-improved and we ll-cultivated p roperly. 011 w hich he raises cotton. co rn a nd oa ts, a nd a lso carries o n a s uc cessfu l business in breeding ca ttle. He is known as a man of integrity in his community and as a man of public spirit a nd c ivic p ride, a lthough he has never held nor sought public office. In politic he is a democrat. He attends t he P resbyterian Church. M r. Craig's first w ife, Mary 0 . (Smith) C raig. d ied August 4, 1893, aged about thirty seve n yea rs. leaving four so ns a nd two daughters, of whom three sons and o ne daughter s till surY ive. For his seco nd wife Mr. Craig married l\fiss Bertha Adams, a nd they have had two sons a nd one daughter. The third in order of birth o f his parents' c hil dren. Augustus H. Craig attended t he p ublic sc hools of Orange County, I orlh Ca rolina, where he passed his boy hood o n his father's homestead a nd was reared as a farmer's so .n. A n agricultural life, however. did not appea l to him, and he accordingly left the parental roof and fo und e mplonnenl wit h the outhern Ha ihyay, working with the construction department fo r a period o f two yea rs. O n January 3, 1910, he ca me to S t. Augustine, where he entered t he service o the Florida East Coast Railway, be ing identified wi th t he car-building department until September 1 r, 1012. At that lime he beca me a member of t he police force of S t. A ugustine, a nd after o ne yea r was a ppointed deputy marshal, a n office w hich he held fo r four years. He resigned February r , 1917, when he purchased a one-half interest in the f uneral directing a nd embalming b usiness of San c hez & Son, taking over the former holdings of t he fa ther, John William Sanchez. T he busi ness has s ince bee n known as L. F . Sanchez & C raig, funeral directors and licensed e mbalmers. T he roo ms and c hapel a re situated at jo S t. George S treet, and a re thoroughly equ ippecl for the rev erent care of the dead, t he partner having modern conveniences of every kind, including a motor a mbulance. Mr. Craig is a member of Grace Methodist E piscopal Church. As a fraternalist he holds membership in Ashlar Lodge No. 98, F . arid A. 1\L; St. Augustine Chapter No. 17, R. A. M.; St. Augustine Commandery No. IO, K. T.; St. Augustine Lodge o f Perfection, S. R. M.; and t-[orocco Temple, A. A. 0. . M . S., of Jacksonv ille; the Knights of Pythias a nd the Independent Order o f Odd Fellows. He a lso has se veral c ivic connections. In his political a llegiance he is a democrat, hut is not active in politics.

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JJISTORY OF FLORIDA 8 1 On February 4, 1914. l\fr. Craig was united in marriage with Miss vVilliHe c Bu h, w ho was born in Toomb County, Georgia, the second in order of birth of the • seven children, six of whom a r e livin g, of Charl es and Ella (Smith ) B u s h , natives of Laurens County, Georgia. Mr. Bush is a wcll k n own farmer and contracting builder of Toombs County, where he is held in high es t eem. To and Mrs. Craig there have been born two sons: Augustus H., Jr. , and William P . \\'TJ.T.TAl\I A. EVANS, city commissioner of Jacksonville, and part owner of the William A. Evans Lumber Company, who l esa le lumber and p laning mill, is one of the solid and representative busi ness men of Duval County. He was born in l\farion County, South Carolina, June 16, 1862 , a son of D ix on and Eli za Jane (Evans) Evans. he born in North Carolina in 1818, died in 1888 , and she. born in South a 1 o lin a in r833 . d i ed in H?2r. They had six children, four of whom survive. and of them all \Villiam A. Evans is the third in order of birth . The father was a physi cian, having graduated from Jefferson Medical College at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and he continued in an active practice the remainder of h i s Ii fe. For years he was a member of the loca l , state and national medical associations. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and the l\fasonic fraternity. In po liti cs he was a democrat. Growing up in his native state, Vl' i lli am A. Evans learned habits of industry and thrift while attending the public schools, a11d subsequent ly wide n ed the scope of his information as a student of the University of South Carolina. For a time after leaving the university he was engaged in cond ucting a lumber business in Geo1gia, but left that state for Madi on County, Florida, in r888. ancl for two years continued in the same line of bus in ess. He was then connected with t h e avannah, Florida & \l\Testcrn Railroad, beginning his con11ection with the road in the general offices. I n J 895 he left railroading and returned to t h e lumber business at Fernandina, l< loricla. In 1908 he came to Jacksonville and organized his present ro m na ny. t h e yard s being at the Atlanti c Coast Export Dock and at Commodore Point. Very prominc11t in the ranks of the democrati c party. he was the l ogica l candidate of his ticket for t he office of city commissioner in r9r9. was elected by a gratifying majority, and is still the incumbent of t h e office. Practical a nd w ith a st r ong sense of civic pride. he is a ve r y Yaluabl e man to have on the commission. and with his associates is ren rlerinr.r a much-appreciated service to t h e c ity. The First Meth6clist Episcopal Church of Jacksonvil l e holds his membership, and through its medium h e gives expression to hi s religi o u s faith. I\ I\lason. he belongs to Amela Lodge No. 47, F. and A. M .. of Fernandina: Fernandina Chantpr, R. A . M.: Damascu s Commanderv, J . T., l\f orocco Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. S . He a l o a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, the O ld Colonial Club and the A ut o Club, a nd is very popular in all of the se fraternities and organizati ons. On l\Jay 6 . r899, l\[r. Evans marri ed Chri stine Hopper. and th ey have two sons. \Villiam A., Jr .. who wa nominated by Congressman Sears a . mids hipman at An nap olis, Maryland. where he i . now receivi n g hi. training: and John Dixon, w h o i< attending school. Mr. Evans has worked hard for the success which he has attained. and is nroud of the fact that he has earned all he possesses. His business is in a flourishing con-rliti on. and hi s comme r cial rating is o( the high est, as is his sta ndin g i n hi s community. HENDLEY FoxwORTH HORNE, M. D. Repre se nt ing t h e modern experien ce and modern ideas of t h e p r ofession of medici n e and surgery, Doctor Horne has achieved defi nite success du rin g his practice at Jacksonville, where hi s abi litie s a rc rapid l y making him k n own as a surgeon of spe cial sk ill and attainments . D oc tor Horne was born at L udowici, Georgia, December 26, 1891, so n of Edward Daniel and Salli e (Moncrief) Horne. His father was born at L udowici in 1866, and his m other i n B la ckvil le, South Carolina, in 1875. Edward D. Horne has spent his active life as a farmer, lumber manufacturer and turpentine producer. He served over fifteen years as clerk of the Baptist Church, a nd in politics is a democrat. Docto r Horne is the second in a fami ly of six children, all living but one, who died in infancy. Doctor Horne was liberal l y educated, and graduated M. D. from Emory U n iversity at Atlanta , Georgia, in 1915. Hi post-graduate work was clon e in St. Luke's Hospital at Jacksonville and in the Southern Pacific Hospital at Houston, Texas. Doctor Horne is one of the younger men in the professio n who served the nation at the time of the war a nd acquired the experience and viewpoint of a mi litary surgeon. He enli tee! August 22, 1917, in the Medica l Corps at Camp Wheeler, Georgia, receivi n g a commission as first lieutenant. He was soon t ransferred to United States Hospital o . 6 at Chattanooga, where he remained on duty unti l receiving his honorable discharge February 28. 1918, o n account of disability. In the meantime he had l ocated i n Jacksonville, in 1916, a nd he resumed his p ri vate practice, which has more and mo r e been taken up with surgery. He is a member of Duval County, Florida tate , and American Medical Associations. He was one of the originators of the Royal Order of Red Deer, whic h i s a business and professio n al men's fraternity, and is its supreme secretary. He is a member of the Baptist Church and is a democrat. Doctor . Horn e married on. A ugust 16, 1916, Miss Annie Lee Adams, a native of Montgomery Co unty, Georgia . They have two children, Jean l\fa r celle a nd Hendley Foxworth, Jr. JA11n:s D. INGRAHAM, sales agent for the Model Land Compa n y at Jacksonville , is till a young 111<111 i n poi n t of years, but i s of ripe expe rien ce and broad knowledge. During an exceedingly active career, most of which up to 1 920 had bee n passed i n t h e r ai lw ay b usin e s, h e has r es id ed i n various communities in thi s and other countries, w h ere hi s con n ection w ith r espo n sib l e a nd prominent posit ions gave him firsth and know ledge of conditio n s that has proven invaluable to him in his p re sent lin e of wo rk. Mr. Ingraham was born at Rutledge, Orange, County, F l orida, ] une r6, 188..t, and is a on of . lam es E. and 1faria Elizabeth (Baker) Ingraham, t he former a native of Green Bay, W i sconsin, a nd the latter of Missouri. Mr. Ingraham has one sister, Katherine, who is the wife of George W. 1 ibhs. Jr. James E. Ingraham is a m e mber of the editoria l staff of this work, and a comp let e re, iew of his active a nd successfu l ca reer will be foun d e l sewhere in t his vo lume. After attendin g the p ublic schools of St. John s County, F l orida, 1 D. Ingraham entered the Sewanee Military /\cadcmy, at Sewan ee, Tennessee, a nd l)is course the r e was fol l owed by one at the Universit y of

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82 HISTORY OF FLORIDA the South, at the same place, from which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1907. His first employment was with Chase & Company, wholesale dealers in fruits and vegetables at Jacksonville, but gave up that position to enter the scnicc of the Florida East Coast Railway, where he was employed in various departments. After about three years with this line he joined the Huston-Trumbo Dredging Company at Isabella de Sagua, Cuba. His next connection was with t lie Seaboard Air Line, as ticket agent at Tampa, Florida. and in 19II he became Cuban passenger agent for this company, being stationed in that capacity at Havana, Cuba, in that year and 19r2 . TI c was next made passenger agent for Florida, with headquarters at Jacksonville, whence he went successively to Cincinnati, Ohio; Havana, Cuba, and Jacksonville. In 1915 he became district pas senger agent at Jack onville, holding that position until 19r7, when he returned to St. Augustine, . Florida, and became associated with the 1fodcl Land Company, where he remained until 1920. Jn that year he again came to Jacksonville, as sales agent for the Model Land Company, a posi tion which he has held to the present time and in which he has gained an unqualified success. l\Ir. Ingraham is energetic, progressive and full of enthusiasm as to the country which he repre sents. A fluent and interesting conversationa l ist, he possesses a wealth of information regarding the territory covered by his company, and his manner of presenting this material has done much to con tribute to the development and advancement of the state. He is an active member of the Rotary Club of St. Augustine, the Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce and the Jacksonville Motor Club, and takes a foremost part in all movements which promise the betterment of his community in any way. He is a member of the Seminole Club. In politics Mr. Ingraham is a supporter of the policies and candidates of the democratic party, but his political activities have been limited to the exercising of his right of franchise as a voter, and he has not cared for public office on his own account. He belongs, with his family, to the Episcopal Church, and contributes to its movements. On June 30, 1915, Mr. Ingraham was united in marriage to Miss Frances Humphrey Hopkins, who was born at St. Augustine, and to this union there have been born two children: I abella Gibbs and Maria Elizabeth. ALBERT MASON \V1LLIAMSON. In journalistic circles of Florida there arc few names that are better known or the owners of which are more highly esteemed than Albert Mason Williamson. Coming to Florida in r882, he was for fifteen years engaged in orange culture, but after losi n g a hardly-won fortune in that business, due to a sudden climatic change, turned his attention to newspaper publishing, and has since been the owner of "The Floridian" of Jacksonville. Mr. \Villiamson was born 1Iay 26, r8_s9, at Greensboro. Alabama, and belongs to the \Vil1 iamsons of North Carolina and the Masons of Virginia, family names well known to historians of those states. A II sections of the old South were impoverished in the days when he was passing through boyhood and youth, and educational advantages were more than limited, but through the affectionate kindness of his sister, 1fiss l\Iary L. Williamson, one of the most highly educated women of her day and locality, whom he holds in grateful remembrance, he received a classical if not a collegiate education, and of him it may be aid that "he knew a little Latin and less Greek." Mr. Williamson removed to Florida in 1882 and became extensively engaged in orange culture, but after fifteen years of labor and priva tio n attending the accumulation of a comfortable competency, this fortune was eliminated by the freeze of February 8, 1895. In the meantime, in 1893, Mr. 'Williamson had been united in marriage with Miss Virginia Will iams, of Tallahassee, and in the fall of 18g 5, with Mrs. Williamson, came to Jacksonville, where he has since resided and been engaged in journalism. In 1898 he bought "The Floridian," a weekly newspaper established at Tallahassee in t828, but since removed to Jacksonville, the old est, and for fifty or more years probably the most influential newspaper ever published in Florida. Mr. Williamson has held only one public o(licc in his career. He was elected a member of the State Senate from the Ninth Senatorial District, and served efficiently in that body from 1893 to 1895. RICHARD EDGAR STILLMAN, of Jacksonville, is an able member of the bar, a rising practitioner in criminal law and an influential member of the state democracy. His career, while not of so long duration as some other , has been one of achieve ment, and care and precision mark the preparation of all his cases of whatever nature, his thorough n ess of preparation insuring a convincing and clear presentation of whatever subject comes before him for adjustment. Ur. Stillman was born at San Diego, California, November 30, 1887, and is a son of John Edgar and Martha Clark (De-Yarman) Stillman, a n d a grandson of John Edgar and Mary (Lashier) Stillman. His grandfather was a pioneer of Florida of 1875, in which year, with five companions, he came from Eau Claire, Wisconsin, and settled in Volusia County, organizing the town of Orange City. \Vhile not a pioneer in residence, he enjoyed the distinction of being one of the first to engage in the orange business in that district, where he became an honored and well-to-do citizen, the owner of a large and productive grove, mayor of Orange City and a school official for years. He was prominent in the Methodist Episcopal Church, was a past master of his Masonic Lodge, and in politics was a republican. John Edgar Stillman, the younger, father of Richard Edgar Stillman, was born Februa1y 27, 1867, at Eau Claire, 'Wisconsin. and was eight .... .,., of age when brought to Florida, where he attended the Volusia County public schools and East Florida Seminary, now the niversily of Florida. He was reared in the orange growing business, in which he was engaged for many years, and became one of the organizers of the Orange City Bank, of which he was president. In r8g3 he came to Jackso1wille and became asso ciated with the Little Brother Fertilizer and Phosphite Company, of which he was secretary and treasurer up to J 897. At that time he lo cated at Pensacola, where he was appointed col lector of United States customs, a position which he retained for fourteen years, and was also president of the Pensacola Investment Company, handling real estate, until his death, February IO, 1913. He served as chairman of the Florida Republican State Central Committee for many years, but after devoting the best of his energies toward a vain effort to organize a white republican party in Florida he joined the democrats in

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llISTOR Y OF FLORIDA 83 1912 and voted for Mr. vVilson. Ile was a mem ber of the Masonic fraternity and a past exalted ruler of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks at Pensacola. 11r . Stillman, also a native of Eau Claire, \!Vi consin, was born December 22, 1868, and survives her husband, as do four of their five children. Richard Edgar Stillman, the eldest of his parents' children, attended the public schools of Orange City and Pensacola, following which he was sent lo Yale Univcrsi . ty, where he graduated from the law department with the class of 1909 At that time he localed at Jacksonville and be came a>sociated with the law department of the Florida East Coast Railway, but severed his con nections in 1914, since which year he has carried on an independent practice specializing to some extent in criminal law, a field in which he has attained mo1e than a passing reputation. He maintains offices at Suite 514 vVcst Building, and is a member of the Jacksonville Bar Association, the Florida tale Bar Association and the American Bar Association. His re l igious connection is with the First Presbyterian Church. Always interested in public affairs, since young manhood he has been active in politics, and at present is a member of the Duval County Democratic Executive Committee. He is a thirty-second de gree 1Iason of Florida onsistory, and a member of Solomon Lodge, F. and A. M.; Jacksonville Chapter, R. A. M., and Morocco Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. S., and also holds membership in Jacksonville Lodge, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and the Seminole Club. ]011, EDWARD PArn, who is giving a most effective administration as city auditor of Jacksonville , takes satisfaction in reverting to Florida as the state of his nativity and in being a scion of sterling old Southern families. He was born on his father's farm in Putnam County, this state, December 1, 1879, and is a son of Warren Albion and Henrietta Rebecca (Evans) Pace, the for mer of whom was born in Effingham County, Georgia, October 19, 1834. and the latter of whom was born in South Carolina, July 17, 1839, their marriage having been solemnized in Putnam County, Florida, in 1 866. 0 f their ten children five sons and three daughters arc living, the subject of this review having been the ninth child. \Varren A. Pace was a boy at the time of the family removal from Georgia to Florida. The children of the family were three sons and three daughters, and later the father, George Pace, c \ to Georgia, where he passed the remainder of his life and where he owned an excellent plantation of 900 acres. \Vhen the Civil war was precipitated on the nation. Warren A. Pace gave definite evidence of his loyalty lo the Confederate cause by enli ting as a member of the Seventh Georgia Cavalry. In the battle at Salem Church he was severely wounded. and he was taken to a hospital in the City of Richmond, Virginia. A fler receiving his honorable discharge he returned to his home in Georgia, but in 1866 he came to Putnam County, Florida. where he continued a successful exponent of farm industry until 1908, since which year he has lived virtually retired. He is a stalwart demo crat, is affiliated with the United Confederate Veterans and has been a member of the Masonic fraternity for more than forty years. his basic affiliation beirnr with Solomon Lodge No. 20, F. A. M. He is an earnest member of the Methodist Epi copal hurch, South, as was also hi wife, whose death occurred July 13, 1913. ) ohn E. Pace is indebted lo the schools of his native county for his early education, and was reared to the sturdy discipline of the home farm. At the age of eighteen years he became a teacher in the rural schools of Alachua County, and he continued his successful service in the peda gogic profession aboul four years. Thereafter he found employment as a stenographer in the City of Jacksonville, in 1902, and to his duties eventually added those of bookkeeper. In 1913 he became chief clerk in the office of the city auchtor, and of this position he continued the incumbent until August 1, 1920, when he was elected city auditor, his ability and previous experience having eminently qualified him for this important municipal office. His political alle giance is given to the democratic party and in his civic attitude he is loyal and pub l ic-spirited. In the time-honored Masonic fraternity Mr. Pace is affiliated with Solomon Lodge No. 20, F. & A. M.; Jacksonville Chapter No. J2, R. A. 11.; Hallmark Council No. 3, R. and S. M.; Damascus Commandery No. 2, Knights Tcmplar; Oriental Lodge of Perfection No. 4 McLean Council, Knights of Kadosh, No. 2; Con sistory, A. A. S. R., in which he has received the thirty-second degree; and Morocco Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. S. He and his wife hold membership in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. On the 20th of fay, 1908, Mr. Pace wedded 1Iiss Frankie Estelle Ross, who was born in Marion County, this state, a daughter of Frank ,/. and Rebecca (Morrison) Ross, both of whom arc deceased, their surviving children being one son and three daughters. Mr. and Mrs. Pace have two children: Vivian Rebecca and Lois Juniata. ERNEST DART, Jacksonville attorney since 1914, prominently connected with the professional and business interests of Florida, rs a member of an old and distinguished Georgia family, and he laid the basis of his reputation as a lawyer in that state. He was born at Brunswick, Georgia, February 22, 1872, son of Urbanus and Angela (McConn) Dart. His father was born in Brunswick, Geor gia, in 1840, and died in l9II, and his mother was born at Quitman, Georgia, 'in 1850, and died in 1907. They were the parents of two sons and two daughters, and the two now living are Ernest and Mrs. Russell Richards, of Atlanta, Georgia. Urbanus Dart was educated in a military school at Mariella, Georgia. He was a member and captain of the Brunswick Rifles, and at the outbreak of the Civil war joined as a member and captain of that company Stonewall Jack on's command as a sharpshooter, and served in Jackson's Brigade during the Civil war. The Brunswick Rifles is the only military organization in the South that has been maintained continuously since r86r. At the last reunion of the survivors of the old company in 1921 there were only three members lefr, Henry Holmes, John ]. Smith and J. ]. Spears, all of Brunswick, Georgia. After the war Urbanus Dart practiced law at Brunswick for a number of years, and later was engaged in the steamboat business. At the battle of Gettysburg he captured a sword be longing to R. C. Knagg of a Michigan regiment, and at his request the sword was laid on his breast and buried with him. He was a member of Ocean Lodge No. 241, F. and A. M., of Brunswick, Georgia, served as alderman and mayor of Brunswick, was a democrat and a member of St. Mark's Episcopal Church.

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84 HISTORY OF FLORIDA Ernest Dart was carefully educated, attending orth Georgia Military School at Dahlonega, Georgia, and in the University of Virginia he studied law under the eminent jurist and law teacher, John B. Minor , who wa s dean of the law department of the Uni,ersity of Virginia for fifty years. Mr. Dart left the university with the class of 1892, and for over twenty years he carried on a successful general practice at Brunswick, Geor gia, being local counsel of the A. C. L. Southern and A. B. & A. railroads. In 1914 he removed to Jack onville, and in addition to practice in all the courts he acts as special counsel for the Atlantic Coast Line Railway Company. While in Georgia Mr. Dart served two terms as county attorney of Glynn County, was elected to the Legislature in 1898, but resigned his seat to join the army during the Spanish-American war. He went into the service as captain of the Brunswick l{ifles, his father's old company, and he wore the captured sword belonging lo his father in the Civil war. He was honorably discharged Novem ber r8, 1898, and was appointed major and lieuten ant-colonel of Georgia Volunteers after the war. 1Ir. Dart was appointed solicitor, City Court of Brunswick, Georgia, February 8, 1909, by Governor Hoke Smith, serving four years, and throughout Governor Smith's administration he was a lieuten ant-colonel on the governor's staff. 1Ir. Dart was affiliated with Ocean Lodge No. 214, F. and A. M., at Brunswick, Georgia, and was also a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, Independent Order of Odd Fellows and Knights of Pythias, at Brunswick, Georgia. For eight years he was organist of St. Mark's Episcopal Church at Brunswick, and is now a member of the church of the Good Shepherd at Ri,er ide, Florida. He is a lifelong democrat in politics. Mr. Dart traces his ancestry back to Sir John Dart of Devonshire, England, and the first of the family in this country was Dr. Cyrus Dart, who served as a surgeon in the American army during the Revolutionary war. Mr. Dart's ancestors also saw senice in the 1Iexican war of 1812. Mr. Dart is eligible to membership in the Sons of the Revolution and is a member of the Sons of Confederate Veterans and a past commander of Thomas \V. \Voodruff Camp of the Spanish-American \Var Veterans of Jacksonville. In 1901 Mr. Dart married Helen Forsythe, daughter of John C. Forsythe, a native of Inverness, Scotland. Her mother was Emily Compton, a cousin of Chauncey M. Depew. Mr. Dar.t lost his first wife in 19II. Their three children arc: Emily Angela, Elinor Winn and Robert Ernest. On December 29, 1912, Mr. Dart married Cam eron Lay, a native of South Carolina, of Scotch ancestry and related to the distinguished Holt and Hickman families of North and South Carolina. They now live at 1824 St. Johns Avenue, Jackson ville, Florida. lloN. \VrLLIAM Pmrny BELOTE. The chief executive office of any community is a highly re sponsible one, and the individual occupying it has resting upon his shoulders not only the multitudinous details pertaining to the management of a city, but also the accountability for its com mercial and moral integrity. As he is, so largely is his community, for it soon reflects his character and manner of dealing with important problems, and unless he retains a firm grip upon the reins of government and influences his asso ciates to act in harmony and in a constructive manner hi administration soon shows the effect of lax principles. For this reason, of late years the people of the more advanced cities have been choosing their mayors from among their sound business men, for they appreciate the beneficent effect of example and action and know that an individual who bas won success in a commercial or industrial way has the ability and experience to manage the complicated affairs of a city gov ernment. The present incumbent of the mayor's ofl1cc of South Jacksonville is Hon. William Perry Belote, who has given the city an excel lent business administration, drawing on his ripened experience as a business man. Uayor Belote was born at Panama Park, Florida, April 21, 1879, and is a son of Henry Clay and Gertrude (Rozier) Belote, natives of Norfolk, Virginia. Henry C. Belote learned the trade of coach painting in his youth, and in 1878 came to Florida and first settled at Okahumpka, whence he removed in the following year to Panama Park. In 1883 he returned to Norfolk, where he remained about two years, then again coming to Florida for about years. Eventually he went back to Norfolk, and there passed the remainder of his life, dying in 1892. He was a member of the Improved Order of the Red Men and a democrat in politics, and his religious faith was that of the Baptist Church. 1Irs. Belote still survives, in her fifty-ninth year. She and her hus band had four children, of whom three are liv ing. William Perry being the eldest. \Villiam P. Belote was but thirteen years of age when his father died, and his educational advantages were somewhat limited, as, being the eldest of the children, he was called upon at that age to contribute to the family's support. Since his youth, however, he has educated himself freely through reading, study a1id observation, and now possesses a good practical education and broad information on a number of important subjects. As a youth he learned the trade of machinist, and when he had mastered that position was employed for a time in the machine department of Little Brothers. Later he was with the Florida Machine Works for about three years, and then entered the machine department of the S. B. Hubbard Company, remaining with this firm ten years, one month and five days. On December 26, 19II, he embarked in the hardware business at South Jacksonville, and has continued in this line ever since, with constantly growing success. His prosperity is the result of merit and industry, and the excellent standing that he enjoys has been brought about by integrity and honorable dealing. Mr. Belote has been interested in civic affairs for a number of years, and is known as one of. the influential democrat of South Jacksonville. As early as 1907 he was appointed one of the Board of City Commissioners by Governor Broward, and in 1908 was elected to succeed himself. lle was also president of the c;ouncil, but resigned before the expiration of his term of office. In 1916 he was elected mayor, defeating William H. Meyer by the scant margin of thirteen votes. In 1917 and 1919 he had no oppo sition for the mayoralty, but in 1921 was opposed by John F. White, whom be defeated by 123 votes. His record in the mayor's office is one that reflects credit upon himself and the city. 11avor Belote is a member and a past master of Duval Lodge No. 159, F. and A. M., the Order of the Eastern Star, the Knights of Pythias, the Knights Templars, the Pythian Sisters and the Woodmen of the World. He belongs like wise to the Commercial Club and the Chamber

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HISTORY OF FLORIDA 85 of Com merce , and his religious connection is with the Methodist Episcopal Church. On December 16, 1903, Mr. Belote married Miss Eunice Plummer, who was born at Plummer, Florida, and they have two children: \Villiam Howard and Vivian Elizabeth. EDWARD NoBLE CALHOUN. Combining the record of father and sons, the distinguished Ca lhoun family has had representatives in the legal pro fession of Florida for forty years. The grandfather and great-grandfather of these attorneys was the American statesmen John C. Calhoun of South Carolina. John C. Calhoun, Jr., was for many years a resident of St. Augustine, Florida. He married Kate Putnam, daughter of Benjamin Putnam and a relative of the General Putnam in whose honor Putnam county, Florida, was named. Benjamin P. Calhoun, son of John C., Jr., and Kate (Putnam) Calhoun, was born at St. Augustine, Florida, August 7, 1855, and spent the greater part of his active life at Palatka. He married Julia Catherine Peterman, a native of Palatka. Her father, Peter Peterman, came to America from Germany, and was a successful orange grower and one of the pioneer tourist hotel men of Florida. He also served with the rank of captain in the Confederate Army. Benjamin P. Calhoun was liberally educated, his training being largely directed by his relative Gen. Kirby Smith at the University of Tennessee. He was admitted to the bar by examination in 1877, first in South Carolina and then in Florida, and was admitted to the ew York State Bar in 1878 and for about one year practiced in New York City. He then located at Jacksonville, where he was associated with John E. Hartrcdge for a year and then moved to Palatka in Putnam County, where he continued his professional work until his death on October 20, l9o6. He enjoyed many public honors, and was the first democrat to r ep resent Putnam County in the State Senate after the war. He was a member of the County School Board, was county judge, county solicitor, state senator one term, state's attorney of the Eighth Judicial District, and was in the last named office at the time of his death. He was a member of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon College Fraternity and the Knights of Pythias. In the practice of law his business took him before all the state courts and before the United States Supreme Court. At one time he was general counsel for the Florida Southern Railway, now part of the Atlantic Coast Line, and was division counsel for the Georgia Southern and Florida Railway. He was a member of the Southern Society of the City of New York, and was a leader in the democratic party of the state from 1876 until his death. The wife of Benjamin P. Calhoun was born in Putnam County, September 25, 1857, and died July 25, 1908. They were the parents of five sons and two daughters, and three sons and one daughter arc living. Edward Noble Calhoun, oldest child of Benjamin P. Calhoun, and a great-grandson of John C. Calhoun of South Carolina, was born in New York City, September 5, 1878. He was liberally educated, attending the Putnam High School and the Florida Agricultural College. He received his LL. B. degree from the University of Geor gia, and was admitted to the bar in Florida in 1901. During the twenty years of his active prac tice he has represented a number of important interests and almost continuously has had some public duty in the line of his profession. He served as municipal judge of Palatka from 190 6 to 191 r. In the latter year he removed to St. Augustine, and has for twelve years been city attorney. He was county attorney of Putnam County in 1909-u, and was appointed state attorney in 1915, but did not serve. Mr. Calhoun is a member of the St. Johns County and Florida State Bar Associations, the Sigma Nu Fraternity, is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias, Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Moose, and is a member of St. Augustine Country Club and the Surf Bound Club. He is a Sigma Nu Frat man of Mu Chapter, University of Georgia. February S, 1912, he married Gertrude E. Mc Williams, a native of St. Augustine. Her father, William A. McWilliams at this time is president of the Florida State Senate. Mr. and Mrs. Cal houn have two children: Gertrude E. and Noble Putnam. , • ti_, JOHN }AMES BALFE. In the career of John James Balfe, proprietor of the Balfe Company, and a prosperous and enterprising merchant of Jacksonville, there is to be found a lesson for the ambitious youth who is striving to gain a foothold in the world without aiding influences. Mr. Balfe was not only compelled to make his own way from a tender age, but to gain his own education. That he has succeeded in reaching a recognized position in a community where com petition is keen and where there is no lack of men striving for honors, is evidence of his per severance, industry and natural ability, homely virtues which have aided him in making the most of ordinary opportunities. Mr. Balfe was born at Toledo, Ohio, June 27, 1867, and is a son of James and Margaret (Killip) Balfe. His father, born in County Mona ghan, Ireland, was brought to this country when a mere child by his parents, on a sailing vessel, the family locating at Rochester, New York, where the lad received a public school education, following which he learned the trade of pattern maker. He followed this vocation first with the Cole Company in Pennsylvania, and later for thirty-five years was identified with the \Vabash Railway at Toledo, where his death occurred in 1902. He was a republican, but never cared for politics or public life, and his religious connec tion was with the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mrs. Balfe, who was born on the Isle of Man, died in 1908. Seven of their nine children are living, and John James was the sixth in order of birth. John James Balfe received his education at East Toledo. At the age of eight years he pre sented himself on the streets as a newsboy, and with the money thus earned he put himself through grammar and high school. At the age of seventeen years he secured a position with the Clark & Terhune .. Company, a lumber concern of Toledo, and, starting at the bottom, within three years had worked his way to the position of bookkeeper. While he was making fairly good progress at Toledo, Mr. Balfe felt that greater opportunities awaited him in the South, and in 1887 he came to Jacksonville, where he secured his introduction to his present 1ine of business as a bookkeeper and clerk for I. E. Baird & Company. This business he mastered from the bottom upward, studying each department and every detail, and in 1906 he and D. J. Conaroy,

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86 HISTORY OF FLORIDA a fellow-clerk, purchased the business which they conducted in partnership until 1912 as the BalfeConaroy Company. Mr. Balfe then sold. his interest to his partner and embarked 111 busmess on his own account as the Balfe Company. He now has a large and thoroughly up-to-elate ment at 6-8 West Bay Street, where he carries a full line of hardware, paints, oils, glass and wall paper and gives estimates on wall papering and decorating, for which he has a corps of able assistants. He has built up this enterprise by solid merit, untiring indwitry and unfailing in tegrity. and while so doing has gained and held a place in the confidence and esteem of his asso ciates. Mr. Balfe is a member of Solomon Lodge. F . and A. M.; a thirty-second degree Mason of Florida Consistory. and a N oblc of Morocco Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He is a dem_oc1a.t. but rolitics have played only a m111or part m his career. On Jviay II. 1898. Mi-. Balfe was united in marriage with Miss Johanna Merrill, who was born at Jacksonville . and to this union there have been hnrn four children: Sarah, the wife of Lmwood Evans; John James, Jr., Alexander l\L and Johanna G. MARVIN HENRY SM1TII. Prr. G., M. D., has gained in his exacting profession that high reputation that is the outgrowth only of ability, close application and fine personal and professional stewardship. In the City of Jacksonville he owns and conducts a modern sanitarium of the best type of equipment and service. and in his specia l field of practice, that pertaining to gastro-enterological disorders, his prestige has far transcended mere local limitations, as shown by the fact that in December, l92T, he was elected president of the Southern Gastro-Enterological Association, the second largest organization of its kind in the world and one whose membership is composed of the leading stomach and bowel specialists in the sixteen southern states. Prior to his elec tion to the presidency of this rcpresentatiYe ass.o ciation Doctor Smith had served three years as its secretary and treasurer and one year .as _its vice president. The Marvin Smith Sarntanum at Jacksonville is situated at 2225 St. Johns Avenue, the building being a modern structure of _three stories and its equipment and general fac1l1ties being of the most approved order. He is known as an avidious student of medical and surgical science, and his individual research work has been broad and well directed. After leavmg the high school in his native town .of Umatilla, Florida Doctor Smith took a special course 111 Stetso1; University, at DeLand, this state, and next ayailed himself of the advantages of the great University of Chicago, in the academic or literary department of which he was a member of the class of 1000. In 1910 he graduated ftom the medical department of Emory University, at Atlanta Georgia, and by a regular course in the Soutl1ern College of Pharmacy, he received from the latter institution in the following year the sup plemental degree of Ph. G. In 1912 he took a postgraduate course in the New York Polyclinic Hospital and also in the New York Postgraduate School and Hospital. Prior to entering medical college he had graduated from the Dixie Business College, Atlanta, in 1909. The doctor is one of the influential and popular members of the Duval County Medical Society, and is actively identified also with the Florida State Medical Society, the Southern Medical Society and the American Med-ical Association. His basic Masonic affiliation is with Ionic Lodge No. 104, F. & A. M., Scottis_h Rite and he is a member also of the Mystic Shri'ne and the lndependent Order of Odd Fellows. His political alignment is with the democratic party, he and his wife hold membership in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and he 1s a member of the Florida Count1y Club of Jacksonville. Dr. Marvin Henry Smith was born at Umatilla, Lake County, Florida, December 16, 1878, and is a son of Henry Thomas and Ellen Amelia (Kaigler) Smith, the former of whom was born at Columbia, South Carolina, March 4, 1840, and the latter at Eufaula, Alabama, in I8.i7-Of their four children the doctor was the third in order of birth; Legrand, who married Miss Etta Martin, is in the United States internal revenue service; Pauline is the wife of A. M. Bullock, deputy collector of internal re1enue at Tampa, Florida; and Burdette, who is a representative physician and surgeon in the City o[ Tampa. married Dr. Mary Shelt on, who is his able professional coadjutor. Henry Thomas Smith received his early education in his native state, and was twenty years of age when he came to Florida and established his residence in Orange County, where he engaged in the buying and shipping of cattle. He was a l so a progressive farmer ancl real-estate dealer, and he became a pionee1 in the growing of oranges. He owned about 1 .ooo acres of land and devoted somewhat more than J co acres of the same to orange culture. He was among the first to voluntee1 for military service in bchal f of the Con federacy when the Civil war began. He enlisted as a member of the First Florida Infantry Regiment, served with the same to the close of the war, and the history of this gallant command is virtually the record of his military career, as he participated in nearly all of its engagements, both major and minor. In later years he was an honored and appreciative member of the United Confederate Veterans. His political allegiance was given to the democratic party, and he and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. February 3, 1913, recorded the marriage of Doctor Smith and Miss Flora A. Grimes, who was born and reared in Georgia, and the two children of this union are Carrel W. and Flora Marvin. FRED W. \i\T1ENllARG. In a large, cosmopolitan city like Jacksonville many different lines of busi-1Jess may flourish, and it is almost a certainty that the old standard ones that supply actual needs ll'ill do well if conducted with honorable methods, good business judgment and a clue regard for public accommodation. The grocc1y business is an example, and one of the leading, well managed grocery houses here is that of Fred W. Wienbarg, a property owner and highly respected citizen . Mr. vVienbarg was born in the province of Hanover, Germany, l\Iarch 27, 1869, a member of an o ld family that had belonged to Hanover for n-encrations. His parents, George and Meta (Brummer) Wienbarg, were born there, his father and mother both in 1844, and died there in 1 882 and 1904, respectively. Of their family of six children, three sons and three daughters, Fred \i\T. was the first born and is one of the four now living . The father was in business as a shipping contractor. Both parents were faithful members

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HISTORY OF FLORIDA 87 of the Lutheran Church and highly respected people in their community. Fred W. Wienbarg attended school at Lehe, in his native province in his boyhood, after which he worked on a farm until early in r887, when he came to the United States. He passed his first six months in the new country as a clerk in a grocery store at Jersey City and in getting ac quainted with the language and customs of the land in which he proposed to spend the rest of his life, and as he was very much in earnest and had a quick understanding, he soon overcame many of the difficulties. From Jersey City Mr. Wienbarg came to, Jacksonville, reaching this city on September 6, 1887. For about three months he worked in a grocery store, on the corner of Pine and State streets, and then entered the employ of Mr. Lilienthal, with whom he remained for about four years, when he went to a business house in Savannah, Georgia, but later returned to Jacksonville. For two years afterward he was concerned to some extent with oil interests, returning then to the gro cery trade, in which he bad had much valuable training. He embarked in the business for himself, and has prospered exceedingly, in bis business house on Davis Street, carrying an extensive stock of first class grocery staples and sundries, and supplying goods to a very dependable class of customers. In 1906 he erected a substantial twostory brick building on the corner of King's Highway and Davis Street, and has other investments. On August 20, r892, Mr. Wienbarg married Miss Lena Van Dohlen, a native of Hanover, and they have .four children: Anna, wife of H. W. Van Dohlen, has four children, Henry, Anna, Katherine and an infant; and George N., Fred W. and Margaret. The family belongs to the Lutheran Church. Politically he is a democrat, and served one year on the City Council with great efficiency. He belongs to the Order of Woodmen. THEODORE v ALTINE POMAR. To the young man entering upon his independent career business seems a fairly simple proposition. He sees a pre scribed formula of work ahead of him, but does not doubt his ability to discharge his share of responsibilities, and visualizes a contented in dependence as the sure wage of his labor. This optimistic faith is the heritage of a rising generation; but how many, when they arrive at stern realities, have clear grit enough to hold to their high ambitions and work with an unchanged purpose? Only a comparative few, for on the up hill climb to success it is far easier to turn aside into a complacent rut of mediocrity than to push doggedly ahead. One of those who has held closely to the high aims of his early youth and who has arrived at a position of prominence in his chosen field of endeavor is Theodore Valtine Pomar, comptroller of the Florida East Coast Railway and one of the leading citizens of St. Augustine. Mr. Pomar was born at St. Augustine, Decem ber r6, r868, and is a son of Cristobal and Appalonia (Masters) Pomar, natives of this city. Cristobal Pomar was educated in the public schools of St. Augustine, and in youth learned the trade of wheelwright, a vocation which he fol lowed throughout his life. During the war between the states he was employed in making guncarriages for the Confederate Army. Mr. Pomar became a well-known and influential citizen of St. Augustine and a leader in the ranks of the democratic party, and on several occasions served very efficiently in the office of county treasurer of St. Johns County. He and his worthy wife were devout members of the Roman Catholic Church and were the parents of seven sons and seven daughters, of whom five sons and two daughters survive. The seventh in order of birth of his parents' children, Theodore Valtine Pomar attended the public schools of St. Augustine, and supplemented this by a course at the East Florida Seminary, now known as Florida University. On leaving school he secured his first employment, a clerk ship in a merchandise house, following which he was for several years a clerk in the post office. He later obtained employment as a clerk with the St. Augustine Transfer Company, subsequently being advanced to bookkeeper. On May I, r8g3, Mr. Pomar resigned his position to enter the service of the Florida East Coast Railway as a clerk in the accounting department, where he won consistent promotion through fidelity, industry and general ability, until February, r908, when he was made auditor. This position he held until May, r9r4, when he was made general auditor, and in March, 19r7, he was advanced to comptroller, which position he now holds. He is now one of the valued officials of his company and a man of ripened experience and thorough railway knowledge. Mr. Pomar has been interested in civic affairs for a number of years and was elected city com missioner for one term, but after 2Y, years of service resigned when this country entered the 'Norld war. , He is a Roman Catholic in religion and a member of the Knights of Columbus, be longing also to the St. Augustine Country Club. In political matters he adheres to the principles and policies of the democratic party and stanchly supports its candidates, without being an office seeker himself. In matters of civic development and improvement he is always found giving his cooperation and moral and financial assistance, and is also a friend of enterprises making for better education, higher morals, religious progress and advanced citizenship. On April 23, r890, at St. Augustine, Mr. Pomar was united in marriage with Miss Anita Capo, who was born in this city, a daughter of Philip V. and Rofina (Genovar) Capo, both of whom were born at St. Augustine, where they passed their entire lives, and are now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Capo were the parents of three sons and four daughters, of whom Mrs. Pomar was the fourth in order of birth. To Mr. and Mrs. Pomar there have been born two children: Evelyn, who is the wife of George W. Winnigham, of St. Augustine, and Theodore, who married Ruth Gro gan, of Atlanta, Georgia. ]AMES BuRNIE GRIFFIN, M. D. Other of the learned professions minister to the needs of hu manity, but none holds the importance of that of medicine. Man can adjust his quarrels without the intervention of the men of law; he can work out his own spiritual salvation, and he can educate himself in letters; but life itself depends upon the skill of the physician and surgeon. Today there is no class of men so respected and honored as those who have dedicated their lives and talents to the amelioration of the ills of mankind and the prevention of the spreading of disease. St. is the home of a nu;riber of distin guished members of the profess10n, and among them one who is held in grateful esteem is Dr. James Burnie Griffin, a member of the State Board of Medical Examiners for Florida, vice

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• 8 IllSTOR Y OF FLORIDA pres id e nt of the St. J o hn s o unty Medical Society and a veteran o f the World war. D oc tor Griffin was born 1Iarch 7, 1884 , at Acton , Ontario, Ca n ada, and i s a so n of Clayton Burnham and 11ar y Ellen (Bro ddy) G1-iffin, the former a nativ e of H erkimer, New York, and th e latter of Erin, Ontario, Ca nad a . 1Ir. a nd Urs. Griffin are n ow r esi d e nt s of Dclroil, Michigan, and have three daughters and one son. The eldest o f his parents' c hildren , Dr. James Burnie Griffin attend ed the public sc h oo l s o f hi s nati\• e plac e and th e Collegiate Inst itut e of \Vind so r , Ontario, following whi c h h e pu r sued a course at lhe Univers i ty of Michigan, A nn rbor. H e th e n e n rolled as a student of Hahnemann Medical Co lle ge, Chicago, from which h e was graduate d in m edic ine a nd surgery in 1909 , and following thi s p erformed h os pital ser vic e a t Flowe r a nd Bellevue Hospitals, l ew \ ' ork City; Brompton R oa d H os pit al. Lon d on, England; and \ Vayne County Asy lum , D e troit, Michigan. In 1larch, 1912, h e ca m e to St. A ugu s line , wh e r e he h as since been in lhe enjoy m e nt uf a large and constantly increasing ge n e r a l practice . On Decemb e r 30, 1914, D oc tor l,riffin s tal en t s were first offic ially recogniz ed by his appointment as a m e mb e r of the State Board o f H o me opa thi c M e dical Examiners for Flori d a, a p os iti o n in which h e served until April 30, 1917. On July 5, 1921, h e became a m e mber fo r three vcars of the State Board of 1Iedica l Examiners for Flo rid a . H e i s a memb e r of the St. J o hn s County M e dica l Society, of which h e was elec t ed vice pre s id e nt in 1 922; th e Southern Homeopathic 1Iedical Society. of which h e was vice president in 1916; and the Ame r i can Institute of H o m eo p athy. As a fratcrnalist h e h o l d membership in St. Augustine L o d ge No. 827, B. P . 0. E., and i s a thirty-seco nd d eg re e Maso n and a m e mb e r of Valley o n s i s l o ry, New York C it y . He lik ewise belongs t o the St. Augus ti n e R otary C lu b and th e St. Augustine Yacht Club. IIis well-appointed offices are l ocate d at No. 44 J effcrso n Theatre Building. On June 12, 1916, D oc t o r Griffin e nli ste d in the M e dical Co rp s o f the Florida National G n ard and rcc e i\ed his commi ssio n as firsl lie ut enant, bei n g a ss igned t o the Firs t Florida Field H os pit al. H e se rv ed with that o rg an i zat i o n al the Slate Ca mp in Flo rida, and o n th e Mex i ca n border un til Marc h 26, 1917, and was then o n leav e and s pe c i a l service until June 13. i917 , when h e was ordere d to the Medi ca l Officers' Training Ca mp al F ort Ogl etho rpe, Georgia, and s ub se que n tly was assigned t o establish, train and command the training camp for Medical D etac hm e nt National Guard u nit s at Camp Greenleaf, Geo r gia. O n September 3, 1917, D oc tor Griffin was transferred t o the Seventy-seventh Divi s i o n at Ca mp Upton. New York, as ass i stant d i v i s i o n surgeon, a nd October 6, 1917, was promoted to major, Medical Corps. N . A. H e lik ew i se se rv e d as training office r fo r th e 1Iedical Department of th e div i sio n . Arriving in France in F ebruary, 1 918. in July of that yea r h e wa s assigned to th e command of th e Three Hundred and Second anitary Train of th e Seventy-seventh Divi sion, and while servi n g thus was pr o m o ted t o lie ut ena ntco l one l of the M e dical Co rps, cited in General Orde rs, and g iv e n the United States Army ge n e ral citat i on for servi ce as commanding office r of the 302 nd Sanitary Train. On March 1 , 1919, h e w as assigned t o lhe .'\ m e ri ca n Soldier Student Detachment in Creal Britain. as co mmandin g officer of Student D etac h ment, United States Troops, at King' College, L o nd on, England, and, returning to th e United States in August, 1919, received hi s honorable discharge August 3 . Doctor Griffin is lhe possessor of th e followi n g medals: 1lexican Service, British General Service and 'No rld war with three clasps and c itati o n star. During 1921 a nd 1922 he served as post co mmander of St. Joh n's Posl No. 37, American Legion. HERBERT FELKEL. In journalistic and arl printing c ircl es of Florida few names a r c bette r known th a n that of Herbert Felkel, editor of the St. Augustine Evening Record and vice president and manager of the Record Co mp a ny. Begi nnin g his connection with j o urnali s m when a student al college, Mr. Felkel h as made rapid advan cement in hi s c h ose n profession, and has not only placed th e n ewspaper of wh i c h h e i s the e dil o 1 on a sou nd financial ba s i s, but h as a l so deve l o p ed one of the l a r gest and best-eq uipp ed art printing es t ablish m e nt s in th e so ulh cas l c rn part of the United Stat es. 1Jr. Felkel was born June 23. 1 889. al De Funiak Springs, Walton Co unty, Florida, the seco nd so n of H enry Noel Felk e l , who died in 189-J, while se rvin g as h ead of the Stale Schoo l for Deaf and Hlircl at St. Augustine. The publi c sc h oo's of St. J o hn s County a nd Tallahassee fu rni shed Herbert F e lk e l with his ea rl y education, following the death of both hi s father a nd mother, and later h e attended the Florida tatc College at Tallaha ssee , when that institution was co-educational, in th e d ays before the e nactment of the Buckman bill. H e th e n s p e nt a yea r a l the nivcrsity of C hattan ooga and his junior and senior college years at th e University of Florida, Gainesville, where he purs u e d a scie ntifi c course and received the degr ee of Bachelor of Science . Ile was editor of lh c first U niversity of Florida publication, the Un i versity ews, a nd a l so fou nded th e Florida Pennant. a monthly m agazi n e . this being also one o f th e ea rly stude nt pul lica ti o n s of th e Unive r sity of Florida. L eaving college, Mr. Felkel went to work o n the Pensacola News as a reporter, and s ub seq u e ntl y b eca m e c ily ed it o r, managing editor and associate ed it o r . Four days before he had attained hi s twenty-first birthday he was chosen by th e directors of the corporation a ed itor-in chie;f and president of the co m pa ny. Later Mr. Felk e l published the Florida Record. a state-wide political weekly. printed in the plant of T. J. f \ nplcyard at Tallahassee, an d while there was marri e d , in 1916. Removing from Tallahassee to St. Augustine in 1918, he became managing editor o f th e St. Augustine Evening R eco rd , a publication whicl1 had b ee n fo und ed in 1893, and retained that position fo r three years befo r e becoming manof th e prop erly and e ditor of the publication. Ever si n ce assu min g the management Mr. Felkel has been bu ily e ngaged in improvi n g the equip me nt of the plant, which now m akes a specia lt y of art printing work. In this connectio n Mr. Felkel retain s the se r v i ces of two h igh-class a 1 tists, a nd a feature of th e work i s the printing of folde r s by th e four-co lor process system. The pan y's field for thi s c la s of printing is not limit ed to St. Augustine, or eve n t o its imm ed i a t e v icinity, for work of this natur e i s done for concerns all over the s tate . Mr. Felkel does not neglect his duti es as edi t o r of the Record, which has a wide c ir c ulati oir and i s a c l ea n , r eliab l e and interesting n ewspaper. At every session of the Legislature since h e reached lh e age of eighteen year s Mr. F e lk el has cove r ed the work of that body as corr es p o ndent for various newspapers at Tallahassee, th ese including the Florida Times-Union, the Tampa Morning T ribun e, the Pen saco l a Journal and the 1Iiami Metropolis. Mr. Felkel has various

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IIISTORY OF FLORIDA 89 social, business and civic connections, and recently served as president of the St. Augustine Rotary Cluh. He is a member of the vestry of Trinity Episcopal Church. He has proven his public spirit on a number of occasions and is always ready to support worthy movements. At Tallahassee, in 1916, Mr. Felkel was united in marriage with Miss Myrtle Warren, of DeFuniak Springs, Florida, a graduate of the Florida State College for Women, and until her marriage a teacher of high school mathematics and assi tant home demonstration agent of Florida. They are the parents of one daughter, Jeanne, born June 6, r920. NoRVlN A. PERRY, president of the Latin American Bank and cashier of the Bank of Commerce, is one of the sound and sagacious financiers of Hillsborough County, and a highly-esteemed busi ness man of Tampa. He was born in Owen County, Kentucky, November 2, 1887, a son ot ,V. M. and Mattie A. (Atterbury) Perry, natives of Kentucky and Missouri, respectively. The father died in 1917, but the mother survives and makes her home at Madisonville, I entucky. They were the parents of the following children: W. A., who is a resident of Henry County, Kentucky; John H., who is president of the American Press Association and resides in New York City; Norvin A., whose name heads this review; and Marie, who is the wife of Dr. M. S. Veale, of Madisonville, Kentucky . Growing up in his native county, Norvin A. Perry attended its public schools and the college at Front Royal, Virginia, and when only nineteen years old entered upon what was to be hi life work, as an employe of the Hanson Bank, at Hanson, Hopkins County, Kentucky. His position was a humble one, and he received only $40 per month for his services as a bookkeeper and teller, but during the two years he remained with this bank he made excellent use of his time and learned the details of banking, rising to be cashier. Leaving this bank he went to Doyle, Tennessee, and organized the Commercial Bank of that place, and was made its cashier. Subsequently he returned to I entucky and became cashier of the Crestwood State Bank at Crestwood, a suburb of Loui ville. There he continued until 1920, when he came to Tampa. His long and practical experience in the banking business has made him one of the valued men in his line in the county, and he is not only president of the Latin American Bank and cashier of the Bank of Commerce of Tampa, but is also president of the Bank of Sulphur Springs, Florida; Yice president of the Hawthorne State Bank at Hawthorne, Florida, and vice president of the Bank of Dade City, Florida; vice president of the Bank of Osceola County, Kissimmee, Florida, and a director in several other Florida banks. In r912 Mr. Perry married Alberta Bowers, a member of an old Virginian family, and a daughter of Vv. H. G. Bowers. Mr. and Mrs. Perry have one son, Norvin A., Junior. Mr. Perry has formed numerous connections since coming to Tampa, and is treasurer of the Civitan Club. He has come to Tampa to stay, and is very much interested in its growth and optimistic with reference to its future, for he feels assured that with its natural advantages and the location here of so many sound business enterprises the progress will be wholesome and rapid. His is a career which proves that it pays a man to concentrate upon the business for which he is fitted, and not lo dissipate his efforts in different channels. EUGENE THOMAS Mc!LVAINE. Recognition as a lawyer of solid attainments has come to Eugene Thomas Mcilvaine of Jacksonvi lle, his c lientag e has steadi ly grown, and his professional 'life has become one of constant employment. He and his partner, William C. Johnson, are real-estate and corporation lawyers, and their preparation of cases is marked by the most painstaking attention. to detail and exhaustive examination of author-1t1es. In trials Mr. Mcilvaine is fair and candid with the court, presenting no theories or propo sitions which he does not believe to be sound, hut supports his contentions with force, courage and tenacity. Mr. Mcilvaine was born at Cedar Keys, Florida, May 23, 1886, a son of Victor B . and Barbara (Collier) Mcilvaine, and grandson of Robert Hunter and Margaret Jane (B l edsae) Mc Ilva ine. Robert H. Mcilvaine was born in Del a ware, April 23, 1820, and died February 14, 1889, while his wife, born March 12, 1824, died April 2r, 1905. Robert H. Mcllvaine was one of the very prominent early settlers of Cedar Keys. Victor B. Mcilvaine was in the wholesale fish business at Tampa for twenty-five years, and from there moved to Miami, Florida, and conducted a similar business. For many years he was an elder of the First Presbyterian Church at Tampa, and was active in religious work. He maintained membership with the Knights of Pythias. In pol itics he was a democrat. He was born at Cedar Keys, Florida, August 28, 1856, and died October 3, 1912. His first wife, who was the mother of Attorney Mcilvaine, died in 1887, having borne her husband two children, of whom Eugene T. Mcilvaine, is the sole survivor, the elder one hav ing died in infancy. In 1890 Victor B. Mcllvaine m.arried Carlyn M. Taylor, and they had six chil dren. three of whom are now living: Ruth, Myra and Victor. Growing up at Tampa, Eugene Thomas Mc Ilvaine attended its pub! ic schools, Gordon Mil itary Institute, from which he was graduated in 1902, and took his academic course in the John B. Stetson University, from which he was graduated in 1904. He then took his legal training at Washington and Lee University, Lexington. Virginia, from which he was graduated in l9o8. For a year he was engaged in practice at Tampa. and then, in 1909, came to Jacksonville and formed his present partnership with Mr. Johnson, the firm name being Johnson& Mcllvaine. This connection is still maintained, the two having found it both pleasant and profitable. Mr. Mcllvaine belongs to the Duval County Bar Association . He is a dem ocrat in political belief. The Presbyterian Church holds his membership. On September 30, 1915, Mr. McI!vaine married Neva Edmundson, and they have three children: Eugene Thomas, Lee E. and Helen Elizabeth. While he has never entered public life, Mr. Mc Ilvaine has a high conception of civic duty, and is ever ready to aid in promulgating and carrying to a successful termination those projects which he deems necessary for the welfare of the city and for the protection of its interests. Such men as he are a valuable asset to any community or profession, and his associates esteem him accordingly. WILLIAM P. GENOVAR. Biography contains no more interesting study than the lives of self-made

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90 HISTORY OF FLORIDA m en. They a r c a product o [ d e m ocracy, and they a r c it s vindicati o n. l f th e r e were need to es t a b lis h the truth of this declaration, it is ev ident in th e thousands o[ m e n who h ave won s uc cess so l e l y throug h the m edium of the ir own m e rit. At St. Augustine there are m a n y of this cla ss t o be found, among them a numbe r of native sons, and i n thi s cla ss stands Willi a m P. Genovar, the proprietor of a thriving r e tail cigar business, l oca t ed at 178 St. George Street. i\lr. Genovar bel o n gs t o a famil y which has re s id e d at St. Augustine for m a ny years, and was born in this c ity, Marc h 17, 1866, a so n of \Villi a m and M o nica ( 11a sters) Genovar. Ilis father, b orn at St. Augus tine , in 1840, was s till a youth when he t oo k part in th e Indian w arfare incident to t his sec tion, and l ater answered th e call o f the South and e nli t e d under the flag of the Confed eracy for participation in the war between the s t a t es. H e w ore the gray all thro u g h th e four years of that strugg le. at the close of which h e returne d t o St. Johns County and engaged in agricultural pur s u its. He followed thi s line of endeavor duri11g th e r e m a ind e r of hi s life, became a hi g hly r e s p ected c itizen , and pa sse d away at th e rip e o ld age of e i ghty yrars, in 1 920 . lJe was a d e m ocrat in hi s p o litic a l belief, and a dernut member of th e Roman Catholic church . 1frs. Gcnovar, who was also b orn at St. A u g u stine, died in 1917, when seventy-seve n yea r s of age. They were th e pa ents of five sons a nd three daughte rs, of whom three so n and o n e daughter arc n ow Jivin g , \\' i l l i a m P. being the second in o rd e 1 of birth. \Villiam P. Genovar att ended the public and paroc hial schoo l s of St. Augustine, and hi s first err>ployment was as a clerk a nd salesman in a r e tail s tore. H e was thus employed until 1 895, in w h ich year h e embarked in busin ess as th e propri e tor of a r etai l cigar sto r e, a business with which h e has been identified e\er s in ce . He i s n o w in the e nj oy m ent of a large and pros pe ro u s trade, built up thro u g h industry, goo d manage ment, and h o norabl e dealing, and carries a large s t oc k of all p opula r brand s of c igars, t o bac co, c i garettes, pipes and smo kers' a rticles. He has an attractive sa lesroom, and during the course o [ twe nt y-se,en years h as attracted to him self many warm friends . 1Ir. Ge n ova r i s o n e of the inAue ntial d e mocrats of hi s community and takes an inter es t in public matters, although hi s on ly public office h as been that of city treasurer, in w hi ch h e se r ve d efficie ntl y fo r four years. Frate rnall y he i s affiliated with th e Knights o ( Colum bus, and hi s reli g i o u s connection i s with the R o man Catholic Churc h. On November 18, 1 892, Mr. Genovar marrie d :\(is :\ [aud 1f. Miot, of Co lumbia, South Carolina, and to this uni on th e r e have b ee n horn two so ns: Harry M. and \\'i lliam P., Jr. EDWARD KmK BAHRETT. In the ca r ee 1 o f Edward Kirk Barre tt, s up erintendent of buildin gs and bridge and water s upply of th e Florida East Coas t Railway Company, the r e i s so m ething of an e nc ouraging nature to be fo und. \\'hen he s t arted hi s ind e p en d ent career it wa in a humble po s i tion, and th e yea r s that followed were well filled wi th hard lab o r. Yet throug h s imply takin g ful l advantage of eve r y-clay o pp ortunities and making the mos t of them he found that the chance is g-ivcn every youth to rise, and that it lies within hi s o wn powers to make a place fo r him se l f. Mr. Barrett was born September 6, i869, at Orange, New J e r sey, and received a public sc ho o l education in Florida, where h e had been brought as a youth b y hi s parents. After l eavi n g t h e Du, a l High School in 1 885, h e took up r ai lroad work, fir st as r odman with a n e n ginee rin g c r e w . After o n e m onth in thi s capacity h e beca m e transmitman and l eve lman . ca p ac iti es in which h e spent eleven m onths with the Jacksonville & Atlantic Railway, and in 1886 b eca m e a Sttr\eyo r , a posi tion whic h h e occ upied during that year and a part of 1887. From 1888 to 1 894 1Ir. Barrett was associated with George S. J\lo ri son, of C hi cago, as bridge ins p ec t o r and e n ginee r , and in 1895 became r esident engineer o[ th e Florida East Coast Railway at Palatka and Palm B eac h. During 1896 and a pa1t of 1897 h e was s uperintendent o( co n structio n and insp ec t o r o [ th e Commerci a l , Cable and Quee n Buildings, New York City, a nd from J 897 to 190 2 was shop i nspccto1 of the Union Bridge Company o f Athens, Penn sy l va ni a, and the P e n coy d Bridge V\Torks. From 1 902 to 1906 Mr. Barrett was gen eral foreman and inspector o ( the Fl orida East Coast R ailway, a nd in 1906 became supervisor of bridges and buildings for th e same road. In July, 1914 , hi s tit l e was c h a nged t o superviso r of bridges and buildings an d water s npnl y, a nd in October, 1 920, hi s title was again changed, this time to s up erinten dent of bui ldin gs a nd bridges a nd water s uppl y . J\l r. Banett's home i s situate d at 6 4 Valencia Str eet. He is accounte d one of th e hcst-informccl men in hi s l ine in Florida, and, havin g worked his way u p from the bottom, i s thoroughl y familiar wi th the details of all d epart m ents. Tl e has a number of c i v i c connecti o n s and h as a lways been a s u p porter of movem ents which haYe promised to adl'an ce the interests of the C it y of t. A ugustine. He is also identified with several fraterniti es and clubs, and belongs to the Ameri ca n 1 \ ssoc iation of Eng ineers. In 1898 Mr. B arrell was uni te d in marriage wi th :\Liss Celes tia M. Crans. of Ath ens, P en n sy lvan ia. They have no children. THOMAS Cou: hrnso:-i has proved himself a staunch apostle of progressiveness, both in connection with busines affairs and his se r vice as a m e mb e r o f th e b oard o ( c it y commi ss ioners of hi s h o me city of Jack so n v ill e, where h e i s manager o f the s ub s t a nti a l wholesale en terpri se con ducted by th e P o n ce de Leon Perfume Co mp any, 226 Hogan Street. Mr. Imeso n was born at C r oss Keys, Alabama, November 10, 1 880, and i s the youngest child and o nl y so n in a fami l y of three childre n b orn t o Jonathan and Mary Jane (Cole) Imeso n . The fath e r and m o th e r were both born in England, th e former in 1838 and the latter in 1842, their m aniage having been so lemni zed at Hastings, Minneso ta. The death of the mother occurred in 1898 and that of the father in 1910. J o nathan Imeso n was a lad of five years at the time of hi s parents' emigratio n from England t o the United States, and the family h o m e was establis hed at Has tin gs, 1Iinnesota. H e was a son of Thomas and 1 Jary Jane ( 13arwise) Imeson, who gain e d pionee r h o n o r s in 1linncsota, but who later r e m o ved t o D etroit , Michigan, w here Thomas Imeso n followed th e trade o[ sto n ecutte r. He was a resident of C h e n ey, \Vashington, a t the time of h i s d ea th. J o n athan Imeso n gained h i s youthful educa tion in the schools of Minneso t a and 11i c higan, and he a l so learned the carpenter trade . pan co min g to t h e South he was for some time engaged in busines as a contractor and bui ld er, and o p erated a cotton p l antati o n at Cross Keys, Alabama, and from 1881 to 1903 he was e ngaged in th e business of contractin g at DeLand,



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HISTORY OF FLORIDA 91 Florida. He then passed about five years in California, whence he removed to the State of Washington, where he passed the remainder of his life . For many years he was affiliated with the Masonic fraternity. Thomas C. Imeson was an infant at the time w h en the family home was established at DeLand, Florida, and there his earl y education was acqu ir ed in the public schools. He later availed himself of the advantages of the Jacksonville Business College and also took correspondence-school courses in law and civil engineering. He was for twelve years an attache of the office of the city engineer of Jacksonville, and he then, in 1909, engaged in independent business by open ing a well equipped novelty store. He has proved a thoroughgoing and enterprising business man, and is now general manager of the Ponce de Leon Perfume Company, as noted in the opening paragraph of this sketch. Under a special charter granted by the Legisla ture to the town of Pabl o Beac h , F l or ida, summer residents of Pablo Beach who reside in Jacksonville are allowed to vote and hold office in Pablo. Thomas . Imeson, under this provision, was elected a town council man of Pablo Beach in 1915 for a term of two years, and one of his first efforts, along with other citizens of Pablo Beach, was to put through a bond issue sufficient to establish electric lights and a sewerage system and by ordinance create a board of bond trustees, which impro, ement the town now enjoys . He was reelected seyeral terms, and served three times as president of that counci l , retiring of h i s own accord. In 1918 Mr. Imeson was appointed a member of the Jacksonville City Counci l , to fill a vaca n cy, as representative of the First \Vard. • lle was e l ected cou n cilman-at-large the following year, a nd in 1921 he was elected city commissionc1, the commission form of municipa l government having been adopted. As a city official he has been alert and progressive, has advocated movements that have been of general benefit lo the community, and among his recent suggestions in the furtherance of street improvements has been that of coat ing old brick street pavements with asphalt, this method making possible extended improvements at m inimum expe n se, and a test of t h e matter being in process at the time of this writing, in the spring of 1922. As i s lo be inferred, Mr. Imeso n is a staunc h advocate of the principles of the democratic party, and he and his wife arc communica nt s of the Protestant Episcopal Church. He is affiliated with olomon Lodge, No. 20, F. and A. M.; is past chancellor of 11ontcfiorc Lodge o. 2, Knights of Pythias, which he has twice repre sented in the Florida Grand Lodge; and he is popular in both busine s and social circles in his home city. ovcmber IO, 1904, recorded the marriage of Mr. Imeson and Miss Mabe l Fowler, and their one child is a son, John G. REGINALD \VnnE. A resident of St. Johns County for nearly forty years, during a large part of this time Reginald White has been iden tified with the Fir t National Bank of St. Augustine, of which institution he is vice president and cashier. Mr. White, while not a public man, has been identified with many of the movements which progressive men of high character and enlightened views have promoted and fostered, and is accounted one of the sub tanlial and reliable men upon whom the community depends for advance ment . Mr. White was born in England, in 1862, and is a son of Samuel and Henrietta (Price) White, both of whom passed their entire l ive s in England and arc now deceased. They were the parents of ten chi ldren, of whom eight are living, Regina ld being the seventh in order of birth. He receive d excellent educational advantages in his youth, completing his inte ll ectual training by a course at Marlborough College, and shortly after his graduation therefrom, in 1883, when a youth of twenty one years, came to the United States with an English lumber syndicate, which owned a large tract of land in St. Johns County, Florida. He continued to be associated with this concern until i8g2, when he entered the First ational Bank of St. Augustine, in a modest capacity . Through i ndustry and fidelity he worked his way steadily upward, and is today accounted one of the in fluential and well-informed financiers of the city. He has a n umber of civic and social connections, as well as those of a business and financial character. Mr. White i s a member and senoir warden of Trinity Episcopal Church. On May 14, 19r3, Mr. )Vhitc married Miss Elizabeth Fraser, who was born in North Carolina. FoNs A. HATHAWAY. The thorough modern educational plant and system that is the pride of Jacksonville owes its existence in a large measure to the responsible l eadership and the enthusiasm of Fons A . Hathaway, who since 1914 has been suoerintendent of schools of the city. Mr. Hathaway is a Florida educator and native son, born in Holmes County, April 8, 1877, son of l ames \Vil b urn and Sarah Jane (Register) Hathaway. Education has been his life work. Mr. Hathaway graduated A. B. from Florida State College in 1902, a nd in 19II received his Bachelor's rlegree from the University of Florida, and that institution in 1918, in recognition of his distin guished services to the cause of education, bestowed upon him the honorary degree LL. D. Doctor Hathaway from 1902 to 1909 was principal of the High School of Orlando. In the latter year he came to Duval County, served as p rin cipal of the Duval High School in Jackson ville. and in 1914 took up his duties as superinteml ent of city schools. In subsequent years, in spite o [ the heavy handicap imposed hy the war, he reco nstructed the school system, involving a lrnilcling program requiring an outlay of more than $2 .. Doctor Hathaway is a member of the University Club of Jacksonville, is a Mason and Knight of Pythias, a Phi Kappa Phi, is a democrat, a director of the N. E. A. from Florida and a member and trustee of the First Presbyterian Church. Jacksonville. He married on June 1003, Annie Elizabeth Van Brunt, of Tallahassee. Their home is at roo Bayard Place. REV. }ORN T. BooNE. Included in the ministry of the Christian Church are men of broad education, religious zeal and enlightened views, whose exampl e and precept exercise an influence for morality that has earned recognition as one of the great fact-ors in advancing any community. Not alone is the Christian pastor a spiritual guide to his people, hut he must also possess a large measure of the practicality which w ill help him to advise and teach in the ordinary events of Ii Ee and to protect the interests of his parish while also promoting its temporal

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!.l2 lllSTOR Y O F FLORIDA affa irs. l\lucl1, in fac t, is demanded of those w ho c hoose the unselfish life o f the C hristian pastor. a l l , in other walks of life, a rc fitted by nature for the sa me s um of respon sibility, a nd perhaps few under the same circums tances wo uld have had s uch s uccess as that wh i c h has atteudcd the e fforts of Rev. J o hn T. Boone, pastor o f the F ir s t Christian Church o f Jacksonville, and o ne of t he prominent Mason o f Florida. Reverend Boone was born in Smith Co unty, Tennessee, a so n of James North and Sarah (Barry) Boone. James 1 o rlh Boone, a descend a nt of the famous frontiersman, Daniel Boone, was reared i n \Vil so n Co unty, Tenn essee, but in young manhood removed to Smith Co unty, where he married, es tablis hed a home and se ttled down to agri c ultural pursuit>. in which he s pent the remainder of a n honorabl e a nd useful Ii fe. His wife was a daughter o f l\Ir. a nd Mrs. J a mes Rarry, who removed from Virginia to Smith County, Tennessee, in the ir ea r l y married life. J a m es . and Sarah Boone b ecame the parents of nine c hildren, of whom o nly two survive: John T.; a nd E. 0., of Tallahassee, Florida. John T. Boone attended a country sc hool in S mith Co unty as a c hild, a nd lat e r was sent to the Masonic Academy at A lexandria, Tennessee. In c hi ldh oo a he h a d settl e d it in his o wn mind that he would become a minis ter, but kept the matte r a s ecret in his h eart fo r ma n y yea rs, and it was not until he was approaching young manhood t hat, o n a certain Su nd ay night, he g reatly surprised his parents by making known his w ish lo attend college fo r t he purpose o f entering t he m ini s try. H i s wishes being r e adily grante d, he first attended Larimore's Coll gc at F l o r e n ce, A l a bama, afterward went to Transylvani a U n i ve rs i ty, Lexington, Kentu c ky. and finally pursued a course a t t he C hicago U niversity, where he co mp l e ted his preparation. Prior to his advent a t Jacksonville he had done littl e p reaching, t he greater part o f that be i n g a t St. Louis, Missouri . \Vhil e the r e h e was united in marriage with M i ss L izzi e B l a ttner. A call from the First Christian C hu r c h of Jacksonville ca me in 1898, o n December Isl o f which yea r Reve r e nd Boo ne a nd his w ife arrived in this c ity, bringing w ith them their tiny ba be, B race. Two other c hildren ha,e s ince co me lo the home: Paul Dryden and Carol y n Marie. B race graduated from Bethany College , Bethany, West V ir gi nia , in June , 1922. Paul Dryden g r a duate d in J une, H)2J, from Van derbilt U niversity, a nd is now in the Government e mploy as a c hem i s t al \V as hington, D. C. Ca ro l y n l\[ a rie is attending C hristian College, Co lumbia. Missouri. A t the t ime of Reverend Boo ne' a rrival the First Christian C hurch had seventy-four m e m bers, meeting in a small wooden struc ture a t Main and Bever s treets. This was destroyed in the great conflagrati o n o f l90I, fo llowing w hich there was e rected t he handsome s tone structure a t the corner of Hogan an d l\Ionroe s treets, which a t t he present time has ove r l ,200 members. In a ddition to the First Christian C hurch, as an outgrowth of the first congregat i o n there a re t h e Central Church, l ocated o n Ninth, between Main and Laura streets; t he Riverside Church, the Evergreen Avenue C hurch, the St. icholas Church of So uth Jacksonville , a nd the Murray Hill C hurch. Reverend Boone look a very active part in the b uilding of t he Florida C hristian Home fo r the Aged at Murray H ill. Thi s in lituti o n c an accommodate about Joo persons. Reverend Bocme, as before no ted, i -prominent in l\lasonry, be ing a pasl c haplain of Temple Lodge o . 23, F. and A. l\L, in which he served several terms; a nd a past eminent commander of Damascus Commandery No. 2, K. T., of wh ich he has bee n prelate fo r -several years. CHARLES A. CLARK. The popular est imate placed upon the se rvice of Mr. Clark as a member and the c hai rm a n of the Duval County Board of Commissioners made virtually his re-election a matter of certainty when he announced his candidacy fo r uch re-election, as representative from t he Fourth District. Ile i one of the s ub stantial a nd public-spirited ci tizens of Jacksonv ille a nd his offic ial se rvice as county commis sioner has shown his deep interest in and loyally to his home c ity and co unty. :-.fr. lark was born at Ca mpbellford, Province uf Ontario, Canada, o n the 26t h of February, 1867, a nd is a so n of \Villiam B. and Flora A. ( L ind s ley) C lark, t he former of whom was born in that p rovince, Decemb r 25, r8.p, and the l atter of whom was born in New York State, her dea th having occurred i n 1892, the s ubject of this s ketch having bee n the second in order of birth in a family of five sons and two daugh te rs. v\l illi a m B. C l ark continued his ac tivities as a representative of farm industry in his native province until 1882, w hen he ca me to Florida, where he i now living retired in t he c ity of Jacksonville. Charles A. Clark gained his .early education in t he sc hools of his native province in Canada a nd was a lad of fourteen years at the ti me of the fa mily removal to F lorida. He here co ntinued his s tudies i n the p ublic sc hools, and here he g ave three yea rs to learning t he undertaking a nd marbl e b usiness, in t he es tablishment conducted bv B. E. Oak. Ile thereafter beca me assoc iated w ith his brother George \V. in establishing a n independent enterprise of t he same o rder, a nd in 1889 he purchased hi brother's i nt e r est in the b usiness, w hich he thereafter co n ducted indi v idually a nd with marked s uccess un til July, 1909 , w hen he so ld oul a nd retired fro m active b usiness. M r. lark had never previo usly held pub lic office until he was e lected county commissioner of Duval Co unty, in r920, his e lection hav ing been co nfirmed by appointment by Cuvcrnor Ca tts, 011 the J 7th of August of that year. O n the 4t h o f January, l92 I, he was e lected chairman o f t he county board of co mmissioners, a nd his executive administration was marked by prog ressiveness and well directed efforts to conserve economy in county affa ir as well as to advance measures making for c ivic and material be nefit. From a n a rticle appearing in t he Florida Times-Union o f March 4, i922, in connecti o n witl1 l\fr. Clark's announcement of his candidacy for re-election, arc t aken, with minor c hanges, the following extracts: "While not laking credit fo r the admirable way in w hich the present co mmission has functioned, friends of Mr. Clark say the present effici e n cy o f the boa rd but reflects his co nscien tious e fforts lo se rve t he people lo the bes t of his ab ility. Chairman C lark, w ho was e lected to the board o n a good-roads platform, has, as far as humanly possib le, fu lfilled his ca mpaign pledges, by g iving Duval County better roads than i t eve r before had. T he maintenance of county roads has bee n t he ch ief ai m of Chairman C l a rk, an d it is sa id that no member of a county road gang has braved the e l e ments a nd worked

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HISTORY OF FLORIDA 93 harder than 1lr. Clark. \\' hen heavy r ains i nundated many roads in t h e county Chairman Clark labored clay and night in bringing aid to the people of t h e ru ral d i st rict . l\ number of needed roads have been c leared under Chairman Clark's administration, and road condit i ons generally throughout the county have taken o n a different aspect. The Pabl o Beach road ha s been materially improved, as well as many other important highways, and effective pa,ing wor k has been done. Improvements al th county stockade and prison farm, under the ru l e of the commission presided over by Mr. C l a rk, have made Duval County famous among pr i son expe?ts who convened here in a prison congress last fa ll. It was under 1Ir. Clark's rul e of th e commission that the Jacksonville-St. J o hn s river h1idge-lhe huge tentacle of steel and concrete that now makes Duval County united as one-was completed." . lt is worthy of record that l.Ir. C l ark b rought to Florida the first automobile p laced i n com mission south of \Vashington, D. C., and hi s ownership of this vehicle do ubtle s had much to do with his vigorous advocacy of good. r oads. II e now has a battery of three a ut o m obiles, as well as three pleasure boats, and he find s h1.s chief recreation in utilizing these excellent fac1lt tics. Ili s poiitica l a lle giance i s given lo t h e democratic party and he and his w 1 fe a.re ac tive communicants of the Protestant Episcopa l Church. Mr. Clark is a charter member. of Jacksonville Lodge, No. 221, B . P. 0. E.; 'is past of Solomon Lodge, No. 20, F. A: M.; a nd h i s :'If ;i,onic afliliation in the York H.1te mc lud e membership in Jacksonville Chapter. o . 12, R. A. 1L; Hallmark Council, No. 3 , R. 1L;, an d Damascus Commanclery , o. 2. 1 emplars. In the 11asonic Scottish !lite he. has received the thirty-second deg ree, 111 F l o rid a Con sistory, No. 2. and he is a life_ of }.[orocco Temple, Tobles of the Mystic Shrme. September 2, r8go, recorded the marriage of :\li-. Clark to 1Iiss 1[argueritc A .. Koch, who was born at Bethl ehem, Pennsylvam.a, and wh.o is the rrracious a nd p opular chatelame of. theff pleasant Florida home. They ha, e no children. Eowrn R. DICKENSON. High on t he _roster of Hillsborough County's . c1t1zens ap i1ears the name of Edwm R. Dickenso n , for one of the brill iant and astute attorneys pra ct i c ing before the bar o[ Tampa, a man '".hose tale nt s have gained him a widespread rep11ta.t10n, one who is universally respected. D unni:; hi s long residence in this city he has s t amped h1. perso nal ity upon its life and The birth of Edwin R. D icken so n took p lace a t Gaines, ille, Florida. October 9, 1878, a nd h e is a son of \ \'. A. and }.Iartha J . (McElvey) Dickc!1son. The father, born at Bainbridge, Georgia, is now acting as deputy clerk of the Ta1;ipa The mother was born at Quincy, F lorid a, a nd i s the daughter of Lawson G. McElvey, who was .a captain in the Confederate army. He came to this country from Scotla nd , and settled at once in Florida . He was a first cousin of Henry Clay Crawford one of the editors of this history. \Villiam H. Crawford, who was ministe r to France, a nd at one time a candidate for the presidency of the nited States is also a family con necti on. Edwin R. is the second in a family of six children born to his parents, four of w h om survive, namely: \V. B., who is an attorney of Tampa; Elsie, who is t he wife of J. M. Graham, of Oil ity, Louisiana; Julia J., who is state registrar for the F l orida D iYision of the U. D. C., and lives a t Tampa; a nd Edwin h .. T he ea rly ed ucati on of Edwin R. Dickenson was secured in t he public sch oo ls, and he subsequent l y attended the State Agricultural Co llege of Florida . Entering the law department of t he University of the outh at Sewanee, Tennessee, he graduated therefrom in r903 w ith t he degree of Bac helor of Laws. During 1900 and 1901 1 [r. Dickenson had been professor of ma th ematics in the Tampa High Sc hool , a nd fro m 1902 to 190-! he held the chair of co nstituti o nal and international law at Rollins Co llege. In 1905 he was made director of t he law departm ent of the Univer sity of F l o r i da, a nd i n 1906 he located permanently at Tampa a nd began the p ractice of his profession, al though he still co ntinued to teach fo r a time. In 1902 h e had bee n admitted to the bar, and was admitted to p ractic e in t h e United S tates courts in 1906, a nd to the United S tates Court of Appeals in 1922. As v ice p re sident of Tampa Business Co llege h e conti nues his interest in educationa l matters. For a ti me he was act ing m uni cipal judge of Tampa. Fraternally he belongs to the Knights of Pythias , in which order he has attained promi nence, being grand p relate of th e Gran d Lodge of Florida; he is past cons ul com mander of the \V oodmen of the \Vorld. Through his father's service during the war of the '6os he belongs to the So ns of Ve terans and Sons of Confederate Veterans. As a member of t he Tampa Board of Trade, the Tampa Young 1Ien's C hristian Assoc iation a nd seve ral of the local c lubs , he is in close to uch w ith t h e progress made a lon g ma ny lines. A close st ud ent, 1Ir. D ickenson is constantly adding to his store of k nowledge and speaks Spanish and French fluently. On Octobe r 30, 1913, 1Ir. Dicke ns on married Vere Co l e man , of Huntsvi lle , Alabama, a daughte r of Capt. Daniel Coleman, a dis tinguished officer of t he Confederate army, a nd a granddaughte r of Chief J u stice Coleman of A labama. Mr. and :Mrs . Dicke n so n arc communicants of the Episcopa l Ch urch, and belong to Saint Andrew's Church of Tampa. T h e caree1 of 1-Ir. D ickenson is marked by a high sense of pers ona l honor and a love of fa ir p lay. He is a s ucce ssfu l practi tio ner, a lthough i t is a matter often favo rabl y comme nted upon that he will not take a false o r compro mising pos ition in t h e hope of aidi ng a cl ient. If he has ha d one wish greater than another it i to ach ieve great success at the bar, for he l oves his work as a lawyer a nd t hrow s his w hole soul into it, and that he ha realized this wis h no one can deny. LEONARD FLOYD SANCHEZ. Aside from any prestige which he may enjoy as being a membe r of one of the oldest fa milie s of St. A ugu stine, and one whose me mbers have contributed mat e r i ally to the growth and deve lopment of the city, Leonard F loyd Sanchez is likew i se known as a b usine ss man of abi lity and a c iti zen of public spirit. He is the senior member of the firm of L. F. Sanchez & Craig, fu neral directors and emba lmers, a business w ith which he has been identified since 1910, when he joined h i s father under the firm s tyle of Sanchez & Son. Mr. Sanchez was born at St. Augustine, F lorida, July JO, 1885, and is a son of John W illiam and E lizabeth Eugenia (Pellic el) Sanchez. His paternal great-grandfather, a native of Spain, early became imbued with the

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94 IIISTORY O F FLORID A idea that the ;,ilk worm could be cultured in this country, and it was while looking for a s u itabl e location fo r the following out of his plans that he ca me lo Florida, where he was g iven many acres of land under the grants of the Spanish government. \\' hi l e at St. Augustine he gave to the city as a p ubli c park the properly s till known as The P laza , and was a l so th e donator of the l and upon which stands the Cathedral of St. Augustine, g iven by h im to the Roman Catholic Church. Disappointed in not securing a suitable location at St. Augustine. he went to Fernandina and later to Alabama a nd Texas, returning then to St. Augustine. llc 11cxt made a t rip to Connecticut, upon the same quest. but finally ca me back again to St. Augustine, where he rounded out his career. John \Villiam Sanchez was born al St. Augustine, Florida, in 1856, and in his younger clays took up the vncation of boatbuilcling, w h i c h he followed as a vesse l owner until 1899. In that yrar he engaged i n the underta king bu iness. w hich he followed until r917. Ile then retired, and is now living q uietly at his comfortable home. 1\1 r. Sanchez served one term as a member o f the Board o f County ommiss;oners, during which t ime through his efforts the county was c l eansed of seve ral law-breaking offic ial , a nd his good work in the office has caused his fe llow c itizens to request h im to again take the pos ition. I-le is a member of the Roman Catholic Church a nd belongs to the Knights of Columbus. In politics he is a democrat. Mrs. Sanchez was born at St. Augustine, in 18_s7, and she a nd her husband ha Ye had four c h il,Jren, of whom one died in in fa ncy. the other three surviving. Leonard F . is the e ldest. A ftrr attending the public sc hoo l s of St. A u gustine Leonard Floyd Sanchez entered t h e Southern Co llege of Embalmin g, where he purs ued a full course a nd graduated with the class o f HJTO. At that time he returned to St. Aug ust inc a nd beca me associated with his father under the firm s tyle of Sanchez & Son, this continuing until 1917, when the cider man's in terest was purchased by Augustus H. Craig, the business then becoming L. F. Sanchez & C raig, as at present. The business is located a t 30 St. George Street, and a ll modern conveniences are to be fo und, including a motor a mbu l a nce. : Mr. Sanchez is a licensed embalm e r a nd master of the art, and a lso possesses the tact, sy mp a t h y and u nd erstandin g necessar y to o n e in his c al lin g. Ile is a devout m embe r o f the Roman Catholic Church. a nd as a fraternalist ho ld s membership in the Knights of Columbus. the Improved Order o f Reel Men, the Benevol ent a nd Protective Order of E lks, the Fraternal Order of Eagles and the Loyal Order of 'i\Ioose. On Apri l 28, HJIJ, 1fr. Sanchez was united in marriage w ith :\Iiss Helen M:cCarl, who was born at Fernandina, Florida, and to this union •hrre has heen born one daughter, Elizabeth E ugenia. JACK A . LEW. During a period of a quarter o f a century Jack A. Lew has risen from t h e proprietor of a s mall merchandi e establishment to become the owner of o ne o f the la rge t department stores o f St. Augustine and one o f the c ity's heaviest property ho ld e rs. His career been one o f constant advancement, in which industry, w ise imestment, acceptance of opportunity and good management have bee n comh'nrd w ith natural ability . .\[r. Lew wa born at-Vineland. New Jcr cy. June 6, 1878, a son of Rabbi \\' olfc and Anni e ( h:aplan) Lew, natives of J{ussian Poland. His father, a Jewish Rabbi, owned a small farm a t Vinel a nd, New Jersey, where he cl iecl i n 1921, a l the age of seventy-four years, while the mother s ti ll s urvives. There were eight c hildren i n th e family, ] ack A . being the sixth in ord e1 o f b irth, and three c hildre n now s u r v ive. T h e public school s o f V i n e l a nd furnished Jack A. Lew with his educational training, and as a youth he busied himself in assisting his father in the culti,ation of the home fa rm. The commercial instinc t in h im was strong, however, and w hen he was seventeen years of age he embarked upon a business career, traveling from place to place w ith a s mall stock of goods. Having accumulated a little capital and m uch experience during his two years of traveling, he settled down a t St. Augustine, where he invrsted his mean s in a line of general merchandise. His initial venture was a modest o ne, but it h a d behind it the energy and untiring industry o f a man who had supreme faith in h imself and w lto made each s tep a forward one. lt g rew yea r by yea1, e n l arging its sco pe and taking in m ore and more territory, until today, as before noted, it is one of t he largest stores of its k ind at St. Augustine. .\Lr. Lew during his business carrrr has d isplayed his fa ith in St. . Augustine by investing he;n ilv in real estate. In adc J:tion to ten resi dences, he is the owner o f the St. Augustine >lationa l Bank Building and the building which is the home o f St. Augustine Lodge of the Benevo l ent and Protecti,e Order of E lks. Early in 1 1 ay, 1922, he became the owner of o ne of the most \ • a luable buildings in the c ity, when he purchase d from the lllodel Land Company t he \1 a ill Block. Th is b l oc k had been o ffered to t h e C ity o f St. Augu stine fo r the sum of $65 . 000 . in July, 1921 , but a vole upon the purchase by thr city was lost. Just prc,ious lo that time, a l a "booster meeting" of the Board of Trade. nf which 1(r. L<'w is vice president. he had stated that if t1le c ity d id not purchase the building he would, and his promise was made good. Th<: building is located at the corner of Charlotte Street and Cathedral Place, a nd is occ11-pied by a number of important concerns. .\lr. Lew i s now making a number nf imnort,nt i mpro, cmrnts, w hich w ill make the property one o f the most modern in the c ity. 1 1 r. L ew is a m embrr o f the Tmnrov ccl Orcle1 of Reel Men, the Loyal Order of l\[oose and the E lks, and in po liti cs is a democrat. On Octobrr 2, HJ07. 1 1 i-. Lew married 'i\[iss /\nna Zimeclbaum, who was horn at New York C ity. FRANK A . Rou.ESTOI'. In three capacities. as irwrlry mrrchant. newspaper man and secretan o f the Board o f Trade. Frank A . Rolleston ha-; hrcome widely a nd fa, o rably known to the peo ple o f t. Augustine, among whom he has spent the greater part of a varied and at all times active and interesting career. A man of vers ati l e a bilities, in each o f his scve1al lines o f endeavor he has a risen to his opportunities, and in his present secretarial position w ith the trade hodv has co n tributed materially lo its substantia l -devel opment and capacit y for usefulness. 'i\Ir. Rollcston was born in New York C ity. October 25, 1872 . a nd is a s o n of V.'illiam a nd E l!Pn (Keclv) Rnllcstnn. ll'-; fat h<'r was horn 011 the Tslc -of 'i\fan. i n the Irish Sea, i n 1843, and camr to thr L'nitecl Stall's in 1870, landing

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ITISTORY O F FLORIDA 95 at ew York, where he remained three years. ln 1873 he located a l Greensboro, Alabama, where he engaged in t he jewelry business for four years, then coming to St. Augustine, where he passed the remainder of his life in the same line, being known as one of the city's reliable and successful business men. Ile was a democrat, but never ought public o ffice. In h i s younger year he belonged to the Episcopal Church, but later adopted the faith of the Roman Catholic Church, in w hich he died i n 1912. A t D ublin, Ireland, 1Ir. Rolleslon married E llen Keely, who was born there i n TS-14, and died in 19q, al St. Augustine, and they became the parents of nine children, of whom three were born in Ireland. Two sons and four daughter., St!l"vive. The fourth in order of birth of his parent;' children. Frank A. Rolleston attended the grammar and h igh schools of St. Augustine, and then pursued a course at the Christian Brothers' School, Dublin, Ireland. On his return t o th i s country, al the age of fourteen years, he became associated with his father in the jewelry business, a line i n w hich he was engaged until 18<)<). At that time he identified himself with Gen. J. C. R. Foster, the publisher of the St. Augustine Morning Journal, and when this paper was absorbed by the Evening Record Mr. Rolleslon remained w ith the latter, eventually becoming city editor, a position which he held until J anuary, 1919, when he resigned lo become secretary of the St. Augustine Board o f Tracie. In his present capacity he has added to his reputation for successful accomplishment and has established himself firmly in the esteem and confidence of those with whom he is daily associated in the performance of his important duties. :!'IIr. Rol leslon is a democrat, but takes o n l y a good citizen's part in political affairs. II e is a membe r of the Roman Catholic Church. In October, r!kM, 1Ir. Rolleston married Miss Carrie A. Watts, who was born a t Nicholas" ille, Kentucky, and to this union there. h_a"e heen born two children: Dorothy and Vlilliam Frank. JoHN SULLIVAN HELMS . M. D. The broad of medical endea\'or o ffers much to the conscientious man in the way of public se rvice, research, teaching. surgery, public health, general practice o r in following some particular path pe rhaps, and through some combination of methods and manners which are individual and distinctive prove natural a bility and careful training. The physician of today must posse s a wide range of general culture must be a n observant clinician and well-read neu;ologist. The stamp o f a n original mind is never more to be observed than i n the case o f the hard-worked medical man whose so ul has often fainted within him when studying the mysteries o f his ca lling. Among the many skilled and distinguished medical men of Hillsborough County one who has gained spec ial notice through his steady nerve, patience, technical manual skill and the courage which is distinctive o f his profession is Dr. John Sullivan Helms of Tampa. Doctor Helms was born a t Ashland, Benton County, M ississippi, March 23, 1871. He attended the p ublic sc hools a t Memphis, Tennessee, and Union University o f Jackson, Tennessee, receiving therefrom the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Subsequently he attended the medical department o f the University o[ Tennessee, a nd was graduated i n l89r with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. He received a n appointment as intcrne in the c ity and county hospitals of Memphis and remained in that city for live years, during' which time he was advanced from intcrne to house surgeon. Resigning from this hospital work he came to Flori?a, a nd, locating first in Manatee County, practhere from r 896 to 1900, in the latter yea1 movmg to Tampa. s a surgeon he stands a t t h e head o f the profession. a nd as a c itizen he is o ne of the most Yalued in the c ity. He is chief of staff directo: o f the division o f surgery at B_ays1c!e Hospital, o ne of the best equipped hospitals 111 the country, occupying a line location o n Boulevai:d, fronting the bay. He was disqualified phys1cally from actual se rvice during the \Vorld war, but gave valuable aid a t home as a member o f the medical sec tion o f the Co uncil o f National Defense, and served as chairman of the Medical Advisory Board o f Di trict Number 3 in the e lective Draft ystem. Doctor Helms s pei:ids a month o r more eac h year i n the la1ge hospitals o f the North a nd East and in other ways keeps himsel f thoroughly abreast of the wonderful progress made i n his profe s ion. For years he has been a member o f the Hillsborough County Medical Society, the Florida State l\Iedical Association, and the American Medical Association, is a Fellow o[ the American Co l lege o f Surgeons, a member o f the outhern Medical .Association, the Southern Surgical Assoc1at 1 011, _the American Public Health Association, the Society fo r the Study of Endocrinology. He has served the county a nd late medical socie ties as president, and is a member of the House of Delegates o f the National As oc iation is a member o f the Board of Governors of th'e American College o f Surgeons, a member o f the committee o n s ta ndards of the American College o f Surgeo ns, a member of t h e executive committee and counsellor of the Florida section o f the American Co llege of Surgeons, and chairman of the committee o n Hospital Standardization fo r the State of Florida and the American 1Iedical Association. Fraternally he maintains membership with the and Elks. He is a member o f the Rotary, 1ampa Yacht and Country a nd the Rocky Point and Palma eia Go l f c l ubs. Doctor Helms married Anna B. Howze and their children are: Kathryn, who is the wi'fe of Earle Craft, and John S ullivan, Junior. It would be difficult to find a man more thoroughly representative o f the best interests o f his profession than Doctor Helms, and the p ublic se rvice he has r ender e d, and i s till g iving, cannot be estimated in material terms, but l ie in that liner higher realm o f exalted c itizenship. ' C n,\llLES BRECKENRIJlGE P,\llKillLL, o f Tampa, was born in Leon County, Florida, June 23, 1859. H i s father, Dr. G. vV. Parkhill , a prominent surgeon a nd physician, was educated for his profession al the Co llege of Physicians and Surgeons o f New York C ity and was in s uccess [ ul practice for many years prior to the war. vVith heroic patriotism he entered the Confederate se n icc a t the outbreak of the great c ivil strife, and ::i captain of a company of the Second F l o r ida Infantry. yielded his life o n the fie l d of Gaines' M i ll, in the seven clays' battles befor e Richmond. Doctor Parkhill was a man of d istinction and influence, whose untimely death was greatly deplored, not o nly by his immediate family and personal friends. but by the state at large, owing to his great promise of future usefulness. \\'bile he was a physician o f recognized s kill and was successful as a practitioner, yet he w as

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96 lllSTOR Y OF l'LORIDA not withdrawn by his profession from public affairs. A man of liberal education and broad views, he naturally took an active interest in poJitical affairs during the stirring times when he lived. llc was an inliucntial rcpresenlati\'C in the Florida Legislature from Leon County, was a member of the Florida Secession Conven tion, and ..:onscientiously believed in the wisdom of a separate government for the sJave and free states. His father, John Parkhill, born in Ireland, was a planter and merchant of Virginia. He married a 1liss Copeland of that state, and removed to Leon County, Florida, in 1828. The mother of Charles B. Parkhill was Miss Elizabeth Bellamy, a native of the land of flowers and a representative of one of the most distin guished families of the South. Her grandfather, John Bellamy, was one of the pioneers of Florida. He came here from North Carolina, while the territory was still a Spanish possession, and be came an extensive land owner and cotton planter. He drew the plans of the City of Jacksonville, and was among the first settlers. He built the road from St. Augustine to Tallahassee, which was the first work of public improvement in Florida after the acquisition of the territory from Spain. Charles B . Parkhill is a gentleman of liberal education and high literary and professional attainments. As an orator before juries and courts he is a logical reasoner, of retentive memory and ready professional sagacity. His work in the political campaigns evinces careful and logi cal study, deep research into the history of polit ical organizations, and effective methods of presentation, while his fund of anecdotes and enthusiasm is inexhaustible. Socially he is the peer of any man as a successful barrister, whose broad experience and successful career has placed him at the head of his profession. He was educated in the public schools of Jefferson Coun ty, Florida, at Randolph-Macon College, Ashland, Virginia, and at the University of Virginia, finishing his professional work at the last named institution in 1882. He was admitted to the bar the same year and began practice in Pensacola. He was elected to the State Senate from Escambia County in 1888. He served two terms as county attorney of Escambia County. In r807 he became county solicitor for the Criminal Court of Records of Escambia County, serving in that capacity until 1903, when he became judge of tbe Circuit Court of the first Judicial Circuit, which embraced six counties west of the Chattahoochee River. He resigned this posi tion in 1905 to become an associate justice of the Supreme Court of Florida, serving in that capacity until r9r2, when he resigned to resume the practice of law in t11e City of Tampa. In r9r3 he was appointed city attorney of Tampa. and held that position until 1917 . At the out.break of the World war he volunteered for service and received a commission as rnaj or, judge advocate in the United States Army, serving in this country and with the American Expeditionery forces in France. In June, 1920, he was honorably discharged from tbe service and returned to Tampa to accept the office of states attorney of the Thirteenth Judicial Circuit of Florida, to which office he was elected while yet in the army. In TCJOI Judge Parkhill as captain of Company K. First Regiment, Florida State Troops, was called into service after the great fire at Jacksonville. and took his company to the scene to protect life and property. The city was placed under martial law, and Captain Parkhill was named the provost marshal. In the discharge of his duties in this position he was required lo sit as the trial judge. The citizens of the lire-scourged city were loud in praise of his services. Judge Parkhill is an active worker in the order of Knights of Pythias, and was elected and served as grand chancellor of the State of Florida when but thirty years old. In 1884 he married Genevieve, daughter of Governor E . A. Perry, of Florida. She died in J 885, leaving a daughter, Genevieve, who married James .M. Lykes of Tampa. In 1891 Judge Parkhill married Helen, daughter of Judge Joseph B. wall, of Tampa. To them were born eight children, seven of whom survive: Barbara, the wife of Beaman Beckwith, of Tampa; Elizabeth, wife of S. L. Lowry, Jr., of Tampa; Joseph F., Charles B., Junior, Helen \ V., Emal a and John Randolph. FRANCIS DAVID MILLER, M. D. The medical profession is represented at Jacksonville, as else where, by a high type of American manhood, earnest, conscientious, skilled and faithful. All over the land they carry on the beneficent work to which they have devoted themselves,. and as a class well deserve all the esteem and gratitude thci1 fellow men accord them. One of the lead ing physicians and surgeons of Duval County is Dr. Francis David Miller, of Jacksonville, chief surgeon of St. Luke's Hospital for seven years, and prominent in numerous other connections in city and county. Doctor Miller was born at Hawthorne, Alachua County, Florida, August 7, 186o, a son of John Milton and Serena Eugenia (Shannon) Miller, the second born in their family of eight children, five of whom are yet living. Doctor Miller comes of Irish ancestry, and family traditions reach back to County Ulster. His paternal grandfather was an early settler in Sumter County, South Carolina, where he accumnlated extensive tracts of land and cultivated cotton with slave labor. John Milton Miller, father of Doctor Miller, was born in Sumter County, South Carolina, and early in the 'sos came from there to Florida, where he engaged in growing Sea Island cotton during the rest of his active life. He was a man of wealth prior to the war between the states, and owned great plantations and many slaves. He served with great valor in the above war, first in Governor Perry's regiment, then in the Seventh Regiment under Col. \i\Tashing ton Sparkman. and later in Finnegan' brigade. and was honorably discharged with t11e rank of sergeant. In early manhood he married Serena Eugenia Shannon, who was born at Camden. Kershaw County. South Carolina. in 18-tI, and survives him. Her father, Francis Adam Shannon, was born and reared in Kershaw County, South Carolina. In 1854 he came to Florida and settled at Rochelle, and became one of the extensive cotton growers in Alachua County, owning many slaves. He would accept no public office, but was a man of influence and assisted in the movement making Gainesville the county seat. Another ancestor of Doctor Miller was Gen . Sir Arthur Cunningham, a native of the North of Ireland and a British officer who came to the American colonies and served in the Revolutionary war. He is reputed to have lived to the unusual age of IT2 years. He became wealthy as a cotton planter in Sumter County, South

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IllSTOl'Y OF FLOlUDA 97 Carolina, as also did his son, Joseph, who was one of the first millionaires in the United States. Francis David Miller was primarily educated at Roper Academy, Gainesville, Florida, now the University of Florida, then attended the University of Maryland and Johns Hopkins Uni\'ersity, and in 1881 graduated from the medical department of the former institution. He located in the Village of Noonsville, Florida, practicing there from 188-1 to 1888, when he came to Jacksonville, and has ever since been active in practice and useful and able in all matters pertaining to the field of medicine. H c served several years as city health officer, for one year was chairman of the State Board of Medical Examiners, had charge of the Marine Hospital during the yellow feve_r epidemic in 1888, and served seven years as chief surgeon of St. Luke's Hospital. During the Spanish-American war he served as an ensign with the State Na val Reserves, stationed at ] upiter, Florida. Ile is a member of different scieutific bodies, including such organizations as the Duval County Medical Association and the Florida State Medical Association. Doctor Miller was reared in the Presbyterian faith. WILLIAM ]AMES KELLY, presideut of the Consolidated Naval Stores Company, is one of the men of large affairs who is contributing to the prosperity and advancemeut of the City of Jacksonville and its various interests and institutions. He has been identified with his present line of business during the greater part of an active and successful career, in which he has been associated with some of the largest companies in this and other states dealing in naval goods. 1-lr. Kelly was born in Bladen County, North Carolina, November ro, 1872, and is a son of ] am es Archibald and Mary Elizabeth (McNeil) l(elly, natives of the same county, tlie former born in i835 and the latter in 18..(5. James A. Kelly fol.lowed agricultural pursuits in North Carolina until 1883, in which year he removed to Georgia, and was there identified with the turpentine business until his death. Ile never cared for public office, although lie was a publicspirited citizen and a stanch democrat in his political views. As a fraternalist he held membership in the Masons, and his religious connection was with the Presbyterian Church, in the faith of which he died in 1910. His worthy wife passed away in 18g2, having been the mother of six sons and three daughters, of whom one died in infancy. The secoud in order of birth of his parents' children, \Villiam James Kelly was still a lad when taken to Georgia, and there his education was acquired in the public schools. His first occupation was that of clerk in a general store, at a salary of ten dollars pe1 month, and in 1887 he was advanced to be bookkeeper for the same company, that of Lightsey, Hyers & Company. In 1890 he came to Florida as bookkeeper for V\Test Brothers in Madison County, and continued to be with the firm until 1895, then becoming associated with J. W. and W. S. West in the dressed lumber business. At the same time he acted as manager for the turpentine business of ]. W. West at V\T est Lake, Hamilton County, Florida. In January, 1896, Mr. Kelly bought a one-half interest in the turpentine busi ness of Mr. v\' est. Mr. West's health failing, in the summer of 1896 Mr. Kelly sold his interests in Hamilton County. Florida, and bought an interest in the firm of \Viggs, West & Company, laking over 1.he management of the business at Savannah, Georgia, which he supervised until 1900, when it was merged with the Peacock, Hunt & West Company. Mr. Kelly was vice president of this concern up to 1904, when it was reorganized as the \Vest, Flynn & Harris Company. Mr. Kelly was vice president of the latter company. ln 1go8 he became vice president of the C0nsolidated Naval Stores Company of Jacksonville, and in 1913 was elected president thereof, a position which he holds at present. He has been largely instrumental in developing this large enterprise to its important proportions, and while so doing has gained the implicit confi dence of his associates by his display of acumen, j uclgment and general executive capacity in the handling of large deals. lle has various other business inte1ests and is widely and favorably known in commercial and fo1ancial circles generally. Primarily a business man, Mr. Kelly has never sought nor cared for public office. He belongs to the First Presbyterian Church of ] acksonville, and was one of the organizers of \\'. B. Barnett Lodge, F. and A. M., also holding membership in Palestine Commandery, K. T., Savannah, Georgia; and Alee Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. S., of the same city. In politics he adheres to the principles and supports the candidates of the democratic party. On May 21, 1902, Mr. Kelly married Miss Cora Hale, who was born in Kansas City, Kansas, and lo this union there have been born three children: James Walter, who is a graduate of the Lawrenceville (New Jersey) School, and is now attending Princeton University, and Margaret and \Villiam Hale, who are attending school at Jacksonville. LOUIS ALBERT COLEE. A thriving business enterprise of St. Augustine which has been in existence for many years, which has kept fully abreast of the times and which reflects the energy and business acumen of its proprietor is the St. Augustine Transfer Company. The directing executive of this concern is Louis Albert Colee, who in addition to being a progressive and successful business man is one who has served the city well and faith fully in a number of important executive positions, in the discharge of the duties of which he gained the conlidence and good will of St. Augustine's best citizenship. Mr. Colee was born at St. Augustine, March 22, 185-1, and is a son of James Louis and Mary P. (Irwin) Colee, natives of this city. His Fatlier, born in i832, was educated at St. Augnstine and adopted the profession of civil engineer, in which capacity he served the Florida East Coast Canal Company in laying out the canal from St. Augustine to Miami. Prior to the Civil war he owned much land and was a slave owner, also engaging in the lumber busi ness. and following the war continued in his several activities, finally taking up the transfer business, which he followed with his son until his death in 1878. He was a democrat in politics, and a member of the Roman Catholic Church. Mrs. Colee, who was born in 1834, died in January. 18<)5. They were the parents of six sons and two daughters, of whom four sons survive. The eldest of his parents' children, Louis Albert Colee attendee! the parochial schools until the breaking out of the war between the states, when lie entered the public schools. At the age of twenty-one years he joined his father in the transfer business, the association continuing

PAGE 11

LllSTORY 0.F fl,OHJDA up lo within a short time o f his father's death whc1.1 the s on. look over the busi n ess and contmued as its proprietor to the present. He was the first to operate a bus to the Ponce de Leon a nd A lcazar hotels, a nd the e lines arc s till in o peration. He was also the first to p l ace age nts o n the trains o f the Florida East Coast Railway, and maintains the same conlncl at this time. He o perates a thoroughl y co mpany, operating carriages a nd automc:ib1les fo r passengers, doing ha uling and handlmg baggage, and renders prompt and effic i ent se rvice in eve ry department o f his business. His reputation in business c ircles is a n excel l ent o ne , a nd has bee n b u ilt up through honorable deal ings a nd fair representation. Mr. Co l ee has been active a nd prominent in civic a ffairs. For a bout s ix o r eight years he se rved as a member of the C ity Co unci l a nd was then e lected city treasurer, a n office in he se rved fo r five terms, o r ten yea rs s ucceed ing himse l f in the office ea ch time bei ng e l ec ted by l a rge majorities. In 188o he was e lected a member o f the School Board, a nd se rved in that body fo r t wenty yea rs durino e ight yea r of which he acted in the of c hairman. He was a l so a member o f the \V aler \Vorks Board, and its c h airman fo r ten yea rs, oc cupying this position a nd that of mem ber of t he School Board at the same time. His a llegiance has a lwa ys been g iven to t he democ ratic party. All public-pirited movements have his aid and co -operation, and hi friendship fo r ed ucation and religion has been ev idenced o n numerous occas ions . Ur. Co lee is a member o f the Roman Ca tholic C hu r c h, a nd his fraternal affiliati o n is w ith the Knights of Columbu s a nd St. Augustine Lodge, To. 829, Benevolent a nd Protective Order of Elks. In 1875 Mr. Co lee was united in marriage with Miss Mercedes B. Reyes, who die d in 1916, having been the mother o f nine c hildren: Joseph Herbert, who is acting as bookkeeper fo r the St. A ugustine Transfer Company; John Lou i . . who died at the age of thirty-eight yea rs, leaving a widow a nd five c hi ldr en; Beatrice, who died in infancy; Theodore F .. who d i e d at the age of e ighteen years; David B., w ho d ied in in fa n cy ; James Albert, cashier of the Peopl es Bank o f St. A ugustine, w ho is married and has o ne child ; Richard; Ambrose, who has s ix c hildren; and Stanlev, who has o ne c h ild. In Septe mb e r, 19:n. Mr. Co lee married Mrs. Ada (Andr ew) Coo per, the wi dow of Judge M. R. Coo per. CAPT. CHARLES H. THOMPSON is a native of the Florida Keys. is a noted marin e r, famous as a n authority o n fish a nd fishi n g i n t h ese s ubtropica l waters, a nd has conducted fishing a nd c rui ing expeditions of many of the most fa mou men in A merica, who regard his friendship as part of t heir e nviable goo d fo rtune. Ca ptain Thompson was born in I 73 o n Soldier Key, off the southeast coas t of Florida, near Miami. His pa rents, Robert H. and Julia (Frouw) Thompson, live a t Coconut Grove . Robert H. Thompson was born in Engl a nd, o f a famil y of seafaring people, came to America be fo re the C ivil war from t he Bahamas, a nd located a t Key West. For seve ral yea rs he was in the se rvice o f t he Government a nd during the late '6 os and ' 70s was located o n Soldier Key in charge of government s upplies used in the co nstruction of t he lighthouse o n Fowey's Rock, not far from the Key. This well known light-house was co mp l eted 111 1876. Julia Frouw's father was ca ptai n o f a Brazilian s hip that was not far from Key West, a nd after this d i s aste r he made his home in Key \Ve t where h is daughte r Julia was born. ' With s uch a n ancestry Charles H. T hompson took to the s ea without e ffort, a nd has been more a t h o me o n sa lt water than o n land. For many ye a r s he has been qualified as a s hip ca ptain, and hold a Government mariner's license. He has been captain a nd o w n e r o f a number of boats, and he ha s operat e d these chie fly as a host fo r fi hing parties in the ce l e brated fishing waters sa id to be the best in the world, in the ocea n to 1 1 iami and particularly a long t he F l orida Keys a nd in t h e Gulf Stream. l-1 undrc ds o f the be l fishermen f the United ta l cs who co me to 1\1 iami in the winter seaso n for fishin g a ffectionate l y know him as "Cap tain C harlie," and they declare him to be the " best fish e rman in the world." The ca tches that have been made under his g uida nce a nd d irection arc notab l e in the history of fishing. These ca tches include the lit e r a lly hundreds of kinds of fish that inhabit these waters, including a ll the b ig game a nd dangerou s va rieties, s uch as tarpon, s ail fish, man-eating s hark. Ca ptain Thompson is invariably c a lled upon to pilot v isitors o f pro minen ce a nd disti ncti o n o n their fishing trips. He was pilot fo r President Harding and party in the wint e r o f 192r. He has been co nd u ctor of the fishing t rips of W. K. Vanderbilt o f New York. A Jetter writ ten by Mr. Vanderbilt May 5, 1922, reads: "To C apt. C harles Thompson: Twenty years ago the goo d s hip Tarantula entered Miami harbor, w here 'Cap t a i n harli e ' join e d us. From that time o n he has a lways bee n considered by me to be t he g reatest fisherman that I have eve r had the p leasure of meeting. He has interested me to the extent t h a t I am now a co llector ( in a s mall way), a nd o n our last two t rips, during 1 922, have a dded ove r 100 s pecimens to my co llection. May we have many more is t he w ish of, Yours sincerely, W. K. Vanderbilt." As this letter indi ca tes, Ca ptain Thompson has attained fa m e as a n expert and authorit y on fis h and fish life in t h e ocean. Through his own varied experience a nd as assistant to other he has promote d the s cientific knowledge a nd classi fication of ma ri n e l ife. lt was his knowledge in this field that l e d t o h i s a ppointment o n the s taff a nd o f t he great aquarium es tablished a nd maintained a t M iami Beach by Jame A lli so n of Indianapolis. C aptain Thompson married Miss Gertrude Falliga nt. M rs. T h o mpson i s a member of a family o f dist ingui s hed a ncestry. Her great-grandfather was Loui s Falligant, a native o f France, who early joi n e d the army o f Napoleon a nd was sent by the Emperor to take charge of the military stores o n the Island o f Martinique. While there he met a nd married Miss Louise Bene dict, whose a ncestors had co me to the American colo nies ea r l y in the seventeenth ce ntury. Louis Falligant after the fa ll o f a poleon ca me to A merica, a nd in 1817 settl e d a t Savannah, Geo rgia, where the fami l y has been o ne o f d i tinction fo r more than a ce ntury. Mrs. Thompson is a daughter o f Dr. Louis A. a nd Rosa O liver (Brown) Falligant. Her father, Dr. Louis Falligant, w ho was born in r836 and died in 1903, served as a surgeo n in the Confederate a rmy, a nd became w idely known as an expert o n ye llow feve r, g iving heroic e rvices to Savannah during the ep idemic

PAGE 13

IHSTORY O F FLORIDA !)9 of 1876, and subseque ntly serving o n a Federal commission for the relief of New O rleans during t he ye llow fever epi demic of 1878. 1lrs. T homp so n 's uncle , Judge Robert l<'al liga11l, was fo1 many years one of Georgia' s ables t lawyers an, came to Tampa and e ngaged in the g roc e ry business here, in w hich he co ntinued until r<}TT. when he took ac tive charge of t he Tampa Drug Company, wholesalers. Mr. A llen

PAGE 14

100 H I STORY O F FLORIDA became president of the company a t that t ime, a nd has si nce held t he office. The company e m p loys about forty-five pe rsons, and the territor) co1ered by it extends p ractically all ove r Florida. :.1 r. A llen has other interests a t Tampa. On July r2, :Mr. A llen married Rachel Huthvin Ray, a na til'e of Kentucky, w ho \\'as t h e n a resident of Tampa, having co me he r e from Eureka Springs, Arkansas, which had for a t ime bee n t he family home. Mr. a nd 1Irs. Alle n beca me the parents of nine c hildren, name h: E llen Rachel, who married C. F. Irish, a s.ketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work: \\' i lli a m Ray. married, who resi des at Tampa; \Valter Geo rge, Dorothy, 11arguerete, Ruth, Josephine, Charles Franklin and a ncy, w ho a rc at home. Mr. A llen is a thirty-second degree :.1 ason. an d is a lso a member o f the 1 lystic S hrine. He i a member of the First Baptist ( "hurch o f Tampa. He be l o ngs to the Rotan Club, is a member of the Tampa Board of Traci('. a nd, w ithal, is a true Floridian. TH01L\S J. CARUTHERS. In studying the lives an d character of prominent men it is but natural to enquire as to t he contribu ting sources of their s ucce s a nd the motives which actuated their effo rts. Success is not entirel y a matter of g>nius . hut rathPr the resu l ts of experience a nd sound judgment. The careers of those who stand highest in p ublic es teem prove in near!) every case that they are those w h o have devoted their lives to effec tive study and close a pplication to b usiness, a nd have risen gradually. fight ing their way again. t all o ppos iti on. Self-reli a nce. conscientiousness. energy and honestr a n . ' so me of the q ualities that produce some of t he h ighe-;l emolume nts an d greatest rewards. Tn these may he attributed in large measure the s uccess of Thomas ]. Caruthers. president of the aruthers Lumber Co mpa n y of Tampa, a nd o ne of the leading c itizens o f Hillsborough Co un ty. He was born in Sumter Co unty, F l o rida. January I , rP63. a so n o f Thomas and S usan (Monroe) Caruthers. The father was born in Burke County. Georgia, an d the mother was a l so horn in that local ity, a nd they were brought to Florida by their parents when c hild r en. i n •R-t-1. locafon being made in what is now Sumt<'r Co unty. They became the parents of e i ght c hi l dren. five of whom s urvive, Thomas ]. Ca rutllC'rs being t he seve nth in order of b irth. Growing up i n h is native co unty, Thomas J. Caruthers attended t he co mmon school s and then took a ro11rsc in t he primary departm ent of E111ory Co llege . After a s h ort expe ri e nc e at Ox ford. Mr. Caruthers ca me lo Tampa in rRQ 1 a nd es tablished himself i n b usiness as a wood dealer. continning to conduct this vard for twenhninc vears. Tn TQ20 he branched out a nd es tah li heel the Caruthers Lumber o mpany. which 11<' has a l read)' deve looed lo large proportions. ln 1AA..i. Mr. Caruthers married J ess ic King. who was ho rn i n 11 issouri, a nd they bream<' t he parents of seve n c hildre n . na111ely: w ho is the w idow of Frank Dorsey. a nd l11cs 111 Ca lifornia: Ethel. who a lso lives in California: "'allacc. who is an electrician of Tampa: L:iw r<'nce. who is a n attorney nracticing al t he bar of Charleston. South Carolina: Mabel. who i' the wi fr of T. TT. Zanes. of New York Citl : a nd \i\'ilbur and Herbert M .. hoth of whom a1e 11nmarricd and associated wi th their father i n the lumber b usiness. Mr. Caruthers belongs tn t he Tamoa TTe;gh t s Methooist Episcopal Church. of which lie has hee n a steward a nd trustee s ince its organization twenty years ago. T he o ld homestead i n umtcr County is still owned by members of the Caruthers family, and during the seventy yea rs it has been owned by t he Caruthers there have bee n but three deaths o n the farm. Careful, consenative and po sessecl of good judgment, Ur. Caruthers has gone teacl i l y a h ea d, widening t he scope of his b usiness occ asion demanded or circumstances ju t ificd. a nd in addition to scoring a success in a mate ri a l way he has at the same time lived the right life and bee n an example to other . P ublic spirited a nd charitable. M r. Caruthers always finds time fo r s t ud y in g and fostering movemenh which aim lo improve t he p ublic weal. S. E. L 1vJNGSTON. \i\Thile connected with t he F l orida East Coas t Railway 1fr. Livingston's duties required his p resence on the s ite of t he present town of Homestead in Dade Cou nty. The railway construction work being completed he determined to remain there a nd throw i n his l o t w ith t h e littl e community, engaged i n merchandising, a nd in later years has built up a large and flourishing b usiness and a t all time has been o ne o f t he really constructive leaders o f the community. He is the present mayor of H o mestead, and is a lso a member of the County Board o f Public Instruction. Mr. Livingston was born near \Voodford i n Orangeburg Co unty, o uth Ca rolina, in 1879. He was reared o n a farm i n his native s tate, attending sc hool at Woodford and a t North. As a young man of nineteen he volunteered for se rvice at the time o f the Spanish-American war, a nd was in Co mpany I of the First South Carolina Regiment, co m111andcd by 01. J oscph K. A ls ton. A few year later, i n r903, 1Ir. L iv ingsto n ca me to F lorida. T he first year wa spent a t C rystal River in Citrus County, and after that h e was at P l ant C ity until 1909. The yea r 1909 brought him to Dade County a nd to t he locality now known as Homestead. He was then timekeeper and bookkeeper i n the auditing department of the Key \Vest extension of t he Florida East Coast Railway, under \N. J. Krome. T hi s road was t hen under construction from Miami to Key \\'est. The headquarters of the department had been established at the site o f Homestead, though there was no town yet started. 1fr. Livingston is one of the very few whose duties brought them here lo remain and id entify their fortunes permanently with Homes tead. After l ea ving the railroad company 1 fr. Livings ton help e d organize the Homestead Mercantile Co mpany, of which \V. D . Horne was president with Mr. Livingston as secretary and treasure r'. In la te r years he organized the coope rati1 • e mercantile company of w hich he is president. T his is o ne o f the large and s uccess fu t mercantile houses of Homestead. ln ad dition to t his busi nes Livingston has made a somewhat notable s uccess as a tomato grower. ITe put in his first c rop of toma t oes in 1 912. His farm o( t wenty ac res lies cast of Homestead, a nd tomatoes arc the chief crop . He has other yaluablc country and c it y property. 1Ir. Livingston was the first city clerk and tax assessor of Homestead. He took office at the elate o f the incorporation of the town, on January 27, 1913. The population of Homestead at that t im e was sixty-six, twenty-seven of whom were regi stered vote rs. In January, 1922, he was e lected mayor of Home tead. At the demo-

PAGE 16

HISTORY OF FLORlDA 101 cratic primaries of J unc, 1922, he was nominated for the County Board of Public Instruction of Dade County. As the facts briefly related would indicate, Mr. Livingston at all times has been a leader in civic and business affairs, and has helped to make Homestead famous as one of the best towns of its size in Florida. Mr. Livingston is a past master of Royal Palm Lodge No. JOD, F. and A. M., is a member of Dacie l{oyal Arch Chapter No. 47, also a m(!mber of Cyrene Knights Templars No. 13, of 11iam1, and is a member of Homestead Lodge No. 29, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He 1ilarried Miss 1linnic Tyler, and they have two daughters, Esther and Helen. \VJLLIAM C. KKll:llT by 1cason of his 10110 experience and his connection with one of larg'<:st corporations is one of the most widely known rnsurance men of the Southeast. For many years he covered a territory embraci1w nearly all the middlo and southeastern but lor some years past has been established al Tampa, from which city he directs a growing and prosperous business in insurance. ,l-fe was born at Atlanta, Georgia, October 6, 1877, son of Thomas and Sarah (Butler) Kniocht the former a native of South Carolina and latter of Tennessee, both of whom spent their last years in Georgia. William C. Knight, fifth in a family of six children, was reared and educalcd in Atlanta, and at the age of eighteen entered the service of the J. M. High Company of Atlanta. He spent eight years with that organization, and in 1904, began what has proved a consecuti1 e service of nearly twenty years with the Fidelity and Casualty Company of New York. For fifteen years he was traveling representative of the company. covering the thirteen states of New York. Pennsylvania, Virginia, North and South. Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Indiana, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana. His headquarters at different times were in Buffalo, Rochester and New York City, Louisville, Nashville, Atlanta and Jacksonville. In 1917 Mr. Knight located at Tampa, and then restricted the field of his operations to the Tampa District. His offices are in the Citizens Bank In addition to the Fidelity and Casual ty Company he represents tl1e American Surety Company of New York and several fire com panies and handles a general business in casualty, fire insurance and bonding. In 190r Mr. Knight married Miss Zee Brooks. of Atlanta, but a native of Mississippi and daughler of Aaro11 ancl Mary Brooks. Mr. and Mrs. f(night have three children, Lillian Dorothy, Hettie Irene and Sarah Elizabeth. Mr. Knight is a thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason Shriner. } night of Pythias. is a member of 1he Palmacena Golf Club, the Civitan Club of Tampa, the Baptist Church and is a democrat in politics. During the Spanish-American war he was a member of the National Guard, and was a member of the Home Guards during tl1e World \\ar. He is a charter and a life member of the llurns Club of Atlanta. RE\ " . Lours Fnz-JAMES HrnDRY, M. A .. B. D. Closely identified with the parish of Trinity, Saint Augustine, which he has served as rector for over eighteen years, Rev. Louis Fitz-James l l inclry, M. A., B. D., is one of the leading divines of Florida, and a man widely known for his scholarly attainments and splendid business capacity. He was born and educated in Eng-land, and prior to 1893 was tutor in preparatory schools for the army and navy in Margate, England, and Llanclulas, North Wales. Coming to the United States in 1893, he obtained his degree of Master of.Arts from Central University, lnclianapohs, Indiana, and his degree of Bachelor ot Divinity from Seabury Theological School, Faribault, Minnesota. While studying for the ministry he taught school at Oxford, Sumter County, and West Palm Beach, Dacie County, Florida, and was ordamed deacon and priest by the Hight Hev. William Crane Gray, D. D., Bishop of Southern Florida. As assistant at the Church o [ Bethesda-by-the-Sea, Palm Beach Florida Hc1'. 1lr. IIindry spent the first four' years of his ministry, and for the succeeding five years was rector 0 the same church. In 1904 he was called to Trinity Parish, Saint Augustine. where he has since continued. Hev. Mr. liindry has been a member of lhc Board of Missions of his diocese since 190,:;; has been secretary of its Standing Committee since 19r4; has been a member of its committee on Constitution and Canons since 1915; of the Board of Heligious Education since 1914; o [ the Commission on Social Service since 1919; lias been a deputy to the General Convention of the Episcopal Church on fiye separate occasions, and since 1914 has been a trustee of the University of the South. From 1905 to 1918 he was chaplai11 of the First Regiment, Florida National Guard. While living at Palm Beach, Florida, in addi tion to other work he served mission stations at west Palm Beach, Jupiter, Delray and Boyu ton, with occasional services as far away as Miami. Trinity Parish is the oldest ' one of the Episcopal Church in Florida, and its centennial was celebrated April 19, 1921, in conjunction with the seventy-eighth council of the diocese of Florida. One of the most interesting features of this celebration was the delivery of an extended history of the parish by Rev. Mr. Hindry, from which the following facts are drawn. The church building of Trinity Parish stands upon a historic site, for it was once occupied by what was known as the English Constitution House, in which services of the Church of England were held during the period embraced be tween the years of 1763 to 1783, when Florida was in tbe possession of Great Britain. With the recession of Florida to Spain there was an immediate cessation of services, and the Episcopal Church was torn clown. On October 28, 1821, soon after the admission of Florida to the Union, the Young Men's Missionary Society of Charleston, South Carolina, sent Rev. Andrew Fowler to organize a parish al Sainl Augustine. During the month he remained in the city he began the work which is still continued, and at the expiration of that period, went back to Charleston and reported favorably. Returning to Saint Augustine in the following spring, he remained at Saint Augustine until May 1823, when he was succeeded by Rev. Mellish J. Motte. On July 2, 1823, the charter of incorporation of the parish was obtained from the Territorial Legislature, but no church was built until 1825, when, June 23 of that year, the cornerstone of Trinity Church was laid. The lot was secured to the church by Act of Congress February 8, 1827. This church was com pleted in 1830. and was opened for divine worship, the first Sunday in June, r83r. This church was 36x50 feet, but it was entirely rebuilt, after a number of additions and improvements had

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102 111 'TORY OF FLORlDA been made on the original building, and now l1as a seating capac ity of 500, and i in the prope r cruciform shape. On November 16, 1837 , Thomas Dougl ass, Joseph L. Smith and B. A. Putnam were appointed de l egates to the meeting at Tallah assee, at wh i ch the D ioc ese of F lorida was o rgani zed . One of the clergymen who se rv ed as rector of Trinity Pari sh, the control of which he assumed 1 1 arch l, 18,+o, was Rev. Francis Huger Rutledge, who became first b i shop of the D i oce e of F lorida and was con ecrated in 185r. On May 7, 1850, the congregation met and reorganized under the corporate name of "The Vestry of Trinity Chu rch oi Saint A ugustine.'' and adopted bylaw s which we r e du l y reco rd ed in the county clerk's office. ln 1856 a Jot in the rear of the church was purchased for the purpose of erecting a pa rish schoo l , and the first money to apply on the e r ec tion of the building was the sum of $37-50 de rived from a sa l e given by the child r en of t he church. The cornerstone was 'laid April 23, 1 857. The original rectory, Beach Cottage, was so ld in 1 858, and the Drysdale House on Marine treet was bought for a rectory. Subseq uentl y t h e o ld schoolhouse was fitted up and used for a rectory, and the house on Marine Street was rented. A house was erected by the Ladies' Aid Soc i ety on Marine Street, but this was later so ld. In 1\)06 the present beautiful rectory was purchased for $11,000. A beautiful new pari sh house was erected in 1917, and ded i cated ] an u a ry l, 1918. During the pastorate of Rev. l\lr. liind r y the church has been entirely cleared of debt, and a balance of $2,500 has been cancelled on the mortgage against the rectory. The number of communicants, 137, in 1904, when Rev . Mr. Hindry became rector of Trinit y Parish, has been incr eased to 375. Ther e arc 228 families in the pari sh, and 500 persons can attend t h e se r vices. vVith the exception of the font, the church buildin g has been entirel y refurni s h ed, beautifie d and adorned, largel y by memorial s to departed ones, including magnificent stained g l ass w in dows . the altar and reredos, the window frame for the east window, the oa l panelin g fo1 t h e sanctuary, the carved oak doors, the comm uni on rail, the oak credence tab le, the proccs iona l cross, the organ and chimes, the l ectern, t h e p ulpit d esk, the p ulpit , t h e cha nc el rail, t h e e ucharistic candlesticks, the tcsse latcd paveme nt of the baptistery, the Gothic door to t h e parish ho u se, the oak vestibule and porch at t h e west encl of the church, bronze tab l ets, and cho ir stalls. The war between the two sect i ons of the count r y resu lt ed in a cessat i on of services for a ti m e in Trinity Parish . At it s outbreak Rev . L. R. Staudenmayer was rector, and he was a strong sympathizer with the Southern cause. In 1862, after Saint Augustine was captured by t h e Northern troops, he rcfu eel to substitute in his church ritual, "The President of the United States." for "the Con federate States," and was ord e r ed to l eave. Following this t h e r e were n o services until after the close of t h e war, w h en Rev. Alfred A. Miller was placed in charge. The following have served Trinity Parish as rectors: Revs. Andrew Fowl er, Melli s h J. Motte, Raymond Henderson, David B r own, Fran cis Huger Rutl edge. C. C. Adams. Bethel J udcl, Benjam.in W right, \Vi lliam Jackson, Henry B. \\.'hip p i e (later Bishop of Minnesota, and noted Apostle t o the Indians), Al frecl A. Mill er, R. L. Stauclenma yer, W. vV. Bours, Owen P. Thackara, D. Gordon Estes, A. Hull, James W. Capen, j oh n E. C. Smedes, William Munford, Thomas Boone, E . Roote, Edward L. Drown, W. L. Githens, John B. Linn, E. V. Evans, J. R. Bickn e ll, C. M . Sturges and Louis F itz-] am es II inclry, the present incumbent. RussELL H. DEAN, M. D. During the heyday of life, when a man is achieving beyond his assoc iates and winning favor and applause, public honors and private admiration, his compelling personalit y may h ave much influence, but after h e ha s passe d off t h e cene of h i s endeavors and his deeds, hi triumphs, his failures and h i s uccesses a r e visioned with the cold and unbiased critici sm that posterity accords even its h ighest and greatest, h i s true character stand out and his measure of usefulne ss lo mankind is truly revea l ed. The student of biography and history k n ows f ull well how often this acid test brings onl y disappoin tm ent. When, then, a community can point proudl y to a man of true nobility from the ranks of hi dai l y life, how valuab l e is the story and h ow far-reasoning may be its influ ence. To the memory of such a man too much specia l and deserved esteem ve r y seldom can be s h own. When the test above referred to is app lied to t h e record of Dr. R u ssell H . Dean, for many years one of the leading physicians of Jacksonville, it is found that he mea urecl up to the highest standards as a professional man a nd a c itiz en, and in h i s death the city sustained an immutabl e l oss. Doctor Dean was born in Marshall County, M i ss i ss ippi , December 21, i85,+, a son of Col. Russell Dean, w h o was born in Tennessee, but became a prominent man and leading planter of Marshall County, M i ssissippi, where he took an act ive part i n po liti cs, serving in the Mississippi State Assembly . Marshall County was his h ome when war was declared between the two ections of the conntry, and he, espousing the cause of t he Confederacy, served w ith honor as brevetco l one l in its army. His son, l\Iaj . Robert A. Dean of Lafayette County, l\lississippi, was in the se rvic e as major of the ineteenth M i ssissippi Infantry. Doctor Dean grew to manhood on his father's p lantati on, and received his educational training at the Universit y of Mississippi. He took 111S professi o nal t rainin g in the medica l department of Tul ane University of Louisiana. at ew Orleans, from which he was graduated in 1875. Immediatel y t hereafter he entered upon the practice of his profession in his home community in Marshall County. There he 1 emained with gratifying success until in April, 1893, when he came to J ac k sonv illc, F l orida, a nd here he maintained a gener a l practice until death claimed him. He kept in close touch with the advance made in hi5 profession by post-graduate work in ew York City. Gaining a wide reputation for his skil l , accuracy and abi lity, he was accorded the position in h i s profession to which he was entitl ed, and he was an ho nored member of the various medical soc ieti es. At o n e time he was v ice president of the Florida State Medical Society, and also served as president and secretary of the Duval l\leclical Soc iety. Doctor Dean was a man who con trib ut ed l avishly of his time and skill, and served as a member of the District Board of Medical Examiners, and for ten years was loca l surgeon of the F lorida Southern Railr oad, and also of the Plant system.

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lllSTORY OF 103 On May q, i8.., Doctor Dean married ).Liss Mary Gray i\lyers, of c w llamburgh, Dutchess Co unty, New York. They became the parent o f five children, namel y : Lloyd, Marian, Russell H . , Junior, llclen Leslie and Franci s Myers. Doctor Dean was a Royal Arch and Knights Templ a r Mason, a nd he be l o nged to t he 1 l ys tic Shrine. the Modern Woodmen o f Amer ica a nd t he Knights o ( Pythias. Long dee ply interested in religious h became one of t he leading members of the Presbyterian Church, and sencd the local congregation as a n c ider. The death of this excellent man occurred September 28, 1q18, and thousands mourned h i s loss . ln his life we re t he e lements of greatness because of the use he made o f his ta! •nb and opportunit ies. and because his thoughts were not selfce nterecl. hut were give n to the mastery of life's problems a nd the f11lfillm e nt o f his duty as a man in his relati o ns to his as::.oci a tes, a nd a c it i ze n in re la t i o n to his co untry . \!\Th a t a magnificent legacy s uch a man lea v cs lo t h e ge ne r a t i o n that s hall co m e after him. for he wo n the v ictory a nd erected for himse lf a monument mo r e enduring than the granite hills . ll is name is assoc iat e d w ith so me of the most beneficent charities o f the c ity, although much of the goo d he did was n ever known to the p ublic, and he never refused to respond to a call upon his e rvice as a physician. HENRY GEORGE \VmTE. 1fany o f the prominent me n o f Florida haYe been attracted originall y to t his state owing to its reputation as a n orangegrowing locality, o nly to remain in other lin es of endeavor in which their talents a nd e fforts bring them s uccess. T n th is category is t be found Henry George \Vhitc , of J ac kso n v i lle , who first ca me to F l orida to become a n orange-gr o wer, but who is now agent of t h e lydc Steamship Compa ny. T l e is a man of energy a nd ind u s t ry, o f business capability and of publ ic s pirit, and in his lin e o f endea\'or has bee n a onstructive factor in the de\'elopment of the c ity and its interests. 1fr. \Vhite was bo rn a t England, June 2.+, 1872, a nd is a so n of 'harlcs I I. a nd I abe lla (Jackson) \\'bite. J li s fath e r, a native o f E ngland. born in 18.)4, was a graduate o f \ • \'estmi11ste1 U ni,ersit\', a nd was a parliamentar y lawyer a nd parliame1;tary age nt for the Great \Vestern Hail way in E n g land. lI e was a promi nent member of the 1Iasonic fraternity a n d belonged to the C hu r c h o f E n g la nd, i n th e fai th of which he died in his native land Decemb e r IO, 191 r. 1-lrs. \Vhite. who was a l so born in England. and spent her entire life in that country, died December 22, JC)OO. age d ixty-four years. IIenry Ceorge \ \ " b ite was ed ucated in his native land. al Center Hill Co llege a nd Arding ly 'olleg-e. a nd at the age of se\"Cntcen years immi grated to t he U nited States to try his hand a t the hu:incss o f orange g rowing. ] Jc was the fourth in a fa mily of eight ch ildren, o f whom s ix a r e no w living. U pon his arri val, 1fr. \Vhite bought a bearing gro\'e situated in P utn a m o unty, a nd conducted this s uccessful l y unti l it was f rozen out during o ne o f the se , • e rc winters. Nothing daunted, h owe\"Cr, he p l a nt e d another g rove , w hich h e operated fo r se1era l years a n d t h e n s o l d out advantageously. Lea, ing the orange business, Mr. \\'hite joined the J acksonvi llc , Tampa & Key " ' es t Railway sys tem. in the capacity of ass i tant cashier and paymaster. About four years later he joined the C lyde Steamship o m pa ny, a nd later was ad\'anc cl to the P
PAGE 20

1 04 HISTORY F L R L DJ\ i s pre i d en t o f t h e T a mp a H ardwa r e Compan y and th e T a mp a Inves tm ent and S ecurities Co m p a ny; v i ce pr esi d e n t o f t h e Tampa F oundry and :-.tac hin e Co mp a ny, B ank of T a mp a, th e Tampa Electric Co mp a ny, the Y b o r C ity Land and Im p rove m e n t Co mp a ny, th e Tampa G as o mp a n y, E x h a n ge Nati o n a l B a n k , th e B ank of Broo ksville, th e T a mp a Building a nd L oa n A ssoc i a ti o n , a nd m a n y o th e rs. H e i s active l y int e re s t e d in d c ,el o pm ents n ea r T a mp a, 111 w hi c h hi s so n , J ose ph K ni g h t, i s a l so inte r es t e d as manager of th e ente rpri se . H e i s gen e r a l co un se l fo r th e vVho le sa l e Hardwa r e J o bb e r s' A ssoc i atio n , o n e o f th e m os t imp ortant tra d e o r ganizatio n s o f th e country . During the l a t e w a r h e serve d a s vice pres id ent, gen eral co unsel and direc t o r of t h e m e rican Internati o nal Shipbuilding Cor po r ation, w hi c h co n structe d the Hog I s land hi p bui l din g Y ards . Mr. Knight r ece i ve d fro m forme r Secr e t a r y of W a r B a k e r a ce rtifi ca t e of prai cs " th e loyalty, e n e rgy a nd effic i e n cy 111 th e p erformance o f war w ork b y whi c h t h e Ame rican Inte rn atio n a l hipbuildin g Corp o r atio n aid e d m a t e r iall y in o btainin g v i c t o r y f o r th e army o f the U nit e d States o f Ame rica in t h e w a r with th e imp e ri a l G erma n government a nd th e im1 e ri a l and r oya l Auslro-IIungarian go v ernm_cn t." o m e ide a of th e m agnitude of th e se rvic e r e nd e r e d b y Mr. Knight a s g en e r a l co un se l fo r th e to n e and vVe bstcr corpo r a ti o n a n d pr o p e rti es in the tate o f Florida may b e gath e r e d fro m th e following li s t o f co n ce rn co n trolle d ' b y thi s corporatio n within th e state : The K ey _ v Vc t E l ec tri c Co mp a ny, t h e J ac k so n v ille Co mpan y , E l ect ri c Co mpany, T a m pa El ec tri c Co mp a n y w ith all of th e s ub s i di a r y co mp a ni es . ' In young m a nh oo d Peter 0. Knirrht m arrie d Mi ss Frie r so n , a dau ghte r of M a j o r Frie r so n of th e Confede r a t e se rvi ce, and a m e mb e r o f o f th e o ld es t and m os t h o n o r e d famili es o f F l o r They h a v e tw o so n . l\Ir. Kni ght i s a thirtyth1rd degr ee Maso n , and b e l o n gs t o th e B e n e v o le nt a nd Prote cti ve Orde r o f Elks, the Knight o f Pythias, the P a tri o ti c Order S o n s of Ame rica Son s o f th e Ame ri can R evo luti o n and th e tary Orde r o f F o r e i g n \V"a r s . H e i s e ntitl e d t o m embers hip in th e S o n s o f th e Ame ri ca n R e vo!utio n throu g h Ri chard Knig ht, wh o was b orn 111 '.767 and d i e d in 1850 . In r778 Ric h ard Knight e nlisted as a drumme r b oy in the Arn ri ca n R evo luti o n , a nd serve d as ca ptain o f a co mpan y du1ing th e \V"a r of 1 8 12. A co nt e mp orary j o urnal s p e aki n g o f Mr. Knight says: " l\Ir. l ni ght's h o m e i s kn own fo r it s lav i s h ente rt a inin g, hi s soc ial duti es are a s great a s ext e n s iv e bu s ine s int e r est s will p e rmit. H e 1 s a thorou g hl y e quipp e d co rp oratio n l a w ye r in e v e r y se n se. H . e e nj o y s a l u cr a tiv e prac ti ce i s r ecognize d as a dan gerous legal oppo n ent b y 1his bro th e r m embers at the b a r . Hi s uc cess in e v e r y r e lati o n o f life i s th e r esult of s t e rlin g integ ri ty t oward the w orld and e v ery trus t r e p ose d in him. His appear a n ce e mph as i zes bra in . H e has a fund o f ri c h humo r , k ee n satire and quick r e p artee . " For thirty-three years Mr. K ni ght has be e n a r es id e n t of T a m pa, and n o t only has bee n co n n ecte d with its wond erful d e v e l o pm ent but i s proud o f it a nd hi s assoc i a ti o n with so rm111y of i ts ente rpri ses . In a r ecent in tervie w r e lati v c t o t h e c it y, h e said in p art: "One g r o w s fo nd e r o f T ampa with each passi n g yea r . T a mpa just s impl y grows o n yo u . It's th e combination o f a fine an d growin g c it y, p eop led with the best people o n earth, b l essed with the finest clim a t e co n ferred up o n a n y pot a n y wh e r e . T o have live d i n Sou t h F l orida as m a n y years a I hav e a nd t o have see n it de ve l o p so w ondro u s l y i s a n in spirati on. I t is a far cry fro m the Tampa o f '8g t o t h e T a mp a o f t o day, ye t I a m sure we h a v e ju t really b e g un because T a mp a i s d es tin e d lo beco m e a g reat c it y and a g r ea t p o rt. " Mr. Knight i s a m a n o f unim peac h ab l e c h a r a c t e r , of unu s ual intellectua l e nd ow m e n ts, w it h a thoroug h kno wl e d ge of the law, a nd possesses pati e nce, indu try a nd urb anity i n its a p plica tion , all o f whic h h a v e bro u ght him h o n o r a n d well m erited p opularity, a s th e a bove k e t c h clearl y pro v es . In priva t e Ji f c, as in profession a l c ircle , Mr. I ni g h t i s a lways th e sa m e r eliab l e, h o n o rabl e man-affable, ye t firm in m a intainin g wh a t h e regards a ri ght. His pl e dge is n eve r s e cure d except up o n th e m os t ca r e full y exam ined g r ound , but o n ce o btain e d i s immo v ab le. His charity i s broad and w arm, a nd it i s th e u ni".crd_ict that h e h a n e v e r wei g h e d a n act o f h1 life 111 th e scale of si nister p o l icy. CAROL l\IATHES O N gen e r a l agen t of t h e :-.Ie rch ants and Min e r s Trans p o rtatio n ' o mpany, has bee n id e ntifi e d with transportati n systems s n ee hi s entra n ce up o n th e a r ena of b u siness li fe thirty -fi ve years ago. During hi car ee r he' h a b ee n a ssoc i a t e d with a numbe r of t h e l a rge lin es and i s w ell known n o t o n l y at hi s h o m e city of ) ack o n\'1lle but t hrou g h out t h e s t a t e as a man o_f marke d capability, broad j ud g m e n l , ripe experi e n ce and sound acume n . H e h a t h e f ull confi d e n ce o f hi s a ssociates and th e ge neral esteem of th e community . l\lr. H ai l e w as b orn D ece m be r 15, 1 8 70, i n Alac hu a o un ty, Flo ri da, a son of Tho m as Evans a nd E s th e r e r e n a (Ch es nut) H a il e, and a g randson of J o hn and Ell e n ( \V"hitak e r ) C h esnut, of amde n , S outh Carolina . Benjamin H ai le, the paterna l g r a nd fath e r of arol l\l. 1 l aile, was b o rn a t Camde n , J a nu a r y IO, 1798 , an d f r hi s second wife marrie d Amelia E v a ns, w h o was b orn at t h e amc place ) a nuary I .), 1 798, s h e b e in g the grandmo th e r of arol l\L H aile . Tho mas E v a n s Ilaile was born at Camden, 3 r , 1 82 4 , and th e r e m arrie d M a r c h 13, E s th e r e v ena h e nut, who w as born at Camde n , May 31, 1 826. In 1 855, after the birth o f five of their childre n , they m ove d t o Kan apaha, Florida , whe r e th e r e m a inder of their chi l dre n w e r e b orn. Mrs. H aile died D cc m be r 7, 1 895, a t G a in es ville, Flo rid a. l\fr. H aile's death occurre d D e c e mb e r 3r, 1 896, at T alla h assee, this s t a t e. O f th e ir fiftee n children, fourtee n lived to maturity, and seve n o n s and o n e d a u g hter s till survive. Tho m as E vans H aile was educat e d in th e publi c sch oo l s of Camden. w h e r e h e spe n t hi s b oy hood and youth o n hi s father' s p l a ntati o n , and eventually e ngaged in cotto n rai s in g on hi s o wn acco un t, c ulti v a ting hi s fiel ds and h a rvesting hi s crop b y s l a ve lab or. \Vhe n t h e w a r between th e s t a t e cam e o n h e e nli s ted i n th e o nfeder a t e A rmy, unde r Capta in Dic ki n o n , of the F i r s t Flo rid a Regim ent, with whi c h h e took p a r t in numerous b a ttl es, skirmi h es and m a r c h es , a n d at all tim es pro v e d a brave and faithful so l d i e r , r etiring fro m mili ta r y life with a sple n d id r eco r d. At th e cl ose o f th e w a r h e r eturne d t o his plantati o n a t Kana p a h a, and continue d lo follow t h e sam e lin e o f bu siness until hi s cl a th . H e w as a s t a n c h de m oc r a t in po liti cs, b u t never cared for

PAGE 22

lHSTOR '{ OF FLORlDA 105 public life Fralernally he belong d lo lhe Masons, an his religious conneclions was wilh the Presbyterian 'hurch, in w hich h e served fo r so m e year s as a deacon. lJc and his wife had the following children: John Chesnut. born January 14, r8..i8, d ied al Kanapaha, Florida, Janu a r y 2r, r867; Elle n \ Vhitaker, born March 28, 1 8 + 9, died July 27, r850, al Camden, South Carolina; Amelia Evans, born ovember 28, r850, died at Tallaha see, F lorida, ovember 26, r 902; Benja-min, born 1Jarch 13, I 52, died at Arre d ondo, Florida, October 10, r889; Thomas Evan s, ] r. , born Augu t 18, 1853, died at Kanapaha, Decembe r 29, 1886; James Chesnut, born June 29, i 855, died at Kanapaha, }.lay 9, 1891; William Edward, born February 10, 1857; Lawrence \Vhitaker, born July rs, 1858; Mary C h e nut, born eptern ber 22, 1859; Charles Evans, born J anuary II. l 6 r ; \Valter l ennedy, born June 30, 1 862, died at Jacksonville March 20, 1920; Sydney, born October 18, I 86+; George R., born December 20, 1865; Evans, born ] une II, 1869; and Carol Matheson. The youngest of his parents' childr en, Carol 11. Haile received his education in the public school s of A lachua County, Florida, and spenl his boyhood and youth on his father 's farm up lo lh e time he was seventeen years of age, when he e ntered upon his independent career as an employe of the Florida Railway and Navigation Company, in th operating department. He remained with this line and its uccessor, the Florida Centra l and Peninsula Company, until 1896. in which year he engaged with the Southern Express ompany in the capacity of route agen t. This association remained in force until 1905, when Mr. H aile j oi ned the Seaboard Air Line Railway, and for f urteen years was travel in g auditor and freight agent at Jacksonville . Since 1 9 1 9 h e has been general agent for the Merchants and Miners Transportation Compan y in Florida, and i s accounted one of his company's most capabl e and trusted empl oyes. Be i s an energetic and industrious transportation man, and one who i s familiar with all the details of th business, having worked his way up through the variou departments. Mr. Haile is chairman of the Board of Deacons of the Sprin gfie ld Presbyterian C hurch of Jackson ville. i s a democrat in politics, and belongs to the J iwanis C lu b. On March 7, 18<).j. Mr. Haile married [i Etta Dupray. wh was born in Duval County. Florida, daughter of William and Carol in a ( oy) Dupray, natives o [ the State of faine. Mrs. H aile is the youngest of tlwee children. Two son s and three daughters have been born to 1 1 r. a nd t-frs. H ai le: Louise. t h e wife of R. N. D ow. who ha. one son, E lwell Evans, who died in in fancy: a rolyn; and \\' a lter Kennedy and Mildred Love, twins. ALEXANDER Dt•NcA ' Mc ETLL. High rank in the legal profession has long distinguished Jackson v ille , and it . numbers among it s m embe r s many men who. e achievements have gained for them tate-wide prominence. Among the a m bitious. a l e r t and enterprising attorneys who ha, e tak e n advantage of t h e manifold opportunities offe red in this citv for advancement is A lexander Duncan McNeil!._ He was born at Fayetteville, North Carolina. August r8, T882, a son of A lexander Duncan an cl Susan (Bell) McNeil!,. natives of Cumberlancl Coun ty, North Carolin a. Growino-up in his native state. Mr. McNeil! attended the public school s, a local academy ancl t h e University of N orlh Car o lin a. His legal training was secured at the J ohn B. Stetson University, and he was g raclu alec\ from its legal department in 1908, with the degree of Bac h e l o r of Laws. Locatin g at Jackso1wille, he has si nce been c11gaged in general practice. l n February, 191 ', 11.r. J\fcNcill was a ppointee\ s tate attorney fo r the Fourth Judicial 'ircuit of Florida, to Jill the vacancy in that office caused by the death of lh e former state attorney, and in the democratic prima r y of May, 1 9 18. he was nominated lo said office for the term, ending June, 1921. During hi s term as state attorney h e condu cted the business of this oflice on a hi g h plane, in an efficient manner and with great c r edit to himself. In this office h e r ende red the peopl e of hi s circu it and of th e s tate many n otabl e and m u c h appr -ciati ve ervices. In addition to his law practice, Mr. McNeill i s associated in business with hi s brothers, D . R. McNei l ! and J ohn . McNeil! , in the naval s t o r es produ ci n g busine s and orange growing. Profcs ionally he maintains membership w ith the Duval County Bar Association a nd t h e F lorida State Bar Association. ]AME B RCII CHARLES, wholesal e lumber mer chant, has b e n a r es id ent of Tampa for ten years, and has an extensi ve a sociati o n and business connections with the lumber ci r c l es in th e Southeastern Mr. h arles was born in Montgomery County, Alabama, April 8, 1 874, son of \V. T. and Flor e nce (Burch) Charles, also nati ves of A labama; a nd now deceased. His father was of F r e n c h ancestr y and hi s m other of Italian. His grandfather, Frances I<.oberl C h a rl e , was a nativ e of outh Carolin a and an earl y settler in A labama, practiced law a nd became a prominent man at .Montgomery. \V. T. Charles was a p l ante r. T h e fathe r of Florence Burch was ] a m es lrby B urch, a native of South Car o lin a, and an A labama planter. ' ]. B. Charl es, the second among his parents' children, pent his boyhood in Alabama. and fini s hed his educati on in th e Agricultural and Mechanical College at A uburn, that state. F o r several years h e was a merchant in Georgia, and while there he a lso e ngaged in the lumbe r bus i ness. He moved his business headquarters t o Tampa i n r 912, and i s a wholesal e r epresentative of a number of mill s in labam a, F l orida and Geor g.ia, sellin g t h e product both in d o m e tic and foreign markets. His office i s i n the C it izens Bank B11ilc\ing. Mr. harles manied in 1 897 Elizabeth Pinks t o n. of Montgomery Coun ty, A labam a. They have two son s . Ray and ] am es. Mr. h a rles' father serve d as a Con federate soldi e r i n t h e i\'il war, with the eventh A labam a Caval ry. T. B. M cGA HEY i s o n e of the o ld e r c itize n s of :\l iami , a nd in his business a a road a nd excava tion co ntractor he has perfected an o rganiz a ti o n that represents the last word in the se rvice o f modern road and st 1eet making. Mr. McGahey was born at Nashvill e. Tenne see, in 1885, a nd was reared and educated in that city. He was a youn g man of e i ghteen when h e cam e to Miami in 1903. .His fir s t work h e r e was a s a clerk in Romfh's stor e, and hi s acti vi ti es continued lo he associated with t h e mercantile enterpri ses of the c it y for so m e year s . Il was in 191 5 that he set up as an independent

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106 BL TORY OF contracto r in the building of roads and excavation work generally. \ Vhile he start e d with modest capi tal , he has promoted hi s business to b e o n e of the lead e r s of its kind in F l o rid a, and h e has extended hi s inv ested capita l until he h a a complete equipment of road b uildin g ma c hin e r y, truc k s fo r h eavy hauling, and all the facilit i es for exp ert and prompt se r v ice in hi s l ine. Mr. McGahcy built practi cally all the street s in l\Iiami B eac h , a number of th e mode rn streets and m os t of the large s ubdivi s i o n s of l\I iami, and muc h stree t work in the c it y pro p e r. Many of hi s co ntract hav e bee n directly with th e munic ipaliti es co n ce rn e d. 1-fe built most of th e modern st1eets in the it y of Fort Pierce. At Mi a mi two of th e prominent s ubdi v i s i o n s in which h e built streets a r e Brickell Hammoc k a nd Shenandoah. In addition to hi s contrac tin g business l\I r. McGa h ey i s d ea l e r in r oa d m a t e ri al. H e is a n active m ember of th e Miami Chambe r o f Comme r ce. He married l\Ii ss Maud E. \ Vi l lard, a native of Florida, and the ir f our childre n a r : Willard, Lillian, Bob and Ben. Ji:ROME E. \VrnEMAN is not only o n e of the r ep r esentative yo unger m e mb e r s o f th e bar o f hi s nati ve s t a t e but a l so has th e di s tincti o n o f being Flo rid a Stale Commande r of the Ameri can L egion, his e l ect i o n to this ofTicc having occurred at th e annual co nventi o n of th e Florida Legion held at \Vest I a im Beach in Marc h, 1922. Ile i s establis h ed in the s uccessful prac tice o f hi s profession at \ Vest Palm Beach, and apropos of hi. electio n t o hi s present office as commande r of the American Legi o n f o r th e State o [ Florida the following state m ents a ppeared in a recent new s pap e r article: " Tl c was a m ember o f th e g r o up that met May r6, r91 9 , and planned organ za ti on of the local post o f th e Ame ri ca n Legi o n, and on th e organizati on of thi s p os t h e wa s e l ecte d its co mm a nd e r, hi s r e-e l ec ti o n having followed the expiratio n o f hi s first t e rm. H e wa s a delegate fro m Flo rid a t o the annua l natio nal co nv e nti o n of th e American Legi o n a t Kansas C ity. and i s a r et irin g m e mb e r o f th e Fl rid:t d epartment's executi ve committee. Captain \ Vid eman was a prime mover in the campaign to b rin g the 1 922 slate co n ve nti on of th e Legi o n t o \!\fest Palm Beach . and was a m e mb e r of the j oint co mm 'ttee of th e local po s t and th e un fo r the conduct of the co nventi o n and celc-brati on . " Capt ain \ l\fideman was born at Mican o py, l ach ua County . Flo rida. o n th e 20th o f March. 1?<10. and is a so n of Col. J o hn vV. and Julia (Edw ards) \Videman. Co l o n e l vVid eman wa s born in Sonlh Carolin a bnt has be e n f o r many yea r s a 1esi d enl of Flo rid a. where h e se rv e d a' co l o n e l o n the staff o f Governor Gilchrist and where h e is a n h o n o r ed and influ ential c iti ze n of Co unty. CapL J e r o m e E. \Vidcman r ece i ved excellent ed ucati o n a l discipline pr.or to initiatin g pre p a rati on fo r hi s c h ose n profession. H e ente r e d the law department o[ te l so n nive r s it y . at D e Land, and in this institution h e was graduate d as a member of the c la ss of 1 9q, hi s r ece pti o n o f the degree o f Bachel o r o f Laws h avi n g b ee n virtually coincident with hi s admiss i on t o th e bar of hi s native state. H e h as s inc e been s u ccess fully e ngaged in th e practice of hi s profess i o n at \ !\fest Palm B e a c h . save for th e p e ri od o f hi s army e r v i cc a nd that of hi s incumbe nc y of the office of Cou nt y Judge of Palm Beach County. H e h e l d fo r two years th e ofTicc of prosecuting atto rn ey of thi s county, a nd at th e expiratio n of his term was appointed t o the bench of t h e County ourt, in which connection he had the distinction of being at the time th e youngest county judge in th e stale . Ile r e i g n ecl this judici a l o ffice in August, 1 917, t o enter the Second OfTicers' Training Camp at F ort Oglethorpe, Georgia, in preparatio n f o r acti,e se r v i ce in connecti o n w ith th e W o rld war. IJe w o n commiss'on as second lieutenant and was assigned to duty o n the ]\[exi ca n bordc1 . as a m e mber of the Twentyf ourth Unite d S t a lc3 Jnfanlry. lie was th e r e pro m o t e d first lieute n a n t a n c l there h e was retaine d in se r v i ce until th e s igning of the armi s tice brought the \Vorld war to a c l ose. H e r eceive d his h o n o rabl e di scharge J a nu a r y 15, 1 9 19, and wa s co mmi ss i o n e d a captain in the 1eservc co rp s o f th e nited tates Army. His high place in th e confidence a nd esteem of hi s comracles in th e American Legi o n needs n o furthe r vo u c h e r than hi s se l ection lo th e office of co m mande r of the Fl o rid a D e p artment of this fine patrio tic o rganizat ion. ALEXAKllER R.\Y. who h as se n ed si n ce 1909 as c it y treasure r of Jac k o nvillc and whose ever y lection has be e n compassed without the appear an ce of an o pp osi n g candidate. needs n o furthe r voucher than this in determining hi s statu s in p op ul a r co nfid e n ce and esteem in his home c i ty. i\lr. Ray was born at Waterto wn , ew Y o rk. u g u s t 30, r8s-1. and i s a so n of Jacob and l\l a rgaret Ray, the forme r of whom was likewi se b orn at \Vatertown. wh e r e h e died at th e age of thirty-two years. The latte r was b orn in Germany, and s h e wa. forty year s of age at the time of h e r death . The s ubj ec t of this s ketch was th e e ld e r of their two children, both sons . The fath e r was a tailor b y trade and occupatio n , wa s a democrat in p olitics and was affiliated with the Masoni c fraternity. A lexandcr Ray was doubly orphaned while still a me1c chi ld , and hi s educa ti o n and subse quent advan cement r epresent the r esults of his o wn abilit y and efforts. As a l a d of thirtee n years h e found e mpl oy m ent i n washing di s he s in a restaurant, hi s compensation being five d ollars a week At th e age of fifteen he obtained a posi ti o n in a real estate ofTicc in hi s nati ve city, and about two yea r s later h e ente r e d the e mploy of an importing h o use in N c w York i ty, t h e co n cern being appreciative of hi s ambiti o n and effect i ve se rvi ce. and aiding him by paying his tuition in a ni ght sc h ool. wh e r e he learn e d bookkeeping. Jn 1 877 l\rr. Ray ca m e t o Jac k so n v ille. Flo r; da. and lat e r he went to P utnam ounty and engaged in the g r owing o f oranges. a lin e of enterprise with whic h h e th e r e continue d hi s associati o n until l8<)T, whe n h e returne d to Jac k so nvill e and ente r e d th e servi ce of what was then known as the Atlantic Coas t Linc R a ilroad. Tn h e took a n office po. iti o n with th e Florida Fruit Exchange. and in 1 898 h e e ngaged in the retail g r ocery bu siness in this c it y. In the follo win g yea r, h o wever, h e was appointed t o a c l e ri ca l position in th e ofTicc of the city treasure r. with th e functio n s of whic h h e has continued his clo e association during th e inte rv e nin g years. His elec ti o n to the p os iti o n of c it y treasure r ccurred in 1 909, as prev iousl y noted. and s u c cessive r e-e l ec ti o n s, without o pp os iti o n. have cont;nued him in this r es p o n . ibl e fiscal office to the present time. l\fr. Ray i s a d e mocrat in hi s p olitical allegiance. Tn th e Maso ni c fraternity his basic affiliati o n is with Templ e L o dge o. 23, F. and A. M., of whi c h h e was mas t e r in 18<)2, and whic h h e repre-

PAGE 24

Ill TORY OF FLORIDA 107 sented as district deputy from I<)02 to T gOO. He ha5 served continuou ly as treasurer of this lodge since 1908 . November r, 1888, recorded the marriage of Ray and 1Iiss Arminda T y r e, who was born in Florida January 16 , 1851, a daughter of Jesse and J\lary Tyre, both likewise natives of thi s state, the father having been a prosperous farmer and having served as a loyal soldi e r of the Confederacy in the Civi l war. Mrs. Ra y was the first born in a family o f thirteen childre n, and in her home city and native state has a wide circle of friends. 1f r. and 1 1 r s. Ra have n o children. r \LEXANDER J. 1Inc n ELL, m e teor o logist and <'!imatologist, and head of the F l orida vVeather Bureau forces at ] acksonville, has, in fo llowing hi s present important and difficu l t vocation, s lipp ed far fro m the moorings of hi s youth , for, while it is not gener a lly known, h e began hi s career as an accredited lawyer and ent e r e d the weather bureau at th e beginning o f th e Govern ment meteorological c lasses. Today he i s acr0unted ope of the most exp ert men in hi lin e in the country, and is recognized as an absolute a uthority in several departments of weather forecasting. Profes<;or l-ritchell was born at Glenville, Rus
PAGE 25

, 10 HISTORY OF FLORID.\ g ustine. 111 1 889 the academy rece ived its chart r [rom the Florida S1atc Legislature. S ince its inception it has inc reased steadi l y in p ublic e;;teem, as well as in t he number o[ its s tudents, who co me from all parts of t he slate and frequently from other s tales lo see k moral a nd inte l l ectual dc\'c l opmcnl under its s heltering roof. The e d u ca tion imparted a l St. ] osc ph's cademy is practi ca l and co mprehensive. Realiz ing and a ppreciating the co ncern o f parents a nd guardians who, whi l e anxious lo gi\'C their c hildren o r wards e very opportunity of mental c ulture, a rc not l ess so licitous about their moral deve l o pment, the Sisters h ave adopted a syste m o f e ducation wh i c h tends to t rain t he heart as well as the mind, a nd w hich will prepare young ladi e to be a n honor lo t heir parents and to o ciety. Recognizing o bedience to la w ful authority and res pect fo r the rights of others to be as really neccs ary fo r t he goo d of the individual p upil as fo r that of t he entire body the Sisters requi r e stri c t o bservance of the rul es o f the academy. These rul es arc s imp l e and c alculate d to form habits o f C hri s tian vi rtue, o bedience, doci lit y towards s uperiors, refinement a nd mutual conside ration in soc ial and fa mily intercourse. St. J ose ph's welcomes lo its a d vantages pupils o f eve ry denomination, a nd 110 undue influence is exerte d ove r the co nscient i o us co nvictions of nona lh o lics, al thou g h fo r the s ake of order all pu pil are requ ir e d to attend divine se rvices with the s t ud ent body at t he Catholic C hurch. All p upils, Ca tholic an d no n-Catholic, a re taught to a ppreciate moral wo rth. K nowing that the charm o f refined manners is the aggregate of habits acq uir e d in youth, t he teachers fail not, o n all oc casions, to point out and take means to correct fault s committe d agains t lad y lik e deportment. urrounded as the students are by a ll that tends to e nnob l e and e l ev ate, it would hardl y see m possibl e that one hould s pend eve n a year at S t. Jose ph's without acquiring greater love a nd res pect fo r all that pertains lo a nobler life. t. Joseph's Academy is e quipped in every way lo care for its s t ud ents. The new academy, erecte d in 1908, and l y ing n orth o f t h e o ld b uild i ng . i s an i mp os i n g four-story brick and concrete stru cture. The fir t floor is devoted to the large auditorium, dining hall, a nd co mmercial a nd m u sic departments. The seco nd floor i ncludes the library , study hall, art department, recreation hall and class rooms. The dormitory, private r oo m s and baths occ upy the third floor, whi l e the fourth floor has lin e n and clothes rooms a nd a number o f p riv a te rooms. T he e ntire b uilding is e quipped with all t he modern improvements which promote securi ty, health a nd comfort. The sc ho l as tic year is divided into t wo ses s i ons: The first commencing the Monday after Septe mb e r 15; 1hc seco nd, the fir s t Monday of Febru a ry. T h e course o f study is t h o rough a nd e mb r aces all branches of both a u seful and an o rna mental e ducation. The curric ulum provides fo r primary, intermediat e a nd aca demic departme nt s , e ach coveriug a period o f four yea rs. The young ladies who have passed satisfactory exa minatio ns, o btaine d the required average, co m p l e ted the academic c ours;, a nd have otherwi se co mp l ied with t h e requiremen ts of the aca demy. r ece ive a dip l oma a nd graduating medal. Rev iews of s tudies, w ritten a nd o ral, are required every month; the record a nd ave rages are read in the presence of the faculty. teachers an d students e ach month. Entertainments arc g iven from ti m e to t ime before the facu lt y in w hich t he p upil s are required to show their progress in e locutio11, l 'Ocal and instrumental m usic. J\t t he close of each term the pupils of the primary department in music give a recital in order that their progress may be tcs1cd. • \ n examination i:; he ld al the clo'c of the year, a nd 011 the result of t his, co mbined with the record of daily work, is ha,cd t he p upil's status fo r t he following year. Voca l and instrumental m usic. drawing a nd p , a inting arc elect ive studies. The commercial course embrace, arithmetic, book keeping, b usiness forms and correspondence, tenography and typewriting. The League of the Sacred Heart of Jesus is es tablished among the student with a view to fostering piety a nd elev lion, and aiding them to acquire more thoroughly the true spirit of Christianity, on ly Cathol ics being members of t his league. Other societ ies of the institution arc St. Joseph's Alumnae Association, the Children of Mary, St. Joseph's Harmonic Circle and St. Catherine's Literary Society. MARTIN c. FROST, of a pio neer fami ly i n t he Dania District of Broward Co unty, is a young business man, a nd his sp lendid energy and ini tiative have put him into a class where he is regarded as o ne of the largest to mato growers in the U nited S tates. He is a lso a ba nker, large property ow ner, a nd has ta ken a prominent pa1t i n the offic ial a !Tairs of his ho me community a nd co unty. M r. Frost was born at l\Iaplc Valley, Oconto County Wiscon in, in 1886, and three weeks after his birth his mother died . His father, A. C. Frost, was for many years a prominent figure i n the lumber industry of \Visconsin, represented his county i n t he State Legislature there, and w as founder of t he Town of Mountain. In 1900 he ca me lo F lorida, fo llowing his olde t son, G. A . Frost, and fo r a time lived at Titus vi lle in Brevard County. In 1901 he removed to Dania in what was then Dade, now Broward Co unty, 'a nd was one of the pionee r in that district w here he is sti ll living. For a n umber o f yea;-s he con d u ctccl a mercantile hus ine s at Dania, a nd i n the meantime acqu ired va luable property in surrounding agricultural ' lands. In t his sec tion he beca me agent for t he lands of the Florida East Coast Railway. The land bus i ness of t his railroad is co nducted under the name of t he Model Land Co mpany. For severa l years, up to 1921, he a lso served as county commiss ioner of Broward Cou nty. Martin C. Frost was about fifteen years old w hen his father came to Dania, and he grew u p i n t his locality. There were less than half a dozen houses in t he community when the fami ly located at Dania, a nd sca rcely a beginning had bee n made o f c ultivating t he surrounding lands, lands t h a t h ave s ince grown into ric h productiveness and have made Dania o ne of t he fa mous w inter vege table producing regions of F lorida. Substantial fo rtunes have bee n made in the tomato and other crops. After leaving choo l Martin C. F rost was associated wit h his father i n the mercantile busi ness fo r seve ral yea rs, but s ince 1908 has concentrated his energies on farming, s pecializing more a nd m.ore i n the growi_ng of tomatoes, one of the cho icest crops of wmlcr vegeta bles u eel i n F lorida. Through the skill a nd efficiency and b usiness-like management he has show n he has set some new standards in t he c ultivation, management and handling of this crop. Most of his tomato growing interests are i n assoc iation with Capt. M. C. Hardee of Miami,

PAGE 27

l U TORY O F F LORLDA 109 a widely k nown c itizen whose career is sketched elsewhe re. Under the firm name of Hardee & Frost they are not o n l y producers of tomatoes, but conduct a s hipping a nd marketing business that probab ly excee ds t h a t o f a ny o t h e r indivi dual firm i n Florida. O n e o f th e largest tomato p l a ntations in t h e state is operated by Hardee & Frost, known as t h e East Marsh. During 1922 t his firm deve l o ped a 200-ac re tract for. tomato production. The c lea rin g o f the land, w hich had never before been in c ultivation was in r92r. They took s pecia l ca re to' proa n adequate sy tern o f drainage, running d itches, bo th large a nd s mall, throughout t he tract, and in order to fac ilitate t he prompt dis charge of s urplus wate r, they installed a sys tem o f p ropeller pumps, which were used with s plendid results during o ne of the heavy rainy seaso ns in the s pring o f 1922. The Hardee & Frost. er'! p was e ntirely sa ved from a ny injury a t this time, a nd w h e n it was ha rv es ted t here were upwards of 500 c rates t o the acre. The c rops a rc be ing handl e d i n a l a rge packing house a t Hallandale. 1 fr. F rost is a lso vice p1esident of the Bank of Dania, and he s ucceeded his father eve ral yea rs ago as representative fo r this territory of' the 11ode l Land Co mpany . He o wns a nd hand les .a large amount of land a nd town property of his own. Mr. Frost is the present mayor of Dama, and has se rved in that capac ity fo r sev e ral te rms. In 192r he was a ppointed by the governor to the office o f county co mmissioner o f Broward Cou nty fo r t he unexpired term o f his fa t h e r., w h o had resigned. ln the democratic pnmanes of June, 1922, he was reot!lar l y n o mi na ted a nd was e lected in _Ur. Fro.s,t married a Vv i sco n in g irl , M i ss May Lawler. I hey have s ix c hildr en, Howard, Ila, Mart111, Jack, Catherine a nd Jeanette. lioN. loN L. FARRIS. A prominent practitioner of the J.acksonv11le ba r for ma ny yea rs, Hon. lon L. has bee n a kading figure in publ i c life durmg a l arge po rtion of that time a nd has se rved fo r a long period as a in both b ranches of the State Legislature . H i p ublic se rvice ha bee n of 0Teat practi ca l va lu e to hi district, his constitutents a nd h i s state a nd h i s consc ientious .fide lity to his duti es, togc'ther with his proven a bility as a l eg i s t a nd executive, make him a figure of much importance in h i s co mmunity. enator Farl'is was born a t Savannah Georgia September q, r878, a nd is a so n of H. a nd 1Iary (Detgens) Farris natives of Charleston So uth Carolina. Oscar' H. Farris was bo rn i1; 18.J,7, a nd during the period of t he war between t he. states learned the trade of boiler-making, w hich he fo llowed fo r so me years in his yo uth. Later he engaged in t he general merchand:se b u ines . at Savannah, Geo rgia, a nd in ca me to Florida a nd located at Jacksonville . One yea r later he went to Marion Co unty, this s tate, whe re he ope ned a general merchandise store and a lso fo llowed bo iler-making, continuing in t he e lines until his retirement three yea rs before his death, which occurred in r9T2. Ile was a democrat in po liti cs a nd a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Mrs. Farris, who was born in 1859, d ied in 19q. In their. family there were three so ns a nd seve n daughte r , of whom one son d ied in i nfancy, t he others s till s urviving. The seco nd in order of birth o( hi parents' c hildren, Ion L. Farris received his ea rly educa t ion in the p ublic sc hoo l s of Marion Co unty, F l o rida, a nd, having decided upon a professional ca reer, read law in t he offices of Herbert Anderso n a nd 'vV. K Ze wadski. In l90I he too k the examination a nd was admitted to the bar by Judge Minor S . Jones, i mmediately thereafter entering upon the practice of his ca llin g at Jack:.onville, w here he now has a large a nd important c lientele. Ile has been o n o ne s ide o r another in many of t he most important ca es that have co me rece ntly before t he local, state a nd fede ral co urts, a nd is accou nted a va luable assoc iate a nd formidable o pponent, being thoroughly at home in all b ranches o f his ca lling. Senator Farris is a member of the Duval County Bar Association. t he Florida State Bar Associa tion a nd the A meri ca n Bar Assoc iation, a nd is a c lose a nd ca reful s tudent. Fraternally he is a ffiliated wit h the Independent Order o [ O dd Fell ows, the Knights of Pythias, the 'vVoodmen of t h e \V o rld, t he Improved . Order of Red Men, and Jacksonville L o dge, Benevo l ent a nd Protective Order of E lks. With his fami l y he belongs to the First 1fethodist E piscopa l C hurcfi. A stanch democrat si nce the attainment of his majority, Senator Farris has long been prominent a nd active i n po litical affa irs a nd pub l i c life . Ile w as e l ected representative to t he State Legislature from Duval County i n 1907, was re e lected in 1910, in w hich sess ion he was speaker o f the !louse, and was again sent to that body in 1913, when he was again s peaker. He was se nt to State Se nate from t he E ighteenth District in 1915. a nd s pent four yea rs in that body. Senator Farri s was the author of the law that made impos i b le Negro co unc ilm e n in Jackso nville. For ten yea rs he led t he fight, aga inst determine d o ppos i t ion, fo r a new c ity charter, a nd for the popular e lection of c ity offic ials, w hich was finally crowned w ith s uccess in t he pass age of the charter, which he introduced a nd had passe d through the Senate. As a me mber of t he Senate he passed the b ill providing for the b uilding of the St. Johns River B ridge. He was author of the "Farris Municipal F reedom Act," e nabling municipalities to c hange their fo rms of government at home. He too k an ac tive part in shaping a n d passing all important legis l a tion for ten yea rs for the upbuilding of t he p ublic sc hool s vstcm and institutions o f higher l ea rning. He c hampion!ld good roads l eg islation and worked for t h e abolit ion of t he co nvict lease system, a lso ac tively supported purifying e lection laws a nd w as t he author o ( the free sc hool boo k bill for poo1 chi ldren. Among t he measures fo r w hich he vote d were: \Voman's s uffrage, mothers' pensions, increased co mpensation fo1 sc hoo l teac hers, t he budget system. lower taxes and more eq ual distribution of the tax burden and numerous other be neficial laws. Ilis record is a c lean a nd constructive o ne that invites examina t ion an d comparison. O n January 30, 1901, Senator Farris married A lli e Lidclcll, who was born near Memphis, Tcn ne see , a nd they have three c hi l dren: Io n L., Jr., James L iddell and Law r e nce Bryan. RALPH NELSON 11. D. In the course of his wide ex perience as a physician a nd urgeon Doctor G reene fo r a number of years was asso cia ted with the Florida State Hospital fo r the Insane. Ile se rved wit h the rank of major in the Medical Co rp during the \ Vo rld wa r, and since e tablishing himself in p rivate p ractice at Jack-•

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110 lllSTOH.Y O F FLOlUDA so11villc, has limited his work to mental and nervous d i se ases. D octor Greene, whose offices arc in the St. James Buildin g, wa born a l Indianapolis, Indiana, ovember 5, 1883, son o f Arthur H. and Mary Elizabeth (Sellers) Greene. This is a b ranch of the G re ene famil y of which Gen. Nat h a nic l Greene of t h e Revolution was a conspi c u o u s m e mb e r. O n h i s mother's s id e Doctor Greene represents the Dani e l Boone ancestry. !Ii pa r e nts were both natives o f Indiana, his father born in Morgan Co unty, in 185-t, and his mother in Johnson County, in 1851. They had three c hi l d r en: Lorin A., who holds the rank of maj o r in the 1 1 e dical Corps of the Army; Layton, w h o died a t the age of f ive years; and Ralph Nel so n. Arthur IL Grei: nc, w ho sine<: 19q has been a r<:sident o [ J acksonvillc, F lorida, has had a long b u s in ess career in connecti o n with the manufacture and s a l e o f paper. For many years he was located a l Atlanta, Ccorgia, and Memphi s, Tennes see, and he now repre se nts the Virginia Paper Company o f R i chmond. Arthur Greene was the inventor of the first press capabl e o f printin g fourco l o r work. Ile is a member o f the 1Iasonic fraternity and the Christian Church, and for year s has been a tanch prohibitionist and te mp erance man. Ralph Nelson Greene recei\cd his professional educati o n in the Hospital 11edical College of Tennessee. graduating in I9Q-t. After graduating he located a t Greenville in Madison Co unty, F lorida, and engaged in a gen eral practice there u ntil 1909. In that year he was a pp o inte d assistant physic i a n to the F l orida State l Iospital for the Insane at C h attahoochee, and in 19ro was promoted to chief phy i c ian, serving in that capacity until I<)t6. Doctor Greene res ign e d from t h e state instituti o n to accompany t h e F ir s t F l orida Field Hospital to the Mexican border. In 1farch. 1917, a ftcr hi s return, h e l ocated at Jacksonville, but in August o f the same vea r he re-entered the Cnited States Anni Medical Corps, with the rank of major, ancl served until honorabl y discharged in July. 1919 Soon after co min g out o f the army Doctor G reen e was appointe d stale health o fficer o f F l orida, hut resigned in June, 1 92 1 , in order to devote all his time lo his s pecia l p 1actice in mental and n e r vo us d iseases. T h e m e d ical professi o n o f F l orida l oo ks upon hi111 as o n e o f its for emost members, a nd in 1917 th e Florida State M e dica l . \ ss oc iati o n e l ected him it s p1csident. ITc i s a lso a member o f t h e A m erican Medi ca l .i\ssociation and is a Felio \\' of the American Association o f Psrchiatrists. Doctor Greene is a ffiliated w ith Solon1on Lodge No. 20, F. and A . 1L, Jacksonville Chapter No. 12, R. A. M., Damascus Commandcry No. 2 . K T., Morocco Templ e of the 11ystic hrine. lic is chairman o f the Offi cia l Board of Riverside Christian Church, and in politics is a democrat. February 8, H)OS, he married L illia n Allen, a native of Green v ille, F l o rida. Their two c hildre n are Virginia E li za be th and Ralph Nel so n, J uni o r. H. JIL CooK, 11. D. The m e dical professi o n is for mankind , and its greatest problem is to secure hon est and faithful performance of prof es ional o bligation. whatever may be the line of professional wo1k, the physician cannot overl oo k the fact that he and his associates are a body o r organized men laboring for the common good o f humanity. Because so many o f the eminent of the world's physicians and surgeons recognize this, progress i:. conslanlly being made. The discoveries made by one are shared by all for the common good of humanity, and thus it has been that re111edies have bee n discovered fo r many o f the diseases once declared in curable. One o f the men who has added lu ster to his professi o n , and i s properl y accounted one of t h e leader s in it in Hillsborough County, is D r. ll. 11. Coo k o f Tampa, with o nicc in the C itrus Exchange Buildin g . Doctor Cook was bo rn i n Alabama, August 2 5 , 1886. a so n o f G. \\'. and .Matilda (Pale) Coo k, both of whom were nati1 • es of North Ca1olina. They arc bo th living. a nd reside a t \\Ta co , Georgia. They had fourteen c hildr<:n horn to them. nine sons and five daughters, thirteen o f w hom reached maturity a nd are s till liv ing, and of them a ll Doctor Cook is the seventh so n and eleventh c hild. (;rowing up in his native state, Doctor Coo k a ttende d i t s publi c sc h oo ls, and co mplet<:d the high choo l course at Bowd e n , Geo rgia, a ftc r w hi c h h e becam e a student o f Emory University at i\tlanta, Georgia, from which he was graduated i n r9ro, w ilh the degree of Doctor o f 1Iedicine. Following that he had eighteen months o f hospital work at Atlanta, and then, in 19r2, came to Tampa and engaged in a general practice and operated a n infirmary, the lease of w hich expired December 1. I92l. Immediately thereafter he opened the II. M. Cook Sanitarium, and is co nducting it at present in conjunction with his private practice. This is one of the well-managed institutions o f thi s part o f lhc state , and is receiving a l arge patronage. Doctor Cook is a man wel l fitted for this c la ss o f work. a n d h i s patients who come to it receive benefic i a l e ffects. Professionally he maintains membership with the llillshorough County :Medical Society, and fraternal ly he be l ongs to Tampa Lodge o. 7o8, B . P. 0. E . On June 2.=;, 19q, Doctor Coo k was unit e d in marriage with 1liss Ruth C. Houlih a n, o f Lexington. Kentucky, and they have one daughter. Ruth Murray Cook. a dear little g ir l o f four years. Doctor Coo k is a man who has eve r I ived up to the h i ghest of id eals in his profe s io n , and is now reaping the j usl rewards o f his ten years o f faithful scnice. Standing high among h i s associate . , he earnestly strives to prove worthy of the great trust reposed in his s kil l a nd a bility. a nd the s uccess w hich attends his practi c e and sanitarium proves that the co nfidence h e in spires i s well mcrilc cl. Broad in his sympathies. h e has a l w ays g iYen lib e ral l y to a id worthy c h';lriti cs . a nd his support ca n be depended upon 111 the furtherance o f those measures which he belie ves w ill work out for the ultimate good of the majority. Such men as he are a valued addition to any calling o r community. for they not _on l y accomplish much good through lhe1r o wn actions. but stimulate others to follow their exampl e and create a high standard of excellence which must be sustained to meet popular approval. ALLEN T. STUART. To the thoughtful it is not a t a ll surprising that so many of the statesmen are t h ose who have achieved distinction practicing at the bar, because the very qualificatio_ns and training which have enabled them to rise a bove their assoc iates arc the ones absolutel y necessary in order that they proper l y represent the p ublic in office. The record of A ll e n T. Stuart a o ne o f the capable and resourceful lawyers o f Tampa is such as to entitle him to the consideration of his fellow c itizens, for it

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IlISTOR Y O F FLORID 111 shows that he is a man of cdu a tion, natural ability and integrity, and o ne who has the prosperity and welfare of his c ity and district at heart. T his was recognized a nd full appreciation o f his tal ents shown in hi s e l ec ti o n to th e Gen e ral Assembly o f Florida, o n the democratic t icket, in 1920, and he i s s till se r v in g as a membe r o f its Lower House. A llen T. Stuart was born in Broome Co unty, New York September 22, 1 8 73, a so n o [ Allen C. and Elle n (Blackmer) Stuart. The father died when about se\'enty-t\\'o years o f age, but the mother s till s urvi\'es. T h y had two c hil-dren, o f whom llen T. is the younger. Growing up in his native co unty, Allen T. Stuart attended its public sc hools, and then matriculated in Co rnell University, and was graduated therefrom in r894 with the degree o f Bachelor of Philosophy, and in 1895 with that o f Bachelor of Laws. Immediately after securing his dcrrrec he was admitted t o the bar, a nd entered n a general practice a t Binghamton, New York. From 1907 until i916, h e was located a t Niagara Falls, c w York. In the ! alter yea r he came lo Florida, l ocating permanently a t Tampa, where he has s ince built up a ycry large p ractice. A lways active as a upon coming lo Tampa he entered pol1llcs, be ca me o ne of the leaders o f his party, and was its logical candidate fo r the Legislature in !92?. :Not only did he receive the full support o f hi s party, but a lso a gratifyingly large vote from the op position party, and his actions s m ce taking his sca t p ro\'c the wisdom o f the c hoice. Fraternally he maintains membership with the illasons, Odd Fellows and Knights o f Pythias, and is active in all o f these orde rs. During th e Spanis h -American war he se rv e d in Co mpan y .l\J, N inth Pennsylvania Volunteers, a nd r ose to the rank of a first lieutenant. In 1 9o r Mr. Stuart married .l\fargarcl Krauss, of BuITalo. 1 cw York. .l\lr. and Mrs. Stuart have two children: lning and H erbert. In addition to his other interests Mr. Stuart i s secretary and treasurer o f the Palm Craft o mpany, manufacturers of fine furniture; vice 1 1rcsidcnt of the G. & H . .l\[otor Car Co mpany, and owns s tock in a number o f other concerns, fo r h e has a practical way o f demonstrating his faith in the future o f Tampa, which is to invest in its enterprises. He fee ls that the beginning I . 1as sca rcely been m ade in the g r eatness o [ the city, county a nd state , and t h a t h e cannot do t oo much to a id in the wonderful work o f developing the natural rcsotffces o f thi s region. As a p1ember o f the First P1esbytcrian hurc h o f Tampa, Mr. Stuart is bearing his part in the uplift work o f his community, a nd in it, as i11 everything, he displays a n earnest sincerity that is very co nvincing. As a lawyer he i s learned, brilliant and forceful, as a c itizen he is efficient and public-spirited, and as a man he is upright, charitable and conscientious, a nd all o f these qualities he carries with him into his work as a legislator. Of his achievements in the hall s of legislation much has already been aid and writte n, for he has been the ac tive and aggressive factor in securing the passage and enactment o f numerous measures o f vast importanc and benefit to the stale, some o f which during their passage through the House met strcnuou and determined o pposition. In his support of any movement tending towards the advancement and upbuilding of the state o r community Mr. Stuart beca me o ne of the organizers and c h arter mem-bers of the K iwanis C lub of Tampa, and is now serving as v ice president o f the same. HoN. VAN C. SwEARJNGEN. Instances a re numerous among Florida's professional men of individuals who have started their careers handicapped by l ack o f financial ass i stance and have worked th e ir o wn way, unassisted, to s u ccess , and a worthy example of this class o f self-made men i s found in Van C. Swearingen, now a prominent m ember o f the Jacksonville bar. Not o nly is Mr. Swearingen one of the most ca pable members of his profession, but during his career he ha rendered exceptionally a ble ser v ice to his c i ty, county and state in positions o f public responsibility, in which his actions have served to g ain the unqualified approval and co nfidence o f his fellow c itizens. Judge Swearingen was bo rn in Nassau County, Florida, February 2 . 1 73, and is a so n of \iVillia m and Mar y Swearingen. A review of the careers o f hi s parents and other membe r s o f the family will be found in the sketch of his brother. J. T. Swearingen, which appears e l sewhere in this Yolume. The seventh so n and e leventh c hild in a family o f twelve children, Judge Swearingen has the distinction o f belonging to a 'family represented in this state s ince I8oo, in which year his rrrandfathe r, amuel Swearingen, a native of South Carolina and a soldi e r during the Indian wars, took up his residence here as a pioneer. The public schools of Nassau County furnished ] udge wearingen with his early education, a nd his intense desire fo r a professional career enabled him to overcome the obstacles represente d by a la c k o f finp.ncial backing, fo r through his o wn e fforts he earned the means with which to complete his education, and in 1899, a ftcr co mpl eting a l a w c otirse, he graduated from Mercer 1 U11ivc rsity, M aeo n, Georgia, wi.th the de<>ree o f Bachelor of Laws. At that tune he at Jackso nville, Florida, where he e ngaged in the practice o f his pro fess ion and made rapid strides therein. As his practice g rew, so grew also his reputation as a learne d, and industrious l a wyer, as well as a man o f high principles a nd marked integrity. and in r9rr h.e was e lected iudgc o f the City Court. \\Th e n l11s term o n the bench expired he was e l ec ted mayor o f Jacksonville. a nd acted in the c hief executive """acit v also for one during which he gave hi s city an excellent administration and inau<>u raterl nunwrous much-needed civic reforms. Jndgc Swearingen was e l ected attorney. general o f Florida and served in that o ffice during 1 917, 1 9 18, 19r9 'and 1920. During his incumbency o f that o ffice numerous important cases came before the attorney general's o ffice fo r trial in the h.ighcr courts and in all o f these Judge Swearingen co moo'rted himself i n a manner that entitled him to be numbered among the distinguished and eminent l cgists o f the s tate. Ile is a member o f the Duval County Bar Association, the Florida State Bar Association and the American Bar and was admitted to practice before the United States Supreme Court April 22, r918. Since l eaving the attorney general's off1c.e, in ! 92 0, ] udge Swearingen has been engaged 111 private nractice o f a corporation and general characte r at Tacksonvi l lc. where his clicntcle is large and important. He is attorney fo r the American Motors Export Company and for other large concerns. ha numerous business connections. As a fraternalist he holds membership in Ionic Lodge No. 101, F. and A . .l\f.: Florida Consistory, thirtvsecond degree, a nd .l\f orocco Temple, A . .\. . 0 .

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112 III TORY OF FLOPIDA . M. S., all of Jacksonville; the Independent Order of O dd Fellows a nd th e Knights o( Pythias. In po l itic s he is a ta11ch de m ocrat. On Ja11uary r , i&J
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J II STORY OF FLORID A 113 stockholder in the \\' ilson & Toomer Fertilizer ( ompany. 11 e is a dcnwnal, hul has m e r take n a n ac tive part i n pnlitics. J l e is alliliated with Solo1t1on Lodge .\Jo . .!O, F . and ,\. J\I., a nd is high p1icst a nd prophet of J\Jorocco Temple of t he J\l ys t i c Shrine at Jackso111 illc. ]Jc is a n elder in the First P r es byter i a n Churc h . January 26, 18g8, Mr. Baker married 1\[iss Julia Simkins, a native of Florida. They have s ix child ren : Katherine, wi fe of Franklin G. Russell, Jr.; Harriett Lou i se, wife of James R. Stockton; ] o hn D., Jr., Thompson S., 1\largarel S. and A rchiba ld J . GnEENVlLLE T. HENDER O:\' . The worth of perso nality is be ing more a nd more recogn i ze d, a nd those fortun a te eno u g h to possess this q ualit y i n a strong degree a re liab l e to be the o nes who have risen h igh in the co nfidence a nd es teem o f their fellow men. T his trait o f character ente r s into t he prosecution of every line of business, the fo llowing of all o f the professions, a nd no statesman eve r came 111to power who d id not possess it. Through a s tr.ong a nd per o nality a man makes fnends, 1t1spires co nfidence a nd creates a demand fo r what he i s se lling ,' whether it be brains, m erchandi se, rea l es tate, insurance, experience, know l e dge o f .men and a ffairs o r all o r o m e o f these comb111ed. One o f the' men who has risen to a high position al Tampa by reason of his personality , which has e nabled him to make a favorabl e impr ess ion a nd co n v i n ce eas ily and readily the public o f his hones t s incerity, is G reenville T. Henderson, o ne of the leading realtors of Hillsborough Co unty. .reenville T. Henderson was born a t Murfreesboro, Tennessee, July 5, 1872, a s on of liam Penn and Lou (Pruett) Hender son, natives o f Tennessee who a re both deceased. They we r e t he parents o'r nine c hildre n, o f wh.om T. w as t he seve nth c h ild . Grow111g up 111 his native c ity, G r ee nville T. IIenders?n attended its p ublic sc hoo l s a nd l ater U111011 U111vers1ty. For a time he was a farmer, a nd t h e n v as e mp l oy ed i n the local tax office in a c l e ri ca position fo r fourteen yea rs. In 1902 he came t o Tampa, a nd as bookkeeper for the Tampa Real E tate & Association entered upon th e work for wh•c h was so 'eminently fitted, a nd found in it h i s true vocation. In 1909 he bo u ght the an d has s ince conducted it, a nd has made it o ne o f the p.otenl factors in t h e realt y b u siness o f this regi o n . However, Mr. . Benders.on ha no t co nfined his activities to this o ne l111e. for h e has branched out and interested himself . in agri c ulturl! a nd horticulture , and is entering orange industry, having j u s t co mp l e tec ! plantmg a s eventy-acr e g r ove . and o w n s a bear!ng gr?ve ten miles out o f Tampa and a no th e r e ight miles a way from t he c ity. His residence a t 90 1 South ewport Street is a fine $40,000 home, a nd h e o wns o ther realty at Tampa, stock in a banking institution and an interest in a hardw.are house . In fac t he is o ne o f the ve ry s ubstantia l men o f Tampa a nd has made a ll his money himse lf. Frateri;ally he maintains member. hip with the Knights o f Pythias a nd the Benevolent and Pro-tective Order o f E lks. . . . In 1893 Mr. Henderson was u111ted 111 marriage w ith Leo Bivins. of Iurfrees boro, Tennessee, a nd t hey have o ne so n a nd two na m ely: Greenville T., Jr.; M r s . Brandon Hayn es o f Tampa. a nd Mrs. Henry Gidde ns, Jr. , o f Tampa. Fo1 seve n yea rs Mr. served as a member of the C ity Council, and the last yea r was its president. It is a remarkable fac t that a man co uld co me into a new territ o ry, t11le r an e 11tirely new lin e o[ business, a nd achie 1 c s uch a remarkabl e s uccess, a nd it is likely he co uld not have acco mplis hed nearly as much if it had no t been fo r the fac t that he did possess a o me.what remarkable personalit y, and f o rlunate l y e nte r e d a bu sines where he c o uld make this q ua lit y count fo r so meth ing and win him the result s to which he wa ntitlccL HARLES Z . ALLEN. Before co ming to F l orida i n 1 910 C harles Z. Alle n was a man o f t he world by trave l a nd experie nce, a nd his e nthus i as m fp r t he Florida country is all the greater fo r the fact that he has travel e d in nea rl y e very c lime o n the g lobe. J\fr. A lien has been prominent in t h e real esta te dev e l o p ment of th e Miami sec tion, a nd has his b usiness offices a nd home in Li ttl e Rive r, F l o rida. He was born in B avaria, Ge rmany, a nd fin ished h i s educalion in Luzerne., Switzerland . J-1 is t rav e l s around the wo rld we r e larg ely ac co mpl i s he d in the c apacity o f a s teams hip s teward, principally o n the s hips o f the Hamburg-America n line . Mr. Alle n has travel e d arou nd the world three times. He came to America to locate permanently about 1907, and for three yea rs was i n t he ho t e l busi n ess in New Y 0 1 k. From the r e he ca me to Miami in 1910. Since t hen he has deve l o ped se veral important s ub divisions surrounding Miam i , a nd his judgment a nd e nterpri se a re rep re se nte d in so m e o f t h e most prosperous residential a nd busi n ess proper ties in that vicinity. J\Ir. Alle n in 1920 began o perations a t t he pres ent Town of Li ttl e River, four miles n orth o f Miami, o n t h e Dixie Highway . T h e tract of land h e ac quired o n th i s h i ghway. i s now t h e o f Littl e River. He gave 1t t he n a me D 1 x1e Park, s ubdividi ng it into building l o ts . Within a co mparatively s h ort time he had disposed of t he prope rty, a nd much o f t hi s i s n o w excee d ingly va luabl e . He a l so o wns Golden Gate Park a t Littl e River, a high-class re 1dence subd1v1-s ion. In t h e spring o f 1922 Mr. Allen gave a l ease o n hi b u s iness l o t a t the corner o f Dixie H i g hway and Ever g lad es Avenu e fo r bank ing inter es ts. Soon afterward he e rected a handsome bank build i n g o n that co rner, t h e first bank in Little River, o f wh ich he i s assistant v i ce president. Mr. A llen per so nally promoted this bank, whic h ha s bee n the means o f bring ing greatly desired fa c i liti es to the littl e c it y and w hich has had a s ha r e in pro m oting its deve l o pment. Mr: A llen's b u s iness offices are in the new bank bu1ld111g at Littl e R iver and his home is i n Go ld e n Gate Park. H e is a memb e r of t h e 1\liami C hamber o f Co mmerce and o ne o f the charter members o f the M iami Realty Board. He married J\Iiss Emily Kugl e r, o f Zurich, w itz e rland wher e s h e was born a nd e d u c ated. T hey ha ve 'a son, C harles Frederick Allen, born ).[arch , 1922. 0. P. I-lILllURN o ne of the l ea ding attorneys a t Tampa, is a native of Flori da, his birth having occurred in Micanopy, March 7, 1892, a so n o f Reverend ] . P . a nd E lla (Peace) Hilburn. His fa ther has bee n active in the ministry o f the Methodist Epi copal C hurch, South, fo r more tha n forty year , and i now presiding e lder o f the Orlando District. O. P. Hilburn was educated in t he p ublic a nd

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114 HISTORY OF FLORIDA high schools of h is stale, following which he grad11atcd, i n 1910, from Southern College wi th the drgree o f J\. Jl. llaving selected law as his Ii fc's work, he entered Vandcrhill U 11iversity, graduating therefrom in 1913, w ith the dcgrcc of L L. B . , and soon thereafter began the practice o ( his profession in Tampa. J n 1916 he was in the l\lexican border troubles as second lieutenant in the Second F l orida Infantry, and was mu tercel out i n I9I7. \!\Then the United States became a participant in the war with Germany he accepted a commission as second lieutenant in the Regular Army. He was l ater promoted to first lieutenant in the E leventh lnfan t ry, Fifth Division, serving with his divis ion at the front in France until August, I9I8, when he w as transferred to the Thirty-eighth Infantry, Third Division. Mr. Hilburn was in active service in the Anoulcl and Saint Die defens i ve sectors and S t. Mihiel a nd Meuse-Argonne offensives. He was seriously wounded during the Argonne offensive, and after several m onths in the hospital was invalided home, in February, I9I9, and in Jul y of that year was p laced upon the retired l i s t of the U. S. Army, for disabil i ties received in action, and ordered hom e . He returned to Tampa and was appointed judge o f the Juvenile Court of Hillsborough County, resigning this position in November. ror9, to accept appointment as Federal prob ibi t i o n director for Florida. holding this o ffice until August, I92I, since which time he has been engaged in the pi-ivate practice of the law. In 1 9 r7 Mr. Hilburn married Miss Rcbah Roberts. and they have one child, a son. Jack. Mr. Hilb urn is a t hirty-second degree Scottish Rite l\fason, and a Noble of the Mystic Shrine. BENJAMIN L. BLACKBURN, supervisor of regis tration for Hillsborough County, is one of t he representative men of this region who are devoting their time and talents to the public service and rendering a n assistance to their fellow citizen which is worthy of commendation. Havi n g been a resident o f Tampa s ince r900. he has been associated with much o f its development both as an o fficial a n d in a private capacity. a nd few men stand as high i n popular confidence as he. The birth of Benjamin L. Blackburn occurred one mile from the state line between Florida a nd Geonria, in Jefferson County. Florida, January 28 , J852, and he is a son of Hon. E . E. B lackburn a nd grandson of Vlilliam B lackburn, who came to Flori rla in 18 :13. Hon . E. E. B lackburn was born at Edgefield. South Carol ina. in Scpt<'mber, r8o8, and died September 22. r 8 72 , aged < i'-:tv-fonr yea r s . He was a distingu ished man. as United States marshal under President B11chanan, and later held the same o ffice 11nder Pres;dent Tefferson Davis of tl1e Confcckracv. He had served in the F l orida State Assemhl v . and was one of the most important men o f Jefferson Cou n ty. His wife was ancv M cMillan. one o f the seventeen c hildren, twel ve s0m a nd five daughters, born to Arch ibald McMilla n. E . E. Blackburn a nd hi s wife had thirteen c hi ldren, ten son< a nrl three daughters, of whom Reniamin L. Blackburn is the youngest a Prl the only survivor. Reared a t Monticell o, Beniamin L. Blackburn attended its schools through the grades and ghschool conrses. and in 188g went to De Sota Co u nty, F l orida, and there was elected county assessor. which o ffice he hel d for four years. \Vhile there he became a dominant factor in the local clcmocralic party, an
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111 'TOI()' O F FLOIUD1 \ 1 1 G .\. \ ' . ..\lilam is prominent in democratic pol itics. serving as a de l ega te from Florida to the >-latio nal Convention in San Francisco in 1920, a nd during that ca mpaign was a member o f the National Finance Committee of the party. lle is a l\lcmber o f the House in Florida Legislature for 1923. He is a ffiliated with St. Johns Lodge o. 37, F. a nd A. M . , a t De Land. Florida. Consistory No. 2 o f the Scottish Rile, and in 1<)18 was potentate o f ,\lorocco Temple o f the l\lystic hrine. He is a pas t president o ( the Kiwanis C lub a nd is a past district governor for the states of Alabama a nd Florida. Uc a lso se rved in the \ 1 \Torld war a nd is a member of the -"\merican Legion. His church is the Episcopal. O n December 1,:;. 19q, l\lr. l\filam married [{hca Van Derpool, a native of Jacksonville. \\'11.1.1AM Th; w rrn. Fl rida numbers a mong i ts representative c itizens so me o f the most distin g uished a ttorneys. men w hose names a i c known all over the country, a nd o ne o f them has c l a imed Tampa fo r his place o f residence fo r so me yea rs, he be ing Vv'illia m Hunter, a ble a nd resourceful lawyer a nd p ublic-spirited c itizen, who has been ca lled upon lo hold many o ffices of lru t a nd responsibility. He was bo rn al Mound C ity, Illinois, November 4, 1857, a nd his father, \Villia m Hunter, se rved in th e wa1 be tween the North a nd the South, as a member o( t he Thirty-second Illinois Infantry, go ing into the se rvice as a ca ptain a nd rising to be a lieutenant co lonel. He a lso saw service as a seco nd lieutenant in t he 1fexican war. \Villiam Hunter, generally kn0\\'11 as Judge Hunter, attended the co mmon sc hools of l\[em phis, Tennessee, a nd then studied l aw, be ing admitted to p ractice a t the ba r of Tennessee i n 1878. U ntil 1882 he was engaged in ac tive p 1 ac ticc in that c ity, but then ca me to Florida, first locating a t Dunedin, where he remained fo r te n yea rs. He then ca me to Tampa, in 1.892, where he has s ince remained a nd w here he has built up a ve ry large and valu a ble co nnection, be ing for ma ny yea rs c losely assoc iated in practice w ith the late E. R. G unby, w ho occ upied a most e nviable position among the l a wyer a nd pub lic men o f Florida. Mr. Hunter has occu pied many high positions in co nnection with his practice. Under the administration o f l\fayor Myron E. G illett, i8g7-g8, he was ci ty attorney fo r Tampa. In i902 he was appointed ref c rcc in-bankruptcy fo r the Tampa District, a nd held the position fo r twelve yea rs. His fellow a t torneys of Tampa honored him by making him president of the Hillsborough aunty Bar Assoc iation, a nd later he was e lected president o f the Florida , tate Bar Assoc iati on, which ollice he held from i9r 7 to i919. For more than e l eve n yea rs he has bee n \'Cry acti vc in the \\or k of the American Bar Assoc iati n, a nd was fo r sev e ral yea rs the represcptati\'e to it from Florida, a nd in 1919 was e l ec ted a, a nd s till holds the office of, member from F l o rida o ( the gen e ral co uncil of the assoc iation. For the past twe l ve years J udgc n unter has been attorney a nd ge n e ral co unsel fo r the Florida Citrus Exchange and i ts a llied a nd a fliliated assoc iations. He is a member of the Kiwanis C lub , a nd belongs lo the i-.;: nights of l y lhias. In 18 2 Judge Hunter married l\{iss Dora Tenncry, an d they became the parents of four c hildren, namely: ha Della, w ho married C. II. Rusk, of Tampa, \ V illiam F., Frank T. a nd l\Icl\'ille G. \ Vi lliam F . Hunter is manager of the Hunter E lectric Co mpany, of w hich his father is president. J udgc Hunter is o n e o f the best known lawyers in this part o f the s tate, and his se rvices a re in demand by those who a ppreciate t h e weight of his influence, character and abil ity. His long ex perience, coupled with his natural a bility, keen judgment a nd knowledge o f men a nd the mot ives which lea d them in o ne direc tion o r t he o ther, make him invaluable as an a ttorney. As a c itizen he is zea lous in behalf of his c ity, county a nd s tate, a nd as a man he measures up lo the highest ideals o f American ca pability, cou rtesy a nd dignity. S uch men as he a rc a n honor to their co mmunities a nd th e ir c all ing. and all who k now him a re proud o f h i m a nd for what he has a lways s tood, the bes t and truest i n Ii fc. FRANK BROWK, the popular c l erk of the C ircuit Court of Duval Cou nty, is a representative of a n o l d and honored fa mily of this county and was bo.rn a t Jacksonville, the present Florida metropo lis. As a boy and yo uth he had fe llowship with adversity and heavy responsibilities, but in his native c ity and county he has worked his way forward, bes ides here having inviolab l e place in popular co nfidence and es teem. l\lr. Brown was bo rn a t Jacksonville o n the 2 'th of November, i869. and is a so n of N ich o l as a nd E llen (Quail ) Brown, of w hose four children two a re living. From a n a ppreciative review that appeared in the Florida Metropolis a leading Jacksonville newspaper, December '3r, 1921 , arc taken the fo llowing quotations: "Frank Brown , c l erk of the Circuit ourt of Du\'al Co unty, was born a nd reared in Jacksonville . received his education in the public c hools of his native county, a nd a t t he age o f t we l ve was fo rced lo support a widowed m other a nd younger s ister. Ile secured employment in the foundry and machine ho ps of T. Murphy, a nd passed through all the hards hips that co uld come lo a boy charged a t that age with the respon s ibility of caring for loved o nes. Anxious to secure an e ducation, intensely interested in pub lic affa irs, reading t he newspapers and studying t he problems of government, he was e nabled through t he friendship and a id of Co lonel J . ]. Daniel, w ith t he help of 1Irs. ]\[. 'N. Shepard, p rincipal of t he Brooklyn a nd River ide sc hoo l , a nd o ( Professor Charles Dod, to continue his s tudies at night a nd become fitted fo r the se rious a ffairs of life. By hard work and constant attent ion lo duty he rose rapidly i n the estee m of his e mployer, and finally was made secretary and treasurer of the T. l\Iurphy Iron \ Vo rks, with w hich he was con nected nearly t wenty-nine ye ars. "In 1901 l\Ir. Brown was e lected to the Cit Co uncil, from the Third \\' arc\, and was re e l ec ted fo r s ix s uccessive terms. serving as presi de nt of the co uncil. ] l e retired from the se r v ice o( t he l\Iurphy l ro n v\'orks a nd resigned from' the Co uncil lo ass ume t he d uties, in 1913, o ( c l erk o f the ircuit Co urt, w which position he has s ince bee n twice reelected." The o riginal e l ec tion of l\lr. Brown lo his pr<.'scnt office occurre d o n the 5 th of No, • c mb e r . I
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llG lllSTORY O F FLORIDA i11 Jack!>o11villc a11d who is a daughter of the late Charles \'\'. a11d Charl otte C. Hobbs. Of t he >ix children born lo .lllr. and .lllrs. Brown four arc living: Frank \Vinfield, who is, in 1922, a member o f the City Council of Jacksonville, married Miss Helen Taylor, and they ha,c o ne daughter, Hel e n L. T. .lllurphy Brown, the scco11d so n, i serving under his father as clepul) clerk of the Circuit Court. Robert Atkisson is a student in the h igh sc hool, and Dorothy Lee, youngest of the children, is attending t he grammar sc hool in her home ci ty. CnARLES 11ERIAN CooPrn was born in J\ the11s, Georgia, January 16, 1856, be ing the so11 o i Charle' Philip Coope r and llessc Mildred Jackso n Coope r. His ancestors settled in early times in Georgia, South Carolina and Virginia. a11d the family has bee n long established in F l o rida a nd prominent in Florida a ffairs. llis great-grandfather, Col. John Cooper, was of that portion o f Liberty County, Ceorgia, which be came Mcintosh County, and was a distinguished ol'li cc r o f the A m erican Revolution, having se n e d throughout t he war as Captain, Major and Licu le11ant-Col o nel o f Geo ro-ia Troops, and a number of his exploits are mentioned i n the histories of Geo r g ia. His maternal great-grandfather, James Jackson, a l so erved with d istinction, as 11ajor and Liuetenant-Colonel of ( ; eorgia troops i11 the Revol utionary war, and as c;Ol ernor of Georga, a member of the United S ta :.cs House of Reprcse 11tatives in the Fir t Co ng 1Tss and as United Stales Senator from Georgia. clyi11g at a co m parativel y early age whil e i11 the United State, Se11ale. The maternal g ra11clmother of Charle. , :'II. Cooper was Mildred Lewi Cobb, who was of Virginia ancestry a nd related to George \\'ash i11gton. The two s o11s of ol. John Coo per, 11ame l y. Charles .111. Cooper, the first, and James C. Cooper, removed irom McI11tosh Co u11tr. Georgia, to F l orida, whi l e it was s till a Ter ritory. James G. Cooper settl ed in i assau Co unty, and became a member of the territorial Council, sened w ith distinction as Major o f F l orida troops in the first Seminole Indian war. and 11as a member o f the State Senate and of t he Secession Co nvention. Ile afterwards rnoved lo J\I a n alee County. His son, Francis i\1. Cooper, was State Senator from DeSoto County. Charles :\I . Coo per, the elder, first acquired and ;,cttkd o n a p lantation o n the Suwannee River, but soon removed to Jacksonville, where he resided many years, being a leading c itizen, a nd for some years Postmaster of that c ity. His son, Charle Philip Cooper, the father of the present Charles 1.l. Coo per, as above mentioned, was one of the leading lawyer of Florida, and resided i n Jacks nvi l lc for many years. From 1857 to i86r he wa General Agent of the United Slates Treasury Deparlrnent, having supenision of custorns from orth Carolina to ew 1Iexico. \Vhen t he war between the States began, he was empl oye d by the Government of the onfederate States to assist i n the organization o f its Treasury Depa r tment. In 1866 he rcpre cnted Duval County in the Legisl ature. In 1884 he was a member of the Democratic onvention that first nominated Grover C leve land fo r the Presidency. Nearly all his active l ife, however, wa devoted lo the prac t ice of his profc s ion, a11d it was as a lawyer that he was c hiefly known and identified wi th the history of Florida. Another son of the first Charl es M. Cooper was Merian R. Cooper, who entered the Confederate sen ice at the age of sixteen years a a private in the econd Florida Infantry, and after being wounded in Virginia a nd discharged, e n listed in the ecoud F l orida Cavalry. He was promoted and commis ioned as Lieutenant for unusual gallantry a t t h e Battl e of Olustee, and was later commissioned Captain in the Confederate J\rmy. After the war he was for many years County Judge of t. J ohn County, F l orida. Charl es P h i lip Cooper left two so ns, C h arles i\l erian Cooper and John Cobb Cooper, bo th of whom reside in Jacksonville, l ' lorida. John C. Cooper is a leading lawyer o f the Stale, whose prominence and a bility in J1is profession has been l ong and uni versally recog-11izcd. He i Chairman of the Board o f the Florida Branch o f The Federal Reserve Bank, localed al Jacksonville, and is a Director i n other l;trge corporations. Charles 11. Cooper a lso is a lawyer. He was admitted lo tJ1e bar in 1877. In 188o he was mar ried lo .Rosa Leonardi. In 1881 he was a member of the Tlouse of Representatives of the F l o rida Legislature from St. Johns County, and in 188.J wa tale Senator from that County. In 1 88.J he wa appointed Attorney General o f the State by Governor Perry, and served for four years. Jn 1 889 he was appointed one of a Co m m iss ion of three which rev i se d the Statutes of the Stat e of F lo r ida, w hich Revised Statutes went into e ffect in 18g2. Jn 18g2 he was e l ec ted a Representative in the Congrcs of the United States from the ccond Congressional District of F l o rida, and was ree lected i n i&J .j, a nd served until March, 1897. ince that t ime he ha continued to reside in Jacksonville, and to practice his profes i o n. (Al':SAR FRANC! IRsCII. E fficiency is the keynote of s ucce along every line. It is the symbo l , the co-re l ated s ign and working feature of the marvelou accomplishme:1ts of every age and o( a ll people . Without it today c ivilizati o n would never have passed beyond the stage o f the cave man. one of the l e arne d p r ofessions \\ ould have been developed from the faint beg in11ing of a people striving for mental advancement, nor would the a ir, the earth, the water a n d e1 e n the heavens, above all, be bound together to produce power and place for each generati on. 1 1 a If-way methods cannot succeed in anythin g . To raise anything above the l o w level of mediocrity requires s kille d and carefully t r a ined knowl edge and the power to use this to the highe l degree, and to take advantage of new invention s and demands. In nothing i s this truer than in the marvelous development o f the a utomobile indu try in all of its various b r a nches. The man in this immense industry without e fficiency is a dead letter; his progress is measur ed by his lack of t his important qual ity, and his failure is a foregone conclusion from the beginning. It is equally true that tho e w h o do posse s it forge rapidly to the front, and t h is qual ity is mo t often to be found among the young and enthusiastic. Among those a t Tampa who have made a name for themsel ves i n th is line of business is aesar Francis I r sch, president of the Tampa Auto Dealers' Association and one of the foremost dea l e1s i n automobiles and accessorirs in Hillsborough County. 1fr. Trsch was born al Jcr ey C ity, c w December J.j, i8911, a so n o f Francis and Hen riella (Burge. s) Irsch, the former of whom was horn in the City of ew York and the !alter in , wilzerland. \V'hen he was about twelve years o ld Caesar F. I rsch was brought to Florida by his parents. who a l that l ime left N c w York C ity,

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11 lSTOlZ Y O F F L RlDA 117 11 hnc tlwy had hc,11 rc,idi11g, a11d took up thci1 pcr111a11e11t h11111L' at Tampa. I t \\'as i11 the cxnlle11t sc hools o i Tampa that y11ung l rsc h gained a thorough grounding in the fundamc11tals of an education, he here co rnpleting the studies hegu11 i11 New York C ity. J l e co111plcted the highsc hool course, and thc11, w ith the co nfidence a11d determination of youth, we n t into busi11ess for himself, in 1916, and in spite o f the depression i n husi11ess d urino-the war period, h as succeeded beyo nd the must hopeful expectations. I le is agent i n h is district for the Cadillac cars a11d hi s volume of business shows a b ig increase annual lv . O n June 27, 1912, Mr. Irsch was united i n marriage w ith E llen R. Alle n, a daughter o f \\' . C . . i\llcn, of Tampa, and they have two c hil dren, namely: E llen and 1 \I a ry L. 1\lr. l rsch is a democrat, and loyal tu party affiliations. One of the ac tive men of his c ity, 11 r. J rsch is a lways to be found in the front ranks o f progress, and was one of the prime movers in e ffecting the o rganizatio11 of the auto dealers into their present associat'o11, a11d is now serving it as president. /\ great booster for ''Creater Tampa," l\11 r. lrsc h is one w ho docs something more than enthuse, he wo rks. a nd makes others do lik e wise, and the results arc to be see n in many directions. l.Ie be lieves in the future o f t his part o f Florida, and is w illing to do en•rything within his power to further advance its interests, to develop its natural resources, and to add to its improvements. STAFFOR!l CALDWELL has made for himself se cure vantage ground as o ne o f the able a nd representative members o f the bar o f his native state, and he is now a prominent figure in the executive affa irs of the law department o f the great Flagler system in Florida, his o ffice being that of general attorney. :\[r. Caldwell was born at Ja. per, Hamilton Co unty. F l orida, o n the 13th of October. 1887. and is a so n o f and Mary Jennie ( oolsby) Caldwell. the former of whom was born at Madison, Madison County, t his state, November 21. 18-t6. an d the l atter of whom was born and reared in IIamilt0n County. O f the famih of twelve children four died in infancy. a nd all of the others arc still living with the exception of Frank Chandoin, who died a t the age o f thirty-six years, the s ubj c t of thi. sketch having been the e leventh in order o f birth. The public schools of his native c unly aff o rdecl :Hr. Caldwell his ea r I v education, and in H)09 he g r aduated from the law departmen t of historic o ld V\Tashington a nd Lee Universitr. Lexington. V irginia, f r m which he received his degree o f Bachelor o f Laws, also being awarded w hile there the "'ashinglon Society ).f e dal for Oratory. Tn the practice of his professi n Mr. Caldwell became iunior nwmbcr o f th e law firm of Tlornc & Caldwell a t judicial center of H amilton Countv. and this a l liance continued until his partner, Mallory F. Horne, was e l ected to the bench of the Circuit Court o f the Third Tudicial ircuit. In H)T2 11"1 . a ld well was made the democratic nominee for the o ffice of states attorney of the Third Judicial Circuit of Florida. a nd was accordingly a pJJointed to this o ffice in r9r :i by the governor of the state. IT e was renominated in r916, w ith incidental reappointment in the following year bv Governor Catts, and he retained the offic.e until February T, 1921, when he re. igned a nd accepted that o f assistant general solicitor for the Florida East oast Railway and nthcr Flagler interests. On the Isl of the following Octnhe1 he was advanced to the post of gen-e 1 a! attorney for the Flagler i11tcrests, the important ofliLc of wh ich he is now the incumbent. In Orient Lodge No. 70, F. and A. 11., at Jasper, J\I r. Cald\\'cll was raised to the degree of J\lastcr J\lason, later he \\'as dimittcd by this lodge and became a ftiliated w ith Barrett Lodge No. -t3, a t Live O ak, o f which he i s a past master, a nd final l y h e received the d imit that was fo l l owed by his affil iation w i th Temple Lodge No. 2 3 at Jacksonville. He is a pas t grand orator of the Masonic grand lodge of Florida, and at the t ime 0 f this writing, in 1922, he is grand master o f the Second Veil in the Florida Grand hapter of Royal Arch Masons, his basic capitular affilia tion being w ith Live Oak Chapter o. 25. ] le is affiliated a lso with Live Oak Commanderi• o. 10, Knights Templar, and with Morocco Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Jacksonville. At Macon, Geo rgia, o n the 25th o f August, was so l emnized the marriage of 1ft-. Caldwell and Tempie Marie Davis, a native o f o nyers, Georgia, and 1.he one child of this uni o n a daughter, Mary Louise. J. \V. SPIVEY. On the role _of pioneers of Dade County the name J. VI/. occ upies a clcservedly prominent place. He ca me h e re be fo re the railroad reached 1liami. and helped develop during periods o f adversity and has bee n a leader in permanent development work i n recent years in the communities of Little River and Lemon C ity. A t o n e time he was one of the principal growers o f citrus fruit a nd vege tables. He is now president of t he Flank o f Little River. 1[r. S pivey was horn in ::-Jancemond Co unty. Viro-inia in t867. He was reared o n a fa rn1, a nd" as : 1 yo u n g man left Virginia and went to the Pacific Co ast. For so me years he was co nw ith farming and cattle ranching in a li fornia and Arizona. Beginning as a common hand, he was promoted to ranch f rcman .. I t was in 1895 that he came to Dacie o unly in South Florida. It was i n 1896 that the Florida East Coas t Railway reached 1liami. He was therefore a pioneer in a wilderness country. The first building on the bay a t Lemon C ity was erected by him. The lumber was brought o n t he schooner Phoenix, Captain Bea rd, from Jacksonville, and there being no clock the lumber was dunipcd in the bay and floated to lite land, and then carried to the place where 1.hc b uil di n g was e r ec ted. It was a two-story structure th e first floor being used as a s t o r e by 1f r. Spi;cy. while he lived in the upper sto ry. T his mercantile b usiness was continued there for nea r ly four years. :Hr. S pivey in 1898 bought land about three miles north, at what is now Little River. Here he started a n orange grove, and occ upied t he first house that was built o n the wes t s ide o f the rail road. A little later he undertook the development of a truck farm o n a portion of the land. For years he was accounted o ne o f the l a r ges t and most s uccessful truck farmers in that sec tion. Jn lat r yea r s truck farming was discontinued, though h e s till maintains a citrus g rove, known as Eureka G rove, o n e o f the h i ghly developed and attractive p l aces in that l oca l i ty. \i\lhat was formerly his truck farm, extending from the Dixie Highway o n the wes t to Little River on the eas t, with a frontage of 335 fee t on Dixie Highway, subdivided into residence Jots, is known as Spivey's subdi Y ision and is being improved with w ide and modern streets and a community park on Little

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J I HISTORY O F FLORIDA River for the be nefit o f the home owners of the s ub divi s ion. T h i s con stitutes o ne o f the most desirabl e a nd a ttractive re idc nti a l e ctions of t h e L ittl e R i ve r i n Miami regio n . C\'nlral .\,cnuc, running west from Dixie Highway to Little Riv e r, lie s be tw ee n this s ubdivi s ion and Eur eka Grove. T h e entire property, embracing e ighte e n acre s , is in the rap idl y-growin g tow n o f Littl e River. He a l so own s valuabl e b u s iness property i n t he bus ines s center of t he t ow n fronting both o n Dix ie Highway and Evergl a de AYenue. A n other propert y o wned b y him is twenty-five ac r es in the wes t part of the town and o n Ever g lad e A venu e. Mr. Spivey is also a property o wner at Lemon C i ty. Hi real es tate pos css ions all to ld in the region north of Miami and adjacent to th e great Dixie Highway approximat e a very s ubstantial fortune. Of this goo d fortune he is s t rictly dese r v in g, s ince he refu e d to lo c i n _ of occasional a dve r s ity, and throu g h h i s 111d1v1dual e ffort ha contribut e d to so me of th e per manent deve lopm e nt s that makes t hi s l o c a lity prosperous beyond a ny pos ible e ve nt o f t h e future. Mr. Spiv e y was o ne of the o rganize r s a nd be ca m e president o f the first bank o f t h e town Bank o f Littl e R i ve r, wh i c h bega n busincs' 1 n Octo be r, 1922. The bank home is a new b uildin g at the corner of Dixie H i ghway a nd Everglade Avenue. Mr. Spivey married 1li;;s Annie 11atthews of C hicago. Their three sons a rc Barney Cec i l 'and Ollie. ' GooLD TAYLOR BUTLER. It is difficu lt fo r a n outs id e r to appreciate the work a ccomplis hed by o n e o f th?se men who arc essentially an outcome of twent1e:th century progressiveness t h e c i vil e_ngineers; f_or t he public generally has 'no realiza t i on o f t h e i mp ortan ce o f t h e work of t hose w ho labor _for the s ervice o f mankind in this s pecia l d irecti on. No man ca n enter upon this important field o f w ith ut a careful a nd co mp l e te preparati o n 1f he expect to s ucceed. The history o f St. Augustine's ach i eve ments as to e no-ineeri1w s hows that this c ity has bee n t he home o f ma ster minds o_f the profcs ion, among whom o n e who takes important rank is Goo ld Tayl o r B utl e r. Mr. Butle r was born at Tarrytown, New Yo rk, June 22, 1857, a so n of John and Sarah A. (Wil son) Butler. His grandpare n t s o n his mother's side we r e John and Sarah A. 'Vil so n who came fro m Edinburg, Scotl a nd , a nd at New York City at an early date. On the paternal s ide hi s great-gr eat-grandfather was Gen. Lewis Butler . . of Gen . George Washington's army, w hi c h e ntitles M r. Butl e r to membe r s hip in the Order o f t h e C incinn a ti and the Sons o f the merican Rev o luti on. John Butl e r was bo rn in e w York C ity. in r8r6, a nd was o ne of t he p r ominent rail road men o f hi. day, being o ne of the organizer s o f t h e Belt Railway o f New York C ity . o f w hich he was president up to the time o f his death, o w nin g fifty-three per c nt of the road' stock During the Civi l war h e was s pecial commissioner from the Uni ted States to South A m e r i ca . a nd included a m ong hi s intimate friend s Pres i dent Linc o ln, Ge n e r a l Grant and Thurlow 'V eed. the noted American journalist. Mr. B utl e r was al. o port warden of the port o f New York fo r a numbe r of y ea r s and a prominent and i nflu e n t ial re publican o f his day. He d i e d in 1868. at lh e age of fifty-two years. Mrs. B utl e r was born i n G r ee nw i c h Villa ge. now a part o f New York City , i n 1821, and died in 1870. She and her hushand we re the parent o f two o ns and lwn daughters , o f whom three childre n arc livin g . The younge,l o f h i s pa r e n t s' children, Goo .ld Ta) l o r Butler, recci,• ccl his ea r l y trainin g i n pub lic a nd Jlr i va tc school s of I \'W York, and was t h\'11 srnl lo the Pen n syh a n i a 1 1 ilitar y Academy. now Pennsyl vania Military 'olle ge. H e then purs u e d a course in c i v i l engine ering a l e g l er's Academ y , from w hich h e was graduated in r876. Prior to t hi , in 1872, he had v i s it e d F lorid a for a short tay, a nd in 1878 re tu med lo th i s s late. which h as s ince been his home. H e ha carrie d o n h i s profession w ith out interruption, but al t imes h as a l so engaged in orange growing, sawmi llin g and the lumbe r b u s iness at Jack so nvill e ull to r89<.q. 1ft-. Butl e r surveyed the o ld G1ce n ovc Springs & Melrose Railway in l r, a nd was the a . s istant engineer i n building a part o f the Jack so nville & Tampa Key west Railway. now i n c lud e d in the Atlantic oast Line sy tern. H e a l so was identified w ith t h e Atl a ntic & V\T es t e rn Railway a nd t h e Atl a nti c Coas t & Indian Ri ve r Railwa y , n o w inc luded in t h e Flagle r sys te m . On February 6. 18\)8, he was engaged hy ).fr. F lagl e r a chief engin ee r of the Florida Fast Coa. t H o t e l System, and r etained that p osit i o n until r9r2, when h e r es i gned and o pe n e d an office at St. Augustine for the ge ne ral p ractice o f h i s profes ion. Since th e n he has been county engineer fo r t. Johns County fo r four years, a nd a t this t ime is c h i e f engineer in the building o f the city sewers o f St. Augu s tine. He i s lik ewis e consulting engineer o f E. L. Barnett. Inc .. o f e w York C ity, and v i ce p r e ident o f t h e Fountain o f Youth Hotel Co mpa ny, cap itali ze d al $ T5,ooo,ooo. Mr. B utl e r is a me mb e r o f the .!\ merican Associat io n o f Engineers and th e F l o1ida Engi n eering Society. In po litic s he main t ain a n independent altitude. His fraternal , socia l and civ ic co nnection a r e numerous. On Jul y 22, 1885. Mr. Butler married Miss H a ttie E. Rewey, who was horn in Utica, e w Yo rk. and to this union t h ere has been born one daughte1, Mary Rewey. Mrs. B utl e r is a direct clesce nclant of Capt. Zacharia Town e nd . who commanded one o f Commodor e Perry ' battl e s hips at the Battl e o f Lake Erie, and he and her daughter are member of t h e ociety o f Co l onial Dames a nd the Daughters o f the American l
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IHSTOH. 'l O F FLORlDA 119 when his father died, i n 1 862 . Subsequently he took up the study of medicine, graduated from St. Louis .Medical College in i874, and in i876 removed from St. Louis to Crescent ity, Florida. lle soo n h a d a ver y s u ccessful practice, and i n J 882 removed to the l arger c it y o f St. Augustine. l l c bought two tracts of land, comprising about iorty acres, in t h e north part o f that c ity, and the management of this property and his other a ffairs soon imol ve d his time a lmost to the exclusion of his professional work. He platted much of the l and and sold it as the Garnett subdi\'ision. J Jc a l so de\• e l oped a business property al Bridge and \Vashington stree ts. H e has been interested in se\'er a l banking and real estate co r po r ations in Florida and e l sewhere. His home p lace includes the Garnett Grove, o n e of the most interesting p laces in this section of Florida and o n e that has been v i s ited by thousands o f t ouris ts. One feature o f the g ro\'e is a magnificent li ve oak, said lo be over 500 years o ld . Dr. H .. B. Garnett for many years had the only orange grove in this section in t h e vicinity of St. Augustine. H e has about 400 orange tree , m a n y grape fruit trees, and a l so kumqua ts. About twenty years ago he planted a number o [ pecan t r ees, and has between 130 and qo o f these trees in bearin" condition. The crop he sold in 1922 a m o unt e d to over 4,000 pounds of pecans. His comme r c i a l interests, his real estate devel opment. his l o n g experience in Florida and hi s interesting and genial personality make R B. Garnett easily one of the most conspicuous c iti zens o f St. Augustine. O n December 3, i 87 4, h e married ,\lary Josephine 1litchell, who was born in S t. Louis i n 1854. Her parents were natives of Kentucky. R. B. Garnett and wife had two children: Doctor Robert S. and Catherine Estelle The daughter i;; the wi [e of J. J. Murphy. Doctor Robert S . Garnett was born a t Crescent C ity, .Florida, April 14, 1877, but s ince h e was about Vive years of age has lived a t S t. Augustine. Ile was educated in Spring Hill College at 1 l obilc, Alabama, w ith the class of l8g8, and later e ntered the medical department o [ GeorgeLown University a t vVashington, D. ., where h e graduated i n 1903. Doctor Garnett a[ter gradu ating in medicine r emoved to Tacoma, Washington, and se r ve d as house physician and accouc h eur o f St. Joseph's Hospita l in that cily from July 1, r 90 3. until July 1 , r904. Ile then conducted a private practice in v\Tashington until J 912, when he returned to S t. Augustine. BC'sides his extensive general practice h e has served as a member of th e staff of the F lagl e r Hospital and the Florida East Coast Railway H os pital. He is a member o f the St. J ohns County, the Florida State a n d American 1Jcdical associations, a11d i s a fourth degree Knight o ( Columbus . May 12, 1908. h e married Elizabeth McNerthney. She is a nati, e of \\Tisconsin. Their four .:hildren arc Philip, Mary, Ruben and Robert. 0BE PrnRCE Goo1w was e lected clerk of the Circuit Court of S t. Johns County in 1916. During s i x years pre , ious to that h e h a d been a judge of the Municipal Court at St. A u g u s tine. For more than a decade h e has discerned t h e actions a nd 1n1rposcs o f men. a nd it i s generally recogn i ze d by his associ ates that few men co nn ec ted w ith the courts are better i n formed as lo human nature. \Vith a ll his years of experience with the delinquent element of human society. w hile it has sharpened his ins i ght o f th e faults and g uile n f mankind. he has p tTscn • etl a n d constantly manifests a kindliness and sympathy in his deal-ings that make him e>teemed a11d respected. His unfailing common sense saves him from the pedantry ot o flicial positi o n, and having been a c lose a n d thorough student unde r th e impetus of hi s own d e t ermination, h e has become fully and practically equipped to meet a ny e m e rgenc y within t he scope of h i s oHice. Judge Goode was born at Shellman, Georgia, April q, i 881, and is a so n of Thomas Sidney a nd Loni e (Pierce) Goo de. Thomas Sidney Goode was born in Virginia, in 1830, but as a lad was taken by his parents to Georgia, where h e was g i ve n a public school education. H e began his career as a farmer, and gradually devel oped into a cotton warehouse owner. Through indus try a nd good management made a s u ccess o[ hi s business a ffairs and was accounted o n e of the well-to-do men of his community a t t he time o f h is death in 1896, w h e n he was s i xty-six years o f age. H e was a democrat i n hi s political v iews, but never ca r e d for public o ffice . His fraternal afJil iation was w i th the Masons, and his religious faith, that of the Presbyterian Churc h, to which belonged also 1Irs. Goode, who was born in Geo r gia, in 1830, and died in th a t state in l88g. They wer e the parents o f three so ns and three daughters, of whom o ne, James Guerry, died in r908, a t the age of thirty years. O be Pierce Goode was th e youngest o f hi s parents' children a n d received hi s education in the p ublic schools of Georgia. When fifteen year s o f age he put aside his studies and came to Florida, where, at St. Augustine, he l earned the trade of c igar m aker. H e followed this vocati o n for some years before being promoted to the post of foreman in a c i gar factory, and late r left this position to become id e ntified w i t h the Alcazar l l o tel, a concern w ith which he remained for six yea1s. lfe was thus e n gaged when, in 19II, h e was e l ected judge of the Municipal Court o f St. A u gustine, and was retained i n that capacity for three terms. I n 1916, after a n excellent record as a judge. he was e l ected clerk of the C ircui t Court of S t. Johns County, and his first fouryear term having proven satisfactory in ever y '' ay, in 1920 he was reelected to the sam e oHice, in which he is now serving. Mr. Goode is a ca pable, courteous and conscientious public oHic ial, and o n e who has the co nfid e n ce and es t ee m of all w ho have b u siness in the court. He i s a past chancellor of St. Augustine Lodge No. 23, i..: . P.: a past master of Ashier L odge No. 98, F. and A. M.; exalt e d ruler o f St. Augustine Lodge No. 829. B. P. 0. E.; past dictator of St. Augustine Lodge No. 498 , L. 0. 0. M., and a past p r esident o [ St. Augustine Lodge, F. 0. E. Formerly a n athlete, Mr. Goode takes a g r ea t in lerC'st i n all forms of manly pastimes, particularlv th n ational game, a n d at present i president of t h e St. Augustine Baseball C lub. During th e \\'o riel war he was chairman o f the home se r v ice r e lief committee of the American Red Cross and general chairman of the S t. Johns County Salvation Army Committee, and a t present i s v ice p r eside n t o f t he St. A u gustine Historical Society. J n politics he is a democrat. O n October q, 1903, Mr. Goode was united in marriage w i t h ). I iss Estelle Carlotta San c hez, who was born at St. , \ u g u sti11e, and to this union there have been ho rn three so ns and two d a u ghters: \\' i lli a m Guerry, Kathryn Ione, \Vinna Louise, Pierce and Obc Byng. E. C. ROBERTS. O n e o f the finest if not the finest citrus groves i n Florida i s the s i x ty-acre plantation of grape fruit, orange. and avocados

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120 IIISTOR Y OF FLOR IDA southwest of Larkins i n Dade County owned by E. C. Roberts. M r. Roberts is a native of Florida, had some experience i n growing citrus fruit as a boy, but for ove r twenty yea r s was a resident of the frozen north under the midnight s un, w he r e he endured the hardships that ea rned every dollar of the comfortable fortune he brought out of the go ld fie lds of A laska. :\Ir. Roberts was bo rn a t Lake Ci ty, Col umbia Co unty, August 16, 1872, so n of B. S. and Ada (Payne) Roberts. His parents were a lso born in Florid a a nd arc n ow deceased. 1Ir. Robe rts was reared a nd ed ucated i n Florida, and a t the age of twenty his adventuresome spirit led h im to lea, e home a nd go to Cal ifornia. He spent three yea rs in t h e m inin g region in the northern part o f that s tate, a nd in 1897 joined t h e gold rush to laska. He went by way of Skagway, where he was introduced to some of t he famous char acte rs who made the w ild history of that co m munity, and from there he went on to Dawo n C ity at t he time o f t he K londike s trike. He was in the K l o ndike about a yea r, and during the Koyuk excitement, i n 1898, went clown the Y ukon and fo r a number of mo nths p rospected a l o ng the tributaries of that river an d for three months of that time was o n t he headwaters of Osina River in the w ild a lone. He finally reached Nome practically pe nniless. T he tide of fortune turned fo r him around 2\o mc , a nd he worked and acquired several va luable properties a nd fo r a time did mining o n a large sca le, o per ating dredge fo r the recovery of gold from t he Behring Sea. It was his spec ial good fortune w hile a t o mc to find his wife. l\Ir. Roberts s till ow ns property in N o mc. \\'hil c t h e re he m e t Miss Pauline Louise \\'idmann , whose na me w ill go down i n history as t he first white woman at Nome. S he was born i n Germany, wa reared in St. Louis, a nd lived for a t ime a t San Francisco. She was t hen attracted to Alaska after t he discovery of gold in that co untry, and reached Nome i n ] une, 1899. . . Roberts is a sister of Frederick \\' idmann, a d i stinguished a rchitect of St. Louis. :\Ir. a nd :\ I rs . .Roberts were married in 1902 at Co u n cil C ity, about seve nt y-five miles above Nome. T hey bought a n o ld homestead of i6o ac res t here, a nd Ji, c d near Kucamapa llot Springs. \\' hile l\lr. Robert co ntinued his mining operations he a lso did so me practica l farming in A l as ka, s ince it was possible l o grow vege table a nd other crops dur ing the th ree months o f continuous s unshine. A t the close of t he sea on, i n September, 1918, :\lr. a nd l\frs. Roberts came ou t of A laska, s pendi n g so me time a t Seattle a nd in Cali [ornia, a n d in November of that yea r t hey arrived in Dade Co unty, F l o rida, a nd located on the 100 ac res o f land which l\Ir. Roberts had purchased about 1915. This land is localed a mile south west of Larki ns, a nd some of t he ea rlier p l a nt i n gs of grapefruit a nd other fruits ha, e reac hed t he bearing stage, so that J\Ir. Roberts is growing c itrus fruit on a commercial scale. He ha s a l arge tract of grapefruit, a bout twenly-sc,en acres altogether, so me sixtee n acres of oranges, a11d r 1 f teen ac res of avoca dos. O n a somewhat smaller sca le he has a lso been a tomato grower. This property represents a large i ll\ eslment, re q uires a large o rganization lo handle the trees a nd t h e fruit, and i t is sca rcely beyo nd the mark lo say t ha t it is o ne of t h e largest as well as f1nc"t citrus grove properties owned by an i ndi v idua l i n South Florida. On plans drawn by M rs. Roberts' brother, F red crick \\' idmann, o ne of the finest country homes in Dacie Co unty is u nd e r co n truction by Mr. a nd 1ll rs. Roberts, a home cos ti n g upwards o f $ 40,000 a nd containing every mod rn co nvenience a nd a ppointment. The structural m ateri a l i nati1 e cora l rock. ll. B1.A1xc: PL\cou;: cit1 jud<>e of \\' es t Tampa secretary a nd o f the \\'est Tampa ilrary Hoard, member of the School Board, and a lawyer o f distincti on, is unquestionabl y o n e o f t he. leading men o.f Hill sborou g h County, a nd o ne entitled lo the highest respect fro m his fello w c itizens. Ile was born a t Rensselaer Indiana February 4, 1892, a son of Col. E . a nci (York) Peacock, natin:s of Indian a a nd O hi o respectively. Co l o ne l Peacock died in Janua1y'. 1921, the moth e r having pas eel away in 1910. T he) were the parents of five c hildre n of whom Judge Peacock is t he younge t. ' Crowing up in h is native s tate, ] uclg<;! Peacock was educated 111 the grade a nd h i gh-school courses of Jasper Co unty, fo l lowi n g wh i c h he too k a co llegiate course, in w hi c h he wa graduated Ile t hen matricufated at Southern Colleae a nd later graduated i n law a t J o hn B. Stets';, , ; U11i1 ersity,. De Land, F l o rida, a nd was admitte d lo the ba r m ] unc, 19IS. T he a me year he was ad millccl to practice in the Federal Co urts, a nd commenced the practice of law in Tampa, where he has s111ce been engaged in t h e general practice of his profe s ion with the excep ti o n o f hi s pe riod of military se rvice. He wa a justice of t he peace of the Twenty-fifth District and c itv judge of Tampa, a nd was so until he en listed for se rvice during t h e \V o r ld war, in J unc, r918. Sent to Camp J ack o n a a private, by_ arrangement he was transferred as c h ief petty officer lo the navy, in w hich he remain e d until h e received his honorabl e discharge in Janu a ry, 191<). a t Key \V est, Florida, a nd returned to Tamp<1. Judge Peacock is now sc n ing as judge o ( t h e C ity Court of \Ves t Tampa, and i s a lso g iving attention to his l arge private practice in a ll the courts. S ince casting his first vole Judge Peacock has been a democrat, a nd ha bee n ve r y ac t i ve in party matters, being now a m ember o f t h e Hills borough County Democratic Executiv e 0111-mittec. In all of the campaigns he i s o ne of the effec tive public speakers i n behalf o f the d iff erent candidates. He is a :Mason a nd Kni ght o f Pythias, and i a c h a r ter m e mb e r o ( the K iwani s C lub, a nd president of the \V es t Ta1npa Carnegie Library Board. ] udge Peacock possesses the i uclicial m ind, and his decisions are clear-cut, direct and to t he point, a nd free from all u se l ess ve rb iage a nd pedanti c s h o w of lea rning. l l c h as no desire to attempt to show for th the vol uminous extent of his readi n g a nd learning upon t he case in hand. It might be said that it is somewhat unusual for o ne who is so good a trial l awyer to possess lo s uch marked degree the CJ\ 1 a lities of mental a nd moral tcadin css and stamina w hich go to make a good judge, and therefore his s uccess in his present o ffice is all the more gratifying to his numerous supporters a nd admirers, who fee l th<1t the future h o ld s i n store further honors for him o n t h e bench. Hl'S DnEw, ] H., I. D., member of the medica l profession a t Jacksonvill e , loved a nd honor cl for his many se rvices to and in the prof essi n a nd as a c itizen, has practiced t h ere fo r over fifty year . Ile is a na l ive of Richmond, Virginia. born December 3, i846, son of olumbus and Marietta

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JHSTOR Y O F FLORIDA 121 Hume (Robertson) Drew. His father was o ne of t he co n picuous c itizens of Florida. Oldest so n o f his parents, Dr. Columbus Drew graduated in Medicine from Washingto11 University at Baltimore, Maryl a nd, w ith the class o f i86g . Ile located for practi ce a t J ac ksonvillc. In 1879 he received t he a d eundem degree from the U ni1 ersity of New York. Doctor Drew has lived up to the highest ideal of a kindl y a nd c apable physician, practicing without discrimination o n account of fin a ncial re\\'ard, he has grown o ld in the service of h i s fello w men. He is a membe1 of t he Duval County Medi ca l Soci e ty, o f the F l orida State and American l VIcdica l associati o ns. May 25, 1872, Doctor Drew married Maria T. Carr of St. Augustine, Florida. S h e d i e d August 18, 1919, when t hey had been married more than forty-seven yea rs . WILLIAM A . BrsJJEE, whose death occurred i n the year r9u, was a man of splendid initiative and constructive ge nius and d id much to advance the c ivic an d materi a l progre s of h is native C ity of Jacksonville, bes ides which h is activities touch a lso, a nd in influential way, t he c ity o f Savannah, Georgia. :Mr. B isbee was born a t ] ac ksonville, Florida, on the 13th of December, 1861, and was a so n o( Cyrus and V ir g inia Josefa (Robiou) B i s bee. He was descended from the well known fami l y of Busbridge, l ong established a t Echingham, Essexs hire, E n gland. Thomas Besbedge, who varied the o r i g i n a l spelling of the fami l y patronymi c , became the founder o f the American Branch of the fami ly, a late r generation of which adopted the present orthography o f Bisbee. Thomas Besbcdge came to New Englan d in the spring o f 1634, in company with his wife a nd their six c hildren, as well as three servants, t he voyage having been made o n t he s hip "Hercul es." Records show that he had bee n a man of wealth and i nfluence in his native land, and he became prominent as a pioneer in New England, that cradl e of much of American history. He landed at Scituate Harbor, Massachusetts, and became o ne of the first deacons of the Lothrops' Church at that p l ace. In 1638 he removed to Duxbury, w hich p lace he rep re entcd in the general court in 1643. He was one of the grantees of Seipicon, and eventually he removed to Sudbur y, where his death occ urre d in 1674. In later generations t h e family name has been s pe lled in fully s ix different fo rms. T h e family coat o f a rms, d u l y recorded in the College of . H eraldry i n Engl a nd, has bee n preserved by t he American representatives. Twenty-five descendants of t his sterling Puritan ancestor represented 1Iassachusetts as patriot soldiers i n the War o f the Revolution. Cyrus B i bee, father of t he subject of t h i s memoir, was born at Bridgewater, Massachusetts, a nd was a young man when he came to F l o rida. in 1835, and numbered himself among the vc r ea r l y settlers o f Jack o nvilte. Here he became associated with Co lonel Conova in conducting a l arge trading post, bes ides which he d id a large commission business a nd was agent fo r the first line of steamers an d a lso the first railroad that came to Jacksonville . His b usiness, like all others in the South, was virtually destroyed when the C ivi l war was precipitated, and with his fami l y he found refuge a t Lake C ity. He was o ne o [ t h e honored pioneer c i t izens of Jacksonvill e at t h e time of his death. June r7, r889. His wife was a daughter of Charl es Maria Nichol as Robio11 de Mareuil, w ho was born on the Island o f San Domingo, in 1782, and who, w ith a n o l de r sister and her co lored maid, escaped when t he negro uprising on the island, in r795, led to the massacre of t h e w hite settlers. His father, five of his uncles and other members of t he fa mily having lost their lives in this massacre. \>\lit h his sister he finally landed at Charleston, South arolina. He was descended from the ancient French family of Robiou, the ancestral c astle, "Portheau," a t Vendec, France, being s till in posses sio n of a representative of t he name. As a very young man Charles Robiou de Mareuil married Mclla nie N cal, of Charleston, and her death oc curre d i n r 8o8. He served as a soldier in t he war o( 1 812, a nd thereafter he es tablished h i s home i n F l o rida, w he re, in 1822, he wedded Rufina Miranda, o f S t. Augustine. Later o n C ha rle s Robiou, w ho had dropped his t itle and a l so the de Maricul from his name, served as a quartermaster in t he Florida Indian war, from 1835 to 1837. Of the five children of his second marriage three died in infancy, and t he two w h o survived were Virginia Josefa and Sidney Gab riel. Rufina (Miranda) Robiou was a daughter of Don Pedro and Dona Josefa (Arredonda) Miranda, of Spain. As Florida was a t that t ime a pan i s h possessio n Don Pedro Miranda settled at St. Augustine, large grants o f land in Florida having been g iven him by the Spanish government, and the o riginal documents of transfer being s till in possession of h i s descendants. After F l orida became a part of the United States Don Pedro a nd his wife returned to S pain, leaving their daughter Rufina, who had become the wife of harles Robiou. She was only fifteen years of age a t the time of her marriage, and survived h e r husband by fifty-two years, dying April 26 , 1899. She retained remarkable mental and phy ica l vitality until t he closing hours of he r s i n gul arly gracious a nd interesting life, and her remains rest in the o ld Catholic cemetery a t Jacksonville. Virginia Josefa Robiou was born March 27, 1829, and at St. Augustine, o n t he 1st of June, 1847, was solemnized her marriage to Cyrus B isbee, of Jacksonville. She w as possesse d of many graces of mind and heart a nd was instant in works of charity and kindly be nevo l e nce. S he died April 25, 1888, and her husband, who was twel ve years her se nior, survi ve d her by about o ne year, his death having occurred June I, 1889. Of their twelve children seve n d i e d in c hi ldh ood. "Willi a m A dolphus, of this memoir, 11as t h e tenth c h ild . Willi a m A. Bisbee, born December 13, 1861, passed his earlier years under that cloud o f depression and misfortune which envel oped eve ry int erest in the South during and fo llowing t he C ivil war. He attended t he p ublic school s of ] ac ksonville and thereafter was a student o n e vea r in the Florida Military Academy a t Gaincs At the age of seventeen yea rs he took a c l e rical pos ition in a mercantile establis hment, and shortly afterward beca m e a clerk in a drug store. The confinement being injurious lo his health , he turned his attent i on lo the real estate b usiness, in w hich he made a record of s uccess. A t the age of twenty-seven yea rs he was elected city treasurer of Jacksonville, and after serving several years in t his o ffice he resigned, and left t h e city for a year of recreation and recuperation. U pon his return to Jacksonville he resumed operations in t he real -estate business and made so me very important transactions, including the sale of the present s ite of the City Hall. Of a remarkabl e a nd interesting phase of his career the following record has been written: "In 1905 the

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lll STOR Y OF FLORlDA s l u mb ering lires o f cliscontcnl 111 oppres eel Cuba broke forth into insurrection. Possibly impelled by a feeling of sympathy fot men w ho were, in a sen se at l e ast, par t ially his countr ymen , and possibl y act u ated by that sentiment which, underneath the cold Purit a n exterior, has a lways burne d as an ardent love o [ lib e rty, Mr. Bisbee put his sympathy with the Cubans into the form o [ active effort. He assisted in p l anning and executing a numbe r o f filibu sterin g expeditions to C uba, and late r purchased the steam lug 'Dauntless' and used i t for that purpose. For about two years thereafter the 'Dauntless' gave more ne ws it ems lo the press of the United Stales than a ny other matter of that day. A ll o f the power of t he Unit e d tates government was brought lo bea r lo break up the operations of this littl e ' ' ess el. Time and again 1lr. Bisbee and his notable captain , Jame s F loyd , and hi s p il o t, J o hn O'Bri e n , wer e hal e d into court, the vessel libe led, and e ve r y e ffort within the reach o f the United tales Di strict Attorney was used lo make t he m desist from their operati ons against Spain; hut a l ong w ith the coo l cauti o n and resolute purpose o f the Puritan, vVilli a m A. Bisbee possessed a l so t h e fiery ardor o f the Spaniard and he would not be downed. The resul t of h i s efforts was the l andi n g o f thirteen s uc cessful expediti o ns o n the I s land o f C ub a, and the arms and ammunition th u s run through the lin es were of p riceless value to t h e trugglin g patri o ts. \ Vhen war with Spain was declare d the U n it e d States government chartered the 'Dauntless,' which then had a worldw ide reputati o n, as a d i spatch boat to fol l o w Sampson's fleet in Cuban water . When Cuban independence had bee n won the 'Dauntless' was g i ve n th e h o n o r o f leading t h e procession o f boats that met the newly e l ected President Palm a in the harb o r of Havana, and a t the reception w hi c h followed, t h e Pres id ent embrace d Mr-B i s bee a nd acknowl edged the indebtedness o f the C ub a n people for the great services rendered them." In 1899 11r. Bisbee e labl ishecl a t avannah, Georgia, an independent te l ephone company, in o pp ositi o n to the powerful Bell Compan y , and the e nt erprise was made a most prosperous one from th e start. Bisbee's company, the Georgia Teleph one & Tele graph Company, was the o n l y undergr ound system south o f the Mason and Dixon Line. When Mr. Bisbee disposed of his inte r es t in th i s corporation, the Georgi a Tel ephone & Telegraph Compan y, in 1907, it had over 3 ,000 te l ephones i n operation. Of later activiti es o f this vigorous and resourceful c iti ze n an interestin g estimate has been g iven and is worthy o f p reservation in th is connection : " [n t h e meantime h e had never l os t interest in J acksonville, and after the fire in 1901 he purchased from his brother s a nd sisters their intC'r es t i n t h e property which had belo nged lo h i-; family in t h e previ o us generati o n, and erected a handsome bui ldin g of s t ores and o flices. lle saw, h owever, that there was yet a g reater opportunity, a nd. returning to Jackson v ill e aft e r d isposing o f h i s te l ephone plant in Sa\'annah, he erected the Bisbee Buildin g, which has the d is tin c t i o n o f be in g the fir s t rein forced concrete and s t e el lire-proof bui ldin g, as well as the first te n -story oOice bui l ding, in F lorida. He later compl e t e d a duplicate o flicc hu ilcling that is a part o f the original building." Prior lo t h e death o f B isbee the following concernin g him found publication: ")Jot yet fifty years o l d, he has Ii, • ed a life f ull o f dramatic incident. is o n e of the best known men i n h i s section, rccognizcd as a strong ancl capable financ i.er, and ready to invest his money and a sist in the upbuilding and advancement o t the sec t i o n in w h i c h h i s life has been passed." On the 12t h of .\ l ay, 1888 , was solemnized thl! marriage of ivJ r. B i s bee to J\lis Harri e t Ann Backus, w h o was born at Burling ton, Iowa, Jul y 13, 1865, a daughter of Nathaniel and Cecel i a (Calkins) Backus. J\Irs. Bisbee survi, es her husband, as do a l so two o f thei r c hildren-Vir ginia Josefa, who is now the wife o f L. IL Boggs, of Jacksonville, and Frank Doan, of whom s pecific menti o n is made i n follo w in g sketch. FHAN E DOAN BISBEE. ln the management of l arge and imp ortant properly a nd business i11-teresls in the City of Jacksonville Mr. Bisbee is well uphoiding the honors of the family name and proving a worthy s ucc essor o f his father, t he late \,Yilliam A. B isbee, who wa one of the most liberal and progressive c iti ze ns of Jacksonv ill e a l the lime of hi s death and to w h o m a memorial tribute is in the preceding sketch. F r ank D. Bisbee was born a l Knoxville, Tenne s see, Novembe r 13, 1 891, and h i e a rl y educat ional advantages includecl those of St. Paul's School, a l Concord, New llampshire, and the Uni versity of Pennsyl va n i a. In 19II he assume d a pos ition in the Florida ational Bank, al jack so nville, and in 1913 he became manager of the Bisbee Building, t h e O ld B i sbee Building and the Clark Building, three of the important business b locks of th is c ity. 0 f the erection of the modern Bisbee Building by his fathe1 mention is made in the memoir o f the father. lle has co n tinued in the management of these properties and is a lso a leading expon ent o f the real es late and insurance business in the F l orida metropolis. In January, 1920, I r. Bis bee to k over the management and control of the Sprin g fie ld llcighls Company, a Florie.la real estate corporation , which was in eriou financial diffic ulti es, the stock o f w hi c h was wo r th o n l y 25 ce n t s o n a dollar. T his company owned a run-down and undesirable subdi vis ion, covering a n area of six c it y b locks extending north and south, and three b locks cast and west. T h e company co u ld not dispose of its lots e\'C n after repeated a le attempts. Upon laking charge, Mr. B isbee plante d out t rees, laid many b l ocks o f sidewal ks, harcl surfaced the main street , extended the water, sewer and gas mains and then commenced the bu i lding o f six bungalows. Upon selling these e,en before completion, he commenced others and during hi s two years o f m anagement h e has been instrumental in the building o f over thirty-five attractive bungal o ws, scattered through h i s subdivis i on. This building program is still goin g o n. A t this t ime, h i s persistent e fforts succeeded in getting the ci ty to p lace c ity e l ectric lights at each street i ntersecti o n, and a l so to buy hi waler and sewer mains a nd pump house a l a h andsom e profi t lo the company. The company now owns a nursery in its subdi, ision that furnishes shrubs and p l ants of nearly e\'ery \'ariety lo its home owners. It can be easily claimed that J\[r. Bisbee has made a bea11lif11l littl e city out of his subdiv i s i o n and that s ecti o n of Springfield stands forth as a reward lo his untiring efforts; and in a ddili
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III TORY 0 F FLORIDA 123 ronmction \\ ith t he \Vorld war. Ov r a year a11d a half before th<' c11lry o f the L'nilecl S tales int 'l t he \\ar he s a iled for Fran ce , and having l'niiskd i n the French Army was ass igned lo the Si'dl'-lifth Div ision of t he l •renrh rill ) as a n a mbtil a nce driver. and w ith t h i s d i v i s i n h e was 011 t h e line of ba llle at the Marne front , in t h e \ ' erdun sec tor. ] l e 1emainecl i n Franc e o ne year a nd after the decla ration o f war by the United . t alcs h e then returned lo his native land and entered t he training ca mp a l Fort Ogl e tho rpe, Georgia. Here, o n the 2 7t h o f ove mber, 1917, he rcceiYed commi s i o n as first lieutenant. As a member of the Fifth Divi s ion of the U nited . talcs , \ rmy he returned to France, and fought with that division in t he Vognes sector unti l transferred as a taff o fficer lo the First m e rican ! \ rmy Headquarters. At army headquarter s he se n e d as 1 iason o fficer a nd he was with his command o n the firing line in the battl e o f St. :-1 ihi e l , besides taking part in both of the great battl es o n th e Argonn e front. l
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124 HISTORY OF FLORIDA attended the Kew York Post Cracluatc 11cdical Co l lege and the New York l)olycli11ic, sludyi11g under Dr. VI/. Gill \Vylic in the New York Post (;raduale and under Dr. John /\. \Vycth i11 the New \'ork Polyclinic. Other scientists of almost equal fame under whom he has studied or with whom he has been associated were Dr. \\Tilliam R P ryor and Dr. James P. Tuttle of New York, Dr. John B. Murphy and Dr. A. J. Ochsner of Chicago, Mayo Brothers of Rochester, Minnesota, and Dr. J. H. Kellogg of Battle Creek. After leaving Puebl o Doctor Marshall removed to Chicago, and was engaged in practice there u ntil he came to Miami Beach early in 1918. During the past four years lie has become thoroughl y established in his chosen work in this world famous w inter resort. To supplement his large persona-I practice Doctor Marshall has been planning for some time the establishment of a modern sanitarium at Miami Beach, something on the order of the noted Battle Creek Sanitarium. Doctor Marshall married at Kansas City, Miss Helle Mills, who was born at the old town of Westport, a town before Kansas City, in which it is now incorporated, was thought of. CAPT. FREDERICK W. BRUCE. The career of Capt. Frederick William Bruce, of Jacksonville, has been a decidedly active, varied and interesting one, during which he has had experience on both land and sea and has accomplished results as vesse l captain and civil engineer. While he is practically retired at the present time, having accumulated a competence that allows him to indulge his wants and hobbies, lie is still consu ltee! freque1it l y on matters pertaining to the civil engineer's profession and keeps in close touch w ith the affairs of the day. Monuments to his skill and industry as an engineer are to be found in a number of J acksonvitlc's notable structures. Captain Bruce was horn in Sullivan County. New Hampshire. May IO. i856, a son of Timothy Vv. and Sarah E . (] ennings) Bruce, natives of New Hampshire, J:he former born September 20. r83r, and the latter. May i9, 183-1. He traces his ancestry back to the Duke of Elgin in Scotland, and to Timothy Bruce, the first American ancestor of this branch of the family. Timothy Bruce had been an officer in the English Navy, h u t was cashiered. and as lie did not wish to be hanged if captured. joined the patriot army during the War of the Revolution, instead of the navy. He was an officer under Aaron Burr in the expedition against Quebec, and held a capf in the United States Army during the War of 1812. His l1ome was at Bolton, Massachusetts. Timothy W . Bruce, the father of Capt. Frederick W . Bruce. was educated in the public schools of New Hampshire, and as a young man adopted the vocation of carnenter and builder. A ftcr foltowing that trade for some years he beg-an co ntracting on his own account, and in this way developed an extensi,1e business in New Hampshire. In 1884 he came to St. Augustine, F lorida, where he carried on carpentry and contracting up to the time of his death, November r2, 1899. He was well known and highly esteemed, and at one time served as a member of the Board of Aldermen. As a fraternalist he was initiated into tl1e mysteries of Masonry while a resident of New Hampshire, but demitted and became a member of Ashier Lodge, F. and A. M .. of St. Augu stine, and was also a tliirty-second degree Mason and a member of Florida Con-sistory. IIe like\\'isc licltl membership in the !(nights o[ Pythias. Origi11ally a whig, he later joined the rcpuhlica11 party, but after coming lo Florida adopted democratic p1inciples. His religious ide11tilication was with the Methodist Episcopal Church. Early in lhc war between the states, Mr. Bruce eulisted in Company C, Seventh Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry, and while he saw action in several engagements, a large part of his service was on detached duty because of his mechanical ski ll. IIe participated in the engagements at Fort Wagner, Hilton Head, Morris Island and N cw Orleans, under Gen. Benjamin Butler, and at the close of the struggle received his honorable discharge and returned for the time being to New England. Mr. Bruce had five brothers and one brother-in-law in the Union Army during the struggle between the North and the South. Mr. Bruce married Miss Sarah E. Jennings, who died July 25, 189_:;, and they became the parents of three children: Frank W., a resident of St. Augustine, Florida; Capt. Frederick William; and Althea C., the wife of Eli Mallett, of St. Augustine. Frederick William Bruce 1eceived his early education in the public schools of New Hampshire, and when still a youth was taught the trade of carpenter under the preceptorship of his father. He also, during his vacation periods at Fitchburg, Massachusetts, worked in a book bindery, and in 1869 came to St. Augustine, Florida, where he was sent to attend school. In the winter of the same year, however, he tired of his studies, and accordingly ran away from school and shipped on the brig "Enterprise," Capt. Jimmie Allen, with whom he sailed to Cuba and various Mexican points. After about two years he returnee! to New Hampshire and attended school winters until he was twenty-one years of age, in the meantime indulging his love for the sea by working as a sailor in lhe summer seasons. He also attended a navigation school at Boston, rose to a captain's berth. and continued to follow a seafaring life up to the time of his marriage in 1877, when lie embarked in business with his father. in Sullivan and Belknap counties, New l-Iampshire. While thus engaged Captain Bruce studied civil engineering under private tuition, and for some years was engaged in surveying and civil engineering. In 188-1, when his mother's health failed, he brought her to St. Augustine, Florida, and here took up the practice of his profession, with \'Cry g1atifyi11g results. In 188.=; he joined the United States Engineering Department. but subsequently resigned to accept the office of chief engineer of the Port Commissione1s of Jacksonvilte. He designed and constructed the terminal and interchanging facilities of the port and a lso accomplished other good work in connection with this office, but resigned after two vears of faithful service. His next big work was the designing of the Merrill-Stevens Shipbuilding Company plant at South Jacksonvilte, but resigned after the ship construction appliances had been completed at a cost of about three million dollars. Since that time Captain Bruce has been living in semi-retirement, although he still as a consulting engineer. During his residence at St. Augustine he served two terms as alderman, and rendered excellent service. Also, while living in that city, during the yellow fever epidemic, he was placed in charge of the shot-gun quarantine and restored order out of chaos. He has also served as justice of the peace. under appointment by Governors Catts and Hardee, and under the first issue of city bonds, served by

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IIISTORY OF FLORIDA 125 appointment as a member o{ the Board of Trustees for South J acksonvillc. In I8<)6 Captain Bruce was made a member of Ashier Lodge, F. and A. J\1., but subsequently dernillcd and joined Duval Lodge of South Jacksonville. ln his political sentiment he maintains an independent stand and views, and gives his vote rather to the man whom he deems best fitted for the office than to the party which the candidate represents. On July 23, 1877, Captain Bruce was united in marriage with Miss Clara F. Paddleford, who was born at Littleton, New Hampshire, February 3, I854, and to this union there has been born one child, Sarah Louise, the wife of Cleveland Johnson, with three children, Frederick Bruce, Clarice Ruth and Mary Louise. Captain Bruce has been a valued member of the American Society of Civil Engineers since 1900. WILLIAM KENNETH JACKSON. A record of achievement of more than local significance has marked the career of this representative member of the bar of the Florida metropolis. Mr. Jackson was born at Box, a village now known as Denver, in the State of Tennessee, on the 18th of November, 1886, and is a son of William Kendrick Jackson and Medora (Montgomery) Jackson, both likewise natives of Tennessee, where the former was born in Hun1phreys County, August 13, 1848, and the latter, in Hickman County, December 3, 1852. Of the family of three sons and three daughters all are living except one daughter, who died in infancy. The father was reared and educated in Tennessee and became a successful commission and general merchant at Box, that state. In he came with his family to Florida and engaged in orange growing and the phosphate business at Inverness. Later he was there identified with the real estate and hardware business until 1913, since which year he has Jived virtually retired. He represented Citrus County in the Florida Legislature in 1899-1901-1903, and was a member of the State Senate in 1905-07. He served one term as mayor of Lakeland, this state, was treasurer of the Florida Real Estate Association, and was one of the organizers of the Florida Retail Hardware Association. He held for a number of terms the office of master of Inverness Lodge of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, and he has been active and influential in the councils of the democratic party in this state, as a citizen of dis tinctive progressiveness and publi"c spirit. William Kenneth Jackson was a lad of about five years at the time of the family removal to Florida, and he acquired his preliminary educa tion in the schools of Citrus County. He thereafter entered the University of Florida, in which he was graduated in 1904, with the deg-ree of Bachelor of Arts. In the law department of the historic old University of Virginia he was graduated as a member of the class of r908, and with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. In 1905 he held the position of recording clerk of the State of Florida. In 19o8 Mr. Jackson initiated the practice of his profession in Jackso!1ville, as a member of the law firm of Jackson & Nixon, but in March of the following year he received appointment to the position of assistant prosecuting attorney of the Panama Canal Zone. Later he was made assistant attorney for the Isthmian Canal Commission and the Panama R!ailway Company, and in April, 1910, he was appointed prosecuting attorney for the Canal Zone. In addition he was supervisor of .elections in Pan-ama in 1912. In I9I-t he was appointed United States district allorney for the Canal Zone, which ofTicc he retained until 1915, when he resigned to return lo Jacksonville, Florida, and resume the private p1aclicc of law. He built up a subs t an tial and representative law business and was one of the able and popular members of the Duval County Bar. When the nation became involved in the W oriel war Mr. Jackson forthwith gave evidence of his patriotism and his readiness for service. In 1918 he was appointed captain in the Chemical Warfare Service of the United States Army, and was made a member of the Finance Board of Control of the War Department. He continued his work in the army until the 19th of February, 1919, when he returned to Jacksonville and to practice of law. He served as chairman of the Jacksonville Chapter of the American Reel Cross in 1920, 1921 and 1922, and in 1922 as secretary of the F lorida Bar Associ ation. He is a democrat in political allegiance, his basic Masonic affiliation is with Templ e Lodge No. 23, A. F. and A. M., and in Florida Consistory of the Scottish Rite he has received the thirty-second degree . September 9, r9r6, recorded the marriage of Mr. Jackson and Miss Katharine Mitchell, who was born in the City of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, a daughter of the late United States Senator John L. and Harriet (Danforth) Mitchell, the latter of whom survives her honored husband, as do also six of their nine children, the son William having attained the rank of brigacliergeneral in the American Aviation Service in the World war. Mr. and Mrs. Jackson have three children: Danforth, Katharine and Richard :Montgomery. The late Col. John L. Mitchell, father of Mrs. Jackson, was born at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, October 19, 1842, and his early education was gained in the schools of his native city. Thereafter he continued his studies at Hampton, Connecticut; Chester, England; and Munich and Dresden, Germany. In 1862, prior to his twen tieth birthday anniversary, he enlisted for service as a Union soldier in the Civil war, and he was advanced to the rank of first lieutenant of Com pany I, Twenty-fou1th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, with which he served unti l incapacitated by physical disability . Thereafter impaired eyesight caused him to abandon the study of l aw, but he became a figure of prominence in con nection with public affairs in his native state. In 1871 and again in 1875 he was elected a member of the State Senate of Wisconsin; in 1873, Governor Washburn appointed him co l onel of the First Regiment of the vVisconsin National Guard; in 1878 he went abroad, where he remained four years; and after his return to Mi l waukee he served as president of the Board of Education of that city, president of the State Agricultural Society. and president of the Northwestern Trotting Horse Breeders Association . In r886 he was elected a member of the Board of Managers of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, and to this position he was reelected in 1892 and 1898. In 1 888 the co l one l became a member of the National Democratic Committee, and in 1890 he was e l ected a representative of Wisconsin in the United States Con gress, the following year having recorded his selection for the position of chairman of the National Democratic Committee. In 1892 he was reelected to Congress, and in the following year he was elected United States senator from Wisconsin, a position which he retained until 1899.

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126 HISTORY OF FLORIDA With his family he passed t h e ensuing three years in Europe, and in 1902 he graduated from the univer s ity at Grenoble, France. In 1904 he was appoin t ed a member of the \ isconsin late Board of Agricu l ture, but hi death occurred on the 29th of June of that year. He was a cl i s tinguished member of one of the honored a nd influential pioneer families of Wisconsin. On July I , 1922, Mr. J ackson moved to Boston to specialize in general practice in Latin-American and Spanish law. He represents the Unit ed Fruit Company as general attorney in charge of Tropical Divisi o ns, and hi offices are with them at r3r State Street. R. A . MooNEY, for many years, was an active business man in the orth, but since r917 has been a resident of Miami. He has achieved some thing more than ordinary success in the real estate field, his outstanding achievement being Little River gardens, one of the most interesting s ub urban developments in the Miami Di trict. Mr. Mooney was born in Kings Mountain, North Caroli na , but when a child he was taken by his parents to Paris, Henry County, Tennessee. He was reared and educated there, a nd h e still h as some property interests in Henry County . Mr. Mooney was in business in Boston and New York for about twenty years, and it was early in 19r7 that he moved to Miami. His developments at Little River, five miles north of the City on the Dixie Highway, have covered a remarkably brief period of time. He made his origina l purchase of land there in the fall of r920, and systematic development was tarted in the spring of the following year. Since th e n under his direction the land has been im proved and put on the market in eight s ubdi visions, comprising a total of ninety-one acres. The prope rtie s are known as Little River Garden lots, and h ave proved a great uccess as home sites for people of moderate means. Mr. Mooney built on these plots seventy-two houses outright, and has helped build numerous others by financing the lot owners and accepting small monthly payments. Many have acquired homes there by expenditures amounti ng to a little more than monthly rentals. In this way Mr. Mooney has n ot only made money for himself but for his clients as well. The majority of the custo m ers at Little River Gardens have been of the stea dy, thrifty working class, and these people comprise an ideal community. Values have doubled and tripled in the Little River community, which is ideally sit u a ted on the great Dixie Highway, close to Biscayne Bay and to Miami, so that the permanancy of property values is assured. Mr. Mooney owns va lu able property in the busi ness section of the town, and has been the active spirit in everythin g effecting the community. While there were only twentyix house in t hat section in 1920, there are now 262 hou cs, prac tically all of them built since the spring of 1921, and within a radius of one-half mile. Previous to this time there had been but two houses built in nine years. The little village is one of which any man might be proud, and the credit of bringing about this wonderful change truly belongs to Mr. Mooney . RUSSELL H. TAUR ha been a Tampa m erchant for fifteen years. He has been chiefly responsible for th e building up of one of the city's largest organizati ons, the Tarr Furniture Company, of which he is treasurer and general manager. Mr. Tarr was born al Pari , Kentucky, April 4, 1883, on l y child of John and arah (Earlywine) Tarr. His parents were natives of Kentucky. Ru sell Tarr was reared and educated in Kentucky, attended the Millcrburg Military Institute, and sub equently studied l aw in Washington and Lee University of Virgini a. Mr. Tarr came direct to Tampa in 1904, and for three years perform ed the duties of Circuit ourt reporter. In 1907 he engaged in the furniture business , and soon organized the Tarr Furniture o mpany, which he has successfully managed. In 1907 he married Berclina Crowell at Tampa. Their three children are Ru sell Crowell, John Robert and Lucy Jane. For a number of years Mr. Tarr has devoted time and energy to variou s civic and commercial o r ganizations. For one year he was president of th e Florida Furniture Dealer ' A sociation, served two years as president of the Retail Merchants' Association of Tampa, i s now president of the Rotary C lu b, is one of the governors of the Board of Tracie, i s a director in the Retail Merchants' Association and the Y. M. . A. a nd the United Charities, and is a m e mber of the Board of Stewards of the First Methodist Episcopal Church. Ile is a Knight Templar Ma on and hrin c r and a member of the Golf C lub . RonERT EDWARD LEE McCASKILL. The study of the career ancf accomplishments of a s ucce ss f ul man is full of educational valu e, especially when uch an individual has achieved tangible and practical results. A record of the accom plishments of some men in the b1ief span of their life's period read like romance. \Vith out knowl edge of attending conditions, it seems a lmost imp oss ibl e that one man might c limb so high or find time to s up e rin tend the details of such great int erests, yet there are men of today whose capability and whose genuineness endow their work with permanence. Such a man is Robert Edward Lee McCaskill, president of the R. E. L. Mc-askill Company, of DeFuniak pring , and one of the leading real estate, land and timber bu i ncss operators of \Vest Florida. 1Ir. Mc askill be l ongs to one of the o ld and honored familie of \Vallon County, where he wa s born at Eucheeanna, June 4, 1871, a son of the late John Jett and Sarah E liz abe th (Flournoy) McCaskill, and a grand on of Kenneth and Sarah (Knight.) McCaskill and of John and Mary (Knowles) Flournoy, the grandparents on both sides being natives of North arolin a who we;e pioneers of \i\Talt on County. John J tt was born in Florida, where he spent ht s entir e lif e and was con n ected with numerous extensi ve While a large mea ure of material spccess attended his efforts he was best known and i most generally remembered for his true, spiritual character. Broad-minded, ympatheti c and generous, he was not content to forge ahe.ad him elf, but sought to bear othe:s a l
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111 ' TUJZ \' UF FLOH.lDA Nati o11al Bank o f DcFuniak Springs, and one o f the organize rs a nd a s tock h older and v ice president o f the \V es t F l orida a \ a l ::)tor e , a t Pensaco l a, in addition lo which he was prominentl y identified with v a ri o u s other great inte rests. To the poor, hi s death was no thin g s ho r t o f a tragedy, fo r he wa e\'er their iri c nd. J le re cci"ed from lif e much; he descr\'cd much, hut, he a lso ga' e much. 1 \ man of energy, acumen, fo r ce o f c ha r ac tc 1-, 11he ral it y o f \'i c ws, and, abo\'e all, s t c rlino-inte g rity, h e had all those qual ities w hi c h ins p ir e co nfid e nce. Robert Edward Lee :\l c l..askill .tttendcd t he public school s o i \\'alto n County and spent o ne yea r a t the \\' cs l F l orida Seminary at Tal laha,sec, co111plct111g his educati o n at l h e a ge o t Ii fteen years and a t that t im e startin g work with his father, in the mercantile and lumber business a t Freeport, the cider man being the owner o f a l a rge sawmill and l u mb e r yard o n Choctawhatchc c Bay. Ile r e main e d with his father from 1888 until 1 912, in \\' hi c h year he l ocat e d at DeFuniak prings and embarked in the real es tate, land and timber husi11ess. It is probabl e that 1 1 r. 1lcCaskiil has done mo r e t h a n any oth e r o ne man to e ncourage the development and col o n i za ti o n o f \Vest F l o r id a, h a v in g adverti se d extensively all through the North and Middl e \\'es t. including s uch leading c ities as C hicago, Cleve l a nd, Detroit, St. Louis, Kansa C ity, e tc . L-lis land ho l dings a r e of t h e most extensive character. 1 l r. McCaskill is 011e o f the tru s t ees o f Palmer College o f DeFuniak Springs, a nd a member of the Presbyteri a n Church. On September 15, i&J5, Mr. UcCaskill married a l De Funiak Springs. 1 1 i ss F l oren ce A . Griffin, daughter o f ] udson and Angeline (Judson) Criflin. o f New ) ' ork s tate, bot h now deceased. Four c hild r e n ha, e been horn lo 1lr. and Urs. Haro ld Judson , Margaret E l izabeth , A n ge l i ne L ucile a nd Eve l y n Juanita. Mr. a nd Urs. 1lcCaskill arc greatly popula r al DeFuni a k Springs, where they are acli\' e in all worth y m ovements. Fraternally :\fr. 11cCaskill is a Knight Templ a r Mason a nd Nobl e of the 1 [ ys tic hrine, a n E lk a nd a memb e r o f t h e Woodmen o f the \Vo rld . RAY B. CnALLF. A n ac ute. coo l -headed man of busi n ess may command respect because o f his g r eat capacitie s in mana g ing large co n cern a nd h is power lo change c ir c um stances and condition s to suit hi s wi ll. hut i n order lo secure the co nfi dence of his fello w c it i ze ns he must have other qualit i es . and yet o lhe1s o f a s till tenderer fibre to w in p ersonal affection. Those who know Ra> 8. ralle best fee l t h a t in him a r c lo be found nol o n l y th e :;ound a nd dependabl e principles which make for b usiness r eliab i lity, hut the so lid Yirtues of a good c itizen a nd the admirable char acteristi cs which \\'in and h o ld others in the bo nd . o f sy mpathe tic fri e nd s hip. As president o f the Ray B . 'ralle 'ompany he occupies a n important position in the business l i fe o f Tampa, a nd his influence in the automobil e trade is felt o\'er a wide a rea. Ray B. Crallc was horn a t Louisvil le, Kentucky, January 12, a son of S. S. a nd Robina (Steele) rallc, nati, cs of Kentucky, t he formc1 o f whom is dece ased. hut the latter sur v i ves. They had two d1ildren. Ray B. being the o n l y son the e l de r . H i s boyh oo d clays we r e spent in his native c ity, a nd he attended its public sc hools. I n 19<>7 he came to Tampa, and traveled out of the cil1' 011 the road until 1916, when he embarked in a;1 automobil e busi1• es. as v ice presi-dent and ge n eral manager o f t he lluls ey Auto i \ ge ncy . ln October , 1 921, h e o pe ned hi s present business, organizing the company which bears hi s name, a nd of which h e has continued pre i de nt. lie i s a member o f the Tampa Auto Associ a tion, o f w hi c h h e was fir s t pres id ent, a nd h e w as th e seco nd president o f t h e Florida State Deal e r s ' , \ s!'oc iation, and has been very acti \'e in t he w ork o f both organizations. 1.1.c handles the Hupmo bi l c cars, c arries a ge n e r a l lin e of accesso ri es, a nd docs a general garage an d station se r v i ce busi ness, h i s bei n g o ne o f t h e reliab l e es tab l ish m ents in the co unty. Cratic i s a B lu e Lodge . Mason, and he a l so be l o ngs to the Ben evo l ent a nd l'rotectivc Order of E l ks a nd t h e Unite d Comme r c ial Traveler s ' Associa tion. H e is a de m oc r at. In i915 1Ir. Cralle marri e d Grace H o uliham , o f Lexington, l(entucky, and t h ey have two c hi l dren, Jane and Grace. T u OMAS V\T. ELARBEE. T h ere are, unq u es t ionably, men o f natura l ab ility found in e very prosperous communit y w h o by reason of inh e r ent tal e nt, by the u se o f their brains and the soundness of their judgment, attain distinction a nd ac quire authority. They are the m e n w h o industriousl y work for a n end and i n helping themselves add to the comfort and happiness o [ all about them. These quie t, res ourceful m e n are the dependence o f t h e whol e s oc ial fabric, f o r t h e ir e fforts n o t o n l y b r i ng into being the s ub stantial industri es which support commerce, but conduct them along the sate a nd sane channel s which assure p ublic prosperity and gen e r a l co n lentmenl. T h ey may be m e n of versatil e gifts and talents o [ a high o rd e r in many directi o ns. but it i s thei r so undnes s, their Y itality a nd th eir sleadinc s w hich mak e them s uch important fo rces in their co mmunities . S uch a man i s Thomas \V. E l a rb ee , manage r of t h e Hills b o r o \Vholcsale Grocery Company of Tampa. Thomas \V. Elar bee was born in Georgia, .\ugusl 6. 1875, a s o n o f J os eph II. a nd Elizabeth (Engler) E l a rbee, nati ves of Georgia, bo th o f w hom a r e deceased. T he y were t h e p a r e n ts o f s i x children, o f whom T h omas V\T. was th e fifth in order of birth. H e was reared a nd e ducated i n his nati, c co unty, wher e h e remained until 1900,
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1 2 IITSTORY O F FLORIDA that an unblemished name ca n only be insured by right act ions a nd proper living. A. R. LIVINGSTON is a c ivil e ngineer by professio n, ca me to Florida to joi n the e ngineering department of the Florida East Coast Rai l road, and now has charge of the business o f the Model Land Company of South Florida, with headquarters at Homestead, in Dade o unty . Mr. Livingston was born a t Ca mden, New Jersey, in 1874. He is a de cendant o f the dis t in0uished L i\ i ngston fa mily, many of whose members we re makers of history in Colonial, L {ernlutionary a nd still later times. The founder of t he American fa mily was a Sco tchman, Rob ert Livingston, who se ttled a t Albany, 1 e w York, in r675. Dictionaries of American biography g ive a large a mount o f s pace lo thi Robert Livingston a n d to many of his descendants. H i s g r a ndson, Philip Livingston, was o ne of the s io-ners of the D c laration of Independence, but o thers were not less e minent. \\'hen A. R. Living ton was abo ut nine y ears o f age his parents, i n 1 3, moved to Barton County, Kansa , w here his father e ngaged in the cattle industry, ow ning a large ranch a few miles f rom Great Bend. In that western country A. R. Livingston was reared, had a public sc hool educa tion, and atten ded the U niver ity of Kansas a l Law rence, where he s pecialized in e ngineering . His home was in I a nsas until 1913, w hen he came to Florida to beco me assoc iated with the e ng i neering department o f the East Coast Rail road. In 1914 he e tablished his headquarters a t Miami, a nd soo n afterward w as g iven charge o f the a ffairs o f the Model Land C ompa n y in extreme So uth Florida. T he Model Land Company is the land department o f t he East Coas t Railroad, its pre ide nt be ing J. E. Ingraham, who is v ice president of the railroad sys tem a nd is the ta te's most distinguished railroad builder and developer. Mr. L ivingston has charge of t he b usiness affairs of the Land Co mpany, i ncluding sa les, urvey of land a nd all engineering p rojects, e mbrac ing t he b uilding of roads, b ridges a nd drainao-e c anal . He has been espec ially ac tive in the b uilding of the h ighway from Homestead into t he C ape S able co untry. For this project Special Road a nd Bridge District No. 1 was c reated. T he Model Land Company b uilt at its ow n expense t he e ntire s tretch o f this road from the Dade County line through Monroe County to Cape Sab le. Evidently Mr. Livingston has a ve ry ' b usy pro g ram, but a number of hi friends are acq uainted with his interesting ide line a nd avoca tion as a n a rtistic p hotographer. His exten ive collec tion of p hotographs is, in fact, Y aluable not o nly fro m the a rtistic , but historical s tandpoint. It contains pho tograph of trop ical sce nes in extreme South Florida, pa rticularly the Cape Sable co un try, a nd a lso many photographs of sce nes taken both before a nd after t he development of lands and the construction o f buil dings a nd towns. 1fr. Livingston is a n amateur who has go ne i n to p h o tography not o nly as a technical s tudy, but as a n art, and many of t he p hotographs in his co llection have bee n co l ored to repre e nt the natural ap pearance of tropical p lants a nd foliage. Mr. Livingston is a Knight Templ a r, Ma o n a nd hriner, a nd is p resent high p riest of the Royal A rch Chapter of Homestead. CLARENCE L. PATCH. n A pril l, 1922, Clare nce L. Patch rounded o ut twenty-one yea rs of co n ec utive service in the Tampa Post Ollice. lt is a long and honorable record, and unusual i11 the postal se rvice. Mr. Patch for a number of yea rs has been assistant postmaster, and he has a n exact knowledge of every de tail connected with this clepartm nt o f the Federal Gove rn m e nt in Tampa. Mr. Patch has lived in Florida si nce boy hood. I f was b rn a t S myrna, Michigan , August 22, 1882, s n of Elmer A . an d arrie (Dolly) Patch. Uis maternal grand father was a p hy ician a t S myrna. Elmer Patch was born in Ionia, Mich igan, a nd is now living at Muncie, Indiana. T he mother d ied at the age of fifty-eig ht. lare11cc L. Patch is t he o lde l of five c hildren. three o f w hom are living. Ile attended sc hool i11 Michigan a nd finished his ed ucation al Orlando. Florida, where he arrived November 19, l&J6, when a boy of fourteen. 111 the fall of 18g9 he came lo Tampa, a nd o n April r, rgo r, a t t he age of e ighteen, he bega n his se rvice in the Tampa l'osl Oflice. al first as c lerk, later as fo reman, an 1 in 19I7 was raised to the grade of assistant postmaster. O n November 7, 1905, 1lr. Patch married Miss Pearl Nash, da ughte1 of Rev. . II. Nash, a re tired Bapti l minister of Tampa. They have fiye daughters: Thelma, Carol, Jlelen, Marjorie a nd Doris. Ir. Patch is affi liated w ith John Darling Lodge No. 154, F. and A. 1 L, a t Tampa, Prospect I .oclge No. 38, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. a nd is a member of the ivilan C lub, t he Palm .'\venue Baptist hurch, a nd in po litics is a rep ublican . l' AH SONS 1.l. GARCIA, 11. D. uccessfully enag d .in t he general practice o f medicine a nd surgery 111 \Vest Tampa, Doctor Garcia was a medical o fficer during the vVorld war, and has rxceptional q ualifications an d training fo r his p rofes ion. JI e was born al Key \\'es t, Florida, J uly r6. 1890. Ile was educated in p ublic schoo ls, a nd in I
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IJISTORY OF FLORlDA 129 1 1 r. l \loyla11 \\'as horn a l Charleslon, So11lh Carol ina, in 1Xc13. .I It' \\'as liberal!,) t•clncall'cl, altcnding tll(• Y. ;\I. C. \. S11111111cr Stl10ol at l:J11e Ridgl', Norlh Carolina, a11cl a l Jarkso111 ilk. l 'lorida. , \-, a ) oung man hl look an all a ronncl interest i n a thletics and physical trai11i11g, ancl has de1 o tcd yea rs to t he study o f the technical s ide o f physical ed ucation. I le is 11alura l ly gifted wirh abilities o f leadership so that he is s plendidly qualified for the tas ks inl'Ol\'ed i n t he work of a p hysical director. llis first sen icc in that capacity w as in connection with the Y. 1l. C. A . at Charleston, South Ca rolina. of which he was appointed assistant physical director in 191:;. The on ly important interruption to his se rvice w as the twenty-three months he spent w ith t he navy during the \\'oriel wa1. Ile enlisted at Charleston i n the summer o f i917, an d was later commissioned a n ensign after completing t he p rescribed course a t the Officers School a t Hampton Road , Norfolk, Virginia. He served o n t he L'. S. . V i1ginia. a nd the U. S. S . ebraska, and o n sub-chaser No. 186 . and a lso a l the Navy \'arcl al Portsmouth, Virgin i a . September 30, 1919, Mr. 1loylan became p hysi ca l director of t he 11iami Y. 11. C. A . 11 has done a great cl a l to raise the standard of p hysical training a nd rec1eatio11 in this i n titution. Through t he program o f activities laid out by him a nd the c lasses he conducts, he has made the Y. 1J. C. A. a ve ry popu l a r place both with business men and the yo uth o f the city. 11 r. 1Ioylan is a member o [ the American Reel C ross, ancl under Red 'ross a uspices he rganizecl a nd is chairman of the B iscayne Volunteer Life Sal'ing Corps of liami. Ile is a lso a member of the Kiwanis C lub, the A d Cl ub, is _ a Blue Lodge Mason, a communicant of the Trinity E piscopal hurch a nd is a member of the National Physical Directors' Society a nd the Southern Physical Director ' oc iety. J\loylan regards liami as his p rmancnt home, a nd has interested himself in a business way in the c ity. During the summer of 1922, in partnership with C lyde B. \Voodward, he platted a nd placed o n the market a new residential sub division known as Moywood. }-! oy l a n marri e d l\ I iss E l eanor Himes Flack of Troy, N c w York. They ha1 e o ne son. John Dudley Moylan. II. JEFFRJES as a young man learned the wagon-making trade, a nd he has been in that line o f industry eve r s ince. Al Tampa he is owner an d proprietor o f a n important industry manufacturing bo dies for trucks a nd a utomobiles a nd handling all t he painting. blacksmithing and other work i n connection w ith automobiles a nd olher vehicles. J\lr. Jeffries was born in Russell Co unty, A labama, December 15, 1883, so n o f Henry and Jennie (Howell) Jeffries. His parents were a lso horn in Alabama, a nd his father is s till living t here. Calvin H. Jeffries, youngest in a fa mily of four children. was reared in Alabama and had a common school education. A t the age of fif tee n he began making his own living, and he \\'Orked a t different thing until he began his apprenticeship as a wagonmaker at Clermont, Geo rgia. with the Davis \Vagon Co mpany. Ile was an apprentice four yea rs. and then for about t wo year he worked as a journeyman with t he Columbus Buggy Company at Columbus, Geo rgia. a nd in TC)03 came to Florida. Ile was w ith the wag on-huilding firm of Hobbs & Knight fo r two o ne year wi th the IIolmes-Bucklcy Company and s ix years with t he Tampa Harness a nd \\'agon Co mp:rny. In 191.=; Mr. Jeffries ho11ght out t he h usincss o C the Tampa Harness and \\.agon Co mpany, a nd has s ince largeh acloptl'd the industry lo thl' nee ds o f the clomina11l a ntomobilc.: a nd motor t ruck. lJc has a plant w ith about fourteen c mployes, and g ives every de tail of his work personal s upervis i on. :-1 r. Jeffries marri cl Oli1 e Kimbrough, o f Phoenix, A labama. Their three c hi ldren are: Ethel, Calvin, Jr., a nd Kate or Dixie. 1Ir. J cff riC's is a York Hite 1fason and hriner. \V1LLL\M P. ADAMSON. A . B., M. D. For O\'Cr twenty yea rs Dr. P. Adamson has figured prominen tly in the medical profession o f Tampa, a nd has maintained throughout hi career a high standard of e thics a nd honorable p rinciples. A man of s kill and c apabi l ity, he has . risen i n his profession, and has deservedly won t he pos ition he holds among his fe l low physi c ians. He was born in Carrol Co unty, Georgia, September 2 3 , 1874, a so n o f James G . and Mary F. (Fleming) A damson, natives of Georgia. The father is deceased, hut the mother s urvives. The A damson family is of Scotch-Irish o rigin, but has been long established in this country. Doctor Adamson was the youngest o f the four children ho rn to his parents, a nd their o nly son. Growing up in his native co unty, he attended the local sc hools and Bowden College, Bowden , Geo rgia, from which he was graduated in w ith the degree o f Bachelor of Arts. He then matriculated in the medical department of the Unil'ersity o f Geo rgia, and was graduated thcref ro m in 1900 w ith t he degree o f Doctor o f Medi c ine. For o ne year thereafter he served as an intcrne at the C ity Hospital of Augu s ta, Georgia, a nd then, in H)OJ, l ocated a t Tampa, where h e has s ince remained, in the active practice o f his profession. Professionally he be l o ngs to the Co unty. State a nd National 1Ieclical assoc iations. He is a thirty-second degree 1Ia. o n, a Shriner. and a Knight o f Pythias. Active locally, he maintains member hip with the Tampa Board o f Tracie, and is -physician-in-chief o f t he C hi l d r en's Home o f Tampa. Ile i connected with the s taff of seve ralhos pitals of Tampa, and is otherwise interested in professional matters. In 190.1 Doctor Adamson married Georgie Robey. of Tampa, a nd they had three c hildren. Dorothy, 1Iargaret a nd Ruth. Mrs. Adamson died in 1913, and o n April 2T, 192r, he mar r i e d Mrs. Elma C. Co peland, of Tampa. In T9T4 Doctor J\ clamson went to Europe, and was abroad w h e n war was declared between Germany a nd France, a nd was i n London when England declared war. TTis purpose o n going abroad was to v isit the l'a rious hos pitals. and he had co mpleted a tour o f France. Germany, Bel g ium. Austria, cotland a nd England when his plans were interrupted, as were so many, by the outbreak of hosti l ities. Owin g to the co ngestion, he was fo rced to return to the Gnited States i n the s teerage. At present Doctor !\damson is devoting himself to the demands of his large pri1ate practice, but for seventeen years he has been urgeon for t he Atl anti c oast Linc Railroad. During the time he has been a t Tampa Doctor Adamson has won recognition as a welltraincd a nd a ble member of his profession, and is thoroughly abreast of the progress made in medical scie nce. Ile has displayed a dignified capability along educational lines, but he fee l s that his professional interests and duties a re paramount in his life.

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1 '.30 HISTORY O F FLORI DA DAVID J. HEFFERX, \N in ten yea rs has made his a bilities as an attorney count in the ac quisition o f o ne o f the best law practices in Southern Florida. He is o ne of ?lfiama's leading men and c itizens as well as s11ccess f11l lawyrrs. He was born a t East \ Veymouth, Massachu se tts, August 25, 1885, and throughout his life he has co n t r ived his o wn o pportunities and advantages. He atten ded pub lic sc hool in his native town, a l so had a business college course and attended the Y. ;\1. C. . law sc hool. It was fo r recreation that he came to Florida in 1912, but decided to remain a nd locate at Miami. He took examination fo r a clmis ion to the Florida Court a t Tallahas ee , and bega n practice in J:iami the sa me ye ar. ince then he has bee n a clmitlecl to practice in the various Federal co urts. Unaided and a lone he has bunt up, s low l y a t first, a law practice that fe w men in the profess ion and the state have achieved. l\Iany o f the i mportant interests o f Miami and South F l orida have retained h i s legal se rvices. He i s an able admiralty lawyer, and that feature o f his prac tice is o f great importance i n all matters a ffecting the growth o f Miami as a port c ity. Ur. Heffernan is typically o ne o f the l ivest and best spirits that, gathered as cos mopolitan from many tates and se ctions, are making the outh Florida metropolis one o f the famous c i ties o f the world. Mr. Heffernan is a ffiliated with the Knights o f Columbus and the Elks. He married J\liss garet Lyons, o f '\Vest Quincy, 1lassachusetts. Their intere ting family of three c hi ldren are named 1lary Ca therine, David J. Jr., and Paul Edward. E . . \V. HOLLOWAY, 11. D. The medical pro-f ession of Hillsborough County has many n otabl e exponents, men o f wide knowledge and broad training who give presti0e to their work and protect the health o f lite peop l e of their com-munity. Among them, perhaps, none stand higher i n t he co n lidence a nd eoleem of his associates, as well as t he public a l large, than Dr. Ellis \V. Holloway, o ne of the l eading practitioners o f Tampa. There is probably no man in the c ity w ho has exercised a more beneficial inAuence, principally beca use of his initiati, e spirit and helpful ac _ ti, • ity. lJis career has been charact e rized by the highest standards of professional e thics, clcvotio11 to duty and principl e and his lo\'e fo r humanity, combined with his strength of character, have gained fo r him a high posit i o n in his county a nd community. Doctor H ollo way w as born in Thomas County, Georgi_a. October 29. 1 881, a so n o [ Timothy and Anni e (Fol som) Hollow ay, both native of Geo r g ia. who came to Florida, where the mother died. but t he father suni\'es a nd lives a t Plant C ity. Florida. They had fonr daughters a nd eight so ns born to them. o f whom two of the so ns are physi c 'ans. Doctor E. \\' . is a tw in a nd the twelfth c hild bo rn. The bo yhood days o [ Doctor Holloway were s pent in Ceorgia a nd a t Plant C i ty, and he a ltrndecl the public sc hools of both s tates, and he secured his professional training a t the Colle ge o [ Physician s a nd Surgeons a t Atlanta, Georgi a, from which he was graduated May 1, 1911, with the degree of Doctor o [ 1Icclicine. That same summer he located at Tampa, where he has s ince remained, building up a large and very valuable practice, and winning and holding the co nfidence and friendship of his community. On May T, 1910, Doctor Holloway was married to Clara McDonald, o nly daughter of W. G. ;\fcDonald o[ Hopewell, Florida, and they h
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'v' HISTORY OF FLORIDA 131 work of all other;, and ils importance ca n nol be too highl} estimated." Bradley Kemp l Janafourdc was born in the City of J \ l a 1Khe>kr, June 8 , i873, and is a s on o f John i\lo r g an l l a11afour
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132 IIISTOR Y O F FLORIDA assigned lo the 1Ictlica l Detachment, and on account of his fami liarity with t he Spanish lang uage he was ass igned a lot of work in the l'syc hol o gica l Drpartment. .\. D. 1'1.NNJY. O ne of t he most s ucces;.ful lawyers of Miami a nd South Florida is A. D. Penney, former j udgc of lhc County Court o f Brevard Cou nty. /\ nati\'e o f South Carolina, A . D. Penney was born at Lexington, a nd was a yo uth when his parents ca me to Florida and located at Fruitland in Putnam County in 1886. He acquired his primary educ ation in Florida, his co llegiate traini ng in the Oxford-Emory Co llege in Georgia, a nd st udied law under Judge l\Iinor S. Jones and George M. Robbins at Titusville, Florida. A. D. Penney was admitted lo the bar i n Brevard County in 1899, began his practice a t Titusville, a nd soon afterward was c ho en judge o f the County Court. He filled that responsible office fo r e ight yea rs, two terms, from 1900 to l9o8. A flrr leaving the county bench Judge Penney removed to Fort Pierce, where he practiced law until 1916, and in that year ca me to Miami and formed a partnership with his brother under the firm name o f Penney & Penney. Judge A. D. Penney is a former member o f the Legislature, having represented St. Lucie County during the sess ion of 19 15. At o ne t ime he was a lso suoerintendent o f public inspection o f St. J ucie Co unty. He is a member o f the First Presbyterian Church of Miami, and was a member of its Boa rd o f Elders until 192!. Judge A. D . Penney married Louise Rosser, a native n f Selma, A labama, an d o f Virginia ancestry. They have o ne daughter, :Urs. Laura J. Baker, o f Miami. II. W. Penney was bo rn in A bbeville, Soulll Ca rolina, a nd he graduated from what is now known as Southern Co llege at Sutherland, Pinellas Co unty, Florida. He came to Miami in 1912 studied law in that c ity under the late Judge James T. Sanders, judge o f the Criminal Court of Record. a nd was admitted to the bar in 1916. He has s ince been a ctively in pracl ice with his brother, and early 111 1922 he to0k np the duties of judge o f the Juvenil e Court of Dade Cou ntv. He was a pnointed to this office fo r a te rm o f four yea rs by Governor Hardee. Tudge H . "' Penney is a member o f the RiverMethodist Church. He married Lulu J. Tohnson, o f Manatee, Florida. and their s eve n r hildren are: II. E . . J. E., Charles F . . Gerald. l\farjorie, Mary a nd Arthur. CHARLES RoMAN. In Charles R?man t.he Ci!:V o f Miami has a source o f enterpnse which will make this o ne of the leading i ndustrial centers of the s tate. Mr. Roman is an a rtist a nd a m?sler of all the tec hnique involved in furmtu:e making a nd designing. He learned his trade 111 the Old World, and has been a resident of the S tate of Florida s ince 1914. He was born i n 18\)2 at Grosswardein, J:Iungary, w here he received his literary and techmcal educa tion. Grosswardein has an excellent trade sc hool a nd in that a t the age o f twelve he his a pprenticeship i n woo:Jworking. and. cabmetmaking. He co mpleted this apprent1cesh1p a t the age o f s ixteen a nd then. e mployment as a journeyman worker 111 v ar10us countries of Europe. On coming to America in 1913 he in New York a nd his first employment was m the plant of 'the Steinway Piano Company o n Long Island. In 1914 M r. Roman ca me to Jacksonville, Flori da, a nd joined t he furniture a nd i nterior decorating es tablishment of t he T heodore Hirsch Company. lle beca me manager of t he interior dec orating department. During the \Vorld war, o n accu llnl o f the difficulty o f ge tting his order fo r furniture filled, 1Ir. Hirsch es tablished a s mall furniture making p lant in Highland Park and placed Mr. Roman a t its hea d as manager. Mr. Roman invested o me of his own c apital in the busine s, and rece ntly he became sole o wner, and it is now known as the Roman Furniture Manufacturing Co mpany. A t first the exclusive line of manufacture was bedroom uils, b ut 1Ir. Roman now has fa cilities a nd trained workmen fo r manufacturing furniture fo r all 1oorns. As a n artist in this line he desig n e d furniture, and has executed a number o f contracts i nce co ming to Miami for the design a nd manufacture of furniture lo harmonize w ith the s tyle of household surroundings. Examples o f this work are found in a number of the beautiful and expensi\e residences o wned by the wealthy winter residents of So uth Florida. In addition to custom made furniture 1Ir. Roman has his factory equipped o n a permanent b asis fo r the manufacture of medium grade fu rniture. He is intere led in all c i\'ic movements in Miami. He married Miss Caroline 1Iajor a t Jacksonville, F lorida. They have one son, Charles H.
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lllSTOR Y OF FLORIDA 111a11 c,f his years anc.l which has g iven him a dcscn cc.lly high repulali o n in business a nd fina n c ial circles was hi performance as receiYer fo r l hc Fic.lelity Bank, which failcc.1 in 1920. llc was co mmissioned to take charge o f lite scltling up of the ba nk's affa irs fo r lhc benefil o f the s tockholders and depositors. Ile haudled this matter wilh s uch e fficiency lhal all concerned have been paid in full a nd the Fidelily ce rtificales are now at par. During l920-2r Mr. Cleary was command e r of l l a rl'cy H. Scee.ls l'usl, American Legion, a t iami. Jlc did nu t regard this as mere l y an empty honor, but devuled a large part of his ti m e while president lo promoling the interests o ( the posl a nd enlarging its membership . The greater part o f the permanent membership o f t h e post toe.lay is clue to the energetic e fforts he pul forth at that t ime. ;\Jr. Cleary is a member o f the K night s of Co lumbus, t he Elks, the C ivitan C lub a nd lhe iami Realty Board. He married Mrs. Mary J. 1 1 o rse, of Montana. ERNEST H. LEBEL. Iu the moving picture industry of South Florida o ne of the most prominent men, as author a nd scenario writer, is Ernest IL Lebel, who fo r a number o f years has devoted so me o f his talents lo literary e xpression an d latterly almost entirely to t he se rvice o f the motion pictt1re b usiness. As a literary man l\fr. Lebel has the great advantage of experience as a p ractical man of a ffairs, and particularly as an engineer, and in t he course of his interesting career he has gai ned a knowledge o f lands a nd peop les all ove r the American continent. l\Ir. Lebel was born a t Union, New Jersev. ] anuary 28, 1881, and was liberally e ducated. He attended public schoo ls in New York, the Lennox . \cademy, and at t he age of fifteen was a student in t he C ity Co llege of New York, where he studied both civ il and mining e ngineering. At the age of nineteen he entered the engineering department of the University o f Arizona, a nd while there he studied law under State Senator ,\. A. of T ucson. Mr. Lebel is a lin guist w ith a command of the Englis h, French, German, Spanish and Portuguese tongues. In his work as an engineer he was assistant deputy mineral surveyor in Arizona, was railro ad location engineer