On revising the mapped drainage area and natural flow system of the Withlacoochee River Basin in the Southwest Florida Water Management District - August 1974


previous item | next item

Citation
On revising the mapped drainage area and natural flow system of the Withlacoochee River Basin in the Southwest Florida Water Management District - August 1974

Material Information

Title:
On revising the mapped drainage area and natural flow system of the Withlacoochee River Basin in the Southwest Florida Water Management District - August 1974
Creator:
Parker, Garald G. (Garald Gordon), 1905-2000
Hernandez, Pedro A.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Location:
Box 2

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Aquifers -- Hydrogeology -- Everglades (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Hydrology -- Florida -- Biscayne Aquifer (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Withlacoochee River (Fla.) ( lcsh )

Notes

Abstract:
Recent hydrologic studies of the lower Withlacoochee River basin in the Southwest Florida Water Management District have shown that an area of about 876 square miles, previously assigned to the Waccasassa River basin, is an integral part of, and the largest tributary to, the Withlacoochee River. The initial assignment of the 876 square miles was determined by the surfacewater drainage pattern of Rainbow Springs and its outlet into the Withlacoochee River, Blue (Rainbow) Run. Ground-water flow studies indicate, however, that a large integrated underground drainage system drains this 876 square-mile area into Rainbow Springs and Blue Run, contributing an average annual daily flow of 788 cfs or 509 mgd, equal to a runoff of about 14.5 inches per year. This makes Rainbow Spring - Blue Run hydrologic system the largest tributary to the Withlacoochee. In fact, at its juncture, the Rainbow Spring - Blue Run system's 14.5 in./yr. runoff exceeds that of the Withlacoochee itself, which is only 8.8 inches per year. Blue Run contributes 70 percent of the inflow into lower Withlacoochee above Inglis Dam at 95 percent flow duration.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of South Florida
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
The University of South Florida Libraries believes that the Item is in the Public Domain under the laws of the United States, but a determination was not made as to its copyright status under the copyright laws of other countries. The Item may not be in the Public Domain under the laws of other countries.
Resource Identifier:
032968560 ( ALEPH )
891343127 ( OCLC )
G16-00696 ( USFLDC DOI )
g16.696 ( USFLDC Handle )

Postcard Information

Format:
Book

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

ON REVISING THE MAPPED DRAINAGE ~EA .AND NATURAL FLOW SYSTEM OF THE WITHLACOOCHEE RIVER BASIN IN THE SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT Pedro A. Hernandez!/ by and Garald G. Parker, C.P.G. g; Aug1J.st, 1974 l/ Hydrologist and Chief, Planning Department, SWFWMD g/ Certified Professional Geologist. Chief Hydrologist and Senior Scientist, Southwest Florida Water Management District, Post Office Box 457, Brooksville, Florida, 33512

PAGE 2

ON REVISING THE MAPPED DRAINAGE AREA AND NATURAL FLOW SYSTEM OF THE WITHLACOOCHEE RIVER BASIN IN THE SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT ABSTRACT Recent hydrologic studies of the lower Withlacoochee River basin in the Southwest Florida Water Management District have shown that an area of about 876 square miles, previously assigned to the Waccasassa River basin, is an integral part of, and the largest tributary to, the Withlacoochee River. The initial assignment of the 876 square miles was determined by the surfacewater drainage pattern of Rainbow Springs and its outlet into the Withlacoochee River, Blue (Rainbow) Run. Ground-water flow studies indicate, however, that a la.r,ge integrated underground drainage system drains this 876 square-mile area into Rainbow Springs and Blue Run, contributing an average annual daily flow of 788 cfs or 509 mgd, equal to a runoff of about 14.5 inches per year. This makes Rainbow Spring -Blue Run hydrologic system the largest tributary to the Withlacoochee. In fact, at its juncture, the Rainbow Spring -Blue Run system's 14.5 in./yr. runoff exceeds that of the Withlacoochee itself, which is only 8.8 inches per year. Blue Run contributes 70 percent of the inflow into lower Withlacoochee above Inglis Dam at 95 percent flow duration.

PAGE 3

INTRODUCTION Seldom has man conceived of water-resources development as an integrated, comprehensive operation in which ground water and surface water are parts of the same resource system. In any successful plan of water management, an understanding of the hydrology of the basin or basins in question is of the utmost importance. This is especially important in our District (Southwest Florida Water Management District, Fig. 1) because of the intimate and involved relationship between streams, lakes, swamps and aquifers. Fig. i near here Among the eleven basins designated by the State Legislature that comprise the Southwest Florida Water Management District are the Waccasassa and the Withlacoochee. In general, boundaries of the designated river basins follow surface-water divides, excepting the Green Swamp Bas -in. However, the boundary lines are stair-stepped along Section, Township and Range boundaries to simulate the topographic divides (Figure 2). This was done for convenience in the assessment of taxes inasmuch as property boundaries normally follow the land-survey grid, not topographic or hydrologic features such as stream or surface-drainage divides. Fig. 2 Those who were charged with drawing the boundaries had difficulty in some near here areas discerning drainage divides because of the non-existence of discernable stream headwaters, even in those areas having good or reasonably good topographic maps. Some parts of the District are not covered yet by topographic mapping, and for the remaining mapped area, the maps usually have only 1O-foot contour intervals. Thus, in very flat and swampy areas, it is almost impossible to determine just where a stream begins, or, even in downstream swampy areas, where its channel should be located. It follows that some unavoidable errors are made in drawing basin boundaries. In addition to these errors are those caused by the fact that surface-water basins, as discriminated by topographic divides, do not always coincide with natural ground-water divides. In fact, in this District, as shown on Figures 2 and 3, they more often do not. Fig. 3 near here Chapter 16 CB-O.O3, Florida Statutes, entitled "Watershed Basins," states that, "Pursuant to section 5 of Chapter 61-691, Laws of Florida, the area of the District (Southwest Florida Water Management District) is divided into watershed basins to include each major stream and its tributary streams and all lands draining therein except the Green Swamp watershed basin" (the italics are ours). Our recent studies of the currently constituted Waccasassa Basin show that of its 1,220 square miles more than 72 percent is not tributary to the Waccasassa River basin but is, instead, tributary to the WithJacoochee River basin through an extensive ground-water drainage system discharging chiefly into Rainbow Springs and to Blue Run (Fig. 1). Thus the intent of the law respecting the part above italicized (and all lands draining therein) was inadvertently bypassed. This resulted in the erroneous inclusion of 876 square miles of the Withlacoochee River basin drainage in the Waccasassa River basin. -2-

PAGE 4

DESCRIPI'ION OF THE BASINS Withlacoochee River Basin The Withlacoochee River Basin is in west central Florida, entirely within the Southwest Florida Water Management District (Figure 2). The Withlacoochee River's main stem, from its origins in the wetlands of the Green Swamp east of Eva to its mouth in Withlacoochee Bay west of Yankeetown, is some 140 miles long (Fig.l). The total drainage basin covers about 2,020 square miles. As Kenner, et al., (1967) point out, most of Florida has 'little topographic relief, therefore surface-water drainage divides are often difficult to delineate. Parker's studies of ground-water divides, as exemplified in Fig. 2, demonstrates that delineation of such lines of underground flow divergence likewise are difficult to determine and to map. In addition to low relief in much of the area, geologic conditions have allowed development of a subdued karst or sinkhole topography. All of peninsular Florida is underlain by several thousand feet of limestone and dolomite that have been periodically exposed to solution, weathering and erosion (Pride et al., 1966). These processes have resulted in the development of extensive systems of integrated ground-water drainage. Some of the systems give rise to such large springs as Rainbow, with an average flow of about 509 mgd (million gallons a day). Thus, Florida has more first magnitude springs than any other state in the nation and more than any other nation in the world. A first magnitude spring has an average flow of at least 100 cfs (cubic feet per second) or 64.6 mgd. About 20 such large springs and spring complexes discharging from the Floridan quifer are first-order springs. Some others in the northern part of the District are: Silver (532 mgd); Crystal River (564 mgd); Homosassa (130 mgd); Chassahowitzka (90 mgd); and Weeki Wachee (110 mgd). For further information on these big springs, each giving rise to a full-sized river, see: Ferguson et al, 1947; Wetterhall, 1965; Mann and Cherry, 1970; and U.S. Geological Survey, 1970, 1971, 1972. For the original description and definition of the Floridan aquifer see Parker in Parker et al, 1955. Rainfall, on the average, is abundant in the area. The average rainfall for the station at Inverness, center of the area, is 56.35 inches. The amount of rainfall on the area varies seasonally. About 60 percent of the annual total rainfall occurs during the wet season from June through September. Most summer rainstorms are local and of the convectional type (thunderstorms) of high intensity and short duration. Summer showers occur almost daily and generally during the afternoon. Heavier and more prolonged rainfalls occur generally in August and September and are usually associated with tropical storms and hurricanes. Winter rainstorms are commonly associated with cold fronts movin g from the north. They are rather widely distributed and of long duration. Period of below-average rainfall usually occur from November to February. -3-

PAGE 5

. Waccasassa River Basin Waccasassa River Basin is in west-central Florida between Suwannee River on the north, Withlacoochee River on the south and the northern extension of the Brooksville Ridge on the east. Waccasassa River rises in the southeastern part of Gilchrist County, flows generally southsouthwestward across Levy County to enter the Gulf of Mexico at Waccasassa Bay as shown in Figure 4. The major tributaries are Otter Creek and Wekiva River, the latter rising from Wekiva Spring with an average flow of 36 mgd. Waccasassa River and its tributaries provide surface drainage for about I • 550 square miles. Fig. 4 near here Drainage divides generally are not well defined. The area contributing direct drainage to Waccasassa River is bordered on the north by a extensive area of swamps, depressions, small lakes, and limestone sinks wherein the drainage pattern is poorly developed. During periods of ordinary precipitation water from this area drains through subterranean outlets, but during periods of excessive precipitation it flows into the Waccasassa River and also into small tributaries of Santa Fe River, which in turn is a tributary of Suwannee River. The watershed is somewhat oval in shape, with the longer axis no _rth and south. The entire watershed is underlain by limestones of the Ocala Group. The upper surface of the Ocala Group lies very nearly at mean sea level in the Waccasassa River area. Free circulation of water through pores, cracks and faults has made the calcareous rocks of the Ocala Group highly susceptible to the development of networks of solution channels. As a consequence, the cavernous nature of the sub-surface rock has clearly influenced the surface conditions of the area (Corps of Engineers, 1964). The altitude of Waccasassa River basin varies from sea level at the Gulf of Mexico to as much as 135 feet above mean sea level in the headwaters along the crest west of the northern segment of the Brooksville Ridge (Army Map Service, 1954) which delimits its eastern boundary. The U.S. Geological Surv.ey has a water-stage recorder on Waccasassa River, near Gulf Hammock. The average flow of Waccasassa River at the above mentioned gaging station is about 373 cfs (241 mgd) for the period 1963-1972. The mean annual precipitation over the Waccasassa basin is 50.99 inches. This figure is the average from three nearby National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration Stations, at Cedar Keys, Gainesville, and Ocala. The distribution of rainfall within the year as well as the rest of the climatological data do not substantially differ from that of the Withlacoochee basin. The Waccasassa River basin is in general an undeveloped region containing extensive areas of heavy timber. About 90 percent of the basin is covered by timber and unimproved woodland. About 7 percent of the area is devoted to general farming and cattle raising on semi-improved, cleared land. The inhabitants of the region are engaged mainly in activities pertaining to agriculture, lumbering, fishing and hunting. -4-

PAGE 6

HYDROLOGY The Hydrologic Divide The Peninsular Florida Hydrologic Divide, shown by the heavy line (Figure l) is the one which separates north and west Florida from central and south Florida, and was first named and described by Parker (1974). The divide passes west and north of the Waccassas' a Basin through Bronson and continues northeasterly about to Lake Geneva, then turns southeasterly through Putnam Hall to New Smyrna Beach on the Atlantic coast. At no place along its entire length does any significant surface-water flow cross this major divide and no ground wat .er flow crosses it. Land south of this major hydrologic divide is as effectively separated from water resources north of the divide as if it were an island. We can conclude, therefore, that people living south of the Peninsular Florida Hydrologic Divide are totally dependent for all their water supplies on precipitation that falls on the land south of this hydrologic divide (Parker, 1974). General Hydrologic Relationships The ground and surface-water systems in Rainbow Springs area are intimately related. Where the stream channel, whether natural or dredged, has cut into the top of the aquifer, water flows to the body of lesser hydraulic head freely. That is, where the aquifer is in contact with a stream, if the potentiometric head is higher than the level of the stream, ground water freely discharges into the stream. This is the situation at Silver Spring and along Blue Run, and along the entire 6-mile length of the western end of the Cross-Florida Barge Canal. Where the stream level is higher than that of the aquifer, water readily flows from the stream to the aquifer. This happens at Lake Rousseau, for example. The potentiometric surface of the Floridan Aquifer is that imaginary surface connecting all points of equal altitude to which water will rise in tightly cased wells open to the aquifer, whether or not the aquifer is confined or unconfined. Where the aquifer is unco~fined, the potentiometric surface and water table coincide at the level at which water will stand in uncased or screened wells. Water in the aquifer in the Rainbow Springs drainage area is derived chiefly from direct recharge by local rainfall over the Rainbow Springs groundwater basin and to a lesser extent from ground-water inflow from the southwestern shoulder of the Putnam Hall High (Parker, 1974). The major discharge from the aquifer .in this area occurs at Rainbow Springs (509 mgd), which makes it the third largest fresh-water spring in Florida, exceeded in volume of flow only by the Crystal River Springs complex (somewhat brackish) and Silver Springs. Smaller springs and seeps occur in Blue Run, which carries the discharge of Rainbow Springs about five miles into Lake Rousseau. A comparison of hydrographs of rainfall, ground-water level, and discharge from the springs demonstrates the close relat-ionsh~ps among these three parameters (Figure 5). Fig. 5 near here -5-

PAGE 7

Ground-water drainage basins may be outlined on a map by drawing lines between divergent flow patterns. Thus, it is possible to delineate the drainage area of Rainbow Springs. The area involved in this large ground-water drainage is about 876 square miles, and its total runoff, averaging 14.49 inches annually, is to the Withlacoochee at a line-juncture east of Dunnellon. Figure 2 shows, by means of arrows indicative of regional ground-water flow, the area contributing drainage to the Withlacoochee. The mapped potentiometric surface is assumed to represent that part of the aquifer supplying the springs. Figure 3 shows the northern part of Figure 2, enlarged and without ground-water flow arrows. Flow Statistics and Flow Distribution Frequency Flow statistics for the Withlacoochee Bive_r at selected gaging stations based on United States Geological Survey records are given in Table 1. For our study we must use the first United States Geological Survey stream-gaging station upstream from the mouth that is unaffected by tides, lake backwater, , . or lockages and releases of flow to the bypass channel. The station near Holder, 38 miles above the mouth, meets the criteria set forth above. It is also the farthest-downstream gaging station on the Withlacoochee river before flow enters Lake Rousseau. Figure 6 is a schematic diagram of the surface-water flow into and out of Lake Rousseau. This "lake" is a man-made reservoir created by the Inglis Dam on the main stem of the Withlacoochee, about 9.8 miles west of Dunnellon. Its average discharge is about 752 mgd, or 8.65 inches per year for the 40 year period of record, but unmeasured flow of about 10 mgd between Holder and Lake Rousseau increases the total average river inflow to the lake Fig. 6 to about 762 mgd, or 8. 78 inches per year. near her• Additional inflow to Lake Rousseau of about 509 mgd, or about 14.5 inches per year, comes from Rainbow Spring and the five-mile-l9ng Blue Run. Thus, total average daily stream inflow to the lake is 1,271 mgd. At average flow rates, Rainbow Spring drainage contributes 509/1271 of the total inflow, or 40 percent of the total inflow into Lake Rousseau. Truly, this makes the Rainbow Springs tributary drainage basin the principal tributary to the Withlacoochee River in times of average flow. Table 1. SELECTED FLOW STATISTICS FOR THE WITHLACOOCHEE RIVER AND RAINBOW SPRINGS Station Withlacoochee River near Eva near Dade City at Trilby at Croom near Holder at Lake Rousseau 4/ Rainbow Springs near Dunnellon 1/ or 8.65 in/yr. g/ or 14.49 in/yr. 130 390 570 810 i825 2736 ~/ 740 Ave. Disch. (mgd) 45 252 334 752 1271 l! 509 g/ ~/ ~ncludes the Rainbow S~rings ground-water drainage _/ 1s not a U.S.G.S. station; figures were derived. area. -6-95% Disch. (mgd) o.4 1.4 15 39 163 555 390

PAGE 8

I • But its importance can be determined better by comparing the 95 percent duration flows of these two tributaries to the lower Withlacoochee River. The 95 percent flow duration as that flow which equals or exceeds the values indicated on a flow-duration curve of a given stre8Jll 95 percent of the time; it is a time of low flow, such as occurs during long periods of dry weather when water supply is in greatest demand. Figure 7 shows the flow-duration curves for the Withlacoochee River at Holder and Rainbow Springs ne~r Dunnellon. It shows from a comparison that the Springs have much more stable flow characteristics. This is due to the very large storage capacity of the Floridan Aquifer from whicb the streamflow emerges.Fig. 7 Near her Analyzing both flow-4uration curves during periods of low natural flow (95%) shows that the quantity entering Lake Rousseau from the Upper Withlacoochee 1s about 165 mgd, whereas the flow from the Rainbow tributary area contributes 390 mgd, or about 70 percent (390/555) of the total flow into the lower Withlacoochee; by contrast, the Upper Withlacoochee only contributes 30 percent. The flow of the Withlacoochee River upstream of the junction with Blue (Rainbow) Run is therefore sustained to a much lesser degree by the Floridan Aquifer. Thus, the Rainbow Spring drainage basin is a prime tributary to the Withlacoochee. -7-

PAGE 9

Conclusions and Recommendations When the Waccasassa Basin was drawn for inclusion in the new Southwest Florida Water Management District (Chapter 61-691, Florida Statutes), it • I I • included a total area of about 1,220 square miles. But more than 72 percent of this vast area, lying in its eastern part, is drained not by the Waccasassa River, which has a drainage area of only about 550 square miles, but by ground-water discharge into Rainbow Springs and by numerous smaller springs and seeps into Blue (Rainbow) Run. Unfortunately, this information had not been prepared prior to the time that the original basin boundaries were established nor was such information available at the time the subsequent decision was made to transfer the Waccasassa Basin to the new Suwannee River Basin Water Management District (Chapter 72-299, Florida Statutes, 1972). With the new information now available (Figues 2 and 3), it can be shown that the 876 square miles of the Waccasassa Basin's Rainbow Springs-Blue Run drainage constitutes the major tributary to the Withlacoochee River. Both the map makers of 1961 and the recent map changers of 1972 recognized that Rainbow Springs and Blue Run, of themselves, constitute a tributary system to the Withlacoochee. Consequently, the basin boundary is drawn so as to include Rainbow Springs and Blue Run within the Withlacoochee Basin. However, lacking an understanding of the extent of the lands draining thereto, the boundary delineators excluded the tributary area to Rainbow Springs and Blue Run from the Withlacoochee Basin. This excluded area produces more runoff per square mile (14.5 inches per year, see Table 1) than any other part of the Withlacoochee River Basin. It has been shown above that the Rainbow Springs hydrologic system, consisting of five-mile-long Blue (Rainbow) Run, the springs themselves, and the contributary, extensive underground drainage system comprise, in total, the prime tributary system to the Withlacoochee, and thus comprise an integral part of the Withlacoochee Basin. The true Waccasassa River drainage area of about 550 square miles is an independent river basin lying between the Withlacoochee River Basin on the south, and the Suwannee River Basin on the north and the northern extension of the Brooksville Ridge on the east. Although the Waccasassa River basin is not a part of either of these huge river systems, it is more closely allied with the Withlacoochee than with the Suwannee. For water-management purposes it should be retained in the Southwest Florida Water Management District. It should not be transferred to the hydrologically unrelated Suwannee Water Management District, which lies entirely north of the Peninsular Florida Hydrologic Divide and not only separates the Suwannee from the Waccasassa and Withlacoochee River basins but also separates the Rainbow Springs ground-water basin which is the major tributary to the Withlacoochee.

PAGE 10

REFERENCES Anderson, W. and Faulkner, G. L., 1973, Quantity and Quality of Surface Water in Marion County, Florida: Fla. Dep 't. Nat. Resour., Bur. Geol., Map Series No. 55. Army Map Service, 1954 (revised 1964), Gainesville, Florida: Sheet, NH 17-7, scale 1:250,000: U.S. Geological Survey, Washington, D. C. Faulkner, G.L., 1973, Geohydrology of the Cross-Florida Barge Canal Area with special reference to the Ocala vicinity: U.S. Geological Survey, WaterResour. Invs. No. I-73, 117 p. Kenner, W. E., Pride, R. W. and Conover, C. S., 1967, Drainage basins in Florida: Florida Board of Conservation, Division of Geology, Map Series No. 28. Mann, J. A. and Cherry, R. N., 1969, Large Springs of Florida's "Sun Coast", Citrus and Hernando Counties: Florida Department of Natural Resources, Bur. Geol., Leaflet No. 9. Parker, Garald G., 1974, Water and Water Problems in the Southwest Florida Water Management District and some possible solutions. A paper presented at the annual meeting of the Florida Academy of Sciences, March 1974 at the Florida Technological University, Orlando. Parker, Garald G., Ferguson, G. E. and Love, S. K., 1955, Water Resources of South. western Florida: U. S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 1255 , 965 p. Pride, R. W., Meyer, F. W. and Cherry, R. N., 1966, Hydrology of Green Swamp Area in Central Florida: Report of Investigation No. 42, U.S. Geological Survey. U.S. Army Corps. of Engineers, 1964, Survey Report on Waccasassa River, Florida: U.S. Army Engineer District, Jacksonville. U.S. Geological Survey, 1970, 1971, 1972, Water Resources Data for Florida, Part 1, vol. 1, Surface Water Records: U.S.G.S., Tallahassee, Fla. Wetterhall, 1965, Reconnaissance of springs and sinks in west-central Florida: Fla. Geol. Survey, Rep't. of Inv. No. 39. -9-

PAGE 11

. . . . . /Joie: 7JrdW -/~ IJ.1i ,'11/~l~r :;.. (u h •tGc_, /I; c(, Hi (, /1 4 ) I ;_;I <.e • .. .. . .. . .. _.., -~,:-~ • .. . J( * TALLAHASSEE . . JACkSONVIUE .:-: • , • . . . . . ... @ . . . . • . . . . . . . . .... :~ . . . . . . . "... , . . . . . .. . . ' . . . . . _@ulf ., .. ' SWFWMD .: : . HFADQllARTf~ : A . 1/i&-ST. ,. , ~ . PETERS BUR . . . . . . . ... & ... . ""'T . . . . . .. /~ . . ' . . .. ' . . .. . . . . . . , MIAMI . . . ' .. . . . . . . ' , . . , , , . . . ,. . . , . . .. . . . -. . . -' . I 'L_!.O 20 40 60 80 ~00 f MILES . . _MAP SHOWING LOC !'ION OF TH , SOUTHWEST FLORID ATER MA A ~ . ! D(STR ICT. '~i' lti/lt~1:J

PAGE 12

• I ' ' .t I !l 7 .-.n :\\t:ellttJ. PENINSULAR FLA. MYOROLOGI<; OLV\DE GROUND-WATER FLOW DlREC.TION

PAGE 13

rxPLANATION r 8.1\SIN BOUNDAR'r' SPtCIFIED BY LAW GROUND-WATE"R BASfN SOUN DAR 'r' LANDS DRAINING TO RRIN80Yi SPRINGS . AND WITHLJKOOC.HEE RIVER .r' .J"--"" I ---"' . .... /s ;JY;_ 1/~ RINGS INBOW PRIN6S \\\ SPRINGS \ 1 \\'l HOMOSASSA . \' s P -RINGS \ \ ' \ \\ , . I i t L, . I .. , .. i

PAGE 14

...! r1st1il 4. Wk(;'::A 5ASSA RIV!~,, FLA. I . ,• .. WAC:CAIAl6A RIV611--.-

PAGE 15

/1100 .... _---~-----------------,...,,-------------:-----~ -..,_.._. --Cn.d~ ..of'-monlh. disch.arge _ -~ .... Rolr/hoW Sprinj'~ .. near Dunnellon~ , ., , -::... • •• ,t ' ... ' : : , ,., . nd-of-monf h woler level in recording /0. 0+-----------------------------------------------"!--~ observation well 2902,~ N082284l,J " ! \I\ 11.o+------Jl.~-~-------i=:;.._-~~--.LJ:..&--..&...:...l~il.t....:11e=-=s:;...___;S:...;._.:,W.~-~':,_a&....:IL.L.&,L..&..:E..11..L=.s.J-~c;.as.__,:1 ......... _________ i t. 1 ..... ,2.0+-----_...,..------------\-----------'-----------.....:-------~---,i,,----t '(;. 4' ~/J.o +--------r--------~----311iia:::-------..-----+-----+-------__,;.,~~~~-;e---.------t ::s ' . . . -....J ct /4.0 ~,,.o ... ~~~--~---------------------~--~--~~----~~~~~~---1 \a u -~ '-.J'"'/0 ........ Monthly rain(q// a( raingage J Inverness. 6+--t=~---~~--ci--t--t--------t-:--:-t---~-t----------------,----t--ir--+-~k~ -~ 0J FM A M J J A . ' , .,.._.....,___,.. ____ _,.. ________ ~,__-.,-_~ ___ ...,....... __ ,...__.__,...---,,--__ -,----,_..,...._..,...---,~..---..-~ ........ ..,,,._....,.., ............ -~~a . ...,..... S A S} .,__ _____ ,970 _____ -#-_____ _ ..

PAGE 16

, I . ! Will,/ocoochee 8yf'Jt1ss Ct:1nl'II mgd• 77.!1 S-85 Cro53 FloridQ /3ar.1e Cqnal Roinl,ow sog ~ri1111s ~--h!!Jd. r J .JSO t • ,. \ , . I ' 111 d-1s2 , , : . .5S -... Lower Wilhlacooches River .J { JJe/ow I n9/I~ 001'11) mgd. { l \ ' . ;. . and the lower f . . . ! Note: Ths Uf'fSr r,,ure represents ovaray., rlow l,m (~ tl11rafloll) flow.'_ . .' .. . . < J .-. F1t1uRe 6 . .7oEALIZED _ 01AG,RAM-O': 1NFLo w ~o AND . Our/:LOW FROM:.,. LAJ
PAGE 17

,., 0 • . , 0 --~,-.-,,? rr,,_., ::0 n f'l1Q :z • ' . -f cJ, 0 .,, -iN -3: rr, u, C, _._. v,o n :I: ::X::,.N ::0 0 :t:>.::=,. U>O rr, .0 ' C:: . 0 :t:a ,-rr, C, 00 o . o ::0 rr, \0 >
PAGE 18

. . • Minutes of the Meeting _ Waccasassa River Basin Board .Southwest Florida Water Management District Bronson, Florida October 25, 1974 ___ ._. __ . __________ __... .. ~------. :-.. r , ' ' • , . ' I . _____ __; The Waccasassa River Basin Board of the Southwest Florida Water Management District met at the Levy County Health Department in Bronson on Friday, October 25, 1974, at 11:00 a.m. The following persons were present: Thomas M. Van der Veer, Chairman Ex Officio; S. J. Adkins and Murray Read, Members; E. D. ve rga ra, Special Projects Director; and William T. Allee, Administrative Assistant; s~~HJMD. The meeting was called to order by Chairman Van der Veer and the roll called. • The Minutes of the May 21, 1974, meeting were reviewed by the Board and following Mr. Read's motion, seconded by Mr. Adkins, were unanimously approved as presented. Mr. Vergara presented . . -RESOLUTION NO. 13 REAFFIRMING THE ANNUAL BUDGET AND REQUIRED TAX LEVY to ratify, affirm and approve the Budget and Tax Levy adopted by the Board of Governors as required by Chapter 61-691 Florida Statutes~ Following discussion Mr. Adkins moved, seconded by Mr. Read, that Resolution No. 13 be approved as presented. Motion passed unanimously. This Resolution will be made a part of these minutes as if set out herein in full, but for convenience sake will be filed in the permanent Resolution files of the Basin. Mr. Vergara repo~ted that construction of the Basin's chloride monitor well at the Cedar Key fire tower at Rosewood has been completed and is currently being inspected by the staff to determine if it meets contract specifications. He stated that if it is found to be satisfactory, final payment to the well driller will be recommended at the Board's next meeting. -~irman Van der Veer inquired as to the status of the Basin's scheduled I ~ransfer to the Suwannee River Water Management District. Mr. Vergara stated that no action was taken to amend the law at the last Legislativ) e session, but the District is supporting the position that the transfers should be delayed for the time being, as there are many problems that need to be worked out~ Chairman Van der Veer requested that the Withlacoochee Basin Board consider supporting this Board's position of remaining a part of the Southwest Florida Water Management District since the staff has determined that ground water flow within the Haccasassa Basin is toward the Withlacoochee Watershed. I . _ There being no further busines . s or announcement to come before the Board, the meeting w a s adjourned . • l--" UIA:amy


printinsert_linkshareget_appmore_horiz

Download Options

close


  • info Info

    There are both PDF(s) and Images(s) associated with this resource.

  • link PDF(s)



  • link Image(s)

    <- This image

    Choose Size
    Choose file type



Cite this item close

APA

Cras ut cursus ante, a fringilla nunc. Mauris lorem nunc, cursus sit amet enim ac, vehicula vestibulum mi. Mauris viverra nisl vel enim faucibus porta. Praesent sit amet ornare diam, non finibus nulla.

MLA

Cras efficitur magna et sapien varius, luctus ullamcorper dolor convallis. Orci varius natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Fusce sit amet justo ut erat laoreet congue sed a ante.

CHICAGO

Phasellus ornare in augue eu imperdiet. Donec malesuada sapien ante, at vehicula orci tempor molestie. Proin vitae urna elit. Pellentesque vitae nisi et diam euismod malesuada aliquet non erat.

WIKIPEDIA

Nunc fringilla dolor ut dictum placerat. Proin ac neque rutrum, consectetur ligula id, laoreet ligula. Nulla lorem massa, consectetur vitae consequat in, lobortis at dolor. Nunc sed leo odio.